Cornwall 6 Bargain Hunt


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Cornwall 6

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head to the Royal Cornwall Showground in Wadebridge to track down well-priced treasures, with Philip Serrell and Henry Meadows.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Cornwall 6. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The sun's out, the dealers are ready.

0:00:040:00:06

The antiques await the Blue and Red teams. So, shall we get on with it?

0:00:060:00:12

Let's go bargain hunting! Yeah.

0:00:120:00:15

What better way of spending an hour

0:00:420:00:45

than wandering through The Royal Cornwall Showground

0:00:450:00:49

here in Wadebridge, figuring out how to spend £300 on three items to take away and sell at auction?

0:00:490:00:56

Let's meet today's lucky contestants.

0:00:560:01:00

For the Reds we have friends, Pippa and Jane.

0:01:000:01:04

Someone is worried...

0:01:040:01:06

I'm concerned that we're going to lose the plot here.

0:01:060:01:10

And for the Blues, it's Andy and Rob, who are all at sea.

0:01:120:01:17

I see a bargain.

0:01:170:01:19

-Now listen, Pippa, you're no strangers to the competitive situation, are you?

-No, we're not.

0:01:210:01:26

We both run Plymstock and District Equestrian Club with some friends.

0:01:260:01:31

I'm the chairlady, and Jane is the secretary, and we run three horse shows a year.

0:01:310:01:37

-Do you?

-And we have quite a few horses between us as well.

0:01:370:01:40

So would you say that you two are incredibly horsey then?

0:01:400:01:43

-Yes. Very.

-Very much.

-Oh, that's lovely.

0:01:430:01:45

Your horses, tell me about those. Have you got any prize winners?

0:01:450:01:49

Oh, I have, yes. I've got three horses and I have an ex-racehorse,

0:01:490:01:54

and I'm fortunate to say that he did well when he was younger,

0:01:540:01:57

and I share his back with a famous bottom in the shape of AP McCoy.

0:01:570:02:01

-Do you really?

-Yes.

0:02:010:02:03

Do you fit into the mould all right, or does he fit into your mould? How does it work out?

0:02:030:02:07

Maybe I might need to just budge him up a little bit.

0:02:070:02:10

-Well, that's quite something.

-Yes.

0:02:100:02:12

And what's he called? Carter.

0:02:120:02:15

Carter. Love it.

0:02:150:02:16

That's sweet, isn't it?

0:02:160:02:18

Now, Jane, are you just as crazy about horses as Pippa?

0:02:180:02:21

Absolutely. I've got three,

0:02:210:02:23

and I've got two beautiful Labradors as well,

0:02:230:02:26

but I'm not so keen on the riding now.

0:02:260:02:29

Too old. So I'm more ground control.

0:02:290:02:30

-Oh, don't give me that, girl.

-No. Too old now.

0:02:300:02:33

-Too old, that's ridiculous.

-Too old, so I'm chief poo-picker of the yard.

0:02:330:02:37

-Are you?

-Yeah. Definitely.

0:02:370:02:39

Oh, that sounds like the business. So who rides your horses then?

0:02:390:02:43

-My daughter.

-Oh, does she?

-Yes. I support her.

0:02:430:02:47

-You've become the unpaid groom.

-Absolutely.

0:02:470:02:49

So apart from horses and dogs, do you collect anything? Husbands or anything like that?

0:02:490:02:54

Still married to the same one, love him to bits - but, yes, I do,

0:02:540:02:57

I collect Royal Doulton ladies.

0:02:570:03:00

My favourite is called Amy, which is after my daughter,

0:03:000:03:04

-and Moonlight Roses by Royal Albert.

-Right.

0:03:040:03:08

You've got business acumen, you've got a shared sporting pedigree...

0:03:080:03:12

These boys are looking really scared.

0:03:120:03:14

-Anyway, very good luck.

-Thank you.

0:03:140:03:16

Now, academics Andy and Rob, welcome.

0:03:160:03:18

-Are you quaking in your boots?

-Absolutely.

-Shivering in our boots, yeah.

0:03:180:03:23

Andy, what are you studying? Anything useful for us?

0:03:230:03:26

I'm doing a PhD at the University of Plymouth at the moment, studying microfossils

0:03:260:03:30

at the end of the cretaceous when the dinosaurs died off.

0:03:300:03:33

-Oh, right.

-It may help you to recreate past climates and past oceans.

0:03:330:03:38

Not very applicable to Bargain Hunt though.

0:03:380:03:40

-Well, I don't know, we get one or two dinosaurs on this programme.

-Yeah.

0:03:400:03:43

We're not talking about the presenter, either(!)

0:03:430:03:46

You've got a touch of wanderlust about you, yes?

0:03:460:03:49

Yeah, I've been to over 40 countries so far.

0:03:490:03:52

My highlight in recent years was taking the train to Hong Kong on the Trans-Mongolian Express.

0:03:520:03:56

That was good fun. And I'd really like to

0:03:560:04:00

do up an old Land Rover and drive across North Africa. That's something I'd like to do.

0:04:000:04:04

-Are you going to be competitive?

-Absolutely. I've got a history of being in team sports.

0:04:040:04:09

I'm currently the president of the University of Plymouth Lacrosse Club, and I've always played team sports

0:04:090:04:14

so I'm quite competitive and focused.

0:04:140:04:16

And what are you going to bring to the partnership, Rob?

0:04:160:04:19

-Probably a long-standing history of watching Bargain Hunt.

-Oh, right.

0:04:190:04:23

And every antiques show under the sun on TV, really.

0:04:230:04:25

Unfortunately again, my PhD isn't really applicable.

0:04:250:04:28

I study mountain building, in particular in the Polish Carpathian mountains.

0:04:280:04:33

-Arcuate fold-thrust systems...

-That's right, yes.

0:04:330:04:35

-That's what you're studying at the moment.

-It is indeed.

0:04:350:04:38

You have an interest in old books.

0:04:380:04:40

I do, yes. I've always been brought up around books, and my parents always encouraged us to read

0:04:400:04:45

from a very young age, and I've got a few...

0:04:450:04:47

not quite antiques, sort of 80, 90-year-old books, encyclopaedias

0:04:470:04:51

and things... Yeah, I just love the smell and the feel of books,

0:04:510:04:55

-and I'd love to own an antique book store one day, that would be a great way to live.

-Perfect.

0:04:550:04:59

Well, here we go then, chaps. Now we come to the money moment.

0:04:590:05:02

The money moment, your £300 apiece, there you go.

0:05:020:05:05

You know the rules - your experts wait, and off you go! And very, very, very good luck.

0:05:050:05:10

Well, isn't that lovely - beauty and brains. Whatever next?

0:05:100:05:14

So, let's meet our experts.

0:05:140:05:18

Philip Serrell will be guiding the Reds.

0:05:180:05:21

Henry Meadows is in charge of the Blues.

0:05:220:05:27

They're on the clock. Let battle commence.

0:05:270:05:29

-Right, girls, have you got a plan?

-Oh, big plan.

0:05:290:05:32

-Oh, Lord help us.

-We're going to follow what you say.

0:05:320:05:34

-What are you looking for today?

