Southwell 1 Bargain Hunt


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Southwell 1

Eric Knowles presents from the Southwell Racecourse Antiques Fair in Nottinghamshire. Experts Gary Pe and David Harper guide the teams.


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Transcript


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Some of these clocks are 300 years old and there are over 2,000

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in the collection, including this clocking-in machine.

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I'll be telling you more about this later, but first...

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Let's go Bargain Hunting!

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We're at Southwell Racecourse in Nottinghamshire

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at a huge antiques fair that's bound to entice our teams.

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They've got £300 to find three items with one hour on the clock.

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Let's take a peek at what's coming up in the show.

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David's despairing with the Reds.

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-Oh.

-Oh! Even I'm going, "Oh!"

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And the Blues are having a Barney.

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-Not buying it for a kid, are you?

-No.

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What are you buying it for, an adult to ride around the house on?

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Over at the auction, the Reds are jumping for joy.

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-Yes, yes.

-That's more like it!

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And the Blues are deflated.

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Oh, no!

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But all that is coming up later. Let's meet today's teams.

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And today, we've got something of a family affair because for the Reds

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we've got mother and son, Pauline and Anthony, and for the Blues

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we've got mother and son, Paula and Jonty.

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-Hello. ALL:

-Hello.

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So let me ask you, Pauline, I know for a fact that you're a bit of a dancer.

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-Yes.

-You certainly have been throughout your life.

-Yes.

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-Tell me more.

-Well, I used to do ballet when I was younger.

-Yes.

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I've danced all my life.

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But you're retired now, so when you were in the working world,

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what were you up to?

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Well, I used to work for Royal Doulton and Waterford Wedgwood.

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-Oh! Stand to attention. Big names.

-Wonderful, wonderful.

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So you know a thing or two about good quality bone china?

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-Hopefully, yes.

-OK. So, Anthony,

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what about the world of antiques and collectables?

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Are you a bit of a collector yourself?

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I don't collect antiques, but what I collect is American comics.

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I've been collecting them for over 30 years.

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-It is just a massive, massive market now these days.

-It is, isn't it?

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-Massive.

-Yeah.

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It goes without saying you need to be earning some money

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to do the collecting. So, what do you do for a living?

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I'm a retail manager. I sell tools.

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But I couldn't use a tool to save my life.

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-No?

-It don't do any DIY. I did put up a shelf not so long back.

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I was very proud of that shelf.

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What about the tactics that you're going to come up with today?

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Not spend anything over £100 for an item.

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We are obviously very proud of being from Sheffield,

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so we're looking for Sheffield silver, Sheffield cutlery.

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-Right.

-And obviously, the name of the game is to look for a bargain.

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-Yes. Good luck.

-Thank you.

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Turning my attention to the blue team and Paula.

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Tell me a little bit more about your career.

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I've worked at a local primary school for the last 17 years.

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The first 13 years, I was...

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Well, the official title is a midday supervisory assistant.

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-OK.

-But actually, dinner lady.

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-Dinner lady.

-Absolutely loved it.

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My mum was a dinner lady, so you and Victoria Wood and my mum,

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-you're in good stead there, aren't you?

-Absolutely, yeah.

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And then the last four years, I've worked in the office.

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So, Jonty, tell me about your day job.

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Day-to-day job's mainly work on the family farm.

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It's me, my dad and my brother on it, and Mum helps out at harvest.

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-Mm-hmm.

-Just keep it a bit of a family do.

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-Has it been in the family for some time, or what?

-Yeah.

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I think my grandad, he built the farm in about 1960.

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-It's been in the family ever since.

-What sort of things do you farm?

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I mean, is it cattle? Is it arable?

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-Just arable, it is.

-Right.

-So wheat, barley, stuff like that.

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And on top of being out there in the fields, you're a bit of an organiser.

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Yeah, I'm a vice chairman of our Young Farmers.

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We all meet up on a Tuesday night. There's about 15 or 20 of us.

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Organise parties, social events. It's a really good thing to be part of.

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I know that for a fact cos I know one or two young farmers

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who found their wives at young farmers dos.

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-Yeah, there's plenty of that goes on, yeah.

-Excellent.

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So how are you going to approach the shopping today, you two?

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-I would like to spend a lot of money.

-Right. OK.

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-What's your approach going to be?

-Cheap and cheerful, but something practical.

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It's not for me to really say, but often mothers know best. Do you know?

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-But having said that, Jonty, you be your own man.

-Yeah.

-OK, all right.

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-Well, you're going to need some money, aren't you, before you can do your spending.

-Yes.

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So I've got £300 for the Reds.

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There we go, Pauline. Paula, I've got £300 for the Blues.

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-Thank you very much.

-And this is the part where I say goodbye to you

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because you're going now off to meet your respective experts.

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-So I'll see you later.

-Thank you.

-So who's in charge today?

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Mothers or sons?

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Our teams will need some guidance, so...

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..taking the strain for the Reds, it's David Harper...

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..and doing battle with the Blues, it's Gary Pe.

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Pauline, what a day for it.

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-Beautiful.

-What are we going to buy?

