Devon 25 Bargain Hunt


Devon 25

The antiques contest comes from Westpoint Fair in Exeter, with experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson. Tim Wonnacott takes a trip to Antony House in Cornwall.


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One, two, three, four!

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A-ha! Here in excellent Exeter,

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is an antiques fair with a top end of 400 stalls

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offering the best in the west.

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And hey, I've had a good idea.

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Let's go Bargain Hunting!

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It's not everyone that gets to spend £300 on three items in just one hour.

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But everyone on this show does.

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Because those are our rules.

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Here's a peek of what's coming up.

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Two couples go head-to-head, and everyone's feeling the pressure.

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-You can't have it.

-Why can't I?

-I'm telling you.

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You're being very mean.

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Reds get riled and the blues bicker.

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-I don't like them.

-You don't?

-Huh?

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Hey!

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Will it be happy ever after?

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Time to meet our teams.

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Today we've got two teams of happily married couples.

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Well, they're happily married at the moment!

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For the reds we have Simon and Liz,

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and for the blues, Ross and Sam.

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-Welcome, everyone.

-ALL: Hello!

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Simon, how did you two first meet?

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I first met Liz at naval college in Dartmouth, where we were at naval college training to be officers.

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Really? What branch were you going into?

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I was joining to be a pilot, and Liz was joining to be a nurse.

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What a lovely place to meet.

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-Was it romantic?

-No.

-No?

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-We met over a pot of shoe polish and a nice steamy iron.

-I see. It was that sort of meeting.

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-Halcyon days.

-You missed out on your first military passing out parade.

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In '96, I joined as an artificer and I passed out with chicken pox at the back of the parade!

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-Really?

-I ended up in sick bay corner!

-Yes.

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And you passed out the second time together?

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Sort of.

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I'd fallen up some stairs and damaged my knee, so I missed my passing out parade.

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-Not so swift.

-Not so clever.

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What keeps you busy these days, Liz?

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Two boys aged six and nine, and I'm a part-time student.

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-What are you studying?

-Studying to be an accountancy technician.

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Having a change of tack due to some newly-acquired mobility issues.

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-I can't be a psychiatric nurse any more.

-A fresh career beckons.

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Absolutely!

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Are you in charge of the money today, as you're going into bookkeeping and accountancy?

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-You'd like to think so, but probably not, no.

-I see.

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-Can't be trusted.

-What tactics have you got?

-No wood.

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-No wood.

-And something shiny.

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Well, you've focused on it. That's your mantra. Good on you. Good luck.

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-Now, moving to the blues. Ross.

-Hi, Tim.

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When did you first clap eyes on Sam?

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When we were at school together. I was 15. We got together when we were at school

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-and we used to be told off for talking to each other.

-Really?

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That's quite something. You weren't flicking pellets at her?

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No, I was in front so it was her flicking them at me!

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Oh, I see!

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What do you do to earn your crust, Ross?

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-I'm actually a baker.

-Oh, really? Who writes these questions?

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That's rather good! How long have you been a baker?

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-For about 12 years.

-Have you?

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Do you have to get up terribly early?

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Yes, sometimes I start at four in the morning. The smell of bread wakes me up.

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Is it the sort of bakery where you make about three trillion loaves a day?

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Yes, especially hot cross buns at Easter.

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-You don't like those?

-I'm sick of the sight of them at the end!

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-Sam, what do you do for a living?

-I'm a savings advisor in a building society.

-Are you?

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So you're the expert with the money today?

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Yeah. Well, hopefully.

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It probably won't go to plan, but hopefully.

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What are you two hunting for today?

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I like something unusual. I like Art Deco things, something along those lines.

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-Yes.

-Nothing in particular.

-So you're just waiting to be grabbed.

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-Yes.

-Waiting for that moment.

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Before you get grabbed I have to give you something to grab.

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It's the £300 money moment. There you go. There's your £300.

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You know the rules. Your experts await and off you go! Very, very good luck!

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Cor, nifty driving!

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We've a canny pair of professionals to pick out the prize-winning items today.

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For the reds, we have Philip "first past the post" Serrell.

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For the blues, it's Charlie "pole position" Hanson.

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We're definitely not buying any wood.

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-Is this your plan as well, Simon?

-It is now!

-It is now!

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-Are you shoppers?

-Yes.

-Can you shop till you drop?

-Yes.

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-Do you shop well together?

-Yeah, sometimes.

-Really?

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We ladies like shiny things.

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Go and find some shiny things. Off you go. Go on, then.

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-Do you ever fall out?

-Yeah.

-All right.

-Definitely.

-We could be in trouble!

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Phil's wasting no time in going into battle.

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What about naval cannonballs?

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-Yeah.

-Cannons.

-You're looking suitably moved.

-Can I just say, it's not very shiny!

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-So that rules it out?

-Not necessarily. Who buys a cannonball?

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Um...

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I'm just going to shut up. Follow me. Will she follow us?

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It's good that you've got your expert with you. And I'm sure she'll be a great help today!

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-Follow me. We only have an hour, OK?

-Let's go.

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Go for it, blues. There's a lot of ground to cover here.

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-We'll start down here first of all.

-OK.

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Phil's found something close to his heart.

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These are very, very collectable.

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Sometimes you have water, and sometimes whisky.

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And you'd put them by the side and before bed you'd have a shot.

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Oh, I like those.

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At auction, I think this one, without the label,

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is going to be perhaps 100 to 150 quid.

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I haven't seen the prices on these, but I'd like to try and buy that for around 130, 140, if we could.

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-I don't know what's on it.

-That one can be 150.

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You couldn't do it for 125, then?

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-We couldn't.

-That's pushing it too far?

-That's less than I paid.

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Gosh, we don't want to do that to you.

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-I'd buy that, which is a good sign, isn't it?

-Do you both like it?

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-Yes.

-I like whisky, too. If it was full, I'd pay more!

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-All three of us like it. I'd love to own one of these.

-I would, too.

-I like it.

-It's lovely.

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-I would own it.

-Top makers, Gold and Silversmiths. 1908, so it's 103 years old.

-Right.

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-SIMON:

-And it's shiny, so that knocks that on the head.

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-I like it. I like it.

-Thanks very much.

-Pay the man!