-Something quirky...

-Anything that'll make a profit.

0:05:340:05:38

I can see a bargain.

0:05:410:05:43

Which way are we going? In that way?

0:05:430:05:45

-"Just like that..."

-Hey, I wear the hats round here, Tommy!

0:05:450:05:49

-Let's go in and have a look.

-Hassle, hassle...

-See what we can get.

0:05:490:05:53

It's a little snuff box.

0:06:000:06:02

-How much is that one?

-85. It's got a bit...

0:06:020:06:05

I think that's really, really nice, but I think that damage there is just going to hold you back.

0:06:050:06:10

-Some surfboards, Rob.

-Well, there's three there, that would be perfect.

0:06:110:06:15

This one's signed by Jimi Hendrix, look.

0:06:150:06:17

Seems the eagle-eyed Reds are in good spirits.

0:06:170:06:21

Take a look at what they spotted.

0:06:210:06:23

What are we going to be looking for with this?

0:06:230:06:26

Condition of the glass.

0:06:260:06:27

Good girl. So what in particular?

0:06:270:06:30

-There's no chips, and that the stoppers...

-She's on fire!

0:06:300:06:34

-She is.

-Smokin'!

0:06:340:06:35

OK. So, why is it called a tantalus?

0:06:350:06:38

-Because you can't get the glasses out without unlocking it.

-So it...

0:06:380:06:41

-It keeps the sherry...

-Tantalises you.

0:06:410:06:43

Whatever's in there tantalises you.

0:06:430:06:46

-Did you buy her a book for Christmas?

-No. I watch it a lot.

-Do you?

0:06:460:06:50

Why is this tantalus different?

0:06:500:06:52

Because it's only two, and there should be three.

0:06:520:06:55

I think I'm going to pack up and go home early. You're on your own, I'm off!

0:06:550:06:59

I just make up the duo.

0:06:590:07:01

I told you, you're my favourite expert.

0:07:030:07:06

I feel totally superfluous to this.

0:07:060:07:08

I've no point, there's no point in me being here.

0:07:080:07:11

I've driven miles to come to this and this is how I get treated.

0:07:110:07:14

-Philip, shall we just go for a coffee?

-Yeah.

0:07:140:07:16

Leave her to it.

0:07:160:07:18

Don't get on your high horse, Philip, just because Pippa knows her stuff. I'm impressed.

0:07:180:07:24

-What's that?

-It's an old blowtorch, isn't it?

0:07:240:07:26

Made in Sweden.

0:07:260:07:28

They are the absolute kiss of death to try and sell.

0:07:280:07:33

So you are kissing that goodbye, then.

0:07:330:07:36

-See anything, Rob?

-Not yet, mate.

-Not yet.

0:07:360:07:40

Keep looking, Blues. Meanwhile, the Reds are getting tantalisingly tempted by the glassware.

0:07:400:07:46

This is 1900, 1910-ish.

0:07:460:07:49

Whether these are the original decanters, there is one bit of a clue, actually. Come on.

0:07:490:07:53

-Tell us.

-That they fit inside.

0:07:530:07:56

-Yes. But another reason?

-The pattern on the bottom.

-Yes.

0:07:560:07:59

-I

-really like this.

-I do as well.

0:07:590:08:01

You just be quiet for a minute if that's all right!

0:08:010:08:04

-Yes. You won't shut her up.

-Really?

-No.

-All the time?

0:08:040:08:06

-Honestly.

-A little rattle, rattle.

-That's why I'm the quiet one.

0:08:060:08:10

Yeah. What I like about it as well, look, is that that just nicely slides forward

0:08:100:08:14

and there's a locking device in there and then that's what stops you getting it out.

0:08:140:08:19

What do you think it will make at auction?

0:08:190:08:21

I would have said 120, but I don't know if that's too much.

0:08:210:08:26

I think you're spot-on with your value.

0:08:260:08:28

If that came into my sale room, I'd estimate it at one to 150, but I do think it's a nice thing.

0:08:280:08:32

-I like that.

-And it's sherry and...

-Whisky.

0:08:320:08:35

-Whisky.

-Whisky, which is two drinks that a husband and wife might drink.

0:08:350:08:39

Does she make this up? She's off again, isn't she?

0:08:390:08:41

Where does all this come from?

0:08:410:08:45

-Really?

-I don't know.

0:08:450:08:47

-What do you reckon, girls?

-Let's see how much it is.

-Yeah.

0:08:470:08:50

-140.

-140.

-136?

0:08:500:08:52

-Why not 135?

-I like 136 better.

0:08:520:08:55

No, no, no, because I can't be doing with coinage. I cannot do coinage.

0:08:550:08:59

All right. 135. Go on. Go on.

0:08:590:09:01

-Go on. Go on.

-Please.

-Go on, then.

0:09:010:09:03

We're going to sell a tantalus and whoever buys it has got

0:09:030:09:07

the bonus buy, two silver spirit labels,

0:09:070:09:10

and they've got to be worth 35 quid which puts this in at £100. So...

0:09:100:09:15

Bargain.

0:09:150:09:16

Yeah. Oh, I hate you.

0:09:160:09:18

That's what it's called. Bargain Hunt.

0:09:180:09:20

-We're good at this.

-Don't count your chickens just yet, Jane,

0:09:200:09:24

it looks like the Blues also feel there may be richer pickings inside.

0:09:240:09:30

It's too expensive, it's £240.

0:09:310:09:33

OK. It's £240, we'll put that back.

0:09:330:09:37

That was gopping. Sorry.

0:09:370:09:39

-But it's children's ware.

-Gopping. I like that.

0:09:390:09:42

-Do you like that?

-For those who aren't familiar with

0:09:420:09:44

the word gopping, apparently it means nasty or horrible.

0:09:440:09:48

This is First World War period.

0:09:510:09:52

It's what's known as a 1914-15 star.

0:09:520:09:56

-OK.

-It would have been issued for soldiers serving during the outbreak of the First World War

0:09:560:10:01

and would come with a British war and a victory medal.

0:10:010:10:04

Now, on the reverse, what's nice about these is from a researcher's point of view

0:10:040:10:08

you can always see who the recipient is.

0:10:080:10:11

For example, this one

0:10:110:10:13

we've got FARCPL.

0:10:130:10:15

I'm fairly sure that's a farrier corporal. So that's quite nice.

0:10:150:10:19

-The only thing that's not nice about it...

-Price.

-It's £80.

0:10:190:10:22

-And it's a broken one.

-Yeah.

0:10:220:10:25

So good history lesson, but...

0:10:250:10:27

-Not for us.

-Yeah.

-Thank you.

0:10:270:10:29

-I like that little matchbox.

-That's sweet, isn't it?

0:10:320:10:36

-That's nice. I like that.

-Yeah. Is it the original matchbox that's inside?

0:10:360:10:39

It's hallmarked in Chester.

0:10:390:10:41

-Yes, it is.

-I think that's quite sweet.

0:10:410:10:43

-I like that.

-It is sweet.

0:10:430:10:45

-If you look at this, the lion passant is a lion looking sideways.

-Right.