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Sheffield Silver. Maybe not plate.

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-Why don't you like Sheffield plate?

-Well, it all depends.

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-OK. On what?

-On the price.

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-I'm looking for maybe a gavel, something industrial.

-Industrial!

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-Expensive.

-I think we need to look for something Chinese.

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-I like Chinese.

-OK.

-Industrial's really good.

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Excellent. I like it.

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-Some furniture.

-Some furniture, right.

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-No.

-No?

-No.

-Ah.

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Are you guys going to be difficult, then?

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I would think it's fair to say we don't need an expert,

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-I think we need a referee.

-Oh, dear!

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Teams, your time starts now.

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Let's go and find some Sheffield plate.

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-Let's go Bargain Hunting.

-Yay!

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And they're off. Best of luck, teams.

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And it sounds like Gary's got his hands full with the Blues.

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-You want expensive, you want cheap.

-Yes.

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-Oh, my God.

-Yes.

-This is going to be hard.

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And will it be all plain sailing for David?

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I like these vases.

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-Why do you like them?

-I just like the artistry on it.

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-The colour.

-And the colour.

-OK.

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Do you know what the design is called? Think of a fruit.

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-A small orange.

-Satsuma.

-Satsuma.

-Satsuma.

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Japanese Satsuma ware.

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It's purely made for the Western market, but very decorative.

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And what sort of date, would you say?

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Without a doubt, they're after 1868

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cos that's the beginning of the Meiji period.

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Looking at them from here, I think they're 1950s. They're later.

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-Right.

-And they're 60 quid.

-How much...

-They're no money.

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-They're hand-painted.

-How much do you think they would bring

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-at the auction?

-I don't think they're great auction buys.

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-No.

-Because you'd be surprised to hear that there's lots of

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-these things on the market.

-Right.

-Yes. That's the problem.

-Yep.

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Best move on, Reds. Now, what has Paula seen?

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You see, those, there, catch my eye.

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-Which?

-Those faces.

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They're probably monkey wood from Africa.

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-You don't like them?

-No.

-OK.

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-All right.

-All right, we'll walk away.

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No harmony yet in the blue camp,

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but the Reds may have just found enlightenment.

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-Do you like him?

-I do.

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-OK.

-I'd like to pick him up.

-Pauline?

-Hmmm.

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Some weight.

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It's Japanese.

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Very nice. It is a boxwood carving.

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Now, this is much earlier than your Japanese vases,

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so this is late 19th, early 20th century. Boxwood.

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-How much is it?

-Is there a price ticket on him?

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No, not that I can see.

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Madame?

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125...ish.

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-OK. He's nice and he's hand-carved, but again, this is...

-No.

-No.

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-..this is mass-produced.

-Yes.

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I mean, very highly skilled and talented to carve him.

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-We're saying no to the Buddhist monk?

-No.

-We're saying no.

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We're saying no.

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That's good team work from the Reds.

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I only wish I could say the same for the Blues.

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Jonty! Absolutely no chance.

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-Try before you buy.

-No. People want modern ones.

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-Try before you buy.

-"Try before you buy"! No!

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How do we resolve this?

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You've got your work cut out here, Gary!

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I think the way we should play this is that you choose one,

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he chooses one, and there will be a joint team choice.

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Maybe Gary's right - you have one and then you leave the rest to me.

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If you can get that down to 15 or even less,

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than I think there's a profit.

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OK. Yes. Jonty, you go for it, then, see what you can do.

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-Go on.

-Have you got the ball?

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Oh, he's got the ball. There you go.

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-Sorted.

-What is your best price?

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Make me a good offer.

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-£7? Seven quid.

-£15.

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-£10?

-£12.

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-£11, then.

-£12 and it's yours.

-£11.

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-£12.

-£11.

-Go on, you've got it.

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-Well done.

-As they say in America, "You the man!"

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Well played, Jonty.

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You've scored your first item in just six minutes.

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Now the Reds have found something a little out of the ordinary.

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-I like that Green man.

-Don't be silly.

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Something different in your house.

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Who's going to buy it, though?

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You know what I mean? Is there a market for it?

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The red man. The red man is looking for this green man.

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Is there a market for it? You see, that's the thing.

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Well, people buy eclectic stuff these days.

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-It's a bit different, it's a bit wacky.

-Yeah.

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-Boom, and it is in their house.

-OK.

-It's £90.

-It's very cool.

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I've got to tell you, it really is cool.

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I mean, I've never seen one of those things for sale before.

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Would I have it in my house? I would.

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I'd have it. I would!

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-Would you?

-Yes. Don't look at me like that.

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You haven't seen my house.

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-It's crazy.

-No, I haven't.

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-If you want that...

-I will go...

-..that will be your piece.

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..and I will ask what the lady can do on that.

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-Shall we speak to the stallholder?

-Yes.

-Yes.

-Good morning.

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Hello. Is this your green man?

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-It is, yes.

-Have you ever owned another green man?

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-I haven't.

-No, I haven't either. It's a cool thing.

-It is, yes.

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-Very interesting.

-It is quite a cool thing.

-The price is...

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-I can certainly do something on the price.