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-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Do you know what? I think they liked that! Let's hope they like the price it fetches at auction.

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-That little box there.

-Sorry?

-The little box that's there.

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That, I think, is probably Chinese cloisonne. Have a handle.

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-I like the dragon on it.

-Yeah, I like the dragon.

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-Ross, what does it pull to you?

-It looks like a tattoo.

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It looks like a cloisonne box to me!

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-Like a tattoo?

-A tattoo.

-Thanks for coming, Ross(!) Thanks for coming!

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I'm pleased you've got some antique aura about you, Ross!

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-Do you have any tattoos?

-I've got quite a few.

-Have you? Whereabouts?

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I dread to think.

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-Really?

-Yes. Some there.

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-Oh, goodness me!

-It's a bit like that.

-Is that a real one?

-Yeah.

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Wowee. Good for you. Yeah. Yeah.

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-So it looks like a tattoo.

-Yeah.

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-It's one way of looking at it.

-Thanks for coming!

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The funny thing, when people talk tat on Bargain Hunt,

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they're not often discussing tattoos.

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Probably 1880s, 1890s.

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-It was a wonderful skill to be able to create these.

-I don't know if I'd want it for 65, though.

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Quite right. But I think at auction, no disrespect,

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at auction it might only make £25.

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So if there was room to negotiate, it might be worth buying.

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-But I think we're a long way from that.

-That's fine.

-Thank you.

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-That's unusual.

-What, the waistcoat or the tall silver...

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No, the plate.

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It is nice, Liz, but it's £675-worth of nice!

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I think that might just stretch the budget.

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It would break the licence fee!

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Keep at it, reds. At least you've bought something.

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-We've had so far 20 minutes.

-Yeah.

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-Which means, really, we ought to buy a lot every 20 minutes.

-Yes.

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-We have an hour.

-Yes.

-Seen anything so far?

-No.

-Nothing.

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-Worried?

-A bit now, yeah.

-Slightly.

-Get outta here!

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Aren't our couples lovely today? All smiles.

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-You can't have it.

-Why can't I have it?

-You've got a shiny already. You've done shiny.

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I know we've done shiny...

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Me and my big mouth, eh?

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-It's in the cabinet for a reason.

-It doesn't necessarily mean it's expensive.

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-No, it doesn't.

-"Cheep, cheep, cheep", like the budgie. Come on.

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I think you're being very mean.

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This is harder than I thought it would be.

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Yes, it's a tough old challenge. You've got to find three items and agree on those three.

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Maybe a little exploration is in order.

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There's no carpet on the floor here. I always think that's a good thing because it's cheaper,

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-you might say. Let's go and find...

-Yeah, cheap works for me.

-I do cheap.

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-I like his post box.

-It's a proper post box. Is it expensive?

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-It's a proper price, as well.

-Is it? 750 quid.

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That's about the price of a first class stamp these days, isn't it?

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What about a post box that's a money box?

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-I think that's two pennyworth, my love.

-OK.

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It's one extreme to the other, with these reds.

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-Let's have a wander.

-You've got a good eye, babe.

-A good eye for tat.

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Now, these, definitely, are not tat.

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What you have here is a wine glass that you may have toasted the French Revolution to.

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You may have toasted Mad King George III when he came to the throne in 1760.

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And that's history.

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Well remembered, Charles.

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And the way these wine glasses have been blown,

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you'll see this writhing in the glass.

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That's hand-wrought lead glass on a folded foot

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and a rough pontil mark

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where they've been snapped off when they've been blown on the tube, like so.

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-I like the age of it.

-Yeah, I do.

-1780. Where were you, Ross, then?

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-In my father's eye!

-Exactly.

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Hmm. That makes your dad about 200 years old, Ross.

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I don't think he'll thank you!

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I wasn't sure of them until you said how old they were.

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So the best price is £100.

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That's a wonderful discount, because the asking on the ticket is 185.

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So we can't complain there, can we?

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With a bit more leeway, they could make 120 or 130.

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-I think we should go with Charles.

-Go on, Charles.

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-I love them because of what they are.

-I like the age of them and the history of them.

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Sometimes you buy it because you like them.

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-Would I buy these?

-Yes.

-Yes.

-You would.

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-It is a sale.

-£100 spent. Well done, guys.

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-Give me a chink-chink.

-Ooh, I don't want to break them!

-Cheers. That's history.

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It certainly is. In fact, that's what this place is all about.

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Everywhere you look, there's a bit of history.

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This is a nice stand,

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stocked almost entirely out of honest, British vernacular furniture.

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And this is a typical honest piece.

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It dates from about 1750, the middle of the 18th century.

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It's got a straightforward rectangular top

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that's made out of a single board of elm.

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And it's incredibly simply made.

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A series of broad elm planks which have been nailed together,

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and it's raised from the floor on these elegant but very, very easy to make,

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chamfered rectangular supports.

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You have to admit, it is slightly odd-looking.

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Fine, the top is pretty straightforward.

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It's a rectangle.

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But look at that depth underneath.

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You can't tuck your knees underneath it.

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It's got no drawers.

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This is something called a dough chest.

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If I pick the top up like that,

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you can see inside.

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There are all those crudely nailed together elm boards.

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What the housewife would do is put a great lump of kneaded dough

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into the bottom of this dough chest and leave it to prove.

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Then she'd take lumps of the dough out, stick it in the oven and go about her bread-making.

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I can see this thing being very, very useful in a modern kitchen.

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Effectively, an island worktop.

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Most attractive.

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What would it cost you here today in Exeter?

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It could be yours for £750.

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That's not a lot of dough, is it?

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The reds are still having a few issues about where to spend their dough.

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That feels nice.

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-They're not antiques, though!

-No, but people like a decent paperweight.

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People like a bacon sandwich, too, but I wouldn't take that to auction!

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-1988. It says it on the bottom. £75?!

-Yeah, well,

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-it doesn't have to be £75.

-That was a vase when it started life!

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She's not giving up. Maybe Phil should have a word.

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-Do you want to make a profit or a loss?

-A profit.

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-Then don't buy that. Have a look at that.

-How much is that?

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£28. But if you don't like it, don't buy it.

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Ooh. No, £28 is more appealing.

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Good work, Phil! Disaster averted.

