Lewes 5 Bargain Hunt


Lewes 5

Antiques experts Thomas Plant and Catherine Southon offer their advice to a pair of father-and-daughter teams. Tim Wonnacott looks at a Native American headdress.


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Transcript


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We're in the beautiful county town of Lewes, today,

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where there are no less than four antique centres for our teams

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to have a go at.

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So, let's go bargain hunting. Yeah!

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Lewes is famed for its gorgeous

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flint-knapped buildings and twittens.

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Twittens, by the way, are a Sussex name for alleyways.

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And we've got no twittens on this show. Oh, no.

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Stay tuned to find out what's coming up.

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It's all fun and games for the Reds.

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Yay! Brilliant.

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-And the Blues make a discovery.

-I reckon that's a yeti's snow boot.

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THOMAS LAUGHS

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-What, a one legged...

-A one-legged yeti.

-He'd be hopping around.

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Well, it's all about dads and their little girls today.

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For the Reds, we've got father and daughter, Roger and Mel.

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And for the Blues, we have father and daughter, Marcus and Holly.

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-Hello, everyone.

-Hello.

-Very nice to see you.

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Roger, it says here you're an obsessive hoarder. Is that true?

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Oh, absolutely.

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Records, of course, is my main collection where I've got...

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HE EXHALES

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..of albums and boxes...

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-What does "pfff" mean in numbers?

-About 2,500 LPs.

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And, I don't know, the same number of CDs and boxes and boxes of singles.

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I can smell vinyl from not far off. I get dragged away, don't I?

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-Yes.

-You have a passion for photography.

-Oh, indeed.

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That's what I do for a living now. It's my second career.

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I'm thoroughly enjoying that. It takes me out and about.

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-I get to meet lots of people.

-What sort of photography do you do?

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Events, weddings, family dos,

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-corporate events, all sorts of things like that.

-Good. Mel,

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you've got a photographer's eye, too, I believe?

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Yes. I've got a degree in photography.

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I studied at Manchester Metropolitan but I first started at college

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and Dad taught me everything I needed to know to get going.

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We've set up dark rooms in the bathroom together

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and taken photos any time we can.

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What sort of subjects do you like?

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I like landscapes.

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But there's no end to your creative skills, is there?

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-I make my own jewellery, as well.

-Is that a piece of yours?

-It is.

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-How lovely.

-I made that.

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What experience have you got with this antique-buying business?

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Well, we both go rummaging, don't we,

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round antique shops and in antiques fairs and so on?

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What sort of thing will you be going for today, Mel?

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I like anything decorative but also practical, so something pretty.

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I like silver, obviously jewellery, so anything that sparkles.

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-This is a tall order.

-THEY LAUGH

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You're going to spend all your cash, I have a funny feeling.

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-Let's hope so.

-Good luck when you get to it.

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-Marcus, you're in the police force.

-I am, Tim.

-What exactly do you do?

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-I've been a police officer now for...coming on 20 years.

-No?

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-You joined as a lad?

-Not quite.

-Cadet?

-Thank you for saying so.

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No, no, come on.

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I was young but not that young.

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I do do the Cadets as well, the Police Cadets. I train them.

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They are from 13 up to 18. My role's slightly changed now.

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I'm a bobby on the beat. I tend to deal with more people's problems.

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I will go and try to sort out neighbourhood disputes.

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I have the time now to talk to people. I can go to local

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communities. I have lots of meetings within the community.

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-And when you're not policing, what do you like to do?

-Many hobbies.

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But my real passion, I suppose, is my motorbike.

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I'd like to say I wasn't obsessive with my bike, but I am.

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She gets polished. I say she.

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TIM LAUGHS

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-Do you go pet her?

-Oh, yes. I use it everyday.

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Unfortunately, my daughter doesn't share my passion for bikes.

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-Too scary.

-Too scary. What, Dad goes too fast?

-Yeah.

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I was round the corner and I was like, "I can't do this any more."

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-Holly, like your dad, you work in the community?

-I do.

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-Tell us about that.

-I'm a carer at the moment

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but I'm training to be a nurse at the same time.

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-Oh, are you?

-But I love my job so much.

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All my little elderly ladies and gentlemen.

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-Yes.

-I just do their personal care and chat with them.

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Just all that kind of work.

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But you'd like, at the end of the day, to be a nurse?

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-I want to work in A&E.

-Do you?

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Follow your father's footsteps down the 999 route?

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-Yeah, it would be exciting.

-Yes, exactly. Exactly.

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What other hobbies can you possibly enjoy in your busy life?

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I just love to bake.

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If I've got spare time, I just bake a cake.

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What sort of cakes do you like to bake?

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I make these lollipop cakes and they're literally like a ball of

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cake and you put it on a stick, and you just ice it like a lollipop.

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And then you lick it? No, bite it.

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You can just eat it like a little canape, or something.

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I don't think I've ever had a lollipop cake.

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Anyway, now the money moment.

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You get £300 apiece, as per normal. There you go, Mel. Holly.

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£300. You know the rules.

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Your experts await and off you go and very, very good luck.

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I like the sound of a lollipop cake.

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Let's meet the experts working with our teams today.

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In the spotlight for the Reds it's Catherine Southon.

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And hoping to keep the Blues out of trouble is Thomas Plant.

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MUSIC: "Daddy Cool" by Boney M

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-Do we know what we're going to buy?

-No.

-We have a few things in mind.

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Have you?

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-Who's the buyer?

-I like to shop.

-You like to shop?

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-Definitely her.

-And who's the dealer?

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I like to do a bit of dealing and a bit of bargaining.

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We just need to look for things that are...I don't like to use

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the word "quirky", but things that are not standard, shall we say?

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-Let's go and get some quirk, shall we?

-All right, then. Where do we go?

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-I've got really nothing to do today, have I?

-No.

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-You can get the coffees.

-Get the coffee while you choose.

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-That sounds like a plan.

-Right, let's go.

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And they're off, and Roger seems keen to stretch his legs.

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Let's just walk to the back of the shop and back again, shall we?

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Captain Franklin. RE - Royal Engineers.

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-OK.

-Oak case.

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Oh, my God.

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-Out of our price range?

-£440.

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-Way out of our range.

-Way out of our range.

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Too rich for this show, Thomas.

