Exeter 24 Bargain Hunt


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


Exeter 24

Bargain Hunt comes from Exeter, where expert Philip Serrell breaks all health and safety rules. Tim Wonnacott visits Sherbourne Castle in Dorset.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Exeter 24. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hundreds of fascinating objects, eh?

0:00:020:00:05

But are we going to be able to find just six that will make a profit?

0:00:050:00:09

Let's go bargain hunting!

0:00:090:00:11

We're six miles outside the city centre of Exeter

0:00:360:00:40

and behind this shed door, it's all happening!

0:00:400:00:44

Isn't that amazing? We've got the stalls,

0:00:470:00:49

we've got the experts, we've got the contestants

0:00:490:00:52

and we've also got £300 each for the teams to blow.

0:00:520:00:58

What could be more fun?

0:00:580:01:00

Today, two smart ladies

0:01:000:01:02

leave their expert to do the manhandling.

0:01:020:01:05

RATTLING Oh, that's all the drawers come out.

0:01:050:01:09

You already told me that your eyes don't work. I'm nearly 60 and my eyes don't work!

0:01:090:01:14

And two old friends suddenly discover a great big gap between their views.

0:01:140:01:19

You don't like it? This is how it's going to be.

0:01:190:01:22

-I told you!

-I told you!

0:01:220:01:24

And here are our teams. First, let's assess the Reds.

0:01:250:01:29

So, Ann and Denise, how did you first meet?

0:01:290:01:32

It was about 20 years ago.

0:01:320:01:34

Denise's husband and my husband worked at the police station

0:01:340:01:38

and we met as a result of that.

0:01:380:01:40

-Ann, you work at the police force?

-I used to.

0:01:400:01:43

-I finished at the end of last year. I've moved on.

-Have you?

-Yes.

0:01:430:01:46

I'd been there over 21 years, so it was time for a change.

0:01:460:01:49

-But you enjoyed it?

-I did, yes.

0:01:490:01:51

-You have quite a different job now?

-I'm working for a local funeral director, in the office!

0:01:510:01:57

-That sounds jolly!

-You'd be surprised. You have to keep positive.

0:01:570:02:02

-You can't walk around with a glum face all the time.

-No, quite!

0:02:020:02:05

You have to pick your moments.

0:02:050:02:07

When somebody's just been bereaved, you don't want to have a rave-up.

0:02:070:02:10

-Absolutely. Time and a place.

-Time and a place.

0:02:100:02:13

What about collecting? What do you collect?

0:02:130:02:15

My first collection was tortoises and that started when I was a child.

0:02:150:02:20

I went to a pottery class with my aunt

0:02:200:02:22

and made what I thought looked like a tortoise,

0:02:220:02:25

and it sort of grew from there.

0:02:250:02:28

-I think I've got about 200 now.

-Have you?

-Yes.

0:02:280:02:30

-They do breed, don't they?

-They do! They're fairly slow, but...!

0:02:300:02:34

Slow off the mark, but when they get going, they get the message!

0:02:340:02:38

That's lovely. 200 tortoises!

0:02:380:02:40

-It's difficult displaying them, though.

-I bet it is.

0:02:400:02:43

Denise, you are, apparently, professionally qualified at getting on with people.

0:02:430:02:48

I don't know about professional, but I am a people person.

0:02:480:02:52

Every job I've ever had's involved doing things with people, customer services

0:02:520:02:58

and helping to raise money for charity.

0:02:580:03:00

-What do you like to collect?

-Quite a few things.

0:03:000:03:03

Postcards was my first collection when I was 12. I've got over 3,000.

0:03:030:03:07

Sadly now, that's going to be a thing of the past, with emails, internet, etc,

0:03:070:03:12

so people don't send postcards.

0:03:120:03:14

-But the interesting ones are all 50 or 100 years old.

-Oh, fantastic!

-It's a great collecting era.

0:03:140:03:19

Will you be buying postcards today?

0:03:190:03:22

-If they're around, we'll look.

-And at the right price?

-Absolutely.

0:03:220:03:26

I think you've got this sorted out, you two. Very good luck.

0:03:260:03:29

-Now for the Blues. Great friends, Rhian and Sally.

-We are.

-Good friends.

-Good friends.

0:03:290:03:35

How did you two meet, Rhian?

0:03:350:03:37

We met, erm, it must be about 13 or 14 years ago

0:03:370:03:41

when we both worked for a local farmer and land agent.

0:03:410:03:46

From the day we started working together,

0:03:460:03:48

we realised we'd get on very well,

0:03:480:03:51

but, unfortunately, we didn't behave ourselves particularly well,

0:03:510:03:55

so we weren't allowed to work together!

0:03:550:03:57

-You started behaving badly?

-I think so!

0:03:570:03:59

-Or too much chat?

-A bit of both.

-She brings out the worst in me.

0:03:590:04:03

So we couldn't work together.

0:04:030:04:05

-You bring out the worst in each other. This is promising!

-Absolutely.

0:04:050:04:10

What's your job, Rhian?

0:04:100:04:13

I am now a welfare officer at an agricultural college,

0:04:130:04:18

which I look after the students and try and keep them in line, basically.

0:04:180:04:23

How do you keep students in line?

0:04:230:04:25

-The theory is, give them plenty to do, it's stops them doing things they shouldn't.

-Right.

0:04:250:04:30

I organise different entertainments and events for them to do.

0:04:300:04:34

It says here "pub quizzes and inflatable parties".

0:04:340:04:37

-What's an inflatable party?

-We get things like bouncy castles and...

0:04:370:04:42

Oh, I see!

0:04:420:04:44

-These are for students?

-They like it! You'd be surprised.

-I bet they like a bouncy castle!

0:04:440:04:50

Sally, what's this business about ornaments wrapped up under your bed?

0:04:500:04:54

That is because I have a fetish for car boots.

0:04:540:04:59

-The car boot is very close to where I live, is the problem.

-I see.

0:04:590:05:02

-And so you find yourself there.

-Yes. As you do.

0:05:020:05:06

As you do. And Rhian has a real thing about the tat in my house,

0:05:060:05:11

so when she says, "Will I get rid of it?"

0:05:110:05:15

I say, "I have!" but I just wrap it up and put it...

0:05:150:05:18

-Under your bed.

-Because I can't get rid of it.

-No.

-It's worth a lot of money.

0:05:180:05:24

So, you're rather looking forward to me giving you £300.

0:05:240:05:28

I am. I could buy a lot with £300.

0:05:280:05:30

-Are you feeling passionate?

-Absolutely!