0:10:450:10:50

-That's called a lion passant.

-Right.

0:10:500:10:52

-That's the mark for silver.

-Right.

0:10:520:10:54

That letter at the end, which is an A,

0:10:540:10:56

or I think it's an A, in a shield... So it's a letter of the alphabet

0:10:560:11:00

in a different shield, that gives us the year.

0:11:000:11:02

-Yeah.

-In this case, it's 1901.

0:11:020:11:04

And in the middle, you've got three wheat sheaves.

0:11:040:11:06

-That's the assay office.

-Right.

-Which is Chester.

-Yeah.

0:11:060:11:09

OK. So this is English silver, assayed in Chester in 1901 and there's the maker's mark there.

0:11:090:11:15

Now...

0:11:150:11:17

-I like that.

-Well, you'd better find out what you can do.

0:11:170:11:20

This time, let's keep her out of it.

0:11:200:11:22

-She won't keep quiet.

-No, she will.

-You do it. You do it.

0:11:220:11:25

All right. Go.

0:11:250:11:27

What would your best price be on that one?

0:11:270:11:29

I can do 30.

0:11:290:11:31

-Would you do 28?

-OK.

-Thank you.

0:11:310:11:34

28.

0:11:340:11:36

-Super deluxe. I love it.

-Thank you very, very much.

0:11:360:11:39

-Thank you.

-So that's two items down, Reds. Well done.

0:11:390:11:44

-Any makers' marks on it or anything like that?

-No.

0:11:460:11:48

Not that I can see. £60 as well.

0:11:480:11:50

Whilst rejecting a compass,

0:11:500:11:52

the Blues can now redirect their interest

0:11:520:11:56

towards a rather resplendent officer's hat.

0:11:560:11:58

-It's what they call a bicorn hat because of the shape of it.

-Sure.

0:11:580:12:03

And it's made by GJ Chapman.

0:12:030:12:05

-Of Plymouth.

-Yes. But what's nice about this one from a researcher's point of view

0:12:050:12:10

is we've got a name on here.

0:12:100:12:12

Looks like CH Down, Royal Navy.

0:12:120:12:15

What sort of age do you think that would be?

0:12:150:12:18

Most probably going to be late Victorian, Edwardian.

0:12:180:12:22

-Depends on the price, though.

-How much for the hat?

0:12:220:12:25

It's £145.

0:12:250:12:27

£145.

0:12:270:12:28

OK. What would be your...?

0:12:280:12:30

Yes, it's nice it's got its tin.

0:12:300:12:32

The maximum? The most you'll go?

0:12:320:12:34

We're looking to make a profit.

0:12:340:12:35

Of course you are. 130 would be...

0:12:350:12:38

-Your best offer.

-I can't do it for any less.

0:12:380:12:40

-It would need to come down more though, really.

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:12:400:12:42

-But it's nice to have its tin.

-Would 120 buy it?

0:12:420:12:44

120 and a smile.

0:12:460:12:47

Oh, that makes all the difference.

0:12:470:12:49

-Yes, you can have it for 120.

-120? I like that. I really like that.

0:12:490:12:53

-Just before we say yes, my estimate would be around £100 to £150.

-OK.

0:12:530:12:59

A cheeky ten pounds here or there.

0:12:590:13:01

We've got one under our belt and we're running out of time here.

0:13:010:13:04

-Yes. OK.

-Yes.

-We'll take £120, please.

-OK.

0:13:040:13:08

So the Blues finally have an item in the bag.

0:13:080:13:11

Talking of which,

0:13:110:13:14

what do you think about this?

0:13:140:13:16

Do you like it?

0:13:160:13:18

It's apparently made of hornback alligator skin

0:13:180:13:23

and if you give it a tap like that, absolutely rock hard.

0:13:230:13:29

If you peel back this flap, it actually protects the entrance

0:13:290:13:33

to the handbag bit itself which is quite nice, and the handbag itself is lined with smooth leather inside.

0:13:330:13:40

But on the outside, running all the way down the spine, effectively,

0:13:400:13:45

of this alligator, is this bullet-hard series of scales.

0:13:450:13:50

It gets a little bit softer towards the outer edges but actually, it's like armour plating.

0:13:500:13:56

Now I have to say, it's looking at its worst today

0:13:560:14:01

because it's dusty and dirty. But I promise you, with a bit of TLC,

0:14:010:14:07

this thing will look absolutely splendid.

0:14:070:14:10

What's it worth? Well, the stall holder is after £60.

0:14:100:14:16

What might you get in a smart online retail store?

0:14:160:14:22

Well, look it up on the internet.

0:14:220:14:24

You'll find that the price range is around 2,000 to 3,000. Gosh.

0:14:240:14:29

So there's money to be made out of these leather goods.

0:14:290:14:35

The only thing to note is that this actually isn't alligator at all.

0:14:350:14:39

The mis-identification of alligator and crocodile skins happens all the time,

0:14:390:14:46

but crocodile skin always has a confirmation of four leading into two,

0:14:460:14:51

which is exactly what we have here.

0:14:510:14:53

One, two, three, four blobs, plus two.

0:14:530:14:56

Got it? Got it.

0:14:560:14:58

Rargh!

0:14:580:15:00

Thinking of sending a postcard home, girls?

0:15:020:15:05

Things with streets and stuff are interesting because people can look and say, that was my house.

0:15:050:15:11

Yeah. We should have a look round.

0:15:110:15:13

-And then come back.

-And if we don't see anything else,

0:15:130:15:15

then I think we can come back here and buy 30, 40 quid's worth of cards.

0:15:150:15:19

-Yeah.

-Definitely.

0:15:190:15:21

As ever, time is marching on.

0:15:250:15:27

But what's this? Are our blue boys going to the ball?

0:15:270:15:31

-What do you think of this? Do you like that?

-I quite like this, actually.

0:15:310:15:34

-It's a bit feminine for you, Andy.

-Not for me. Not for me.

-Fair enough.

0:15:340:15:37

-But it's just a bit...

-Is it silver, is it?

0:15:370:15:40

-Yes. They said they'd do it for 100.

-Can you do 90 on it?

-I can do 95.

0:15:400:15:43

That's the absolute best I can do.

0:15:430:15:45

-It's a meltdown piece, really.

-Yeah. OK.

0:15:450:15:47

What about this?

0:15:470:15:51

-You wanted quirky.

-Yeah.

0:15:510:15:53

You're a golfer as well, aren't you?

0:15:530:15:55

So I mean, it's got the novelty charm about it.

0:15:550:15:57

-You've got two markets, silver market and golfing interest.

-Yeah.

0:15:570:16:01

I think that's quite nice, actually.

0:16:010:16:03

It's got hallmarks there.

0:16:030:16:06

Yes. Sheffield hallmark. This date letter here is O and I believe that's from 1942.

0:16:060:16:12

-So it's middle of the war.

-Exactly.

0:16:120:16:14

-Yes.

-It's interesting that they are still making silver pieces in the middle of the war.

0:16:140:16:17

That's what I was thinking. You know, middle of the war...

0:16:170:16:20

-Rations and things and they're still making silver.

-Fascinating.