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Well, Roger's starting to get to grips with the job at hand.

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I don't like chintzy stuff.

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You know what that is. That's a bit like Aunt Flo's monstrosities.

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I tell you what that is...

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-..Horrible.

-THEY LAUGH

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Now that is a big lump.

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-You're right there.

-What do you think this is? What's this?

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I don't think so, Roger.

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These are dumbbells. They're cold.

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-They're dead cold.

-They're freezing.

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THEY LAUGH

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Victorian, late 19th-century, cast-iron. Four pounds.

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-They're quite cool.

-They're £65.

-Yeah.

-Too much. Too much.

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What have you found?

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-And...

-Cribbage boards are... We see them constantly - all the time.

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What is nice about that one is the section that comes out.

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-That is quite unusual.

-This is different.

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-I've not seen one like that before.

-Would it make us much money?

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I think, honestly, if you put that into auction, it would make

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-exactly what you've got on it, about 25, 20 to 25.

-All right.

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But you might be able to get that for...

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-..20, 15, 20.

-Who knows?

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Do you want to try on it?

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We haven't been going long so why don't we just leave it

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there for the moment, and then if we need something, we know it's there.

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Managed to find anything in your price range yet, team?

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-These are cool. 380. 280.

-A bit outside our budget.

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-65.

-A bit much.

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So, no luck there then, Blues. And it's time to move.

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MUSIC: "Money" by The Flying Lizards

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-It looks like Mel's focusing on something.

-Oh, I love that.

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-The handle is gorgeous. Look at that.

-Oh, yes.

-Magnifying glass.

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-Can we have a look at that?

-What do you reckon that is?

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How old do you think that is? 1930s?

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Arts and Crafts, so it's going to be turn-of-the-century.

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-You reckon it's as old as that?

-And the whole ethos behind Arts

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and Crafts was making something useful but also

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making it beautiful, and that is very aesthetic and it's very useful.

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A nice magnifying glass there. It just has a fantastic look about it.

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It's silver-plated. The way these have been twisted around.

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It's a super piece of design.

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-85.

-Mm.

-Mm.

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-I don't know.

-What could it be?

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It would probably get to 70.

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I would say that's probably still a little bit too much.

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-We've got to get a profit, haven't we?

-We have. That's the idea.

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Could we go down to 60?

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OK, we'll do 60.

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-A nice shape.

-I like it.

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-Can you tweak another fiver off?

-Yeah, OK. Just a fiver.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, let's go for it.

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-We'll go for that one.

-First purchase. Well done. Well found.

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An elementary purchase there for the Reds.

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MUSIC: "We Are Family" by Sister Sledge

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Now, what's Thomas found?

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-This is a swagger stick or a crop.

-A swagger stick.

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-Is that when you have to sort of...

-No, like this.

-OK.

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In the army or colonial services.

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I think it's more of a crop, really, for riding

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but it's certainly colonial-made. Somewhere hot.

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The Tropics, because this here is vegetable ivory.

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-Vegetable?

-A nut.

-OK.

-A nut.

-Yes.

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It's been carved to take something in there.

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It's rather handsome, isn't it?

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What would they have put in there, do you think?

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You could be walking round your estate,

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your plantation and you wanted to collect some seeds.

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Instead of putting them in a pocket, you'd probably put them in here,

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screw it up and it's dead tight in there and they're fine.

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-It's quite unusual.

-It is unusual, isn't it?

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I'd say it's 1920s and its £17.

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-That's quite reasonable.

-I like that.

-You like it?

-Yeah, it's cool.

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You like the fact it's got a little nut carved...

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-Yeah, it's weird.

-And it's not very much money. Should we go for that?

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-Yeah. I like it.

-Sounds like a plan?

-Does sound like a plan.

-It's cheap.

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-Shall we see what we can get off it?

-Absolutely.

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Go on, Marcus. Strut your stuff. Get haggling.

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-It's £17.

-We can do 14.

-14.

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-Is that the best you can do?

-It's the best.

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I was thinking more sort of 12.

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-They're not ours so we are only guardians for them.

-I'm with you.

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-Maybe we can meet in the middle.

-13.

-13.

-OK.

-Well done, Blues.

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And as they saunter off with a new cane,

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-it looks like Melanie's rising to the challenge.

-What can you see?

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-I think it's a phoenix or something.

-Oh, wow.

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Now that would look lovely on your...

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-..Look at that. Against the red.

-It's superb.

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Obviously, we've got no precious gems or metal going on here.

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It's purely, I would say, probably glass.

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So it's a bit...

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tinfoily on the back, isn't it?

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-Shall we think about it?

-Let's see what else we see today.

-All right.

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It's not...

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..You can have that later if we haven't seen anything else, anything better.

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He's only looking out for you, Mel.

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MUSIC: "My Girl" by The Temptations

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What do you think of those two beakers? We call that niello work.

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-They are expensive.

-I can't see.

-They're 180 quid.

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Look at that. Really fine work on there.

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-What do you think?

-Yeah, they're cool.

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I see they have some hallmarks on them.

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Those would be the Russian, the Russian strike marks.

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They've got 875 on there, so Russian standard silver.

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A bit below our standard of 925.

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Silver-gilt which is mercury-gilded silver.

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And then engraved with an enamel design on here.

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Originally produced in Roman times, niello reached the heights of its

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popularity during the Renaissance period.

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Russian goldsmiths, working in the town of Tula,

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revived the craft in the 18th century.

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-They've got real quality, haven't they?

-Yeah.

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-Would you see these being used or more an ornament?

-Collector.

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Collectors, absolutely.

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Although I think their price is quite high.

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-It can be 120.

-Do you think we should go for that?

-I think so.

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-And you like them?

-Yeah. I do like them.

-I think that's a really good

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-discount and I think they've got a chance.

-A large tequila.

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That's another item down the hatch for the Blues. This pair are going

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far, but I don't think the Reds have moved yet.

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Roger, where are we going? Where are we going next?

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I don't know. Where do you want...

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-You don't want to go down...

-I don't mind. We'll go wherever...

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..Let's have a quick look down there. Let's go have a quick look.

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That is quite nice. That's a little agate inkwell.

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-Isn't that lovely?

-It's very pretty, isn't it?

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I think that's quite pretty. People do collect inkwells.