-Would you take £50 for it?

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I couldn't 50 on it.

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What about 65?

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65 and we'll shake your hand?

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-I can do 65.

-Yeah?

-Yeah. Brilliant.

-Thank you very much.

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-Thank you.

-Excellent.

-Thank you.

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Well, that is a new experience, isn't it?

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-No problem at all.

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First purchase in ten minutes. Very good.

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Great. The Reds are off the mark with their first item.

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Meanwhile, Paula and Jonty are still at odds.

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You've had your go.

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Planters.

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They're not very old.

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You mean...which?

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-This or that?

-Those there?

-Yeah.

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-Yeah. They're quite...

-They're sort of industrial.

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-They have the industrial look.

-But I think they look...

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-Are they modern?

-Yes, they are.

-I don't want to do modern.

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-No?

-No, no, no.

-So, you want old and antique?

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-I would like old and antique.

-OK. Let's try that out.

-Yes.

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The message is clear, Gary, it's got to be old.

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Not so with the Reds, though.

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-I like that.

-All right, OK.

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Tell me why you like it.

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Well, the colours and...

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-Do you like bright colours?

-Yes.

-Good for you. I do.

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I know!

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All right, what's it made from?

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-It's glass.

-Is it hand blown?

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I don't think so because there's no...

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-Pontil mark.

-Pontil mark.

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But often the pontil marks, which is the little, like,

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belly button on the base of a vase, where the rod has been snapped off,

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-they are polished out very often.

-Yes.

-I'm looking for scratches.

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I'm looking for wear, use, polish marks.

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It is smooth.

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It is smooth. And I feel that there was once a pontil mark there...

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-And they've polished it.

-..and they've polished it,

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which makes me believe for certain that this is a hand-blown vase,

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and there is only one of these vases in the universe.

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It's probably Italian.

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-Right.

-It's not Murano?

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It may well be Murano.

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-That little island off the coast of Venice.

-Do you think?

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It's Murano-esque.

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Glass-making originated in Murano in the 8th century

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and is famous for leading the way in developing or refining

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many glass-making technologies,

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including multicoloured glass like this.

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So date wise, it's got the swinging '60s, maybe '70s feel to it, hasn't it?

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-Yes.

-That's what it has.

-Yes.

-But I do love the colour.

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-Do you love it, Pauline?

-Yes.

-What are we going to do now, then?

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-Find out the price.

-Find out the price.

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OK. Madam, hello.

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You're looking very bright and cheerful.

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-Like the sunshine.

-Very lovely indeed.

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-Glass vase.

-15.

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-15.

-Ten?

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12.

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-OK.

-Deal.

-12.

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Is Anthony happy? You're happy?

0:12:370:12:38

Yeah, he's happy. He's not involved any more. Thank you very much!

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-I left that one to her.

-That's mine.

-Well done.

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And that's one item for Mum and one for son after 19 minutes.

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Back to the Blues, and it looks like Paula's in the driving seat.

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-What do you think?

-Oh, that car.

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I dread to think the price. What is it, Jonty?

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-Oh, £100!

-£100.

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-Is it modern?

-It is modern.

-Oh.

-But it's very well made.

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-£100.

-It is too much of a risk, isn't it?

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-Too much of a risk.

-OK.

-Right.

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-You hesitate, you say no, so...

-Yeah, OK.

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One to stay clear of, Blues.

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Meanwhile, the Reds are really motoring.

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Look at you two, you're absolutely on fire.

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-One purchase each.

-Yes.

-Now, who's going to buy the third?

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-Both of us.

-Well, we decided it would be both.

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Both? Do you agree on anything?

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No, but... Try.

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-How's that going to work, then?

-We will, we will.

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-We'll agree.

-No, we will, for the next one. We need some...

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Something really...

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-Sheffield plate. Excellent.

-Yes, yes.

-Come on, then.

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Off they go, and while the clock keeps ticking, I'm off to

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discover just how timepieces changed our working lives for ever.

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The Industrial Revolution in Britain in the 18th century heralded

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the beginnings of a machine age which was to be ruled by time.

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Coal-powered factories sprang up across the country,

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including here in Nottinghamshire,

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to produce anything from textiles to bicycles.

0:14:130:14:16

To keep the vast wheels of industry turning day and night,

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the bosses needed workers.

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Thousands of them.

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The challenge was how to ensure that those employees turned up

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for work on time and did the hours that they were supposed to.

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I'm here at the Museum of Timekeeping at the British Horological Institute

0:14:370:14:42

with collections officer Alex Bond to find out just how clocks were

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used to keep tabs on the comings and goings of workers.

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So, Alex, how did clocks change people's lives

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-during the Industrial Revolution?

-With the Industrial Revolution,

0:14:530:14:57

families flocked from the country into the city,

0:14:570:15:00

hoping to find their fortune in these new factories.

0:15:000:15:03

The managers of these factories needed to find a way of organising their staff

0:15:030:15:08

to ensure that productivity was at its most efficient.

0:15:080:15:11

So what is this and how does it work?

0:15:110:15:15

I can see a clock face there,

0:15:150:15:17

but the rest, well, I'm... You know, just tell me.