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-Would you keep it for us for half an hour? Would that be all right?

-No problem.

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Whizzie Liz has gone off again.

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I thought this was a team game.

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I've found a pair of pink glass matching tea-cake stands.

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You can tell he's excited, can't you?

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It's not going too well for the reds is it?

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I'm beginning to wish I'd brought my mother instead of my husband.

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-He doesn't like any of the things I like.

-Yeah...

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Which is why we've only got one item.

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For me, 20 minutes to go, my mission is to keep you on a tight leash,

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because you seem to have an eye for tat as opposed to stuff that makes money.

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-Oh, you're so harsh!

-I know!

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Come on, reds. It's about teamwork.

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At least the blues are getting on with it.

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A nice pair of toast racks. Chester. Sweet. 1918. They're gorgeous.

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-There we go. Look - toast, which is...

-Bread!

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We've got the bread lots. We've got it.

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-They're quite small, aren't they?

-Tiny little things.

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They were made in Chester in 1918.

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Chester stopped hallmarking silver in 1962.

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Somewhere, you'll see a hallmark.

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There it is. Just there.

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-Let's double-check the hallmarks match up.

-They certainly do.

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-What do you think?

-£70 for the pair, £35 each.

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70 isn't a bad price. If they came into my sale room,

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I'd say to a client, "They're going to fetch between 60 and £90."

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-I don't like them.

-You don't?

-Huh?

-I don't like them.

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Oh, well! This is your husband's background. His pedigree!

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-Don't you like them really?

-No.

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Oh, it was all going too well.

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You couldn't go a bit more? Look at me.

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65.

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That means it.

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-I think we should...

-I'll leave it to you.

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-VENDOR:

-There's profit in them.

-I think we should go for it.

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-That's only just over £30 each.

-What do you think?

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-I don't like them.

-Give the man his toast racks!

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-Then the last lot is up to you.

-Yeah, the last one's yours.

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-OK.

-Is it sold?

-It's a deal.

-It's a deal. We'll buy them.

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-Well done.

-Shake the baker's hand. Sam, happy?

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OK.

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I am. They're lovely. Nice pair.

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Keep it clean, Charles!

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-I just didn't like them.

-The toast racks?

-No.

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-OK.

-But I can live with it.

-Are you sure?

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-It's your turn now, OK? It's your turn.

-OK.

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Oh, dear. Both couples are having issues, and the pressure's on. Time's a-ticking!

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The reds seem to be getting on with it at the moment, though. But where's Phil?

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We've got "God Save The Queen,

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"2nd June, 1953."

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And "Denby stoneware, Made in England."

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What's the price on that one?

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-Looking at £20.

-£20.

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Liz, she's got an eye.

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I'm not sure it's an eye we all share, but she's got an eye!

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-I think we've got to rein her in from buying something really whacky.

-It's a deal.

0:16:130:16:18

I think you might have spoken too soon, Phil.

0:16:180:16:20

-We may have made a second purchase.

-Really?

-We have.

-May or have?

0:16:200:16:25

We have, actually. We have made a second purchase.

0:16:250:16:28

-We'd still value your opinion, though.

-We would value your opinion.

0:16:280:16:32

I think it's a bit late for that!

0:16:320:16:34

-You bought this?

-We bought that.

-Yes.

0:16:340:16:36

-A little bit of Denbyware.

-£10.

-£10.

0:16:360:16:39

I can't see you losing more than 15 on it.

0:16:410:16:44

ALL LAUGH

0:16:440:16:46

We'll see if they've got themselves a money maker with the mug later.

0:16:460:16:52

Now, come on, teams. There's a third item out there for you somewhere

0:16:520:16:55

but only 15 minutes left to find it!

0:16:550:16:58

-Pig pin cushion!

-Pig pin cushion.

-Here.

-I'm having it.

0:16:580:17:00

Look. Look! Look at that pig!

0:17:000:17:04

-That's a good pig.

-I like that!

-That's nice.

-I do like that.

-Do you like pigs?

0:17:040:17:08

-I do. Any animal, really.

-Yeah.

0:17:080:17:11

A pin cushion that will probably date to around 1900.

0:17:110:17:14

The more popular ones are in silver.

0:17:140:17:16

He's charming. How much is he?

0:17:160:17:18

-He's 33.

-I reckon about £30.

0:17:180:17:21

Yeah. He's novel, he's neat

0:17:210:17:24

-and you could even buy him for maybe 20.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:17:240:17:28

-I would say he's a really good finale to our three lots.

-OK.

-Yeah.

0:17:280:17:32

-See what we can do.

-Any pigs at home?

-No pigs.

0:17:320:17:36

-Three dogs.

-Have you?

-Yes. They look like pigs!

0:17:360:17:39

I think he's telling porkies!

0:17:410:17:42

I've spoken to her. She was reluctant to come down, but I've got her down to 25.

0:17:450:17:49

-25.

-That's the lowest she'll do.

0:17:490:17:52

Come on, guys. You said Sam could choose the next item.

0:17:520:17:55

-I want the pig.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:17:550:17:57

I think if it is £10, it's £10.

0:17:570:18:00

-Hopefully the wine glasses and toast racks will bring us up.

-Yeah?

0:18:000:18:03

-OK?

-Go for it.

-Lovely. Thank you very much.

-No problem!

0:18:030:18:05

Go, girl power! Now everyone in the blue corner is as happy as a pig in muck.

0:18:050:18:10

Three items safely stashed. Reds, you've got five minutes. No time to disagree.

0:18:100:18:15

Get that final item found!

0:18:150:18:17

Whitefriars, Geoffrey Baxter.

0:18:170:18:19

They're quite nice. Are they a pair?

0:18:190:18:21

You could buy them as a pair, but they're separate.

0:18:210:18:24

You've got five minutes left and you've got to buy something.

0:18:240:18:27

-I would like you to buy something you like.

-I like that.

-Keep the damage down.

0:18:270:18:32

-How much is that?

-One of those is £28.

-OK.

0:18:320:18:34

-Want to look at the other one?

-Yes, please. Can I have a look?

0:18:340:18:37

Cos I'm sure, everything that I've listened to

0:18:370:18:41

is a pair is best.

0:18:410:18:43

I'd rather you buy Whitefriars than nobody's.