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I think that's quite a nice example.

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That round the top as well is nice.

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It's absolutely pure and perfect.

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-It's quite heavy.

-Well, it would be. It's just a lump of stone, isn't it?

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That would sit quite nicely on your desk, wouldn't it?

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-You haven't seen my desk.

-A complete contrast to the fashion jewellery.

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-But this is practical as well. It's what I quite like.

-You say that.

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I don't think it's practical now, so you don't really...

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It may well have been part of a set.

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You might have had the red and the black ink

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and perhaps it was on a desk once upon a time.

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-Shall we see how much we can get it for?

-Go and ask.

-Do your stuff.

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-Go on, then.

-Would you be willing to go down to 30?

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-33 quid. We'll do 33.

-33?

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-33.

-I reckon 33.

-You think it's OK.

0:14:540:14:57

-OK, do it.

-Well done, Reds. That's your second item.

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MUSIC: "Papa Was A Rolling Stone" by The Temptations

0:15:010:15:03

Right, the Blues are on the move

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-and it looks like Roger's following his nose.

-I can smell vinyl, here.

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-Look at this.

-Don't need any more records.

-Shall we leave him to it?

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-Don't be too long.

-Hey, hang on. You know what you got here.

0:15:140:15:16

We've got Babbacombe Lee. You know the story of Babbacombe Lee?

0:15:160:15:19

It's quite good. I wonder...

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-Come on. Come on, dear.

-MEL LAUGHS

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With tension mounting and the clock ticking,

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it appears the teams are heading for a dramatic finale...

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..in the same shop.

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Looks like Thomas has found another trunk.

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Oak, copper chest.

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Very useful in today's world because it has a flat top.

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Look at the hammered rivets here.

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Actually quite a good size

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-for modern houses, because it's narrow.

-Modern hinges...

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-..I think all these fittings are modern.

-They're all quite modern.

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It is quite modern. I think old bits of wood which have been...

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-..put together.

-To make a box.

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-Oh, God!

-God.

-He always picks up heavy things.

0:16:150:16:20

If you want heavy, try that.

0:16:200:16:22

I'm not even going to attempt to lift it. What is it?

0:16:220:16:24

-It's a bit of sculpture.

-What's it made from?

-Stone of some sort.

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-Good grief.

-It is enormously heavy.

0:16:280:16:31

-It is, isn't it? Why do you like that?

-I don't know.

0:16:310:16:35

It just sort of goes whoomph at you.

0:16:350:16:38

-"Whoomph"?

-Wow!

-Whoomph. Yes. It does go whoomph, doesn't it?

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I'm not sure it whoomphs in the right direction.

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-This thing here.

-Yeah.

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A plum dryer. £48. For drying one's plums.

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-Come on, you.

-That's me. You want me to come past, do you?

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I reckon that's a yeti's snow boot.

0:17:010:17:04

THOMAS LAUGHS

0:17:040:17:05

-What, a one-legged...

-a one-legged yeti, yes.

0:17:050:17:07

He'd be hopping around.

0:17:070:17:09

-What's that?

-Money box, is it?

-I don't know.

0:17:090:17:12

-American money box.

-Yeah.

0:17:120:17:15

I like the fact that it's got a home-made appeal to it, hasn't it?

0:17:150:17:19

-A bit of woodworm.

-A bit of woodworm.

0:17:190:17:21

It could be used for display

0:17:210:17:22

but it could also still be used for drying one's fruit.

0:17:220:17:26

I think that's quite fun. That's quite well spotted.

0:17:260:17:28

-Shall I go and ask for key 17?

-Can you do that?

-Stay here.

0:17:280:17:31

-Keep looking. I'll go have a look.

-You do that. OK.

0:17:310:17:35

£48. It's quite a lot of money

0:17:350:17:38

-but it is a bit of fun.

-It's different.

0:17:380:17:41

It's your turn. There you are.

0:17:410:17:43

Go and do some haggling and I'm sure you've got your father's genes.

0:17:430:17:46

-I'm going to try my hardest.

-Go on.

-Go for it.

0:17:460:17:49

Well, there's no time to waste, Holly.

0:17:490:17:51

A nice piece.

0:17:530:17:55

Oh, it's heavy. How does it work? Is it clockwork?

0:17:550:18:00

-Place coin in the pitcher's hand.

-So then what we do?

0:18:000:18:03

I don't know. I cant see...

0:18:030:18:05

-..Oh, I see. It goes like that.

-Is there a button to press?

0:18:050:18:08

-ALL:

-Yay!

0:18:090:18:10

-Brilliant. Fantastic.

-So it works.

0:18:110:18:14

The thing is, this will be online, it's baseball.

0:18:140:18:17

American collectors, maybe. How much is on it?

0:18:170:18:21

-56.

-What could it be?

0:18:210:18:24

I can make a telephone call and let you know what it can be.

0:18:240:18:27

You go.

0:18:270:18:29

It's all pressure on the dealer

0:18:300:18:31

-because the Blues are approaching her, too.

-Found this plum dryer.

0:18:310:18:36

Do you think there's any possible way we could have it down to 28?

0:18:360:18:40

You want to make me an offer. 48. I can make a telephone call for you.

0:18:400:18:44

Yeah?

0:18:440:18:46

And the dealer's having to be quick with all these phone calls.

0:18:460:18:49

Two and a half minutes left. Let's use those minutes wisely

0:18:490:18:53

-in case we don't get a discount. Oh, hello.

-Hello.

0:18:530:18:56

I've made a phone call. Unfortunately there's no answer, so

0:18:560:19:00

-I'm allowed to...let's go for £48.

-Oh.

0:19:000:19:04

-But I probably could go to 45, if that would help?

-Could you do 40?

0:19:050:19:09

That is going to be robbing a bank, but I will let you have it for 40.

0:19:100:19:13

-I love that. I think that's brilliant.

-No, I like it.

-OK.

0:19:130:19:18

The Reds have just made it, but what about the Blues?

0:19:180:19:21

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:19:220:19:23

I made a phone call and she's happy to let it go for £28.

0:19:230:19:28

-Well done.

-Well done, Holly. Thank you very much.

-That's it.

0:19:280:19:32

Time's up. Let's check out what the Red team bought. They went that way.