0:15:170:15:20

Well, you're quite right, it doesn't look like a regular clock.

0:15:200:15:24

This is a clocking-in machine from the turn of the 20th century,

0:15:240:15:27

so around 1910, and these would have featured in

0:15:270:15:31

most large sites and factories up and down the country

0:15:310:15:34

at the time of the Industrial Revolution.

0:15:340:15:36

Each employee was given a specific employee number.

0:15:360:15:40

So if I was arriving at work, I would take this lever...

0:15:400:15:44

..move it around to 901, and I'd push this through...

0:15:450:15:49

..which would then have stamped my time in on the card

0:15:520:15:55

next to my employee number.

0:15:550:15:57

This allowed the managers to really make sure you were

0:15:570:16:00

where you said you were at the time you said you were there.

0:16:000:16:03

Goodness me, this is Big Brother watching you, isn't it?

0:16:030:16:07

Absolutely.

0:16:070:16:08

And it wasn't just shift workers in factories who were being monitored -

0:16:100:16:14

it applied to other businesses, too.

0:16:140:16:16

So what's this clock? I'm looking at it,

0:16:160:16:19

I can't see any hands at all. Is it a clock?

0:16:190:16:22

This was designed to allow managers to see whether or not

0:16:220:16:25

their night-watchmen were falling asleep on duty.

0:16:250:16:28

Every half-hour, the night-watchman pushed down this lever,

0:16:290:16:32

which in turn would depress the spikes around the edge of the clock,

0:16:320:16:35

making a mark onto a card inside the clock.

0:16:350:16:38

If they missed one,

0:16:380:16:40

it would be very obvious to whoever was in charge that they had

0:16:400:16:43

either been away from their post, or they'd actually been asleep.

0:16:430:16:47

That's fiendish, isn't it?

0:16:470:16:48

And I can see on here that it was from the Bank of London.

0:16:480:16:53

That's right, which really goes a long way to explaining why they were

0:16:530:16:56

so stringent about the hours that their night-watchmen were doing.

0:16:560:16:59

If you're guarding the Bank of London, you can't

0:16:590:17:02

-afford to have people falling asleep on shift.

-No. Quite right.

0:17:020:17:05

Clocks didn't just ensure factory owners got their money's worth,

0:17:070:17:11

they also made the workplace safer. In the 19th century,

0:17:110:17:14

thousands of men across Britain risked their lives down the mines

0:17:140:17:18

and using pocket watches like this enabled them to keep a crucial check

0:17:180:17:23

on how long they had been underground.

0:17:230:17:25

Why was timing important?

0:17:260:17:28

Well, it was really important that miners came back up to the surface

0:17:280:17:32

on a regular basis to avoid lung infection.

0:17:320:17:34

The air quality beneath ground would have been truly appalling.

0:17:340:17:37

There would have been smoke to contend with, there would have been

0:17:370:17:41

poisonous gases to contend with, as well as the coal dust as well.

0:17:410:17:45

These also served a secondary purpose.

0:17:450:17:47

Beneath the watch, in these brass cases,

0:17:470:17:50

were brass discs which were stamped with the miner's employee number.

0:17:500:17:54

These were left above ground when the miner went below,

0:17:550:17:58

so that in the event of a disaster,

0:17:580:18:00

the foreman would be able to see at a glance, from his board,

0:18:000:18:04

who was still down below the ground and that way, they wouldn't

0:18:040:18:08

waste valuable resources searching for anybody who was already safe.

0:18:080:18:12

You know, it's fascinating the fact that clocks weren't there just to

0:18:120:18:16

tell us the time, but they shaped our working lives, as well,

0:18:160:18:20

so, Alex, thank you so much for all the information.

0:18:200:18:23

You're very welcome.

0:18:230:18:25

Well, as they say, time is money, so best get back to our teams.

0:18:250:18:30

Back at the fair, and with 20 minutes gone,

0:18:360:18:39

the Reds have one item left to find,

0:18:390:18:41

but the Blues are still two down,

0:18:410:18:43

so time to get a gallop on, team.

0:18:430:18:46

What about this cute baby, horsey thing?

0:18:460:18:50

It has this industrial look that you're looking for.

0:18:500:18:53

It does. A lot of sharp edges, Gary.

0:18:530:18:55

-That's true, yes.

-You're not buying it for a kid, are you?

0:18:550:18:58

Who are you buying it for, an adult to ride around the house on?

0:18:580:19:01

-No.

-You're buying it for a child!

0:19:010:19:04

Put it in a hallway, put a plant on it.

0:19:040:19:06

-Oh.

-Yeah.

-A plant?

0:19:060:19:08

-Absolutely.

-It's not overly...

0:19:080:19:10

If you buy it you can't moan at my football table.

0:19:100:19:13

Yeah, yeah, we're walking away, Gary.

0:19:130:19:15

-We are walking away.

-Come on, let's go.

0:19:150:19:17

Nice try, Gary, but they're not biting.

0:19:170:19:19

Now, how is the Reds' hunt for silver coming along?