0:05:300:05:32

-Do you reckon you'll win?

-Definitely.

0:05:320:05:34

If I have a stronger hand in it, I think we will.

0:05:340:05:38

Things are going to go well!

0:05:380:05:40

-Here we go, then. There's your £300.

-Thanks.

0:05:400:05:42

You know the rules.

0:05:420:05:44

Your experts await! Off you go! Very, very, very good luck.

0:05:440:05:49

We've brought bags of expertise down to Exeter.

0:05:490:05:53

In the Red corner, fighting fit and full of vim, Philip Serrell.

0:05:530:05:56

Battling for the Blues with determination and style,

0:05:580:06:01

Catherine Southon.

0:06:010:06:03

-Have we got a plan?

-Not really.

-Got a plan?

-No.

0:06:030:06:07

This is what I like to hear!

0:06:070:06:09

-Do you want to spend a lot of money?

-As much as I need to!

0:06:090:06:13

We've got to concentrate because this'll be the quickest hour you've ever had.

0:06:130:06:18

OK, everyone, make the most of it.

0:06:180:06:21

-That's lovely.

-We like that.

-That's also £250.

0:06:210:06:24

-Just a bit gorgeous!

-That's also too much for us!

0:06:240:06:27

I think the clock may be slightly out of our range!

0:06:280:06:32

-No to the clock, then!

-£750 - that's a no-no.

0:06:320:06:35

It's all geared to fashion. You've got to think,

0:06:360:06:39

"What do the general public want?" because of the auction.

0:06:390:06:43

-It's extremely well made.

-Do you really?

0:06:430:06:46

You don't like it. This is how it's going to be, isn't it?

0:06:460:06:49

The Blues have found another clock with a handsome horse on top,

0:06:490:06:53

and a handsome stallholder alongside.

0:06:530:06:56

-That'll sell because it's an Art Nouveau clock with the horse...

-Because of the horse.

0:06:560:07:01

..and horses are very collectable.

0:07:010:07:04

-I like that.

-It's not the person who wants the clock would buy that but the person who likes Art Nouveau.

0:07:040:07:09

-If they like clocks and horses, you're onto a winner.

-Definitely.

0:07:090:07:13

It's pewter and the detail is quite nice.

0:07:130:07:16

-It's very nice detail on the horse.

-It's a nice horse.

0:07:160:07:19

You're into horses. Is he quite a nice-looking horse?

0:07:190:07:22

I think so. Sometimes they don't look like proper horses, but that does.

0:07:220:07:26

-I'll start at 100 -

-Oh, gosh!

-We'll negotiate.

0:07:260:07:29

-We've got to negotiate a long way.

-Not too far!

0:07:290:07:32

Where does the expert think?

0:07:320:07:34

-I was thinking about 40.

-I wouldn't want to go anywhere near £100.

0:07:340:07:37

MAN: Go on, then, make me an offer.

0:07:370:07:40

You said 40? MAN: Don't be daft! The pewter's worth more than that.

0:07:400:07:46

-60.

-50.

0:07:460:07:49

-I say -

-That's a compromise.

0:07:490:07:51

What do you think? You're having deep thoughts.

0:07:510:07:53

I would like it if it was a lot less money. MAN: 60.

0:07:530:07:57

Let's have a look and see what else there is.

0:07:570:08:00

I think it's nice, but I don't like it that much. MAN: That's fine.

0:08:000:08:03

-I think you're very nice. MAN: Thanks.

-He's completely lovely!

0:08:030:08:07

-What is the bottom line?

-55. I'll not go less than that.

0:08:070:08:11

-You're not convinced.

-No.

-Put it down. We'll find something else.

0:08:110:08:15

Meanwhile, the Reds have arrived at an oak stall,

0:08:150:08:18

and Uncle Phil's got a salt box.

0:08:180:08:21

-What sort of wood is it?

-Tree wood.

0:08:220:08:25

This looks like it's rosewood and these are normally salt boxes.

0:08:250:08:29

They would hang on a wall to keep salt dry.

0:08:290:08:32

But I've got a feeling this was never intended to be a salt box.

0:08:320:08:35

I think it's been a stationery box. I think it's rosewood.

0:08:350:08:39

Quite why you'd hang your stationery on a wall, I really don't know.

0:08:390:08:43

-I think it dates to about 1880, somewhere like that.

-Pretty old, then.

0:08:430:08:48

I think at auction, that would make between £40 and £60.

0:08:480:08:53

-OK.

-So kind of around the money, then, with...

-Maybe down a bit?

0:08:530:08:57

-Well, what did he say?

-BOTH: 50.

-You could always smile sweetly.

0:08:570:09:01

-Where are you?

-Can I smile sweetly at you?

0:09:010:09:05

MAN: 45.

0:09:050:09:07

-45.

-Absolute best?

-MAN: Yes.

0:09:070:09:10

-You like it, don't you?

-It caught my eye. Do you think it's worth a punt?

-I do.

0:09:110:09:16

It is pretty.

0:09:160:09:17

I'm going to ask you one thing.

0:09:170:09:20

Do you, one at a time, do you really like that?

0:09:200:09:23

-Yes, I do. It caught my eye.

-Do you like that?

0:09:230:09:26

-Now I've had a closer look, yes.

-Honestly?

0:09:260:09:29

It wouldn't be my personal taste, but yes.

0:09:290:09:32

-OK, go buy it off the man.

-Thank you!

-There you are.

-Thank you.

0:09:320:09:36

-Tell him you want it gift-wrapped.

-Absolutely!

0:09:360:09:40

Well done, Denise and Ann, you're away!

0:09:400:09:43

-I like that.

-Do you? Sewing table or games.

0:09:430:09:46

That's quite a nice decorative piece.

0:09:460:09:49

Is it solid silver?

0:09:490:09:51

-The answer is, yes and no.

-Right.

0:09:510:09:54

This is silver, but it's not solid, and the base is loaded.

0:09:540:09:58

I'm looking for a hallmark.

0:09:580:10:01

-I like it.

-Oh, well!

-I like it. I play chess, as well.

0:10:010:10:05

We're in trouble now. You've already told me that your eyes don't work.

0:10:050:10:09

I'm nearly 60 and my eyes don't work, so we're now in your hands.

0:10:090:10:14

-Do you know what my concern is?

-What?

0:10:140:10:17

-That this has been put on this.

-I think that.

-They don't go together.

0:10:170:10:21

It's a bit of a marriage between about three different pieces!

0:10:210:10:26

I poked myself in the eye with one of those once.