0:19:320:19:36

The sleuth in Melanie just couldn't overlook the magnifying glass.

0:19:380:19:41

The Reds spent £55 on their first purchase.

0:19:410:19:45

Catherine did well to find their second buy.

0:19:450:19:48

They just couldn't resist spending £33 on the agate ink pot

0:19:480:19:53

and in the final throes of the game, Roger spotted the baseball

0:19:530:19:56

money box for £40.

0:19:560:19:57

-OK, team?

-Yes.

-Did you have fun with Catherine, or what?

-We did.

0:19:590:20:03

-Wonderful, wasn't it?

-What's your favourite piece, Rog the Dodge?

0:20:030:20:06

I think that money box.

0:20:060:20:10

-That little...

-Do you?

-I really like that.

0:20:100:20:13

OK. Do you agree with that, daughter?

0:20:130:20:16

No. I like the magnifying glass with the fancy handle.

0:20:160:20:19

-That's your favourite?

-Yes.

-Is that going to bring the biggest profit?

0:20:190:20:22

-I hope so. I think so.

-Do you agree, Dad?

0:20:220:20:26

Um. I think all three will make a medium profit.

0:20:260:20:30

-Has he been like this all day?

-Yes.

0:20:300:20:32

OK, lovely. On that happy family note, how much did you spend?

0:20:330:20:37

-£128.

-128. I'd like £172, please.

0:20:370:20:42

£172. Steaming hot, too. Straight over to trot to Catherine.

0:20:420:20:48

-Lovely.

-What are you going to spend it on, darling?

0:20:480:20:51

-I feel that I might go down an artistic route.

-Really?

0:20:510:20:54

That means she might buy a picture. That's code, maybe.

0:20:540:20:57

On the other hand, perhaps she won't. Such a temptress.

0:20:570:21:01

Anyway, good luck with that, Catherine. Good luck, team.

0:21:010:21:03

Meanwhile, why don't we check out what the Blue team bought, eh?

0:21:030:21:07

The Blues snagged the swagger stick for just £13.

0:21:070:21:11

They were rushing to get their hands on the niello beakers

0:21:110:21:14

but it cost them a whopping £120 for the pair.

0:21:140:21:18

And they dried their eyes

0:21:180:21:19

and picked up the tear-shaped plum rack for £28,

0:21:190:21:23

JUST in the nick of time.

0:21:230:21:25

Well, team. That was great, wasn't it?

0:21:250:21:27

-It was brilliant.

-It was fun.

-What's your favourite piece, Marcus?

0:21:270:21:30

-My favourite piece is the plum dryer.

-The plum dryer?

-Yes.

0:21:300:21:34

It would be, wouldn't it?

0:21:340:21:36

-You agree with that?

-That's my favourite piece as well.

0:21:360:21:39

Is it really? Oh, dear. It's young and trendy as well as popular.

0:21:390:21:43

And is your plum dryer going to bring the biggest profit?

0:21:430:21:46

Erm, I think the swagger stick will.

0:21:460:21:49

Swagger stick will bring the biggest profit?

0:21:490:21:51

I'm going to stick with my plum dryer, definitely.

0:21:510:21:54

You're obsessed about it. How much did you spend all round?

0:21:540:21:57

-We spent £161.

-£161.

0:21:570:22:01

-I'd like £139, please.

-Okey-doke.

-Okey-doko.

0:22:010:22:05

-There's the notes.

-Thank you very much.

0:22:050:22:08

-And your change.

-And the shrapnel. Straight over to Thomas.

-Thank you.

0:22:080:22:12

-T Plant, this is your favourite moment.

-I love it.

0:22:120:22:14

-Absolutely love it. I'm going to spend it all.

-Spend it all.

0:22:140:22:17

-Every penny.

-On something profitable.

-Hope so.

-Great.

0:22:170:22:22

So, while Thomas heads off on his travels, I'm going

0:22:220:22:26

to head off on mine.

0:22:260:22:28

Would you expect to find in Lewes

0:22:340:22:38

an early American headdress?

0:22:380:22:42

I think this thing is absolutely brilliant.

0:22:430:22:46

Out of all the first nation tribes in North America,

0:22:460:22:51

only about 12 actually wore feathered headdresses

0:22:510:22:56

and they come in a variety of styles.

0:22:560:22:58

You get the halo look

0:22:580:23:00

that does a curve all the way around your head.

0:23:000:23:03

You have this long trailed type.

0:23:030:23:06

Or, if you belonged to the Blackfoot tribe, typically,

0:23:060:23:11

they liked their feathers sticking more or less vertical,

0:23:110:23:14

which is what these do.

0:23:140:23:16

So I reckon this is a war bonnet

0:23:160:23:19

that might come from the Blackfoot tribe.

0:23:190:23:22

It's beautifully decorated with its beadwork along the front.

0:23:240:23:28

It's got all its feathers there. Some of them are a bit wonky.

0:23:280:23:32

Each of those feathers traditionally came from the great

0:23:320:23:35

American Eagle, which the warrior had to hunt down.

0:23:350:23:41

That was one of his tasks.

0:23:410:23:43

And he would not be entitled to wear a feather

0:23:430:23:46

until he had done some brave deed of daring do.

0:23:460:23:50

So the guy that had this did approximately 40 brave deeds

0:23:500:23:56

to enable him to wear this number of feathers.

0:23:560:23:59

What I like is the way the feathers have been secured

0:24:000:24:04

to the chamois leather skullcap

0:24:040:24:06

and they've got bits of red blanket that have been crudely cut

0:24:060:24:12

and tied together to make the sockets into which the feathers sit.

0:24:120:24:17

The other thing that's nice is these little trails of hair that

0:24:170:24:22

have been tied to the top of each of these feathers.

0:24:220:24:25

They are another traditional sign of an additional honour.

0:24:250:24:29

Sometimes these bits of hair are from the mane or tail of a horse,

0:24:290:24:35

sometimes the hair comes from an opponent who you've scalped.

0:24:350:24:40

You take a lump of hair and add that to your war bonnet.

0:24:400:24:43

The big problem is, unless you're an expert, is dating them.

0:24:430:24:48

My personal feeling is that this

0:24:480:24:50

is not one of the modern tourist type headdresses.

0:24:500:24:55

It's got some age to it.