0:18:440:18:48

Excuse me, what's the best that you could do on these, please?

0:18:480:18:52

I'll do you the pair for the price of one.

0:18:520:18:54

-It's 28 I've got on one, so I'll do the two for 28.

-What do you think, chaps?

0:18:540:18:58

-Sounds like quite a good deal.

-And they're red.

0:18:580:19:01

Do you know, I would love to...

0:19:010:19:03

I like these and I'm going to say, thank you very much, sir. You've got a deal!

0:19:030:19:08

Well, someone had to make a decision.

0:19:080:19:10

There were only a couple of minutes left.

0:19:100:19:12

Once again, a nice bit of girl power. Fantastic.

0:19:120:19:15

Yay! With three minutes to spare!

0:19:150:19:18

Actually, in all seriousness, I'd much prefer for you to buy something you like

0:19:180:19:22

than something you don't like.

0:19:220:19:23

I think I'm in need of a good strong cup of tea.

0:19:230:19:27

Or if I can find that whisky thing and fill it up...

0:19:270:19:29

That would probably do me more good. Follow me.

0:19:290:19:32

Good on you, reds. From trials and tribulations to a good old titter. Good shop done.

0:19:340:19:40

-Excuse me, have you got the time?

-I've got lots of time, Tim. Take your pick!

0:19:400:19:43

So you have!

0:19:430:19:45

Anyway, time's up. That's your lot. Let's see what the red team have got.

0:19:450:19:50

They made a good start. Five minutes in and they agreed on this whisky toddy jug.

0:19:510:19:56

It set them back £150, though.

0:19:560:19:59

With half their cash gone, they went very low-key for their second item.

0:19:590:20:03

So low that Phil missed it altogether!

0:20:030:20:05

It was a £10 Queen Elizabeth II coronation mug.

0:20:050:20:08

But it was when indecision reigned that Liz took charge,

0:20:090:20:12

settling a deal for these Whitefriars vases at £28 the pair.

0:20:120:20:17

-It's had its moments.

-It has!

-What do you mean, it's had its moments?

0:20:180:20:21

-Well...

-Did we have a fall-out?

-No, no. Nothing that Relate couldn't put right!

0:20:210:20:26

It's a very good affair that, I'm told.

0:20:270:20:29

Which is your favourite piece, Elizabeth?

0:20:290:20:32

I think the small whisky decanter is my favourite.

0:20:320:20:36

-Would you agree?

-I do, yeah. I'm also torn between the vases. They're nice. They're growing on me.

0:20:360:20:42

-Right. Are they going to bring the biggest profit?

-No.

0:20:420:20:45

-I think they are.

-OK.

0:20:450:20:47

I think the vases will bring the biggest profit.

0:20:470:20:50

-And?

-Whisky decanter for me, to bring the profit.

0:20:500:20:53

-How much did you spend?

-£188.

-188. I'd like £112 of leftover lolly, please.

-£112.

0:20:530:20:59

-No discount for cash!

-Will you take 60?

-No!

0:20:590:21:01

You're getting into the swing of this, aren't you?

0:21:010:21:04

-There you go, Phil. A nice little lump.

-I'll go and try and find something a touch different.

0:21:050:21:12

OK. Good luck. Go and have a cup of tea, guys.

0:21:120:21:14

Meanwhile, we'll check out what the blue team bought.

0:21:140:21:17

The blues bought a pair of 18th-century drinking glasses

0:21:170:21:21

that cost them a nice round £100.

0:21:210:21:24

Charles and Ross overruled Sam

0:21:260:21:29

and bought a pair of silver George V toast racks for £65.

0:21:290:21:33

Sam spotted an Edwardian brass pig

0:21:350:21:38

and pinned it down for a sharp £25. Oink!

0:21:380:21:41

-What a pig, eh?

-What a combination.

-Yeah.

0:21:410:21:45

It's good, isn't it, when you have a happy shop.

0:21:450:21:48

-You had a happy shop, didn't you?

-Yeah.

-In most parts.

-Yeah. Mostly.

0:21:480:21:51

Well, a little bit of a tiff, but...

0:21:510:21:54

You know, nothing lasting. Where's a relationship without the odd tiff, eh, Charles?

0:21:540:21:59

-Quite right.

-Quite right, too.

0:21:590:22:01

Anyway, which is your favourite piece?

0:22:010:22:04

My favourite is the pig pin cushion that we bought.

0:22:040:22:07

-The pig pin cushion. Will that bring the biggest profit?

-I think it will.

-Think so?

-Yes.

0:22:070:22:12

-What's the total spend?

-190.

-190. I'd like 110, please.

0:22:120:22:16

-There we go. £110, which goes straight to Charles.

-Thanks, Tim.

0:22:160:22:20

Who's going to truffle round for a decent bonus buy.

0:22:200:22:23

Something you'll both like and you'll really be happy with.

0:22:230:22:26

A bit of romance and a bit of charm.

0:22:260:22:29

Good luck with your search. Good luck, team.

0:22:290:22:32

Meanwhile, we're heading off somewhere drop-dead gorgeous!

0:22:320:22:35

This is Antony, in Cornwall.

0:22:410:22:44

A strange name for a house, you might think.

0:22:440:22:47

But then it gets its name from the parish in which it sits.

0:22:470:22:51

Little remains of the original Antony House.

0:22:530:22:56

This house was mainly rebuilt by Sir William Carew in about 1720,

0:22:560:23:01

as a new home for himself and his wealthy wife, the heiress Lady Anne Coventry.

0:23:010:23:07

The house is currently the home of Sir Richard and Lady Mary Carew Pole.

0:23:070:23:13

In fact, there have been Poles, Carew Poles and Pole Carews here

0:23:130:23:17

for over 600 years.

0:23:170:23:18

Glad we got that sorted out!

0:23:180:23:20

As you enter the house, you're confronted by a series of portraits

0:23:220:23:26

of family and friends.

0:23:260:23:28

Some would say dominated by this striking portrait of King Charles I

0:23:280:23:34

awaiting his trial in 1648.

0:23:340:23:38

And it was Charles and the Civil War that led to the great divisions

0:23:380:23:43

in the Carew family.