0:19:190:19:22

-I'll tell you if I see real Sheffield plate.

-Yes.

0:19:220:19:25

That's plated.

0:19:250:19:27

That one? Yes.

0:19:270:19:28

Now, they're not old, but could these attract the Blues?

0:19:280:19:32

-What is it?

-It's supposed to be a spotlight.

0:19:320:19:35

Oh, right, OK.

0:19:350:19:36

-£15.

-I like the price.

0:19:360:19:39

-I don't know.

-Is that 15 quid? No!

0:19:390:19:41

-£15 each, yeah. I've got five of them all together.

-This?

0:19:410:19:44

-Yes, yes.

-So what...?

0:19:440:19:45

Can you do three for 30 or not?

0:19:450:19:47

-Yeah, I'll do three for 30.

-What would you use them for?

0:19:470:19:49

-The kitchen.

-Yes, in a kitchen, but any high ceiling, vaulted ceiling.

0:19:490:19:53

-I think that one's got a dent.

-That's OK.

-Pull them out.

0:19:530:19:56

That contributes to...

0:19:560:19:58

-Does it?

-Yes.

-OK.

0:19:580:20:00

-..the look of it.

-So you're saying three for 30?

0:20:000:20:02

-Three for 30.

-Three for 30.

0:20:020:20:04

If you can get £1 off, if it goes for 30 at auction,

0:20:040:20:08

-then at least we make a profit.

-Would you do three for 25?

0:20:080:20:11

No. That would be...bring a tear to my eye, that.

0:20:110:20:14

Could we do three for 29,

0:20:160:20:18

just to give us a bit of luck at the auction if it goes up in £5?

0:20:180:20:22

-Go on, then.

-Oh, thank you so much.

0:20:230:20:25

-So kind of you. Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:20:250:20:27

-Wonderful.

-We agreed on that.

0:20:270:20:29

-Yes! Perfect. Yes. Lovely. Thank you.

-Excellent.

0:20:290:20:32

At last, harmony in the Blue camp.

0:20:320:20:35

Their second item bagged in 22 minutes,

0:20:350:20:38

and both teams are level-pegging.

0:20:380:20:40

But over with the Reds, David and Pauline are not impressed.

0:20:400:20:44

Oh! Oh!

0:20:440:20:45

Even I'm going, "Oh!" I'm with you.

0:20:450:20:47

Graphic novels.

0:20:470:20:49

-No.

-No.

0:20:490:20:51

-What, not even Pride And Prejudice And Zombies?

-No.

-No.

0:20:510:20:53

So, now you've bought an item piece, Blues,

0:20:530:20:57

what's the plan for your third?

0:20:570:20:59

We are going to spend, spend, spend.

0:20:590:21:02

Now with over half their time gone,

0:21:030:21:05

the Reds are still on a quest for silver.

0:21:050:21:07

Do you like big funky bowls?

0:21:070:21:09

-Anthony?

-I do.

-Genuinely?

-Yes, genuinely.

0:21:090:21:11

-Pauline?

-Yes, I like it.

0:21:110:21:13

OK, Pauline, how old is it?

0:21:130:21:16

-'30s.

-'30s?

0:21:160:21:18

-No.

-I'm going to go 1850.

0:21:190:21:22

Ah, OK.

0:21:220:21:23

Very good, cos you're both very wrong.

0:21:230:21:25

-I love that.

-Right.

-Yes.

-It makes me look better.

-I know you do.

0:21:250:21:29

-That's it!

-It's handmade, isn't it?

0:21:290:21:31

-Look at it.

-Yes.

-Look at the way it's beaten.

-Yes.

0:21:310:21:33

It's completely hand beaten. Made from copper.

0:21:330:21:36

Looks almost medieval in its construction, doesn't it?

0:21:360:21:38

-Yes.

-Yes.

-Very much of a period, late 19th century, the Arts and...

0:21:380:21:44

-Crafts.

-Crafts.

0:21:440:21:46

..Crafts period, yeah.

0:21:460:21:47

The Arts and Crafts movement began in Britain in the 1860s,

0:21:470:21:50

and promoted well made, handcrafted goods

0:21:500:21:54

over poor quality mass-produced items.

0:21:540:21:56

Now, with Arts and Crafts things, we're looking for makers' marks,

0:21:560:22:00

names. Wouldn't it be lovely if you found a retailer's mark on there?

0:22:000:22:04

-Yeah.

-And the retailer I'm thinking of is Liberty.

0:22:040:22:06

-I love Liberty.

-Do you?

0:22:060:22:08

-Yes.

-Well, that screams Liberty.

0:22:080:22:10

Utterly scream... It's not. It wasn't retailed through Liberty...

0:22:100:22:14

-No.

-..because if it was it would be marked.

0:22:140:22:16

-It's a period piece.

-How much is it, David?

0:22:160:22:18

£58. I would buy it.

0:22:180:22:20

-What do you think, David?

-I would buy it, for the right money.

0:22:210:22:24

I think 30 quid, 35 quid, would be a steal.

0:22:240:22:27

Would you have it if we could get it for 30?

0:22:270:22:29

Yes, because it's got a split in it.