0:10:260:10:28

There's a hallmark! It looks like an anchor. Would that be right?

0:10:280:10:32

What a girl. That's Birmingham.

0:10:320:10:34

-And a lion.

-Yes.

-And a "D".

-Yes.

0:10:340:10:38

-It kind of says, "Birmingham 1903!"

-She's checking up on me.

0:10:380:10:42

-Is that what it says?

-On the label!

-Does it?

-Yes!

0:10:420:10:46

Oh, right. OK. That's really funny, isn't it?

0:10:460:10:50

Always pays to look at the label first, I find.

0:10:500:10:54

The Blues have found a great big box.

0:10:540:10:56

They're told it's what the French use to keep baguettes in.

0:10:560:11:00

-Is it a big, chunky piece of furniture?

-It's not too bad. Feel the weight.

0:11:000:11:05

-Ooh, God! I'm going to hand it over.

-That's all right.

0:11:050:11:09

-I love it.

-I think it's lovely.

0:11:090:11:11

-It's in lovely condition.

-It is. And I like the pillar.

0:11:110:11:16

They tend to be fairly plain to stand in the kitchen,

0:11:160:11:20

-whereas this has been made like a piece of furniture.

-Exactly. It's really attractive.

0:11:200:11:25

But we're a bit concerned about the price.

0:11:250:11:28

-I see.

-As we always are!

0:11:280:11:31

-Well, I can move.

-That's a very specific price.

0:11:310:11:34

-88.

-Mm.

0:11:340:11:36

I can move £10 and make it 78, certainly.

0:11:360:11:41

Could you do a nice, round 70?

0:11:410:11:43

It's the OCD kicking in! We don't do odd numbers!

0:11:430:11:48

I tell you what, I'll do a nice, round 75.

0:11:480:11:52

-Are we going to make money on it?

-It's entirely your call.

0:11:520:11:55

I really like it. I'm forgetting that we've got to make a profit.

0:11:550:12:00

This is a major problem on Bargain Hunt. We buy with our hearts.

0:12:000:12:04

-I think it's really nice.

-If you could possibly do 70...?

0:12:040:12:07

-I probably shouldn't, but I'll do it for 70.

-You know you should!

0:12:070:12:11

-ALL: Thank you.

-Are we happy with that?

-BOTH: Yes.

0:12:110:12:15

-I wish you luck. It'll be the only one in the auction, I'm sure.

-I bet.

0:12:150:12:19

That's one piece apiece for our teams.

0:12:200:12:23

The Reds have found a silver purse.

0:12:230:12:26

That's a lovely thing, but it's all down to price.

0:12:280:12:31

It's priced at £145.

0:12:310:12:34

I think I could do a very best price of £110.

0:12:340:12:37

-That's a gamble.

-It is in fabulous condition.

-It's a belter.

-It really is.

0:12:380:12:44

What you've got to do with this programme is, buy with the head and not the heart.

0:12:440:12:48

TIM: Good point, Phil.

0:12:480:12:50

What on earth have the Blues got?

0:12:500:12:53

-Absolutely no idea. What does it say?

-Coat hook!

0:12:530:12:58

So... Oh, yes, look. You hook it up on here...

0:13:000:13:03

-It's got nooks. It's wooden, but it's got that bamboo look.

-It's very light.

0:13:030:13:08

-I don't think I like it.

-No.

-I just wanted to know what it was.

0:13:080:13:11

The Reds are still on a silver streak.

0:13:110:13:14

-Aww!

-MAN: That's a delightful little cream jug.

0:13:140:13:16

-That's nice.

-That's beautiful.

0:13:160:13:18

MAN: I can do that...for £50.

0:13:180:13:21

That's 1909, Birmingham. And it's got the weight.

0:13:210:13:25

The weight of silver, with the current price and value,

0:13:250:13:30

it's, er, it's there.

0:13:300:13:33

-That is lovely. What do you think it would make?

-£50?

0:13:330:13:37

-I'm being really picky. It's got a little dent there.

-Right.

0:13:370:13:40

It's got a dent there. It's a lovely thing, actually.

0:13:400:13:43

Barraclough & Sons, silversmiths in Leeds.

0:13:430:13:47

MAN: Barraclough would be the retailers.

0:13:470:13:49

I like that. It's quite sweet. I think...

0:13:490:13:53

..if that came into my sale room, I'd put £40 to £60 on it.

0:13:540:13:58

-We're close, then, aren't we?

-You're close.

0:13:580:14:01

Would you consider less than 50?

0:14:010:14:04

I'd consider!

0:14:040:14:07

What's your very, very best?

0:14:070:14:09

I'll meet you at 45.

0:14:090:14:11

-For £45, I like it.

-We do like it very much.

0:14:110:14:14

What did I say to you at the outset? BOTH: We've got to like it.

0:14:140:14:18

-We like it?

-I do like it.

0:14:180:14:20

-Then, you've got your answer.

-May we?

-Thank you so much.

0:14:200:14:23

-ALL: Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:14:230:14:26

In 1905, what would a well-heeled, artistic gentleman

0:14:340:14:38

be likely to have in his waistcoat pocket?

0:14:380:14:42

Well, if he was lucky, he might have one of these.

0:14:420:14:46

I know, on the face of it,

0:14:460:14:48

this simple rectangular silver box looks like a Vesta Case.

0:14:480:14:53

I've seen lots of those.

0:14:530:14:55

Or a toothpick case.

0:14:550:14:58

Seen lots of those.

0:14:580:15:00

But if you look very carefully,

0:15:000:15:02

the design of the top gives the game away.

0:15:020:15:04

Because here we've got two very well detailed,

0:15:040:15:09

slightly domed, raised panels,

0:15:090:15:13

just like you used to find

0:15:130:15:15

on those black Japan watercolour paint sets in full size.

0:15:150:15:21

If I open this up, that is indeed what is inside

0:15:210:15:26

this solid silver example.

0:15:260:15:28

Look at that! Two rows of polychrome watercolour tiles.

0:15:280:15:33

If you took the little brush inside, wet that in some water,

0:15:330:15:39

apply it to the coloured cubes,

0:15:390:15:41

you'd be halfway home to creating a watercolour,

0:15:410:15:44

a simple wash drawing

0:15:440:15:47

whilst on your travels through the shires of Britain.

0:15:470:15:51

This thing is as rare as a hen's tooth.

0:15:510:15:56

It's fully hallmarked for London, 1905,

0:15:560:15:59

and you've got the maker's mark, William Hornby, WH,

0:15:590:16:03

stamped on the end.

0:16:030:16:04

It's a peach. What's it worth? A couple of hundred pounds?