-Silver spoons.

-£20.

0:16:200:16:24

Room for manoeuvre if we can get it.

0:16:240:16:26

Ten pounds, do you think?

0:16:260:16:27

Well, you'll have to speak to the chap nicely, won't you?

0:16:270:16:30

Ten pounds?

0:16:300:16:32

I can't do ten on it, I can go to 15.

0:16:320:16:34

-Meet you in the middle with 12?

-12 and a half.

-12 and a half.

0:16:340:16:38

12.50. OK. That's a deal.

0:16:380:16:41

So now it's neck and neck.

0:16:420:16:44

Both teams have two items.

0:16:440:16:47

-How much is that?

-95.

0:16:470:16:49

When I started in this business, warming pans were £110 and copper kettles were 95 quid,

0:16:490:16:54

-and copper kettles are now a fiver and warming pans are eight quid.

-Yeah.

0:16:540:16:58

-And people don't want to polish things like that.

-No.

0:16:580:17:01

-What about Charlie Chaplin?

-It's horrible.

-OK. Fair enough.

0:17:050:17:09

Oh, my God, a truncheon.

0:17:110:17:12

My dad had a truncheon.

0:17:120:17:14

-He was a prison officer at Wormwood Scrubs.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:17:140:17:18

-He locked the Krays away.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:17:180:17:20

Rog and Ren? No... Rog and Ren?

0:17:200:17:22

-Reg and Ronnie.

-Reg and Ronnie!

0:17:220:17:25

In fact, if I ask my mum, she's probably still got it.

0:17:250:17:28

So, can we sell his instead of buying that one?

0:17:280:17:30

-Come on, girls, this is time, time, time.

-Yes.

0:17:300:17:33

That's right, Phil - you keep them on their toes.

0:17:330:17:35

You have 15 minutes left.

0:17:350:17:38

This bowl, I think, is beautiful.

0:17:380:17:40

-Really beautiful.

-Excuse me, how much is the Kosta bowl?

0:17:400:17:43

Well, there's 75 on it.

0:17:430:17:46

-OK.

-I'd take 50.

0:17:460:17:48

OK. There's no age, but I do really like it.

0:17:480:17:51

That's the thing, I think, when you're looking at glassware

0:17:510:17:55

like this, you know,

0:17:550:17:56

-it's got to appeal to, I think, a private buyer.

-Sure.

0:17:560:17:59

At £50, I'm not sure if you'll make a profit,

0:17:590:18:01

but it's got a nice look to it,

0:18:010:18:03

-and we need a couple of people like you in the saleroom.

-Absolutely.

0:18:030:18:07

And we're going to make...

0:18:070:18:09

I've got my item with the admiral's hat. It's your item.

0:18:090:18:15

How much would you estimate it at?

0:18:150:18:18

Personally, I would put 30 to 50, 40 to 60 on it.

0:18:180:18:21

-OK.

-So we're not a million miles out, really.

0:18:210:18:24

Would you take 40 for it?

0:18:240:18:26

-Yes. OK.

-OK.

0:18:260:18:27

I think at £40 it's a fair deal for the stall holder and for us as well.

0:18:270:18:33

That's a good discount!

0:18:330:18:34

Well done, Blues, that's all three items purchased.

0:18:340:18:40

Now then, Reds, you two need to get your skates on.

0:18:400:18:43

-What do you think?

-Gopping.

0:18:450:18:49

I'm concerned that we're going to lose the plot here.

0:18:490:18:52

Oh, stop moaning, Phil!

0:18:520:18:54

Where have they gone now?

0:18:560:18:58

I'm having a panic.

0:19:010:19:02

-What is it?

-No.

0:19:050:19:08

-Gopping.

-That's the word of the day!

0:19:080:19:11

-What's that?

-Is that a whisky...?

0:19:140:19:17

Yeah. This is a model of a curling stone.

0:19:170:19:19

All curling stones were made from granite that comes off Ailsa Craig,

0:19:190:19:23

which is just off Turnberry Golf Course.

0:19:230:19:25

It's that rock mountain thing.

0:19:250:19:27

-Right.

-People do collect this stuff.

0:19:270:19:30

Peter Thomson (Perth).

0:19:310:19:34

Gleneagles Scotch Whisky. So it's a little tot of whisky.

0:19:340:19:37

There would have been whisky in it?

0:19:370:19:39

Yeah. And it's not hugely valuable, to say the least,

0:19:390:19:41

but, you know, we've got two minutes left...

0:19:410:19:44

-Yeah.

-..it's six quid, if you can get that for two or £3,

0:19:440:19:47

if they give it away, you've only lost three quid,

0:19:470:19:50

which in Bargain Hunt terms is something of a result, isn't it?

0:19:500:19:53

-Yeah.

-Gopping? I think it's gopping, you think it's gopping.

0:19:530:19:56

I think it's gopping.

0:19:560:19:57

You think it's gopping. But it's two quid's worth of gopping.

0:19:570:20:00

A man could go out on the moors with that in his pocket

0:20:000:20:02

and it would keep him warm.

0:20:020:20:03

She has a ferocious imagination, hasn't she?

0:20:030:20:06

For £3. Right, let's go and get it sorted.

0:20:060:20:08

Go, girl! Talk them down!

0:20:080:20:11

It's bargains we want on this show.

0:20:110:20:13

-Is she always like this?

-Like a terrier.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:20:130:20:16

-I've managed to get it for £4.

-You bought it?

-Yes.

0:20:160:20:18

I think that's a bit of a result, really, isn't it?

0:20:180:20:21

-Yes.

-It's definitely not deluxe, and it's gopping.

-But it's got a purpose.

0:20:210:20:24

I'm going to go and lie down in a sheltered, darkened place somewhere!

0:20:240:20:28

-We're done.

-I'm done!

0:20:280:20:30

Oh, poor Phil. He just can't take the pressure.

0:20:300:20:34

Time's up.

0:20:340:20:36

Our teams' time is spent,

0:20:360:20:38

and so is their cash, so let's check out what the Red team bought.

0:20:380:20:44

The girls paid £135 for this Edwardian twin decanter tantalus.

0:20:440:20:51

They forked out £28 for a silver matchbox holder.

0:20:510:20:55

And finally, the princely sum of £4 was paid

0:20:570:21:00

for this miniature whisky decanter.

0:21:000:21:03

So, are you pleased with what you've done?

0:21:030:21:06

-Oh, it's fantastic.

-That thing at the end was a rush!

0:21:060:21:08

Yes, but somebody might buy it.

0:21:080:21:11

So, what is this, then, excuse me?

0:21:110:21:14

-Some kind of mutual admiration society here?

-Yes.

0:21:140:21:17

-Yes.

-This one is like a walking antique encyclopaedia.

0:21:170:21:20

That's lovely, isn't it? And she knows about horses.

0:21:200:21:22

And they are both interested as well, and that's fantastic.

0:21:220:21:25

Well, there you go.

0:21:250:21:26

-Now, you're not feeling left out here, Janie, are you?

-Not at all.

0:21:260:21:29

-Not at all.

-You're obviously getting on otherwise perfectly well.