0:22:290:22:31

Yeah, I know. I doubt we're going to get it, but leave that with me.

0:22:310:22:34

-Yeah. You have a good chat, I'll go and have a word.

-Brilliant.

0:22:340:22:36

While David goes to talk to the dealer,

0:22:360:22:38

Gary tempts the Blues with some eastern promise.

0:22:380:22:41

Now, this table...

0:22:420:22:43

-..it's got a lot of things from the Orient.

-Mmm.

0:22:440:22:48

Oriental things make good money at auction.

0:22:480:22:51

-Yes.

-Because of the booming Chinese economy.

0:22:510:22:54

-OK.

-So anything here that grabs you?

0:22:540:22:58

Um...

0:22:580:22:59

-No, nothing here I can say at the moment.

-OK.

0:22:590:23:02

So, what's the news on that copper bowl, David?

0:23:020:23:04

-45.

-We'll have it.

-I think we'll have it.

-I like it.

0:23:040:23:08

-Shall we have it?

-Yep.

-That's it. Well done, you two. Well in time.

0:23:080:23:11

-Brilliant.

-That's your three purchases. Happy?

-Very happy.

0:23:110:23:14

-Happy?

-Yes.

-Let's go and enjoy some more sunshine.

-Brilliant.

0:23:140:23:18

It's not the Sheffield plate they were after,

0:23:190:23:22

but it's their third item, and in just 34 minutes.

0:23:220:23:25

They've got time to chill.

0:23:250:23:26

-It's not a hard number is it, really?

-No, no, no.

-Let's be honest.

0:23:270:23:30

No, this is the life.

0:23:300:23:31

But the Blues still have £260 burning a hole in their pocket,

0:23:310:23:35

and Paula has an opportunity to spend big.

0:23:350:23:38

There are a few enamel brooches in there.

0:23:380:23:41

And I do like them.

0:23:410:23:43

-They have this Scandinavian look to them.

-They do.

0:23:430:23:47

Do people buy brooches?

0:23:470:23:49

-Yes.

-Right.

-Very popular. And especially enamel brooches.

0:23:490:23:53

-Yes.

-And you specify that you want enamels.

0:23:530:23:56

-Yes.

-So there are three brooches in here...

0:23:560:23:59

-Yes.

-..that qualify.

0:23:590:24:01

Could we have a look at those brooches, please?

0:24:010:24:04

From this distance,

0:24:050:24:07

-I can tell you that these three are probably Norwegian.

-OK.

0:24:070:24:12

The heyday of Norwegian enamel was at the end of the 19th century,

0:24:120:24:17

coinciding with the Art Nouveau period,

0:24:170:24:19

and resulted in some of the finest enamel work ever made.

0:24:190:24:22

The green one is 40.

0:24:220:24:24

Yeah.

0:24:240:24:26

And the two whites are 40 each, so 120.

0:24:260:24:29

-If we could get it down to about 80ish...

-Right, OK.

0:24:290:24:34

-..then I'd say yeah.

-Have a word. Yep. We'll try and find out.

0:24:340:24:36

-Should we have a word?

-Yeah. See what the best price is.

-Right, good.

0:24:360:24:39

Could we find out the best price for those three, please?

0:24:390:24:42

If you take all three, I can do them for 90, but that's the very best.

0:24:420:24:46

Is that absolute death?

0:24:460:24:48

No movement at all on that?

0:24:480:24:50

Could you do 85? If we're nice?

0:24:500:24:53

-Go on, 85.

-85. What do you think?

0:24:530:24:55

-Would you go for it?

-Well, it looks like you've decided.

0:24:550:24:57

Yeah, should we go for it? Yeah, we'll go for that, then.

0:24:570:25:00

-Hey!

-Yes. That's it, we're done.

0:25:000:25:02

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:25:020:25:03

Well done!

0:25:030:25:05

Great, the Blues complete their final buy unscathed,

0:25:050:25:09

and with 20 minutes to spare, I'm calling time.

0:25:090:25:12

Teams, time's up.

0:25:120:25:14

-I think we deserve an ice cream.

-Definitely.

-Oh, definitely.

0:25:140:25:17

-Let's go for it. Absolutely.

-Let's go.

0:25:170:25:19

Let's find out what the Red team bought.

0:25:190:25:22

They got going with the green man streetlight at £65.

0:25:230:25:27

Next, the multicoloured hand-blown vase for £12.

0:25:270:25:31

And finally, the Arts and Crafts copper bowl set them back £45.

0:25:310:25:37

Well, I don't know about you, David, but I was so impressed, actually,

0:25:370:25:40

by that certain unity here today.

0:25:400:25:43

Yes, Eric, yes, I'll go along with that, yeah.

0:25:430:25:46

So your favourite item today?

0:25:460:25:47

I think it's the bowl, actually.

0:25:470:25:49

-The Arts and Crafts?

-The Arts and Crafts bowl.

-OK.

0:25:490:25:52

Which is the one item that you think is going to give you

0:25:520:25:54

-the biggest profit?

-The bowl.

-You think so?

-Yes.