0:16:040:16:09

£500 if you must?

0:16:090:16:12

Right. Let's have a look at the price ticket.

0:16:120:16:15

£1,750.

0:16:150:16:19

It's a cracker!

0:16:200:16:23

OK, let's see where our teams have got to.

0:16:240:16:28

What about the clock?

0:16:280:16:30

If we are struggling, we have the clock.

0:16:300:16:33

The Reds have found a big writing slope.

0:16:330:16:37

Careful, Phil!

0:16:370:16:39

And Rhian's discovered a half-price offer.

0:16:390:16:43

-I wouldn't say it's by a particularly well-known name.

-OK.

0:16:430:16:49

"Indian Tree". It's just a Staffordshire...jug.

0:16:500:16:55

What do you like about it?

0:16:550:16:56

I like the colouring. The colours are nice.

0:16:560:16:59

-Go for it, then.

-But then, I know it's about making a profit.

0:16:590:17:03

If I saw that...

0:17:030:17:05

-You wouldn't.

-..I would say it's about a £15-20 jug.

0:17:050:17:10

-I'm just intrigued to know why you picked it up.

-Because it's half price and cheap!

0:17:100:17:15

Because it's Bargain Hunt!

0:17:150:17:18

Go and find out how much it is, because we haven't got time.

0:17:180:17:21

That's it, Catherine, you keep pushing them along, girl.

0:17:210:17:24

-How much age has that got?

-It's not old, is it?

-No.

0:17:250:17:29

And this has been put together by a blind man in a coal cellar.

0:17:290:17:33

Ha! Now, move on.

0:17:330:17:37

-£19.

-£19.

0:17:370:17:39

-I suppose the relief pattern is quite nice.

-The colours are nice.

0:17:390:17:44

-But...

-The colours are nice.

0:17:440:17:47

You may surprise us yet.

0:17:470:17:50

Have it if you want it and you feel there's profit in it.

0:17:500:17:52

I don't want to act like a brat and say, "I want it!"

0:17:520:17:56

-I want everyone's approval.

-But you do and you are.

-Really?

0:17:560:17:59

-Go for it. We haven't got long.

-£19? Thank you.

0:18:010:18:04

You've made her very happy.

0:18:040:18:06

-We'll see.

-Now she's pulling a face!

0:18:060:18:10

Thank you very much!

0:18:100:18:12

Now the Reds are examining a letter opener.

0:18:130:18:18

It's gorgeous.

0:18:180:18:21

-I'd like to own it. How much is it?

-£160.

0:18:210:18:25

She's going to have to come down a bit on that one.

0:18:250:18:29

What do you think that would make?

0:18:290:18:31

If that came into my sale room, I would put an auction estimate on it of 80 to 120.

0:18:310:18:37

That would be my guess.

0:18:370:18:40

I'd like to see you buy it for just under 100, but this good lady will tell you.

0:18:400:18:45

-What's the very best?

-WOMAN: We could do it for 110.

0:18:450:18:48

-Would you do 100?

-I can't.

-105?

0:18:480:18:52

-OK, we'll split the difference. 105.

-105?

0:18:520:18:55

Yes. Are you happy with that?

0:18:550:18:57

-Let's go for it.

-It is lovely.

-Thank you very much.

0:18:570:19:01

TIM: That's it for the Reds, well within time.

0:19:010:19:05

The girls picked a wooden wall box for £45.

0:19:050:19:09

They invested the same sum in a silver jug, dated 1909.

0:19:090:19:15

They completed their trio with an Art Nouveau letter opener at £105.

0:19:150:19:21

-What did you spend, Ann?

-£195.

0:19:210:19:23

Good. I'd like £105 of leftover lolly, please.

0:19:230:19:27

That Philip Serrell, it's his moment now. Look at him!

0:19:270:19:30

He's really happy about this.

0:19:300:19:32

What are you going to spend it on?

0:19:320:19:35

We've got a bit of wood, silver and Art Nouveau,

0:19:350:19:37

so I think it's time for me to branch out.

0:19:370:19:39

-Absolutely.

-I think there's a hint there!

0:19:390:19:43

Good luck, girls!

0:19:430:19:45

Now the Blues have some decisions to make.

0:19:450:19:47

I think we need to run around and see something. If not, we go and get the clock.

0:19:480:19:54

Yes?

0:19:540:19:56

Majolica.

0:19:580:20:00

-No.

-Is that a bit pricey?

-You can't have the bowl.

-No.

0:20:010:20:05

-I don't like this sort of thing.

-Right.

-I like something bigger.

0:20:070:20:10

-I can feel a bit of a tension building up.

-It's always like this, don't worry!

0:20:100:20:15

Rhian, Sally, you're supposed to be a team, girls.

0:20:150:20:18

Ah, it's back to that clock, eh?

0:20:180:20:21

-My goodness.

-Have you got it working?

-MAN: Have a listen.

0:20:210:20:24

Please, because she's won so far with two items.

0:20:240:20:27

£50 I need that for. Please. Please.

0:20:270:20:32

-You know you want to.

-I do, really.

-Yes.

-OK.

0:20:320:20:37

Oh, really?! MAN: Just for this one.

0:20:370:20:40

-You were very mean earlier.

-She is bossy.

-I'll do £50.

0:20:400:20:44

-Thanks.

-What's the outcome?

-£50.

0:20:440:20:48

-Are we happy?

-Happy with that?

-Thank you.

-Pleasure.

-Good job.

0:20:480:20:52

A bit of teamwork on the last lap.

0:20:520:20:54

Let's remind ourselves of the Blues' decisions.

0:20:540:20:58

Sally and Rhian agreed on buying a big French box,

0:20:580:21:03

which might've been used for storing baguettes. It cost them £70.

0:21:030:21:07

Then Rhian argued the case for a Staffordshire jug

0:21:070:21:10

at the bargain price of £19.

0:21:100:21:13

And then they ticked off a clock with a horse on top.

0:21:130:21:17

That was £50, which brought their total spend to £139.

0:21:170:21:22

Now, which is your favourite piece?

0:21:220:21:25

We have all agreed on one item, which is a godsend

0:21:250:21:30

-because there was a bit of...

-Conflict.

-Conflict.

0:21:300:21:33

-It doesn't have to be a team favourite.

-No, we all liked it.

0:21:330:21:37

-Maybe we didn't all like it!

-We all like it, but whether or not it'll bring the most profit -

0:21:370:21:41

That's not my question! Which is your favourite?

0:21:410:21:45

-The baguette box. We all liked that.