0:21:290:21:32

Beautifully, you've bonded!

0:21:320:21:35

-How much did you spend all round?

-£167.

0:21:350:21:38

167. 167. So can I have 133, then?

0:21:380:21:43

-Please, from someone?

-That was my job for the day.

0:21:430:21:45

-You're the bag carrier, really, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:21:450:21:48

You had to follow two steps behind her royal highness!

0:21:480:21:50

I had to have a job, because I didn't do much else.

0:21:500:21:53

-I looked after the money.

-And were very decorative.

0:21:530:21:55

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:21:550:21:57

-Now, boy, there you go, look.

-Thank you.

0:21:570:21:59

-That's quite a lot, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

0:21:590:22:01

And I've learned a new word today,

0:22:010:22:03

which is "gopping",

0:22:030:22:04

and I'm going to go and try to buy something that isn't gopping.

0:22:040:22:08

Is he with it or is he not with it?

0:22:100:22:12

-He's with it.

-I've been worried about him for some time, actually.

0:22:120:22:15

Anyway, you look after yourselves, girls.

0:22:150:22:17

Good luck, Phil, with your bargain buy.

0:22:170:22:19

Meanwhile, why don't we

0:22:190:22:20

remind ourselves what the Blue team bought, eh?

0:22:200:22:23

A naval officer's bicorn hat was snapped up for 120.

0:22:230:22:30

£12.50 was spent on a hallmark silver golfing spoon.

0:22:300:22:36

And, they bought a Swedish iridescent bowl for £40.

0:22:360:22:42

Three really different items, though...

0:22:420:22:44

-This looks like a crowd of wide boys to me!

-Yeah.

0:22:440:22:47

-Very pleased with yourselves!

-Yeah, we did well. We got some good buys.

0:22:470:22:51

We shall find out how good your buys are later at the auction, I fancy.

0:22:510:22:55

-And how much did you spend overall?

-£172.50.

0:22:550:22:58

-So who's got all this leftover lolly, then?

-I have.

0:22:580:23:00

Have you? About your person.

0:23:000:23:02

-Thank you very much, Andrew.

-This is for you.

-Very good.

0:23:020:23:05

-And some coins.

-And some cash.

0:23:050:23:06

Pretty oddball number, but fair enough, I'll believe you!

0:23:060:23:09

-Here we go, Henry.

-Thanks very much.

0:23:090:23:12

What are you going to spend that on?

0:23:120:23:13

Not too sure at the moment,

0:23:130:23:15

but hopefully something quirky, as we were discussing earlier.

0:23:150:23:19

Very good luck with all of that, boys.

0:23:190:23:21

We're heading off somewhere splendiferous.

0:23:210:23:23

It's Cornish, it's right down the sharp end,

0:23:230:23:25

and it's called St Michael's Mount. Ooh-arr!

0:23:250:23:29

St Michael's Mount, off the south Cornish coast at Marazion,

0:23:340:23:39

has been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since 1647,

0:23:390:23:42

when Colonel St Aubyn became Captain of the Mount.

0:23:420:23:45

Successive generations, all called Sir John, left their mark here.

0:23:450:23:49

The third Sir John was responsible in the 1720s

0:23:490:23:52

for repairing the harbour and revitalising the island.

0:23:520:23:56

During the following century,

0:23:560:23:58

the population swelled to 300,

0:23:580:24:00

thanks to his investment in the place.

0:24:000:24:04

But it's the fourth Sir John that I'm interested in today.

0:24:070:24:11

If you look at this elevation of the building,

0:24:110:24:14

does it not say to you bleak, medieval, former abbey?

0:24:140:24:19

Nothing very comfortable about this.

0:24:190:24:22

But in 1762, our fourth baronet, Sir John,

0:24:220:24:26

went in for something completely different.

0:24:260:24:30

Wow. Look at this.

0:24:380:24:40

Clearly, our Sir John was a bit of a trendsetter,

0:24:400:24:44

because in 1762 he imported into the wastelands of west Cornwall

0:24:440:24:51

the very latest, cutting-edge, Gothic Strawberry Hill style

0:24:510:24:57

into this, his delicious blue drawing room.

0:24:570:25:00

Where does the term Strawberry Hill come from?

0:25:020:25:06

Well, Horace Walpole, who was Sir Robert Walpole's youngest son,

0:25:060:25:11

built a house, Strawberry Hill, in Twickenham, Middlesex.

0:25:110:25:15

He built that house around 1758,

0:25:150:25:18

and the style that he employed was Gothic.

0:25:180:25:22

Not a muscular, churchy or medieval fortified Gothic,

0:25:220:25:28

but a comfortable, mid-18th century interpretation of the Gothic,

0:25:280:25:33

which is exemplified in this room.

0:25:330:25:35

Up above the fireplace,

0:25:350:25:37

you've got a sort of pagoda roof, which is typical.

0:25:370:25:42

And the supports that flank the fireplace

0:25:420:25:45

and support the mantel shelf are Gothic cluster triple columns,

0:25:450:25:50

interposed by a frieze

0:25:500:25:52

with these lovely quatrefoil with a flower head in the middle.

0:25:520:25:57

Then, either side of the fireplace, we've got two recesses,

0:25:570:26:00

capped by the quintessentially, typical Gothic cusped arch.

0:26:000:26:08

This one is fun, though, because it contains a secret door...

0:26:080:26:12

..which leads us into the blue drawing room anteroom,

0:26:140:26:19

all part of the same decorated series of rooms, though,

0:26:190:26:23

with, in my view, an even more Gothic-looking fireplace.

0:26:230:26:29

All this trouble creating and sustaining

0:26:290:26:33

the Gothic decorative effect is reflected also in the furniture.

0:26:330:26:38

A whole suite of furniture, to be precise.

0:26:380:26:41

Made by Thomas Chippendale

0:26:410:26:44

specifically for this Gothic suite of rooms.

0:26:440:26:47

Look at this splat back.

0:26:470:26:49

All these cusped, pierced sections are typical.

0:26:490:26:53

You've then got a pierced section that looks a bit like

0:26:530:26:56

a lancet window, and if I turn up

0:26:560:26:59

the front supports, here we've got a blind fret carving

0:26:590:27:04

that mirrors the lobed pierced back,

0:27:040:27:07

and also at the bottom of the leg

0:27:070:27:09

we've got these very curious carvings

0:27:090:27:13

that look a bit like rocket burners, that go to make up the block feet.

0:27:130:27:18

My all-time favourite spot, though, is this,

0:27:210:27:25

the most charming little Gothic bay window.

0:27:250:27:30

Just look at the way they've cut that plaster

0:27:300:27:34

in a frivolous Rococo way,

0:27:340:27:36

and applied it on the Gothic shape of that cusp.

0:27:360:27:40

And underneath, you've got these oak glazing bars.

0:27:400:27:44

Astragal bars, but in these delightful shapes.

0:27:440:27:49

In short, it's just perfect.

0:27:490:27:52

The big question today is, of course,

0:27:520:27:54

how PANE-ful is it going to be for our teams over at the auction?

0:27:540:27:59

Well, we've popped to Jefferys Auctions in Lostwithiel

0:28:090:28:13

to be with Ian Morris. Good morning, Ian.