0:24:550:24:57

This is a lovely understated war bonnet that could date perhaps

0:24:570:25:03

from the end of the 19th century or early part of the 20th century.

0:25:030:25:07

How much would you chance on this war bonnet?

0:25:070:25:13

Would you pay a couple of hundred pounds for it? £300?

0:25:130:25:16

How about 25,500

0:25:180:25:22

that was paid for a similar one in America last year?

0:25:220:25:27

There's the range of price and there's the range of speculation.

0:25:270:25:32

And actually, the price here in Lewes was £300.

0:25:320:25:36

And for me, that was my Hiawatha moment.

0:25:380:25:41

It is surely worth more. Commissioned at £250. Are we all done?

0:25:520:25:56

Fair warning, then. Selling at 250.

0:25:560:25:59

How lovely is this, to be at Bellmans

0:26:000:26:03

saleroom in Wisborough Green in the county of West Sussex with JP.

0:26:030:26:07

-How are you, old boy?

-I'm very good, Tim.

-Looking ever younger.

0:26:070:26:11

Now, first up we have the silver-plated magnifying glass

0:26:120:26:14

that looks like CR Ashbee to me. Is it?

0:26:140:26:16

It is that sort of ilk. Arts and crafts, late 19th century style.

0:26:160:26:20

-The handle is better than the other bits.

-How do magnifying glasses sell?

0:26:200:26:24

Well, in the section of the sale that this is in, very well.

0:26:240:26:27

We have all sorts of miscellaneous and I think it would do rather well in that section, actually.

0:26:270:26:31

-Perfect. And your estimate?

-£30-£40.

-£55 paid.

0:26:310:26:35

So it is within a whisper.

0:26:350:26:37

Next is this rather intriguing looking agate inkwell.

0:26:370:26:40

It wouldn't hold much ink but it's novel, isn't it?

0:26:400:26:44

Being a gemologist, for me, I'm more interested in the stone itself, which is agate, which is a quartz.

0:26:440:26:49

You've got these coloured lines in it which were all formed sedimentary as the thing is growing.

0:26:490:26:53

-So it's rather a fun object.

-OK. How much?

0:26:530:26:56

£20-£30. £33, so that is within a whisper.

0:26:560:26:59

Now, we've got the Americano cast iron money bank.

0:26:590:27:02

-It looks the part, doesn't it?

-It does. And you are connected to the internet?

-Absolutely.

0:27:020:27:07

So our American collectors who seriously know about cast iron money safes, don't they,

0:27:070:27:12

they can get a squint and if they fancy it, they can have a go.

0:27:120:27:15

-Absolutely.

-How much?

-£30-£50.

-Perfect. £40 paid.

0:27:150:27:20

That's bang in the middle.

0:27:200:27:22

Let's hope we'll be posting some cash into our money box shortly.

0:27:220:27:26

Anyway, that's it for the Reds.

0:27:260:27:28

I fancy that they are going to need their Bonus Buy,

0:27:280:27:32

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:320:27:34

Well, this is exciting, isn't it?

0:27:350:27:37

What did Catherine, who had the whole £172, go and buy?

0:27:370:27:42

Catherine, you bought a rocket ship!

0:27:420:27:45

-Oh, that's it.

-What do you mean, that's it!

0:27:470:27:50

I think that's pretty good.

0:27:500:27:51

-Don't you think that's brilliant?

-I like it.

-Look at the size of it.

0:27:510:27:55

-It's huge.

-It's fantastic. This has a multitude of uses.

0:27:550:28:00

You get your artist first of all.

0:28:000:28:02

Think about a nice hotel, they could put it in the entrance to a hotel.

0:28:020:28:06

A nice big menu on it or a wedding, so many uses.

0:28:060:28:10

So how much did you pay for it?

0:28:100:28:12

-You gave me quite a lot of cash, didn't you?

-Yes.

0:28:120:28:14

-You didn't spend it all, did you?

-I didn't spend it all.

0:28:140:28:17

-I spent £50 on this.

-Is that all?

0:28:170:28:21

-£50.

-That's OK. I don't know.

0:28:210:28:25

I thought that was brilliant, actually.

0:28:250:28:28

I'm just trying to work out, I mean, what would it sell for?

0:28:280:28:31

This is going to double your money. If it doesn't, I will be surprised.

0:28:310:28:35

The big thing is, you don't have to choose now,

0:28:350:28:38

you can choose later after the sale of the first three items.

0:28:380:28:40

But for the audience at home,

0:28:400:28:42

let's find out what the jolly old auctioneer thinks about Catherine's easel.

0:28:420:28:46

JP, as if by magic, let's not get hung up on this!

0:28:480:28:51

This is rather a nice one, really.

0:28:510:28:53

It's made of Beechwood but because you've got this lovely old dribbled oil on there and stuff...

0:28:530:28:58

It's got an old master on it!

0:28:580:29:00

Made in Italy, which I always find is a very reassuring sign.

0:29:000:29:03

Nice brass ratchet.

0:29:030:29:06

The thing is decently made.

0:29:060:29:08

You could put a really expensive picture on that with some security.

0:29:080:29:11

I think you probably could.

0:29:110:29:12

I think it would be fairly safe to put a big gilt frame on there

0:29:120:29:15

and expect it to be there when you came back into the shop.

0:29:150:29:19

My feeling is that we will hopefully see about £100 for it.

0:29:190:29:21

-So I've put an estimate of £80-£120.

-Have you really? Because she only paid £50.

0:29:210:29:25

If you can get £100, she has doubled her money

0:29:250:29:27

and you will get a whoop in the saleroom, I guarantee you.

0:29:270:29:31

Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:29:310:29:34

A pretty wacky mixture. We've got the swagger stick.

0:29:340:29:37

It's a cane, isn't it?

0:29:370:29:39

A bamboo cane or something with this organic ivory egg on the top with a little screw-top.

0:29:390:29:43

-Vegetable ivory, that.

-Vegetable ivory, yes.

0:29:430:29:45

Yes. Quite fun to have that novelty, isn't it?

0:29:450:29:48

People buy canes for the finials, don't they,

0:29:480:29:50

and it's quite nice to have this very organic...

0:29:500:29:52

I think if you are a vegetarian sergeant major, this is what you would want, isn't it?