0:25:540:25:57

OK. Anthony, what about yourself? What's your favourite?

0:25:570:25:59

-It's got to be the green man.

-Good lad.

-I love it. I absolutely love it.

0:25:590:26:03

But I don't think that's going to give us the best profit.

0:26:030:26:06

I think it's going to be the copper bowl.

0:26:060:26:08

-Oh, do you?

-So we do agree on that.

-All right. So what was the spend?

0:26:080:26:11

-122.

-OK, not huge.

0:26:110:26:14

So you're going to give me, what?

0:26:140:26:16

178.

0:26:160:26:18

You're giving it to me, but I'm going to pass it over to David there.

0:26:180:26:22

David, you got your eye on anything out there?

0:26:220:26:24

Well, we've been trying to find some good period Sheffield plate.

0:26:240:26:28

-Yes.

-So I'm going to go and try and find some.

0:26:280:26:30

I've got enough money, but whether I find any Sheffield plate,

0:26:300:26:33

-I've no idea.

-OK.

0:26:330:26:34

So while David goes off in search of something decent from Sheffield,

0:26:340:26:39

let's remind ourselves what the Blue team bought.

0:26:390:26:41

Their first buy was the table football,

0:26:410:26:44

which they scored for just £11.

0:26:440:26:46

Next, the set of three industrial lights helped shine the way for £29.

0:26:460:26:51

And finally, the Blues spent big on a set of three enamel brooches

0:26:510:26:55

at £85.

0:26:550:26:57

Gary, I was a little bit worried for you, actually,

0:26:570:26:59

because I could see there was a certain amount of conflict here,

0:26:590:27:02

before you even started. So, how did you sort it out?

0:27:020:27:05

Well, I thought if Paula chooses one...

0:27:050:27:08

-Mmm-hmm.

-..and Jonty chooses another...

0:27:080:27:10

-Yeah.

-..and we all collectively choose a third.

0:27:100:27:13

-That's democracy for you.

-Yeah.

-So, favourite item?

0:27:130:27:16

It would have to be the enamel brooches.

0:27:160:27:18

-Mmm-hmm.

-Definitely, yes.

-But which is going to give you

0:27:180:27:20

-the biggest profit?

-I think the industrial lights, yeah.

0:27:200:27:23

OK. Come on, Jonty, favourite item?

0:27:230:27:25

If I don't say the football table, I'll never hear the end of it.

0:27:250:27:28

So why did you like the football table?

0:27:280:27:30

It's a bit beaten up and a bit rough and ready.

0:27:300:27:32

So that's your favourite item, Jonty, but what about the one object

0:27:320:27:34

-that's going to give you the biggest profit.

-I think it will be the football table, maybe.

0:27:340:27:38

-You think so?

-Maybe.

-Well, let's hope we score with it, eh?

0:27:380:27:40

-Hopefully. Fingers crossed.

-How much did you spend eventually?

0:27:400:27:44

-125?

-Yes.

-125?

-It is.

0:27:440:27:47

£175, please, madame.

0:27:470:27:49

-There you are, sir.

-OK. There you go, Gary.

0:27:490:27:52

-Right.

-So anything in there that you just noticed that you might go for?

0:27:520:27:57

Let's put it this way. In the interest of harmony,

0:27:570:28:00

we've got two industrially looking things...

0:28:000:28:02

-Yeah.

-..one dainty-looking thing,

0:28:020:28:04

so I thought I'd balance it off and go the dainty route.

0:28:040:28:08

-OK.

-With a little bit of history.

0:28:080:28:10

-OK.

-Perfect.

-So while Gary goes off for a little bit of

0:28:100:28:14

a dainty bonus buy, we're going off to the auction.

0:28:140:28:17

Well, we've moved counties.

0:28:260:28:28

We're actually in Lincoln, at the sale rooms of

0:28:280:28:31

Golding Young & Mawer, and I'm joined by Colin Young.

0:28:310:28:34

-Absolute pleasure to have you here, Eric.

-Thank you very much, Colin.

0:28:340:28:37

Well, let's start with our Red team, shall we?

0:28:370:28:39

Anthony and Pauline, and the first item is a level crossing green man.

0:28:390:28:43

I have sold quite a few in the past.

0:28:430:28:45

I'm not quite sure how it's appeared here, but we've got to sell it.

0:28:450:28:48

What's your estimate on it?

0:28:480:28:49

A reasonable estimate of, say, 40 to 60 should encourage anybody.

0:28:490:28:53

That's where we're at.

0:28:530:28:55

Well, you might have to do a lot more encouraging.

0:28:550:28:57

They paid £65 for that, OK.

0:28:570:28:58

-Oh, OK.

-So that was chosen by Anthony.

0:28:580:29:01

The second item chosen by his mama, Pauline,

0:29:010:29:04

is this interesting piece of art glass.

0:29:040:29:07

It's decorative. What do we make of it?

0:29:070:29:10

Well, very much a style of its own.

0:29:100:29:12

We see plenty of it through the rooms. It doesn't inspire me.

0:29:120:29:15

-No?

-So let's come up with an estimate.

0:29:150:29:18

-Yeah.