0:23:430:23:45

The Carews became Pole Carews in 1772,

0:23:460:23:51

when Reginald Pole inherited the estate.

0:23:510:23:54

The family name remained unchanged

0:23:540:23:56

until 1926, when the family switched the name around once more

0:23:560:24:00

to become the Carew Poles.

0:24:000:24:03

Simple, ain't it?

0:24:030:24:04

Another member of the family who changed his identity,

0:24:040:24:09

but very much earlier,

0:24:090:24:11

is this character, Sir Alexander Carew,

0:24:110:24:15

seen here in a full-length portrait

0:24:150:24:18

that is supposed to have been painted at the time of his coming of age

0:24:180:24:22

around his 21st birthday.

0:24:220:24:25

He was born in 1609 and was therefore in his early 30s

0:24:250:24:31

at the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642.

0:24:310:24:36

If you look very carefully at this portrait,

0:24:360:24:40

there's an incredibly crude line of stitching top and bottom

0:24:400:24:45

and that's because, according to family myth,

0:24:450:24:49

following the outbreak of the Civil War,

0:24:490:24:52

this portrait was simply hacked from its frame

0:24:520:24:57

and only later crudely stitched together and re-hung.

0:24:570:25:01

And that was because the family wanted to cover up, if you like,

0:25:010:25:06

their shame at his change of allegiance.

0:25:060:25:10

The Carew family was largely royalist. However,

0:25:100:25:14

Alexander represented Cornwall in the Long Parliament

0:25:140:25:17

and at the outbreak of war, Parliament gave him command of the strategic island of St Nicholas,

0:25:170:25:23

which was guarding the approaches to Plymouth.

0:25:230:25:25

The war didn't go well for the Parliamentarians

0:25:250:25:28

and Alexander got wind of this.

0:25:280:25:30

He also heard that his cousin and uncle, both Parliamentarians,

0:25:300:25:34

had turned coat and gone over to the Royalist cause.

0:25:340:25:38

So, Sir Alexander would have sat brooding and fretting on his island,

0:25:380:25:43

separated by half a mile of water.

0:25:430:25:47

He would have been fearful for his family,

0:25:470:25:50

the fact that his estates would have been sequestered by the Crown.

0:25:500:25:56

He said that he would hand over the island to the Royalists

0:25:560:26:00

if he got a Royal Pardon.

0:26:000:26:03

He thought a deal had been done.

0:26:030:26:06

He waited and waited for that pardon, which simply never came.

0:26:060:26:13

Alexander's treachery was discovered by the Parliamentarians.

0:26:140:26:18

He was surprised in his fort

0:26:180:26:20

and taken to London for trial,

0:26:200:26:22

where he was condemned to death.

0:26:220:26:24

The family story therefore says that the family members who remained loyal to the king

0:26:250:26:33

were ashamed of the fact that Alexander went with the Parliamentarians

0:26:330:26:39

and ripped the painting from the frame.

0:26:390:26:41

Only later, when he changed allegiance to the Crown

0:26:410:26:45

did they stitch it up and re-hang it.

0:26:450:26:48

The fact that he was beheaded is brutally true.

0:26:480:26:52

Whether the stitching up of the portrait is true or not,

0:26:520:26:55

frankly, that remains unproven.

0:26:550:26:59

The big question today, of course, for our teams over at the auction is,

0:26:590:27:02

are they about to be stitched up, too?

0:27:020:27:06

We've trotted east from Exeter, all the way to Honiton

0:27:130:27:16

-to Bearnes, Hampton and Littlewood's to be with Brian Goodison-Blanks. Brian, good morning.

-Good morning.

0:27:160:27:23

Now, Simon and Liz. Their first item is this wee decanter and silver label. How do you rate that?

0:27:230:27:29

It's a nice little thing. It's Goldsmiths and Silversmiths Company,

0:27:290:27:33

well known established retailers from about 1880 in London.

0:27:330:27:37

Unfortunately, the label doesn't match. The label is much later.

0:27:370:27:41

Although we know the silver mount is 1908, the label itself is 1964.

0:27:410:27:45

-Ah.

-So because of that, we've estimated it at a realistic price,

0:27:450:27:50

we've said about 50 to £70.

0:27:500:27:52

-Is that all?

-Yes.

-They paid 150.

-Right. Oh.

0:27:520:27:56

Which is a bit tight, really.

0:27:560:27:58

In fact, it could be a deep, dark hole into which they're about to plunge! Anyway,

0:27:580:28:03

not so very optimistic there.

0:28:030:28:05

What about the Denby coronation mug?

0:28:050:28:08

We do see a lot of pieces. They tend to be collected by everybody

0:28:080:28:12

because it's such a national event that people hold onto them.

0:28:120:28:15

I've got my coin from 1977 that was handed to me when I was in primary school all those years ago!

0:28:150:28:19

-In your shorts!

-Indeed!

0:28:190:28:22

It's probably only five to £10.

0:28:220:28:24

-OK. They only paid £10. There ain't going to be much in it.

-No.

0:28:240:28:27

What about these so-called Whitefriars glass vases?

0:28:270:28:29

It's difficult because a lot of coloured glass is referred to as Whitefriars,

0:28:290:28:35

even if it's Italian glass from the 1950s, Murano glass.

0:28:350:28:39

Having looked at these, they do fit the Whitefriars factory

0:28:390:28:44

with the pontil marks being ground down.

0:28:440:28:47

-Maybe a bit off the boil just at the moment.

-They are a bit plain, too plain,

0:28:470:28:50

so really again perhaps ten to 15 on a good day.

0:28:500:28:54

-OK. £28 they paid.

-Right.

-So that could be a bit tight, too.

0:28:540:28:58

What with the predicted loss on the whisky decanter,

0:28:580:29:01

they're going to need their bonus buy. So let's have a look at it.

0:29:010:29:04

Now, Simon, Liz, you spent £188. £112 went to Philip Serrell.

0:29:050:29:09

-What did you spend it on, old boy?

-I did say it would be different!

0:29:090:29:13

-Ooh!

-Do you want to take it? I don't actually know what it is!

-Oh!

0:29:150:29:19

But I know where it was made. It was made in Glasgow by a company called Gilchrist

0:29:190:29:24

because it's stamped along there.