-Everybody likes the baguette box. Lovely.

0:21:450:21:49

-Which piece will bring the biggest profit?

-The jug.

0:21:490:21:53

-The clock.

-We've got a split.

0:21:530:21:56

Here's your cash. It's quite a lot. Have you got any idea what you might spend it on?

0:21:560:22:00

No, but I didn't want to cause an argument because there's been so much conflict.

0:22:000:22:05

As long as you think there's going to be a profit in it, you will be 100 percent safe.

0:22:050:22:10

-Lovely to see you, girls.

-ALL: Thank you.

0:22:100:22:12

I'm heading off now to the home of the Digby family.

0:22:120:22:15

Do you know where that is? Sherborne Castle.

0:22:150:22:19

The castle sits close to the Dorset coastline.

0:22:210:22:24

Between here and east Devon are many tall, rugged cliff faces

0:22:240:22:29

that annually weather away to expose hundreds of extraordinary fossils.

0:22:290:22:34

It's all part of The Jurassic Coast,

0:22:340:22:37

England's first Natural Heritage Site.

0:22:370:22:40

A number of fossils were excavated from quarries,

0:22:430:22:46

providing the stone for Sherborne Castle.

0:22:460:22:49

And now, the castle includes an exhibition of these natural wonders.

0:22:490:22:55

The collection of fossils, on display today in the cellar at Sherborne Castle,

0:22:580:23:03

is a modern collection

0:23:030:23:06

put together by Edward Wingfield Digby,

0:23:060:23:08

son of the current owner.

0:23:080:23:11

The collection focuses particularly on Ammonites

0:23:110:23:16

and the examples that we can see date from the Devonian period,

0:23:160:23:20

that is between 465 million years ago.

0:23:200:23:26

What I think is so extraordinary

0:23:260:23:28

is that when you discover an Ammonite

0:23:280:23:31

contained and squashed within the stone,

0:23:310:23:35

so much of the detail is preserved,

0:23:350:23:38

almost as if that marine creature was still alive.

0:23:380:23:43

Interestingly, the term "Ammonite"

0:23:430:23:46

comes from a reference back to the Egyptians.

0:23:460:23:50

Pliny the Elder, when describing the Egyptian God Ammon,

0:23:500:23:56

referred to the horns that Ammon was portrayed as having in Egyptian art,

0:23:560:24:03

rams horns that are intensely, tightly coiled,

0:24:030:24:08

just exactly like the intensely, tightly coiled nature of the Ammonite.

0:24:080:24:14

And it is, of course, that visual symmetry

0:24:140:24:17

which draws us to the Ammonite as a collectible today.

0:24:170:24:22

Upstairs, here in the boudoir at Sherborne Castle,

0:24:260:24:30

is a fossilised tabletop,

0:24:300:24:32

the like of which you will not see anywhere else in the world.

0:24:320:24:37

It is quite extraordinary.

0:24:370:24:40

The central piece, the greyish flecked stuff,

0:24:400:24:44

is called Marston Marble,

0:24:440:24:46

which was discovered in a village, Marston Magna,

0:24:460:24:50

about five miles away from Sherborne Castle

0:24:500:24:53

when they were digging a well in the 18th century.

0:24:530:24:57

74 feet down under the ground,

0:24:570:25:00

they encountered a great boulder

0:25:000:25:03

and that boulder contained this stone,

0:25:030:25:06

hence they call it Marston Marble.

0:25:060:25:09

If you look carefully, the grey stone is filled

0:25:090:25:13

with literally thousands of tiny Ammonites.

0:25:130:25:18

To increase its decorative effect,

0:25:180:25:21

they've then taken some socking great Ammonites,

0:25:210:25:24

these fellows in each of the corners,

0:25:240:25:27

and arranging them in a geometric and extremely decorative way.

0:25:270:25:32

And running round the outside, we've got a piece of Italian white marble, Carrara Marble,

0:25:320:25:38

that's been applied to the Marston Marble

0:25:380:25:41

and then inlaid with more Ammonites,

0:25:410:25:43

which they've cut out of the Marston Marble!

0:25:430:25:47

It's completely bonkers, isn't it?

0:25:470:25:50

But the effect is absolutely divine.

0:25:500:25:54

In fact, the Digby family were so happy to own this precious object,

0:25:540:25:59

this fossilised tabletop,

0:25:590:26:02

with its connections particularly with this part of the world,

0:26:020:26:05

that they had a whole piece of furniture constructed to accommodate it.

0:26:050:26:10

Brilliant.

0:26:100:26:12

The big question today is, are our teams over at the auction

0:26:120:26:15

likely to become fossilised

0:26:150:26:18

or simply ossified?

0:26:180:26:20

We've headed over to Bridgwater in Somerset and the Tamlyn Sales Room

0:26:200:26:25

to have our items assessed by auctioneer Claire Rawle.

0:26:250:26:30

-Good morning, Claire.

-Good morning.

0:26:300:26:32

Now, first up for the Reds, we've got this hanging box.

0:26:320:26:37

-Whatever it's made of, it ain't rosewood.

-No.

0:26:370:26:40

I thought it might be what's loosely described as red walnut these days,

0:26:400:26:44

which is an imported wood, used a lot in the latter part of the 19th century.

0:26:440:26:49

-I can see where the rosewood came from, because it's got that dark lining in it.

-Hm.

0:26:490:26:53

It's got quite a nice colour.

0:26:530:26:55

-And you'd keep, apparently...

-Stationery, it would seem.

0:26:550:26:59

-It's unusual for stationery.

-It is.

0:26:590:27:02

You don't hang them on the wall. They sit on the end of a desk.

0:27:020:27:05

-It looks like a salt box.

-It really does.

0:27:050:27:08

Quite unusual. How much?

0:27:080:27:11

-30 to 50.

-£45 paid. So they're slap-bang in there.

0:27:110:27:15

-There is some hope.

-Yes.

-Good.

0:27:150:27:17

Next is a rather lonely little milk jug.

0:27:170:27:20

Yes, just a single little jug.

0:27:200:27:22

And it has been in the wars a bit. It has a few little dents in it. Little bit misshapen.

0:27:220:27:27

It'd be nice if it had a sugar bowl, it could be called a strawberry set.

0:27:270:27:31

-Yes.

-It's nice and it's silver and it weighs reasonably well.

0:27:310:27:36

-How much?

-30 to 50.

0:27:360:27:38

£45. Exactly the same as last time. We're getting into a rut!

0:27:380:27:43

At least they're not straying out of the estimate, which is good.