0:29:520:29:56

Yes. I don't know many vegetarian sergeant majors. You horrible lot!

0:29:560:30:01

Finish up your carrots or you will be in big trouble!

0:30:010:30:04

-We're on night patrol tonight!

-Polish your boots!

0:30:040:30:08

-So what is it worth?

-That is £30-£40.

-£13 paid.

0:30:080:30:11

-That's good, I think.

-That is a Thomas Plant find of the century.

0:30:110:30:15

Next, we've got the niello Russian decorated beakers.

0:30:160:30:20

As soon as I saw these, I knew Thomas was coming to the saleroom.

0:30:200:30:24

He seems to like these things, very much so.

0:30:240:30:26

What I quite liked about these ones though is if you go 19th century

0:30:260:30:29

you get that very traditional 19th century sort of ornament.

0:30:290:30:33

To look at that, it really does make you think of the 20th century

0:30:330:30:37

and it has that air of the early 20th century about it.

0:30:370:30:40

And actually, the marking on the base is for the period of 1927 to 1954

0:30:400:30:43

and it fits right in there.

0:30:430:30:46

'40s or '50s in style.

0:30:460:30:47

So I really quite like them.

0:30:470:30:49

So putting our boldest and bravest hat on, how much do you think they are going to bring?

0:30:490:30:53

Again, I hope we're going to get £70-£90 for them.

0:30:530:30:57

-Or maybe a tad more?

-Maybe a tad more.

0:30:570:30:59

If I can push it past 100, I will endeavour to do so.

0:30:590:31:02

-Give it a push, push because Thomas paid £120.

-Well, we're nearly there.

0:31:020:31:06

Now, next is the plum dryer,

0:31:060:31:08

which I thought might have been a Canadian snowshoe.

0:31:080:31:11

Yes, you would have to have a big foot for that, wouldn't you?!

0:31:110:31:15

This is very specific and particular to a place in southern France.

0:31:150:31:19

-This shape, particularly.

-How interesting.

0:31:190:31:22

So there are regional varieties in France of plum dryers.

0:31:220:31:25

Only by this one particular shape, to be honest.

0:31:250:31:28

-The rest are fairly straightforward.

-How fascinating.

0:31:280:31:30

You are a brilliant man to do all that research.

0:31:300:31:33

Having said all that, what is it worth?

0:31:330:31:35

-£30 or £40, I would have thought.

-Would you go for a plum dryer?

0:31:350:31:38

-I don't have a great deal of use for them any more.

-No.

0:31:380:31:41

-It just depends how plummy you are really, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:31:410:31:44

So that's very interesting.

0:31:440:31:46

It all depends frankly on how the vodka cups go as to whether

0:31:460:31:50

the team will need their Bonus Buy, but let's go and have a look at it.

0:31:500:31:54

OK, you dynamic duo, you spent 161 and you gave Tom £139.

0:31:550:32:00

What did you navigate yourself towards, Tom?

0:32:000:32:03

It looked like a really boring box, but when you open it up,

0:32:030:32:06

a fabulous desk set. Ink, seal, pencil,

0:32:060:32:10

paper knife and a little inkwell.

0:32:100:32:12

-Very nice.

-And it's Bakelite. The colours are strong.

0:32:120:32:15

If you think of the Deco period, you think strong, bold,

0:32:150:32:20

geometric patterns and colours, and this is what you've got. Fabulous.

0:32:200:32:24

The thing about deskware, is it's becoming more and more popular.

0:32:240:32:27

Oh, OK. How much did you spend?

0:32:270:32:29

-£75.

-OK.

0:32:290:32:31

Which I don't think is a huge amount of money for a Deco desk set.

0:32:310:32:35

How much do you think it'll go for?

0:32:350:32:37

I do quite a lot of pens and desk sets at auction

0:32:370:32:40

and I see a potential in this. I say small profit, £10 or £20.

0:32:400:32:45

But I see it as being a good thing.

0:32:450:32:47

-The thing about these is they are good online sales items.

-OK.

0:32:470:32:53

You may not need to go with it because you've made so much profit.

0:32:530:32:56

-I don't think we'll need it, but we never know.

-There you go.

0:32:560:33:00

That's a nice positive attitude, Marcus. Lovely jubbly.

0:33:000:33:03

Anyway, for the audience at home, why don't we find out right now

0:33:030:33:07

what the audience thinks about Tom's desk set?

0:33:070:33:10

-There you go you.

-Yeah, isn't that wonderful?

0:33:120:33:15

It's Bakelite, early 20th-century,

0:33:150:33:18

and it's simulating a sort of jasper and onyx and...

0:33:180:33:23

-Amber.

-Amber and onyx, absolutely.

0:33:230:33:26

And ivory, it's meant to be. Very typically '30s.

0:33:260:33:30

Now, what are you going to do with it?

0:33:300:33:33

You either shut the box and keep it

0:33:330:33:35

or take all the stuff out and use it.

0:33:350:33:37

I don't really like the inkwell. The top doesn't fit very well.

0:33:370:33:41

The nib's broken. But you could replace that, of course you could.

0:33:410:33:44

-There's just a few things about it that I really...

-Thomas had £159.

0:33:440:33:48

He invested just under half of it. He paid £75.

0:33:480:33:53

And quite frankly, for me, I'm slightly with you,

0:33:530:33:56

because that box isn't good enough.

0:33:560:33:59

It's paper covered. If it were leather covered or even old cloth...

0:33:590:34:02

OK, having said that, how much?

0:34:020:34:04

£25-£35.

0:34:040:34:07

I'm with JP on this.

0:34:070:34:09

I think it would be better if the team don't go with it.

0:34:090:34:11

But you never know in this game. They probably will. Let's find out.

0:34:110:34:15

Thank you very much, JP.

0:34:150:34:17

-OK, kids, this is exciting, isn't it?

-Super!

-Yes!

-Yes! She said yes!

0:34:240:34:29

First up will be your magnifying glass. £55 you paid for that.

0:34:290:34:34

-30 to 40 is its estimate.

-Ohhh!

-Let's get into focus. Here we go.

0:34:340:34:40

Nice little object, this. And I have £25 to start me.

0:34:400:34:43

At £25. Give me 30 now. 30. 35.