0:29:240:29:26

-Is it heavy?

-Just a touch, yeah!

0:29:260:29:29

-That is very heavy!

-Yeah.

-Wow.

0:29:290:29:32

I paid £40 for it. They guy I bought it off thought it might be an oat roller,

0:29:320:29:36

which it might be. But if somebody came up with a better idea,

0:29:360:29:39

I could equally believe that.

0:29:390:29:41

-I've seen those back massagers that have all those different things.

-Really?!

-Seriously, in rubber, Phil!

0:29:410:29:46

-Yes. Absolutely(!) Rubber.

-Rubber.

0:29:460:29:48

OK, fine. I think that is going to make at auction...

0:29:480:29:52

I think it's a quirky duff thing and it could make 40 to 60 quid.

0:29:520:29:55

-£40?

-It's very aesthetically pleasing.

-What's it worth in scrap?

0:29:550:29:58

What's it worth in scrap? We've got Simon here.

0:29:580:30:01

He's so hot on this!

0:30:010:30:03

He's clearly seen what I've bought before in this programme! Thank you!

0:30:030:30:07

You may have made so much profit on your first three items

0:30:070:30:11

-that you don't need to bother with this.

-Maybe.

-In which case, don't take it.

0:30:110:30:15

But for the audience at home, let's see what the auctioneer makes of Phil's oat crusher.

0:30:150:30:21

OK, Brian. There we go. Over to you. How do you rate that thing?

0:30:220:30:26

I wouldn't like to meet the housewife who could use that one-armed!

0:30:260:30:29

-No.

-If you were to buy an oat roller today it would be made of plastic

0:30:290:30:34

-and break after the first few pieces.

-I suppose so.

0:30:340:30:36

I'm slightly suspicious about it because it is so beautifully and heavily made.

0:30:360:30:41

The one thing I thought it may be part of something else

0:30:410:30:44

because of the depth of the spikes.

0:30:440:30:46

It's an unusual thing. It's going to grab somebody's attention.

0:30:460:30:49

I think probably 50 to £70, maybe a bit more.

0:30:490:30:52

Well, that cunning old Phil "the fox", Philip Serrell,

0:30:520:30:55

only paid £40 for it, and he knows his way around.

0:30:550:30:59

-So it'll be interesting to see.

-It will be.

-Anyway,

0:30:590:31:02

that's it for the reds. Now the blues.

0:31:020:31:04

And they kick off with these very nice cordial glasses,

0:31:040:31:08

with the faceted stems. Do you like those, Brian?

0:31:080:31:11

I do like them. A nice good tint to them.

0:31:110:31:13

We've had them under the ultraviolet so they're good lead crystal. They don't glow.

0:31:130:31:17

And also with the bowls, there's pincer marks just in there.

0:31:170:31:20

-Are they worth £50 each?

-I think so.

0:31:200:31:22

I think they will for a collector. It's a nice example of the pieces.

0:31:220:31:26

It's a shame they're not air twist stems which everybody's after,

0:31:260:31:29

-but they should make £50 apiece. So 100 to 150.

-Very good.

0:31:290:31:33

Excellent. They paid £100, so we've got some hope for a profit there.

0:31:330:31:37

Next, equally charming in their way, the little toast racks.

0:31:370:31:41

-Little, yes. They are rather dainty.

-They're fully marked.

-They are,

0:31:410:31:47

on the edge there as we can see. Rather nice little things.

0:31:470:31:49

-What's your estimate?

-I'd say 40 to 50.

-Brilliant.

0:31:490:31:52

-£65 they paid. They're the sort of things that could nudge on.

-Yes.

0:31:520:31:56

-Next up, the piggy-wig.

-The piggy-wig!

0:31:560:31:59

He's a charming little chap. It's a shame he's not silver.

0:31:590:32:02

-Yes.

-Silver is the key really, with pin cushions.

0:32:020:32:05

This one's probably had the pad replaced, as well.

0:32:050:32:08

-So what do you think he's worth?

-He's probably going to make 15 to 20.

0:32:080:32:13

OK, £25 they paid.

0:32:130:32:15

So that's not so far off. Just depends on what's going to happen with the glasses.

0:32:150:32:18

On that basis, let's go and have a look at the bonus buy.

0:32:180:32:22

-Now, Ross, Sam, this is exciting, isn't it?

-Yep.

0:32:230:32:26

You gave Carlos Hanson £110 to spend. Charles, what did you spend it on?

0:32:260:32:31

I spent the entirety. I've gone big.

0:32:310:32:34

I've gone for the magic of the Far East.

0:32:340:32:37

Look at that.

0:32:370:32:39

-Ooh!

-Do you like it?

-Yes, I do.

-It's really nice.

0:32:390:32:41

-You spent £110 on that?

-£110. It's Japanese,

0:32:410:32:44

it's circa 1890, 1900,

0:32:440:32:46

and it's what we call the magic of the Meiji period.

0:32:460:32:49

It's the high-brow export that was made for the Western world.

0:32:490:32:53

It's not just a teapot and cover.

0:32:530:32:55

I've also got a milk jug, a sugar bowl, six cups and saucers too,

0:32:550:33:00

all in a similar condition for £110.

0:33:000:33:02

Have a handle of the magic of the Far East.

0:33:020:33:05

All hand-painted, all labour intensive, and it's a jewel!

0:33:050:33:09

-It's really nice.

-I like it. How much could it sell for?

0:33:090:33:12

Well, it ought to be having a guide price of 100 to 150.

0:33:120:33:17

I think that's quite reasonable.

0:33:170:33:19

Hopefully on a good day, it could make more towards 200.

0:33:190:33:22

-I hope so, but you never know.

-Sam, do you like it?

-I do, actually,

0:33:220:33:25

-I'm quite surprised.

-Quite surprised? What are you surprised by?

0:33:250:33:29

I think it's really nice.

0:33:290:33:31

-You're surprised you like something that Charles likes?

-No, that came out wrong!

-I'm surprised!

0:33:310:33:35

-Dear, oh, dear! I think we'll stop while we're still friends!

-Yes!

0:33:350:33:40

And for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Carlos's set.

0:33:400:33:44

Right, Brian. Here we go. Nicely decorated

0:33:450:33:49

-and lots of it.