0:27:430:27:46

Now, this slightly strange paper knife...

0:27:460:27:51

-It's very heavy, isn't it?

-It is very heavy.

0:27:510:27:55

It's actually quite nicely cast. I thought it might be French.

0:27:550:27:58

-It doesn't display terribly well.

-No.

0:27:580:28:01

And very heavy and a thick blade,

0:28:010:28:03

not useful for undoing manila envelopes.

0:28:030:28:06

-Not really. You'd have a job to slide the thing there.

-You would.

0:28:060:28:11

Anyway, so not commercial, I wouldn't think.

0:28:110:28:13

Not terribly, I don't think.

0:28:130:28:15

-How commercial?

-30 to 50 again.

-Not commercial enough.

0:28:150:28:18

-£105.

-Right, OK.

0:28:180:28:21

A stonking price which will torpedo them

0:28:210:28:24

and mean they'll need their bonus buy.

0:28:240:28:26

Let's go and have a look at it!

0:28:260:28:28

Ann and Denise, this is your moment for the leftover-lolly reveal.

0:28:280:28:32

On what did Philip Serrell spend the £105 of leftover lolly we gave him?

0:28:320:28:36

Philip...

0:28:360:28:38

BOTH: Oh!

0:28:380:28:40

-I bought that.

-That's small!

-That's diddy!

0:28:400:28:42

-It's beautiful.

-Have a look.

-It's quite cute.

0:28:420:28:46

-It's very pretty.

-It's Royal Worcester.

0:28:460:28:48

It was hand-painted in the 1930s by a man called Ernest Barker.

0:28:480:28:52

-Ernie Barker was a pupil of a man called Harry Davis.

-BOTH: Right.

0:28:520:28:56

Harry Davis was one of the best three ceramic painters of the 20th century and Ernie wasn't far behind him.

0:28:560:29:01

-I think that's a beautiful thing.

-How much did you pay for it?

-I paid £40 for it.

0:29:010:29:06

If that doesn't make you a profit, that's the end of the world.

0:29:060:29:11

It should make you between 50 and 100, and in a specialist sale £100 plus.

0:29:110:29:16

-Not profit, price.

-No, no.

0:29:160:29:18

-It's absolutely beautiful.

-We're hopeful?

-Absolutely.

0:29:180:29:22

I think we're all in love with it. I think you've done very well.

0:29:220:29:25

I don't think there's a lot of choice.

0:29:250:29:27

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Phil's little plate.

0:29:270:29:33

Very pretty. Painted by Ernest Barker,

0:29:340:29:37

who's known for painting sheep and flowers.

0:29:370:29:40

I've found that this market has picked up a lot recently.

0:29:400:29:44

-The floral painted Worcester has started making better money.

-Oh, good.

0:29:440:29:48

Just in time, I'd say.

0:29:480:29:50

Anyway, Philip Serrell paid £40. Will you be able to turn him a profit?

0:29:500:29:54

I'd have thought so. I've estimated 60 to 90.

0:29:540:29:57

-Ooh good!

-I do hope so.

0:29:570:29:59

Wouldn't that be marvellous if he could double his cash? If the team decide to go with it...

0:29:590:30:04

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:30:040:30:07

First up is this so-called baguette box.

0:30:070:30:11

Yes, I can see where that sort of comes from,

0:30:110:30:14

but I'm not sure I'd keep baguettes in it.

0:30:140:30:16

-I think it's ridiculous, don't you?

-Yes!

0:30:160:30:19

You'd have every known rodent...

0:30:190:30:21

-Getting in there!

-..burrowing its way into the bottom to get at the crumbs!

-Yes.

0:30:210:30:27

What might it be?

0:30:270:30:29

Maybe it was made for a shop. It's got a sloping top on it.

0:30:290:30:33

You could write on that,

0:30:330:30:35

-perhaps throw your waste in it or...

-That's a good idea!

-..stack something in it?

0:30:350:30:39

It's actually quite nicely made. It's not a bad item.

0:30:390:30:43

OK, well, at least we've dreamt up a practical use for it, apart from bread!

0:30:430:30:48

-But will it make any bread?

-I have estimated 45 to 70.

0:30:480:30:52

-That's a good estimate.

-A bit of a curious estimate.

0:30:520:30:55

-I think it will appeal to somebody who likes quirky items.

-Perfect.

0:30:550:31:00

-They paid 70, so that's all right.

-That's fine.

0:31:000:31:03

Next is the Staffordshire water jug, which I think is absolutely hideous.

0:31:030:31:07

-I have to agree with you!

-Doesn't appeal to me one scrap.

-No.

0:31:070:31:10

A few years ago, they used to sell quite well.

0:31:100:31:13

There was a market for this decorative, moulded-type pottery.

0:31:130:31:19

-It doesn't do it for me, I'm afraid.

-Well, tastes do change.

-Indeed.

0:31:190:31:24

-So, how much do you think?

-I've put 12 to 20 on it.

0:31:240:31:27

They paid 19, so not a big loss. It just happens to be hideous.

0:31:270:31:32

But the last item is this gee-gee.

0:31:320:31:36

-People love horses, don't they?

-They do indeed.

0:31:360:31:39

I didn't rate the quality of it, it's got a rather poor movement.

0:31:390:31:43

-It's white metal.

-It is.

-So cheap, speltery stuff.

0:31:430:31:46

It's made to look like bronze. It's got a bronzed finish.

0:31:460:31:49

On the other hand, it all comes together and looks like 1920s or 1930s.

0:31:490:31:55

-It's got the horse and the tick-tock. How much?

-15 to 30.

0:31:550:31:58

-Oh, dear. £50 they paid.

-Oh, right.

-That is a problem, actually.

0:31:580:32:03

It's their only predicted big loss and it may drag them down,

0:32:030:32:06

so let's go and have a look at their bonus buy!

0:32:060:32:10

Now, Sally, Rhian, you gave Catherine Southon

0:32:100:32:13

£141 to spend in the way of leftover lolly.

0:32:130:32:16

-What did you spend it on?

-Well, ladies, I have bought you...

0:32:160:32:21

..this.

0:32:210:32:23

-Ooh.

-BOTH: Right...

0:32:230:32:27

Cast-iron doorstop in the style of a rather proud lion.

0:32:270:32:33

-Well, it's certainly useful.

-I think so. Very useful.

0:32:330:32:37

-I actually bought it, remember the chap that we bought the baguette box from?

-From him?

0:32:370:32:43

-We liked that stall.

-He had really interesting items, so I went back and saw that.

0:32:430:32:48

-I thought you might have seen it.