0:34:430:34:47

-40 by the flowers.

-Ooh, a little bit more!

0:34:470:34:50

£40 down here. It's surely worth another fiver. 45.

0:34:500:34:53

One more, come on.

0:34:530:34:55

Yes!

0:34:550:34:56

50. 55.

0:34:560:34:59

55 on the right. Still at 55.

0:34:590:35:01

Any more at £55? It's all quiet on the net.

0:35:010:35:04

I shall sell for 55, then. All done at £55...

0:35:040:35:09

Yes!

0:35:090:35:11

OK, it's face, how lovely is that, 55.

0:35:110:35:14

No profit, no loss, no pain, no gain.

0:35:140:35:16

£30 to start me, £30 for the inkwell.

0:35:160:35:19

-Surely worth £30.

-Come on, surely!

0:35:190:35:22

£20, then. Nice little...£20 is bid, thank you. £20 at the front here.

0:35:220:35:26

£25 on the internet.

0:35:260:35:28

He says "no". Internet now at £25, surely worth 30 in the room.

0:35:280:35:31

One of you put your hand up in here.

0:35:310:35:32

We've got 25 going...30, thank you.

0:35:320:35:34

Well done, Madam.

0:35:340:35:36

In the room at 30. 35 on the net.

0:35:360:35:38

Oh, we've got profit!

0:35:380:35:40

No, you're not. 35 on the net,

0:35:400:35:42

selling to the internet then.

0:35:420:35:44

All done at £35.

0:35:440:35:46

£35 is plus £2, what could be nice than that? OK, now, the money box.

0:35:460:35:52

£30 to start.

0:35:520:35:54

Nice lot this for £30.

0:35:540:35:56

-Somebody.

-Come on, internet.

0:35:560:35:58

£20 then? Let's get £20.

0:35:580:36:01

-There's 20.

-He quite rated this as well.

0:36:010:36:04

So, 25, 30, he's gone now.

0:36:040:36:06

35, to the left of the pillar, 40, sir? 40.

0:36:060:36:09

45. We have 45, hiding behind the pillar at £45.

0:36:090:36:14

Where's 50? Surely worth 50!

0:36:140:36:16

£45, behind the pillar at £45.

0:36:160:36:18

Any more than £45?

0:36:180:36:20

-All done, are you sure?

-It's good enough.

0:36:200:36:22

£45, gentleman's bid, 45 all done.

0:36:220:36:24

£45 is plus £5. So, that means overall you're plus £7.

0:36:240:36:28

One wiped face, £2 and £5 is £7.

0:36:280:36:31

What are you going to do about the easel, you going to risk it?

0:36:310:36:34

-No-brainer.

-We're going to go with it.

0:36:340:36:35

Definitely going with it.

0:36:350:36:37

Lovely, they're going to go with the Bonus Buy, the easel.

0:36:370:36:39

Now, you've made your decision,

0:36:390:36:41

I can tell you that the auctioneer has estimated it at £80-120.

0:36:410:36:45

Oh, that's all right.

0:36:450:36:47

So, clever socks over there paid £50,

0:36:470:36:49

the auctioneer thinks you're going to double your money, for certain.

0:36:490:36:52

-That would be good.

-Wouldn't that be nice?

0:36:520:36:54

Anyway, decision made, we're going with the Bonus Buy,

0:36:540:36:56

we're going with the easel and here it is!

0:36:560:36:59

I have £220 to start with.

0:36:590:37:03

I don't believe it!

0:37:030:37:04

How brilliant is that?!

0:37:040:37:06

-On the book at £220.

-That's amazing!

0:37:060:37:09

Straight in at £220,

0:37:090:37:11

with commissions, that £220.

0:37:110:37:13

220 then?

0:37:130:37:15

I shall sell it...any interest on the net?

0:37:150:37:17

At £220.

0:37:170:37:19

Yes!

0:37:190:37:21

£220, you've just made £170!

0:37:210:37:24

-Brilliant!

-£170!

-Thank you!

0:37:240:37:27

-Catherine Southon!

-I'm glad I bought that now.

0:37:270:37:30

"Oh, I'm glad I bought that!"

0:37:300:37:33

That is so cool! So, you are plus £177...

0:37:330:37:38

177.

0:37:380:37:39

Do not tell the Blues a thing!

0:37:390:37:42

-Oh, no!

-Keep that quiet.

0:37:420:37:43

Now, team, do you know how the Reds got on?

0:37:480:37:50

-Not a clue, not a clue.

-You don't want to know, I tell you.

0:37:500:37:53

Now, the swagger stick, yes?

0:37:530:37:55

With the little screw-on kind of end cover.

0:37:550:37:59

-You paid £13 for that.

-Yes.

0:37:590:38:02

Which is so a joke, I can't tell you!

0:38:020:38:05

Anyway, he's put £30-40 on and I think that's

0:38:050:38:07

a bit of a miserable estimate, if I'm being frank.

0:38:070:38:11

Let us hope for the best! Here it comes.

0:38:110:38:13

Someone start me at £40 it.

0:38:130:38:14

£40 is bid. Straight in at 40.

0:38:140:38:17

In the centre at 40.

0:38:170:38:19

£40 is bid, main bid at 40.

0:38:190:38:21

Surely worth five though, where's five?

0:38:210:38:23

That's five, in the centre of the room at £40.

0:38:230:38:25

Gets it at 40, he's the only bidder and I'm selling to him now.

0:38:250:38:28

If you're all done, it's £40. All done? £40.

0:38:280:38:31

Oh...£40 but never mind, it's £27,

0:38:310:38:34

there's nothing shameful about that!

0:38:340:38:37

-These are your glasses.

-Now, here come your beakers.

0:38:370:38:39

Rather attractive with gilt

0:38:390:38:41

interiors and at what shall I say?

0:38:410:38:43

Someone start me £70 for them,

0:38:430:38:45

for the silver beakers.

0:38:450:38:46

Start me £70.

0:38:460:38:48

Tumbleweed...yes, it's gone quiet.

0:38:490:38:51

£40 then, let's get it rolling. 40 down here.

0:38:510:38:53

Come on, it's got to go upwards now.

0:38:530:38:55

Where's five? 45, 50...

0:38:550:38:57

you can't just do one, surely?

0:38:570:38:59

50, he's saying.