-It is, isn't it? The Geishas there, the pagodas in the background.

0:33:490:33:53

Always Mount Fuji in the background, and the lakes.

0:33:530:33:57

Also the nice mark on the bottom.

0:33:570:33:59

But probably a spurious mark. At this point, Westerners aren't familiar with

0:33:590:34:04

the katakana and hiragana on the bottom of pieces.

0:34:040:34:07

It dates from around 1920, 1930.

0:34:070:34:09

Produced probably more as a souvenir service for people doing the grand tour of the Orient.

0:34:090:34:15

The decoration here is very loose.

0:34:150:34:18

We do see better examples of this type of Satsuma ware.

0:34:180:34:21

-But you've got lots of it.

-We have got quite a set.

0:34:210:34:23

-A proper service of six.

-It's a good service. We're looking at 80 to £120.

0:34:230:34:28

Charles Hanson has invested £110 of their money and he's optimistic as ever, Charles!

0:34:280:34:33

Anyway, that's it. Brilliant. Are you taking the sale today?

0:34:330:34:38

-Yes, I am.

-We're in safe hands.

0:34:380:34:40

-Now, are you nervous?

-Yes!

0:34:470:34:50

-I wasn't, but I am now.

-You're so brave, but yet so frightened!

0:34:500:34:55

I know!

0:34:550:34:57

First up is your whisky decanter. Here it comes.

0:34:570:35:01

Interesting whisky toddy jug here. Shame the label is a little later.

0:35:010:35:04

Interest here with me at 40, 45, 50.

0:35:040:35:08

55. At £55. 60.

0:35:080:35:11

Five. 70. The bid is in the room at £70. Five, anybody else?

0:35:110:35:15

75, fresh place. 80. Five?

0:35:150:35:19

At £80 seated. In the room at 80.

0:35:190:35:22

-In the room, then, at £80.

-Uh-oh!

0:35:220:35:23

That means a hit of minus £70. Sorry about that.

0:35:230:35:27

Anyway, here comes the Denby jug.

0:35:290:35:31

The Queen Elizabeth II coronation mug by Denby. 1953.

0:35:310:35:36

What can I say for that? £10?

0:35:360:35:38

-Come on!

-Five pounds?

0:35:380:35:40

-Come on.

-Five I have. Thank you, madam. God bless you.

0:35:400:35:43

At five pounds, then. And eight now elsewhere?

0:35:430:35:46

Any advance on five?

0:35:460:35:48

I don't like the look of this!

0:35:480:35:50

-That's a five pound note.

-I thought it would do something on £10.

0:35:500:35:54

The pair of Whitefriars ruby and clear glass bud vases.

0:35:540:35:58

Five pounds? Five I have all over the place.

0:35:580:36:00

And five, eight, ten.

0:36:000:36:02

12? 12. 15.

0:36:020:36:04

18? At 15, then, seated.

0:36:040:36:07

At 15.

0:36:070:36:08

Oh, dear!

0:36:090:36:11

£15. So minus £13 on that.

0:36:110:36:14

That's minus 88.

0:36:140:36:16

-It's all going well, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Fantastic(!)

0:36:160:36:20

Chaps. Now, to roll or not to roll, that is the question.

0:36:200:36:25

-We'll roll.

-We need the bus fare home, Tim.

-Going with it?

-Yes.

0:36:250:36:28

-We're going with the roller.

-It's interesting.

0:36:280:36:31

And here comes the so-called oat roller.

0:36:310:36:33

The brass oat crusher or roller by Gilchrist of Glasgow.

0:36:330:36:37

Interesting thing. I'm sure you all want one!

0:36:370:36:39

LAUGHTER

0:36:390:36:40

Interest here with me at £50.

0:36:400:36:43

55. 60. Five. 70. Five. At £75. 80.

0:36:430:36:49

At 80 here. Five now elsewhere.

0:36:490:36:52

-At £80, the bid is in the room.

-He's doubled his money!

0:36:520:36:55

-I'm sure you want one. At £80, then.

-We've cut our loss a bit.

0:36:550:36:59

Selling at 80.

0:36:590:37:00

£80 it's gone for. Well done, P.Serrell. That's plus £40.

0:37:000:37:04

-Thank you.

-That's the way to produce a bonus buy

0:37:040:37:07

and cut 'em up. Plus 40.

0:37:070:37:10

Which means overall, you are only now minus 48, which could easily be a winning score.

0:37:100:37:16

-Just don't say a word to the blues.

-We won't!

0:37:160:37:19

-Not a word. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:37:190:37:21

Well done. Thanks, Phil.

0:37:210:37:23

-So, Ross, Sam. Do you know how the reds got on?

-No.

-No.

0:37:310:37:36

-Haven't been chatting?

-No.

-Good.

0:37:360:37:38

We don't want that. Overall, I reckon you guys are going to do OK.

0:37:380:37:42

Then you've got the Satsuma tea-set to fall back on if you need it.

0:37:420:37:46

-OK? Are you cool?

-Yes.

-Everybody cool?

-Yes.

-Charles, cool?

0:37:460:37:50

-Very confident.

-Nobody cooler than Charles.

0:37:500:37:52

First up is your drinking glasses. Here they come.

0:37:520:37:55

A pair of George III fluted drinking glasses, circa 1780.

0:37:550:37:59

And here with me at 50.

0:37:590:38:01

Five. 60. Five.

0:38:010:38:04

70. Five. 80.

0:38:040:38:06

Five. 90 now. 90.

0:38:060:38:09

-Five. 100?

-Moving.

-110? 120.

-We're in profit. Good.

0:38:090:38:14

130. 140?

0:38:140:38:15

-130.

-Yes.

-Shake of the head there.

0:38:150:38:17

-140, do I see?

-Well done, Charlie.

-£130, then.

0:38:170:38:20

130. That is £30 profit straight up. That is so good.

0:38:200:38:24

Now, these toast racks.

0:38:240:38:27

Toast racks. Dinky little things, for if you're on a diet!

0:38:270:38:30

What do I say here? Commission bid with me

0:38:300:38:33

at 35. 40. 45. 50.

0:38:330:38:35

50 bid here with me.

0:38:350:38:37

Five.

0:38:370:38:38

55. 60. Five. 70. Five.