-I actually like that.

0:32:480:32:51

-I do like it. It's nearly a horse.

-Well, it's a lion!

0:32:510:32:55

-And how much was he?

-£48.

0:32:550:32:58

Really?!

0:32:580:32:59

-Oh.

-I mean, "really!".

0:32:590:33:02

-"Really" in what way?

-I thought that was quite a lot.

0:33:020:33:05

-You think that's quite a lot?

-Have you held it?

-Yes.

0:33:050:33:09

Hold it and feel how heavy it is. Think of that.

0:33:090:33:12

-Quite a lump, isn't it?

-It is.

-You'll drop it. Give it to me.

0:33:120:33:15

-How much would you pay for something like that?

-Erm...

0:33:150:33:19

-Would you pay £10 for it?

-Yes.

0:33:190:33:21

-Would you pay £20?

-I'd probably pay 20.

0:33:210:33:24

-Would you pay 30?

-No.

-That's because it doesn't appeal.

0:33:240:33:27

-Sally, what would you pay, sweetie?

-Probably 20 to 30.

-There you go.

0:33:270:33:31

-I thought you two would really like that.

-BOTH: We do.

0:33:310:33:35

-What they don't like is the price.

-They don't!

0:33:350:33:38

-What they like is £20 to £30.

-Right.

-It's interesting, isn't it, to ask the question?

0:33:380:33:43

20 to 30 is where it gets you in the tummy, not £48.

0:33:430:33:46

You don't have to pick right now, pick after the sale of your first three items.

0:33:460:33:50

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Catherine's doorstop.

0:33:500:33:56

This is pretty chunky ware.

0:33:560:33:58

-Yes. Good lump of cast iron.

-Yes.

0:33:580:34:01

Victorian in style, but I think later in date.

0:34:010:34:05

Very standard, lion rampant. Not much you can say about it really.

0:34:050:34:09

Will you have a decent market for it?

0:34:090:34:11

Funnily enough, these sort of things do sell reasonably well.

0:34:110:34:15

-How much?

-40 to 70.

0:34:150:34:17

£48 Catherine paid. It's her bonus buy. She rates it.

0:34:170:34:20

Not very girly, for a change. But there it is!

0:34:200:34:23

-You'll stoop to any depth to make a profit on this programme, which is lovely.

-Good.

0:34:230:34:28

-Profits is what we want, isn't it?

-Absolutely.

-Absolutely.

0:34:280:34:32

-Are you excited about this process?

-BOTH: Absolutely.

0:34:370:34:40

It's good fun. Great day.

0:34:400:34:42

Now, the hanging box. £45 was paid. Her estimate is 30 to 50.

0:34:420:34:47

So you're about in the bracket there.

0:34:470:34:50

-The little cream jug... £45 paid. She's put 30 to 50.

-Yes.

0:34:500:34:55

-Silver's well up, so you should be OK.

-I hope so.

-Good.

0:34:550:34:58

Then you've got that letter opener, which is beautifully made.

0:34:580:35:02

-30 to 50.

-Ooh, no!

-Maybe...

0:35:020:35:04

It cost you £105, Denise, so it maybe be a bit sticky here.

0:35:040:35:10

First up is the little hanging stationery box. Here it comes.

0:35:100:35:14

Lot 182 is a red walnut hanging box. There we are.

0:35:140:35:18

Nice little interior.

0:35:180:35:20

I start straight in at £50. At £50. The bid's with me at 50.

0:35:200:35:26

Now five anywhere? At 50. Do I see five?

0:35:260:35:29

Nice little box. At £50. Are you all done at 50?

0:35:290:35:33

-That is a miracle.

-That's good.

-Straight in. One bid, £50.

0:35:330:35:38

Lot 183 is the little silver cream jug. Birmingham 1909.

0:35:380:35:42

I have to start at 45. I've got two bidders. 45 it is.

0:35:420:35:46

Start at 45.

0:35:460:35:48

Do I see 50 anywhere? At 45 for the little cream jug.

0:35:480:35:51

-At 45 it is.

-Come on!

0:35:510:35:53

At £45...

0:35:530:35:55

-Wiped its face. £45.

-We can live with that.

0:35:550:35:57

No shame in that. Now, the letter opener...

0:35:570:36:01

Bronze letter opener. The finial's cast in the form of a boy's head.

0:36:010:36:05

Rather French-looking, lot 184.

0:36:050:36:07

I've got £30.

0:36:070:36:09

-It's got to do more than that.

-Come on!

-Bid's with me at 30.

0:36:090:36:13

At £30. At £30 it's going to be. All done. Selling here with me.

0:36:130:36:18

-Ouch, girls. Ouch, ouch, ouch.

-That is minus £75 at a stroke.

0:36:180:36:24

Which means overall, you're minus 70.

0:36:240:36:27

What's your pick now? Are you going to go with the dish?

0:36:270:36:30

-100 percent.

-Most definitely!

-We've discussed and agreed.

0:36:300:36:33

188, a Royal Worcester pin dish,

0:36:330:36:37

painted by Ernest Barker, a popular artist.

0:36:370:36:40

-Start me at £50.

-That's all right! Well done.

0:36:400:36:44

Thank you. 50 I have. At 50. Do I see five anywhere?

0:36:440:36:48

-Come on!

-At 50. Now five. At £50. Now five?

-Come on!

0:36:480:36:52

At £50 it is, then. Are you all done at 50?

0:36:520:36:56

-Ouch!

-That really is...

-You tried.

0:36:560:36:59

It's plus £10.

0:36:590:37:00

Her estimate was 60 to 90 on that and she sold it for 50.

0:37:000:37:05

Anyway, minus 60 is the final score.

0:37:050:37:07

-Don't say a word to the Blues. Not a word, thank you!

-No. No way!

0:37:070:37:11

So, Sally, Rhian, do you know how the Reds got on?

0:37:230:37:26

-Absolutely no idea.

-No idea.

-We don't want you to know.

0:37:260:37:31

The baguette box, I talked through with the auctioneer.

0:37:310:37:33

-We don't think it has anything to do with baguettes.

-Really?

0:37:330:37:38

We don't think bread has ever been stored in that box.

0:37:380:37:41

-What is it, then?

-Not quite sure.

0:37:410:37:43

But we don't think bread is the answer.

0:37:430:37:46

Her estimate is £45 to £70. You paid £70,

0:37:460:37:49

so in her view, you'll be lucky to get there, but you might.

0:37:490:37:52

Then you've got the water jug.

0:37:520:37:54

She's put £12 to £20 on that.