0:38:590:39:01

I thought these would cream away.

0:39:010:39:04

Internet? No interest on the net now. It's £50 down here.

0:39:040:39:07

Anyone else in the room? Come on, one more bid, £50 here...

0:39:070:39:09

Come on!

0:39:090:39:11

This is a disgrace!

0:39:110:39:12

£50, he's steely faced!

0:39:120:39:15

50, I'm selling, fair warning, 50.

0:39:150:39:17

That is as cheap as the proverbial fried potato!

0:39:170:39:21

Anyway, that's -70, bad luck, chaps.

0:39:210:39:24

Now, the plum dryer, this has got a long way to go.

0:39:240:39:27

£40 for it?

0:39:270:39:29

-£40?

-Worth every penny.

0:39:290:39:31

£30 then? Surely, £30? Come on, £30 for the plum dryer.

0:39:310:39:35

£30? There's £30 on the internet now.

0:39:350:39:37

Surely another five though? Internet on £30.

0:39:370:39:39

-You're in profit.

-We are.

-Miracle!

0:39:390:39:41

Five somewhere else?

0:39:410:39:42

Anyone in the room for 35?

0:39:420:39:44

You're all quiet now...at £30.

0:39:440:39:45

£30, well that's not bad, is it?

0:39:450:39:47

You've made a £2 profit.

0:39:470:39:48

That means overall you are -£41.

0:39:480:39:51

So, what are you going to do about the bonus buy?

0:39:510:39:53

What do you reckon, shall we go for it?

0:39:530:39:54

-Yeah, why not?

-We're in the minus anyway.

0:39:540:39:56

Try and bring it up a little bit.

0:39:560:39:58

I don't know if it will, but might as well go for it.

0:39:580:40:00

-Yeah, we'll go for it.

-You're going to go for it.

0:40:000:40:02

An art-deco Bakelite desk set.

0:40:020:40:03

Nicely fitted this with bids on the book,

0:40:030:40:06

I can start straight in

0:40:060:40:07

at £40, is bid.

0:40:070:40:09

At £40, are we going to get 40, we're looking for £45.

0:40:090:40:11

45 internet, 50 with me.

0:40:110:40:14

Come on!

0:40:140:40:15

55 and I've got 60 on the book.

0:40:150:40:17

Against you 60.

0:40:170:40:19

65 and 70 with me,

0:40:190:40:21

against you, internet, at £70.

0:40:210:40:23

75...

0:40:230:40:25

Yes, you've wiped your face, Tom.

0:40:250:40:26

-I've got 80 on the book.

-Oh, 80 on the book!

0:40:260:40:29

We're in profit, well done, Tom.

0:40:290:40:30

-I have 90 on the book.

-90, it's all coming back, Tom!

0:40:300:40:34

Are you going to go one more? It's a commission bid then at £90.

0:40:340:40:37

Anyone in the room now?

0:40:370:40:38

On the book at £90 commission.

0:40:380:40:40

It's fair warning, selling to

0:40:400:40:41

the book at £90, 95 in time,

0:40:410:40:43

clears the commission.

0:40:430:40:45

Now, internet bid at £95, fair warning then, selling 95.

0:40:450:40:49

£95, Tom-tom is plus £20,

0:40:490:40:51

that means you are overall -£21,

0:40:510:40:54

so well done.

0:40:540:40:56

That could be a winning score. Don't say a word to the Reds, all right?

0:40:560:40:59

-No, nothing at all.

-Zip!

0:40:590:41:01

Well, you lovely teams, you've been chatting to one another?

0:41:060:41:09

TOGETHER: No!

0:41:090:41:10

Not about the result, I dare say.

0:41:100:41:12

Well, there is a chasm between our teams today, I have to say.

0:41:120:41:16

And the runners-up by a fair old chalk are the Blues.

0:41:160:41:21

THEY SIGH

0:41:210:41:22

But it ain't right this, Blues, because you made three profits

0:41:220:41:26

on three of your items.

0:41:260:41:29

You just missed on one, seriously badly,

0:41:290:41:32

which was those wretched Russian cups.

0:41:320:41:35

-£70 was the body blow from which you could not recover,

0:41:350:41:38

all right.

0:41:380:41:40

Tom made you £20 profit on the Bakelite, contrary to the

0:41:400:41:43

auctioneer's and my predictions, so you did well with that, Tom.

0:41:430:41:47

But it wasn't enough to claw it back, was it?

0:41:470:41:49

-No.

-Never mind.

0:41:490:41:51

No, your overall score is -£21

0:41:510:41:52

but we have loved having you on the show.

0:41:520:41:54

-Thank you, it's been brilliant!

-And you've been great sports.

0:41:540:41:57

But the victors today are going home with a multitude of pleasures.

0:41:570:42:01

For a kick-off, £177 profit, which is a fair old slug.

0:42:010:42:08

Almost entirely made up by the brilliance of Catherine Southon.

0:42:080:42:12

Well done!

0:42:120:42:13

Who made £170 profit on her easel, that was a result!

0:42:130:42:18

And as it's in my gift, you had one wiped face

0:42:180:42:21

and two further profits but I've decided that you should be

0:42:210:42:24

admitted to the ancient and venerable order

0:42:240:42:26

of the "golden gavel".

0:42:260:42:29

We will treat it as three profits,

0:42:290:42:31

cos it's as close as a sheet of Bronco to achieving it.

0:42:310:42:33

There you go, darling. There you go, Rog the Dodge!

0:42:330:42:36

All right, thank you.

0:42:360:42:37

Pin on with pride

0:42:370:42:39

and there's something to go with Catherine's collection of these.

0:42:390:42:42

-Anyway, have you had a nice time?

-I've had a lovely time, thank you.

0:42:420:42:45

It's pretty cool, isn't it? When it works out like that.

0:42:450:42:47

It's really exciting. Did you enjoy it, Rog?

0:42:470:42:49

Oh, it's fabulous!

0:42:490:42:50

On that happy note, join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes? Yes!

0:42:500:42:55

There is drama on the high street of Lewes.

Experts Thomas Plant and Catherine Southon offer their advice to a pair of father-and-daughter teams, but will they find their three items in time and will they make a profit at auction?

Tim Wonnacott points out the special features of a Native American headdress.


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