0:28:130:28:15

-Morning.

-Lovely to be here.

0:28:150:28:17

The first item is this tantalus.

0:28:170:28:19

Two-bottle tantalus, and it's in brilliant condition, for a change.

0:28:190:28:23

It's a good piece. I like tantalus, myself.

0:28:230:28:26

People recently seem to have gone off decanters generally,

0:28:260:28:30

but I just think it's a lovely object to look at and handle.

0:28:300:28:34

Yes. What's your estimate?

0:28:340:28:36

I've been conservative on this lot.

0:28:360:28:37

I've put an estimate of 70 to £100.

0:28:370:28:39

I think that's just a nice piece for the money.

0:28:390:28:42

Well, they paid 135.

0:28:420:28:44

They'll be disappointed if they don't turn a small profit on it.

0:28:440:28:47

I'm not sure they'll turn a small profit on it, but...

0:28:470:28:50

No pressure here(!)

0:28:500:28:52

I think, yes, they'll not lose too much money, either, on it,

0:28:520:28:56

so I think it's a reasonable buy.

0:28:560:28:58

Second item, this tiny, terribly plain and ordinary

0:28:580:29:02

little vesta cover.

0:29:020:29:03

It is very plain. If it wasn't for the metal price

0:29:030:29:06

being so high at the moment,

0:29:060:29:07

it would be...not a non-starter, but it wouldn't...

0:29:070:29:11

-Be a pound or two.

-It wouldn't create much interest.

0:29:110:29:13

I've estimated it at 10 to £20.

0:29:130:29:16

I suspect on the day it will do that,

0:29:160:29:18

maybe top end, maybe a little bit more,

0:29:180:29:20

-so I think it could still get away.

-Well, £28 is what they paid.

0:29:200:29:23

What about the whisky bottle novelty

0:29:230:29:25

in the form of a curling stone? Like that?

0:29:250:29:27

The curling stone is an unusual item,

0:29:270:29:29

in the fact that we normally have a lot of these little decanters,

0:29:290:29:32

usually in the form of eagles or little small animals.

0:29:320:29:35

Unfortunately, most of them are always empty!

0:29:350:29:38

Bit of a drawback!

0:29:380:29:40

But this one is of a curling stone, which is a little bit different.

0:29:400:29:44

Not normally an individual lot.

0:29:440:29:45

-Because it's too low a value, is it?

-Too low a value.

0:29:450:29:48

We would group it with other like-minded items.

0:29:480:29:51

But in this particular case, five to £8.

0:29:510:29:54

£4, they paid. So that's not too bad.

0:29:540:29:56

The big problem is going to be the tantalus.

0:29:560:29:58

If you are right and you get under £100,

0:29:580:30:01

they are going to be crucified,

0:30:010:30:03

and they are going to need their bonus buy,

0:30:030:30:05

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:30:050:30:07

Now, Pippa and Jane, the bonus-buy moment.

0:30:070:30:11

You gave Philip Serrell £133. Phil, what did you spend it on, please?

0:30:110:30:14

-Well, I spent it on that.

-Oh!

0:30:140:30:18

Is that to keep us in line?!

0:30:180:30:20

Gives you a dap!

0:30:200:30:23

It's a Victorian truncheon.

0:30:230:30:27

And it was £35. I think that's really quite cheap for that.

0:30:270:30:30

Oh, that's good.

0:30:300:30:31

I mean, the painted ones can make well over £100,

0:30:310:30:34

well into three figures,

0:30:340:30:36

and it's sort of quite simplistic, but I think

0:30:360:30:39

at auction... Oh, here we go, neck on the block.

0:30:390:30:43

I think that could make between 40 and £60.

0:30:430:30:47

No, I'll rephrase that - I hope that could make 40 to £60!

0:30:470:30:52

I'll rephrase it for you - "I pray that it will make 40 to £60!"

0:30:520:30:57

Is that the man's name on there?

0:30:570:30:58

I would think it stands every chance of belonging to Sydney Deacon,

0:30:580:31:02

-or whoever it was.

-Well, if not, we could hit you with it!

0:31:020:31:05

By which time it'll be too late -

0:31:050:31:07

-it will be sold to somebody else.

-Aw!

0:31:070:31:09

You've got three jolly good items.

0:31:090:31:12

You are going to sell those and make massive profits.

0:31:120:31:15

-We hope.

-Your decision as to whether you risk

0:31:150:31:18

some of those massive profits

0:31:180:31:20

on this £35 truncheon will happen

0:31:200:31:22

after the sale of the first three items,

0:31:220:31:25

but for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks

0:31:250:31:30

about Phil's truncheon. One truncheon.

0:31:300:31:33

It's always nice to handle something like this, you know,

0:31:330:31:36

that has been worked well, it's lovely and smooth.

0:31:360:31:39

You've got the Victorian cipher on the top.

0:31:390:31:42

It's just a lovely, lovely piece of equipment there,

0:31:420:31:45

and it's just got such a nice feel to it.

0:31:450:31:47

It's a typical Serrell purchase.

0:31:470:31:50

He likes anything made of wood,

0:31:500:31:52

and it is a nice piece of turned elm, isn't it?

0:31:520:31:54

Yes. Mind you, it's still hard enough.

0:31:540:31:56

I wouldn't like to get hit by one.

0:31:560:31:58

No. Quite right too! How much is it worth, do you think?

0:31:580:32:01

I'd put an estimate of 30 to £50 on it.

0:32:010:32:04

Brilliant. Brilliant. £35, Phil paid, so he's paid the right money for it,

0:32:040:32:08

and with any luck, if the team go with it, it'll turn a profit.

0:32:080:32:11

Well, that's it for the Reds, and now for the Blues.

0:32:110:32:14

First up for them is the naval officer's hat,

0:32:140:32:17

and its Japan tin box. That's splendid, isn't it?

0:32:170:32:21

I like it, and the condition of the hat is very, very good for the age.

0:32:210:32:24

It's been kept in that box,

0:32:240:32:25

and it has certainly been well looked after.

0:32:250:32:28

I feel a bit of HMS Pinafore coming on.

0:32:280:32:30

Yes, so long as it doesn't turn into a song, I suppose!

0:32:300:32:33

No need to worry about that on this programme!

0:32:330:32:35

Anyway, how do you rate that, then, money-wise?

0:32:350:32:38

Money-wise, I put a guide of 80 to £120,

0:32:380:32:41

and I think that's a fairly safe bet.

0:32:410:32:43

£120, they paid. Good, traditional piece of naval costume. Brilliant.

0:32:430:32:47

Next item is the golfing spoon.

0:32:470:32:51

Again, you've got a crossover here

0:32:510:32:53

between the person who likes to collect silver

0:32:530:32:56

and the person who likes to collect the golfing memorabilia.

0:32:560:32:59

So I'm hopeful there

0:32:590:33:01

that either one or two styles of collectors would be

0:33:010:33:04

interested in this lot.

0:33:040:33:06

How much?

0:33:060:33:07

Put 20 to £40 on it.