0:37:540:37:57

You paid £19, so you're in the frame there.

0:37:570:38:00

Otherwise, you've got the equestrian timepiece.

0:38:000:38:04

She put 15 to 30 on that. You paid 50.

0:38:040:38:07

-So if there's one that's going to drag you down, according to her, it'll be the gee-gee.

-My fault.

0:38:070:38:12

First up, though, is the baguette box! Here it comes.

0:38:120:38:17

Lot 204. I start this away, I have got £40 on it.

0:38:170:38:23

45. At 45. Away in the alcove. 50.

0:38:230:38:26

-Five. 60. Five. 70.

-He's a baker. You can tell.

0:38:260:38:32

-Don't stop. 75. 80.

-You're in profit, kids.

0:38:320:38:35

Lady's bid at £80. Do I see five anywhere?

0:38:350:38:38

At £80 it is, then. Are you all done? Selling at £80.

0:38:380:38:42

-Wow.

-That was really good.

-Plus £10, that's wholemeal.

0:38:420:38:46

Lot 205, the Staffordshire water jug with the Indian Tree decoration.

0:38:460:38:53

-I start this one straight in at £15. At £15.

-Come on, please!

0:38:530:38:58

18 in the room. Now 20 anywhere? At £18 it is, then.

0:38:580:39:01

-We want a little bit more.

-Are you all done? Selling at £18.

0:39:010:39:06

-Oh, please!

-Oh, puhlease!

0:39:060:39:08

-That's minus £1.

-What did we pay?

-19.

-Oh, that's OK.

0:39:080:39:11

206 is the timepiece, surmounted by the figure of a horse.

0:39:110:39:17

I start straight in at £35. At 35 for the timepiece.

0:39:170:39:22

At 35 it's going to be, then. Are you all sure?

0:39:220:39:25

Selling to my bidder at £35.

0:39:250:39:28

-£35 is minus 15, which is minus 16...

-Oh, dear!

0:39:280:39:32

..which is minus six overall.

0:39:320:39:35

-What are you going to do with the doorstop?

-Minus six we're at...

0:39:350:39:39

-It could be a winning score.

-It could be, but it's negligible.

0:39:390:39:43

What do you mean?! It could make the difference.

0:39:430:39:45

-Minus six...

-Yes, I know. I think we should go with it.

0:39:450:39:50

Do you?

0:39:500:39:51

-But we haven't made a huge loss.

-We've not made a profit!

0:39:510:39:55

-No, no, but -

-They could've made a bigger loss.

0:39:550:39:57

-Yes, but I want to make a profit...

-Oh, dear.

-..to be honest.

0:39:570:40:03

-See, we cannot agree to agree.

-You can't. I'm staying out of it!

0:40:030:40:07

-We have a difference of opinion.

-We do.

-It depends on whether you want to win the programme.

0:40:070:40:12

-I don't mind, I just want to be better -

-I do!

-Well, it would be nice, but I think -

0:40:120:40:18

-What are the chances of making a profit out of that? Quickly.

-Probably very little.

0:40:180:40:22

-In which case -

-No, we go with it!

-You're not going with it?

-No, we are.

-You are?

0:40:220:40:27

-She wants to.

-We're going with it.

-We're going with it.

0:40:270:40:30

Cast-iron doorstop in the form of the lion rampant.

0:40:300:40:35

Lot 210. Who'll start me away on this one, please? £30 anywhere for it?

0:40:350:40:39

-20 to get it going, then.

-Oh, God.

-Uh-oh.

0:40:390:40:43

I knew it!

0:40:430:40:44

£20? Anyone? Well, £10, surely?

0:40:440:40:47

For crying out loud!

0:40:470:40:49

£10.

0:40:490:40:51

-At £10. Do I see 12?

-I knew it!

-I told you!

0:40:510:40:55

-15.

-It's your fault.

0:40:550:40:57

15 it is at the back there, then. At 15.

0:40:570:41:00

I told you I was right. You lost us the game.

0:41:000:41:03

It's going to sell for £15.

0:41:030:41:05

Minus £33 on that.

0:41:050:41:07

-Dreadfully sorry!

-Minus £39 overall.

0:41:070:41:11

-I'm sorry.

-Minus £39 could be a winning score.

0:41:110:41:14

-Do not despair.

-No.

0:41:140:41:17

-But we'd have been better off before.

-I know.

0:41:170:41:19

-It doesn't matter. What's done is done.

-Yes.

-Minus £39 could be a winning score.

0:41:190:41:25

-Don't despair. All will be revealed in just a moment.

-OK.

0:41:250:41:28

So, have you teams been chatting at all?

0:41:360:41:39

-ALL: No.

-Jolly good.

0:41:390:41:40

It's no secret to the teams, nor the audience, that you both made substantial losses,

0:41:400:41:46

it's just a question of the scale of these losses.

0:41:460:41:49

The team that's ahead on the losses stakes is...

0:41:490:41:53

-..the Reds.

-THEY GROAN

0:41:530:41:55

Sorry about that. Minus £60 is your score.

0:41:550:41:59

It started out very nicely with Phil's box, with a plus-£5 score,

0:41:590:42:03

and it deteriorated until the man's bonus buy,

0:42:030:42:06

when he gave you back a £10-profit on the bit of Worcester.

0:42:060:42:10

Nevertheless, minus £60 is, I'm afraid, the runner's-up score.

0:42:100:42:14

-But the victors today, who managed to win by losing only £39, are the girls.

-BOTH: Yes!

0:42:140:42:20

-How do you feel about that? Better?

-Great!

-Good.

0:42:200:42:23

It would've been nice to win by a profit, but by a loss is the next best thing.

0:42:230:42:27

Absolutely right. You started off with the so-called baguette box so beautifully

0:42:270:42:32

with a plus-£10 number.

0:42:320:42:34

And then it went down the proverbial a bit, didn't it?

0:42:340:42:37

-A little bit.

-Just a little.

-A lot.

-You went with the bonus buy and that added to the whatnot.

0:42:370:42:41

But going with the bonus buy made no difference to the end result.

0:42:410:42:45

You are the victors today and you should walk tall, girls.

0:42:450:42:49

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting! Yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:42:490:42:53

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:530:42:57

E-mail [email protected]

0:42:570:43:01

Bargain Hunt comes from Exeter, where expert Philip Serrell breaks all health and safety rules by trying to carry a heavy desk. And two old friends start to discover big differences between their opinions.

Tim Wonnacott pops over to Sherbourne Castle in Dorset to look at an extraordinary collection of fossils from the Jurassic heritage coast.