0:38:380:38:42

80. Five.

0:38:420:38:44

At £80 commission back with me, then.

0:38:440:38:47

-Five now elsewhere? At £80, then, all done.

-Love it, Charles.

0:38:470:38:50

-At £80.

-That is plus £15.

0:38:500:38:53

I love that, don't you? £15.

0:38:530:38:56

-You were doubting, weren't you?

-I didn't like them.

0:38:560:38:59

Now the pig pin cushion.

0:38:590:39:02

The little piggy's here. What do I see for that? £15?

0:39:020:39:05

15 straightaway. Thank you. 18 now?

0:39:050:39:08

At £15 here. 18. 20?

0:39:080:39:11

20. 22. 25.

0:39:110:39:13

-28. 30.

-You're in profit. I love it.

0:39:130:39:17

35. 38. 40. 42.

0:39:170:39:19

Oh, my pig!

0:39:190:39:21

At £40 in the room, then.

0:39:210:39:23

40.

0:39:230:39:24

It came to market and it sold. Plus £15.

0:39:240:39:27

-Well done!

-So, you've got 30 plus 30 is plus 60.

0:39:270:39:31

Perfect.

0:39:310:39:32

Now, there's a bit of a decision to make here, OK?

0:39:320:39:35

So, do you park your £60-worth of profit,

0:39:350:39:41

which is lovely, could be a winning score.

0:39:410:39:43

Or do you risk it to go with the Satsuma tea-set?

0:39:430:39:46

I think we should go with it. I really like it.

0:39:460:39:48

-Shall we? Shall we go with it? Really?

-Yeah, why not?

0:39:480:39:53

Oh, no!

0:39:530:39:54

-Are we sensible here?

-Probably not sensible, but...

-Not sensible.

0:39:540:39:58

-Quickly, you've got to decide!

-We're not going with it.

-You're not?

0:39:580:40:01

-I thought you were?

-I don't know.

0:40:010:40:03

-What do you think, Sam?

-Let's go for it.

-We're going to go for it?

-Yes!

0:40:030:40:08

It's not easy. You've got 60, for goodness' sake. Do you want to keep it or...

0:40:090:40:14

-Do we get a golden gavel if...

-Don't worry about that!

0:40:140:40:17

-Are you going with the bonus buy or not?

-No.

-No?

-No.

-OK, no.

0:40:170:40:20

-No.

-No.

0:40:200:40:22

-No, we're not. Quickly.

-No.

-No.

0:40:220:40:25

Right. We're not going with the bonus buy.

0:40:250:40:28

-Dear, oh, dear!

-Lot 75 is the Japanese Satsuma tea-service.

0:40:280:40:32

-Lot 75. Satsuma tea-service.

-Watch it make 400!

-20th century.

0:40:320:40:36

With the figural decoration.

0:40:360:40:38

What do I say for this? £80?

0:40:380:40:41

-Really chancing.

-It is chancing.

-Bid me 40?

0:40:410:40:45

-Oh, no!

-No commission bids.

0:40:450:40:47

£20? Thank you, sir. At 20. 22. 25.

0:40:470:40:51

28. 30.

0:40:510:40:53

32. 35.

0:40:530:40:56

38. 40?

0:40:560:40:58

Sure?

0:40:580:40:59

Keep going!

0:40:590:41:01

£38. Bid is in the room. In the room at 38.

0:41:010:41:03

No bid on the internet.

0:41:030:41:05

-Yes! 38.

-We made the right choice! Thank God for that!

0:41:050:41:08

-You did make the right choice.

-Painful, isn't it?

0:41:080:41:10

-That's two shy of 40.

-I would have paid that.

0:41:100:41:13

That would have been minus £72, lads.

0:41:130:41:16

-We did the right thing, then.

-You did the right thing.

0:41:160:41:19

-You parked it.

-You parked up.

-Just about!

0:41:190:41:21

You are plus £60, OK?

0:41:210:41:24

Don't let anybody say you're indecisive because that's not true!

0:41:240:41:29

-Listen, don't say a word to the reds, all right?

-No.

0:41:290:41:32

-Completely sealed up?

-Definitely.

0:41:320:41:35

All will be revealed in a moment. Well done.

0:41:350:41:37

Well, it's been a mixed bag, hasn't it?

0:41:450:41:47

I don't know! Been chatting, the reds and the blues, about the scores?

0:41:470:41:51

ALL: No.

0:41:510:41:53

Well, we can only have one runner-up per show.

0:41:530:41:55

And the runners-up today are the reds.

0:41:550:41:59

Sorry about that. Overall score, minus 48.

0:42:010:42:05

-But it could have been so much worse without Phil's roller.

-OK.

0:42:050:42:09

That rolled out a profit of £40, which actually was very good going.

0:42:090:42:13

-Yes.

-Should have had more like that.

-Yes. You were just unlucky.

0:42:130:42:16

-But you had fun?

-We have had fun, yes.

-Thank you, Phil for your very profitable bonus buy.

0:42:160:42:22

But turning to the victors today, who are going home with £60 profit. How about that?

0:42:220:42:29

That's the full 60. Not only do they go home with their profit,

0:42:290:42:33

they also go home with the very special award, which is the golden gavel!

0:42:330:42:38

The ancient award of the golden gavel. There we go.

0:42:380:42:42

Take one of those. That's great, Sam. Thank you very much.

0:42:420:42:45

-And another one for your collection, Charles.

-Wonderful!

0:42:450:42:48

And you get that for getting a profit on each of your items, which you succeeded in doing.

0:42:480:42:53

It's a difficult thing in the best of times. I congratulate you.

0:42:530:42:56

-Thank you.

-Happy with that?

-Really pleased.

-Yes, definitely.

0:42:560:42:59

-It's a very good result, Charles.

-It is. Delighted.

-We're all very, very chuffed.

0:42:590:43:04

We're so chuffed, join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting. Yes?

0:43:040:43:08

Yes!

0:43:080:43:09

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:290:43:33

This time on Bargain Hunt, the teams head to Westpoint Fair in Exeter, where the reds run Philip Serrell ragged, leaving Charles Hanson's blues to bicker over a bargain. Tim Wonnacott escapes it all to visit the beautiful Antony House in Cornwall.


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