0:33:070:33:09

Very good. £12.50 paid. Now, what about this modern glass bowl?

0:33:090:33:13

-Do you rate that?

-Not really my cup of tea,

0:33:130:33:15

but it's big and heavy, it's got nice colour through it,

0:33:150:33:18

and I put a guide of 40 to £60,

0:33:180:33:20

and I think, yeah, that's the kind of run of it.

0:33:200:33:24

And Kosta Boda is one of those factories, isn't it?

0:33:240:33:27

-It's still going today.

-Yes.

0:33:270:33:29

You can buy Kosta Boda glass today, but it does go back to the '20s.

0:33:290:33:32

Yes.

0:33:320:33:33

Anyway, they paid £40,

0:33:330:33:35

you are estimating 40 to £60, so that's not too bad.

0:33:350:33:38

I suspect it will depend on what happens with the naval officer's hat

0:33:380:33:42

as to whether they need the bonus buy or not,

0:33:420:33:44

but let's go and have a look at it anyway.

0:33:440:33:47

Now, Andy and Rob, you've spent £172.50,

0:33:470:33:50

you gave Henry £127.50.

0:33:500:33:53

Henry, what did you spend it on?

0:33:530:33:55

What do you think to this? Different, isn't it?

0:33:550:33:58

-It's a bit of cow horn, is it?

-I'd say so, yes.

0:33:580:34:00

Late 19th century.

0:34:000:34:02

What's nice about it is it's got white metal on there,

0:34:020:34:06

it's Scottish, probably.

0:34:060:34:07

-OK.

-And I think it's a nice thing.

-You think it's silver or plated?

0:34:070:34:10

I think it's silver. It's not hallmarked,

0:34:100:34:12

so we can't call it silver,

0:34:120:34:14

but I think it's got a nice look about it.

0:34:140:34:16

More important question - how much did you pay for it?

0:34:160:34:19

I paid the princely sum of £20.

0:34:190:34:21

£20. OK. And how much do you think it's going to make?

0:34:210:34:24

We're not going to be able to retire on this,

0:34:240:34:26

but I think we could possibly double our money.

0:34:260:34:29

-Doubling would be good.

-Would be all right.

0:34:290:34:31

-Make up for the losses elsewhere!

-Hopefully not!

-Think positively!

0:34:310:34:34

Well, that's optimistic, Rob, isn't it, eh(?)

0:34:340:34:37

Well, you've got to be realistic these days.

0:34:370:34:40

I think the trouble with you intelligent people is that

0:34:400:34:42

you spend too much time thinking about stuff!

0:34:420:34:44

-Possibly!

-You ordinary mortals don't

0:34:440:34:46

worry about that! Do we, Henry?!

0:34:460:34:48

No, definitely not!

0:34:480:34:50

Think about that.

0:34:500:34:51

Your chance to pick comes after the sale of your first three items.

0:34:510:34:54

But first of all, for the viewers at home,

0:34:540:34:57

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks of Henry's mug.

0:34:570:35:01

So, one horn beaker. That's rather fun, isn't it? Very plain.

0:35:010:35:04

Yes. That's maybe the only drawback with this.

0:35:040:35:08

Horn beakers used to sell, and sell very well.

0:35:080:35:10

The plaque is silver, but it is, as you say, very plain.

0:35:100:35:15

That might just deter buyers

0:35:150:35:17

from being interested in bidding for this lot.

0:35:170:35:20

I'd like to see a hallmark on the plaque,

0:35:200:35:22

because that does at least then date the whole beaker.

0:35:220:35:25

It would, and with a good mark as well,

0:35:250:35:28

-that certainly would have wider appeal.

-Anyway, it's not marked,

0:35:280:35:31

it's incredibly plain - what do you think it would bring?

0:35:310:35:35

I've said 20 to £30.

0:35:350:35:37

Fine. Magic.

0:35:370:35:38

I mean, Henry paid £20 for it.

0:35:380:35:40

It's his bonus buy.

0:35:400:35:42

If the team decide to go with it, everybody will be happy.

0:35:420:35:46

And you only want to make everybody happy!

0:35:460:35:48

Yes. If I can make everybody happy, that would be great!

0:35:480:35:52

So, how are you feeling, girls?

0:36:010:36:02

-Excited.

-Excited. And nervous.

0:36:020:36:04

-How excited, on the excitability scale?

-Ten!

0:36:040:36:07

-11.

-12!

0:36:070:36:09

-He can count!

-You're right up there, aren't you?

0:36:090:36:13

Listen, all the money is on the tantalus.

0:36:130:36:16

It's the first lot of your trio, and here it comes.

0:36:160:36:19

Lot 250 there, Edwardian oak and silver-plated

0:36:190:36:21

twin decanter tantalus there. What say, £80 away?

0:36:210:36:24

£50 away? £30 I'm bid.

0:36:240:36:26

At £30. 35, £40, 45, £50, 55.

0:36:260:36:30

At £55 I'm bid, I'll take 60 now. £60. At £60, I'll take five now.

0:36:300:36:33

-65, £70? £70. 75?

-Come on.

0:36:330:36:37

At £70 I'm bid. Five not. At £70, I'm going to the back, it's £70.

0:36:370:36:41

That's giving it away.

0:36:410:36:43

-£70.

-The two silver labels are worth that much.

0:36:430:36:46

-I know.

-How rude.

-Very, very quick.

0:36:460:36:48

Now, here comes the match case.

0:36:480:36:49

Lot 251 there, a hallmarked silver plain matchbox holder.

0:36:490:36:53

Chester 1901. £20 away? £20 I've got.

0:36:530:36:56

At £20, 22, 25, 28, £30. 32?

0:36:560:37:00

At £30 I'm bid. At £30, I'm selling at £30.

0:37:000:37:04

Plus £2. That's very good.

0:37:040:37:06

Now, the whisky decanter.

0:37:060:37:08

252 there. Miniature curling stone, whisky decanter.

0:37:080:37:12

It's empty, unfortunately. £10 away.

0:37:120:37:14

£5? Five I'm bid.

0:37:140:37:16

At five, at six, at seven? At seven, at eight, at nine?

0:37:160:37:19

At nine, at ten, at 12? £10, the bid's on the books.

0:37:190:37:23

At £10, 11, 12? At £12, still with me.

0:37:230:37:25

At £12, you're done. At £12.

0:37:250:37:28

£12 is plus eight.

0:37:280:37:30

Which means you are minus £55. Minus £55.

0:37:300:37:33

What are you going to do about the truncheon, kids?

0:37:330:37:36

We're going to go for it.

0:37:360:37:37

You're going to go for it.

0:37:370:37:39

I don't blame you going for it. That's very sound.

0:37:390:37:41

I can tell you that his estimate now is 30 to £50.

0:37:410:37:44

Philip paid £35, so you are almost dead cert,

0:37:440:37:47

-according to his estimate, to make a profit.

-Good.

0:37:470:37:50

So let's all cross our legs and look at the truncheon.

0:37:500:37:53

Now, lot 258 there.

0:37:530:37:54

It's a 19th-century elm truncheon decorated with the VR motif.

0:37:540:37:57

£30 away? £20 away? £20 I'm bid.

0:37:570:38:00

At £20, the truncheon. I'll take two to go on.

0:38:000:38:02

-22. 25, 28, 28, £30.

-Come on!

0:38:020:38:05

32? 32, 35?

0:38:050:38:06

32, the bid's in the middle. At £32 I'm bid, five and up.

0:38:060:38:09

-At £32...

-One more!

0:38:090:38:12

At £32, the bid is up front. At £32.

0:38:120:38:15

£32 is minus £3.

0:38:150:38:16

Damn! People with the shout! I hate it when people shout!

0:38:160:38:20

Me too. But you did it anyway. And I did it too.

0:38:200:38:23

-Minus 58. Minus 58 smackers. That's where we are.

-Oh, wow.

0:38:230:38:26

That's extremely disappointing, but the way things are going today,

0:38:260:38:29

that could be a winning score, so don't say a thing to the Blues,

0:38:290:38:32

-all right?

-We won't.

-We won't.

0:38:320:38:34

Now, Andy and Rob, feeling OK?

0:38:480:38:50

-Yeah.

-Confident, yeah.

-You've been quietly confident.

0:38:500:38:53

Well, you can't be bragging about this game, can you,

0:38:530:38:55

because nobody knows what is going to happen in the auction.

0:38:550:38:58

-Have the Reds told you how they got on?

-Not at all.

-No.

0:38:580:39:00

Well, you don't want to know about that, I tell you! OK, fine.

0:39:000:39:03

First lot up is the naval officer's hat, and here it is.

0:39:030:39:06

Lot 274 there. Late Victorian naval officer's bicorn hat there.

0:39:060:39:09

In the original carry case.

0:39:090:39:11

Five bids on this, I'm going to start at £100.

0:39:110:39:13

At £100, the bid is with me.

0:39:130:39:15

I have £100 is the bid, 110 to get on. I have 110, 120, 130...

0:39:150:39:19

I have 130. All my bids are out. It's still at the back at 130.

0:39:190:39:22

140? No? Are we all done?

0:39:220:39:24

Selling at £130.

0:39:240:39:26

-£130. He's plus £10.

-Yes.

0:39:260:39:32

Now, golfing spoon.

0:39:320:39:34

Are we going to get a profit on each lot?

0:39:340:39:36

Lot 275 there. The hallmarked silver golf spoon,

0:39:360:39:38

designed with the long handle.

0:39:380:39:40

Sheffield hallmark, 1931.

0:39:400:39:42

£20 away, can I say? £10 for the silver spoon? Ten I'm bid, at ten.

0:39:420:39:46

At £10, the silver spoon, lot 275.

0:39:460:39:48

At 12, at 14, at 16, at 18.

0:39:480:39:50

-At 18, at 20, at 20, 22, 22, 24, 26?

-It's going to be a hole in one!

0:39:500:39:54

£24 beside me. At £24, this lot, £24.

0:39:540:39:58

-Good result.

-£24.

0:39:580:40:01

That is nearly double your money.

0:40:010:40:02

Look out, here comes the iridescent bowl.

0:40:020:40:04

Lot 276 there.

0:40:040:40:05

Marked glass, heavy circular bowl, incorporating a milk swirl, by Kosta.

0:40:050:40:10

Lot 276. £40 away? £30 away?

0:40:100:40:13

£20 I'm bid. At £20, £20.

0:40:130:40:16

25, £30, 35, 35, £40?

0:40:160:40:17

At £35, the bid is beside me.

0:40:170:40:19

At... 38, £40? £40, 42? At £40.

0:40:190:40:23

The bid is beside me at £40.

0:40:230:40:25

£40, it's wiped its face.

0:40:250:40:27

£40, which means you are plus £21.50.

0:40:270:40:31

-What about the horn beaker?

-I think we're going to go for it.

0:40:310:40:34

-Give it a go.

-Yeah.

-We're going with the bonus buy. That's fair enough.

0:40:340:40:38

Now you've decided,

0:40:380:40:39

I can tell you that the auctioneer's estimate is 20 to £30.

0:40:390:40:42

Henry paid 20, so you've paid

0:40:420:40:43

-the right price, apparently, there, Henry. Well done.

-Thank you.

0:40:430:40:46

Exciting. We're going with it, and here comes Henry's beaker.

0:40:460:40:50

Lot 282 there. It's a 19th-century horn beaker

0:40:500:40:53

with silver shield-shaped monogram, lot 282.

0:40:530:40:56

-£30 away? £20 away? £20 I'm bid.

-Wahey!

0:40:560:40:58

At £20 I'm bid, I'll take two to get on. 22, 24, 26, 28? At £28, 30 now?

0:40:580:41:04

At £28, the bid is with me. At £28.

0:41:040:41:07

-Respectable, isn't it?

-At £28, he says.

0:41:070:41:09

It's plus eight, which means you are plus £29.50.

0:41:090:41:13

-That's pretty good.

-That is a result.

0:41:130:41:16

-It's fantastic.

-Well, it's not going to be much of a meal, but...

0:41:160:41:21

Doesn't look bad at all, £29.50. Anyway, there we go.

0:41:210:41:25

Don't say a word to the Reds,

0:41:250:41:26

because that might be a winning score.

0:41:260:41:29

Sadly, there is a world of difference between our teams today.

0:41:380:41:41

We don't have losers any more, we only have winners and runners-up,

0:41:410:41:45

and the runners-up by a long margin are the Reds.

0:41:450:41:47

-Oh!

-Yeah(!)

0:41:470:41:49

I don't want you crying or anything like that, all right?!

0:41:490:41:53

It was the tantalus that did it in for you. Sadly, you are minus 58.

0:41:530:41:58

But let's not dwell - you have been great.

0:41:580:42:00

Let's turn to the boys, who are going to take home £29.50!

0:42:000:42:05

How about that?

0:42:050:42:07

Well done!

0:42:070:42:09

There's your £29.50. And here's all the small change coming up.

0:42:090:42:13

-Thanks very much.

-Thanks very much.

0:42:130:42:14

And because you made profits on two of your items

0:42:140:42:17

and wiped your face with the other -

0:42:170:42:19

and, incidentally,

0:42:190:42:20

made a profit on the bonus buy, which is really good -

0:42:200:42:23

I'm going to present you with the noble and rare award

0:42:230:42:27

of the nice chromium-plated pin.

0:42:270:42:29

So, take a pin, Andy. Pin it with pride. Rob, take your pin.

0:42:290:42:32

-Marvellous. Thank you very much.

-And here we go, Henry.

0:42:320:42:35

Thank you.

0:42:350:42:37

Your specialist pins, and there are very, very few of these around,

0:42:370:42:43

-so congratulations for getting an award.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:42:430:42:46

In fact, congratulations for joining us today,

0:42:460:42:48

because we've had a great day.

0:42:480:42:50

-Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting. Yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:42:500:42:53

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head to the Royal Cornwall Showground in Wadebridge to track down well-priced treasures. Steering the red and blue teams in the right direction are experts Philip Serrell and Henry Meadows, while Tim pays a visit to the iconic and bracing location that is St Michael's Mount.