-Well, £10 to £30.

0:29:180:29:20

Somebody should spend £10 on it, you would have thought.

0:29:200:29:22

-Well, they paid £12 for it, OK.

-Not bad.

0:29:220:29:25

The third item is the 20th-century hammered copper bowl.

0:29:250:29:29

Interesting style, really, isn't it?

0:29:290:29:31

That sort of hammered or planished finish.

0:29:310:29:34

-What would you put in it?

-Well, that's a very good question.

0:29:340:29:36

-A lot.

-Yes, clearly.

0:29:360:29:38

-Wouldn't you?

-Clearly.

-What's your estimate on it?

0:29:380:29:41

I've gone with a safety estimate on this one, really, £25 to £40.

0:29:410:29:45

Anthony and Pauline paid £45.

0:29:450:29:47

Yeah, that seems a little bit on the heavy side.

0:29:470:29:50

It strikes me that they may well be in need of their bonus buy,

0:29:500:29:55

so let's find out what it is.

0:29:550:29:57

Well, you gave our David £178 of leftover lolly to go and play with,

0:29:590:30:03

so, come on, reveal all.

0:30:030:30:06

Well, we were searching for Sheffield plate all day long.

0:30:060:30:09

-Yes, yes.

-Yes.

-We couldn't find any, Eric.

0:30:090:30:12

Another good eye. Pauline, you're dumbfounded in such a good way,

0:30:140:30:18

I can tell. It's a measuring thing, isn't it?

0:30:180:30:22

-Let me hold that.

-Thank you Eric.

-OK. Ravel it out.

0:30:220:30:24

Hold that tight.

0:30:240:30:26

There you go.

0:30:260:30:27

-Oh!

-There you go. What does that remind you of?

0:30:270:30:29

You're in the garden, you're planting your runner beans,

0:30:290:30:32

-you want a straight line.

-Look at the construction of it.

0:30:320:30:34

It's wrought iron, it's beautifully decorated.

0:30:340:30:37

It's like a blacksmith-made thing. A lot of effort has gone into it.

0:30:370:30:41

-How much did you pay?

-How much did you spend?

0:30:410:30:43

OK, I got it for the bargain price of 35.

0:30:430:30:46

-That's fine.

-So, now you've had the description, what do you think?

0:30:460:30:50

Seeing that it's that old...

0:30:500:30:52

..yes, I'm a bit more interested now.

0:30:530:30:55

Are we happy with that?

0:30:550:30:57

-Yes.

-If she's happy, I'm happy.

-Is that right?

0:30:570:31:00

-It's all that really matters.

-Well, you don't have to decide now.

0:31:000:31:04

Wait til you've sold your first three items and then make your decision.

0:31:040:31:07

But in the meantime, let's find out what the auctioneer has to say

0:31:070:31:10

about David's bonus buy.

0:31:100:31:11

And, hey, presto, one bonus buy.

0:31:130:31:16

-Oh!

-A garden marker of sorts.

0:31:160:31:18

-Do you want to give it a...

-I'll give it a bit of a tug.

0:31:180:31:20

Give it a tug, yeah. Well, there you are. It's got some age, doesn't it?

0:31:200:31:23

Exactly what I was going to say. It's got to be 19th century.

0:31:230:31:26

Could even be a little bit earlier than that.

0:31:260:31:28

I mean, I've never seen one sold before.

0:31:280:31:30

Me neither, so, again, a little bit of guesswork.

0:31:300:31:32

I've put an estimate on it of £10 to £30.

0:31:320:31:35

Where has it got to be?

0:31:350:31:36

Well, David went out and paid £35 for it,

0:31:360:31:40

-so he obviously thought it had got potential.

-OK.

0:31:400:31:43

In the meantime, let's turn our attention to the Blue team.

0:31:430:31:45

This is Paula and her son Jonty

0:31:450:31:48

and their first item is the table football.

0:31:480:31:51

There's not a great deal of quality.

0:31:510:31:54

Is it '60s, maybe '70s, got that plasticky finish to it.

0:31:540:31:57

-So what's your estimate?

-Well, I've gone for £10 to £30 on this one.

0:31:570:32:01

Well, that's all right. He paid £11 for it.

0:32:010:32:03

It seems like a pretty reasonable buy. That being said,

0:32:030:32:06

his mama surprisingly went for three of these.

0:32:060:32:10

-Aluminium.

-Yeah.

-They are formidable, aren't they?

0:32:100:32:13

That industrial look is very positive in terms of

0:32:130:32:16

modern furnishing and decoration. You can imagine those hanging

0:32:160:32:19

-in a kitchen or in a conservatory.

-Yeah.

0:32:190:32:22

-Just really adding to that look.

-So, estimate?

0:32:220:32:25

Well, there are three of them, so we'll go for £25 to £40.

0:32:250:32:28

-OK. Paula paid £29, so...

-OK.

-..I think she's in with a shout there, don't you?

0:32:280:32:32

-Yeah, that doesn't seem an unreasonable purchase.

-OK.

0:32:320:32:36

And then, item number three is the Scandinavian jewellery.

0:32:360:32:39

I think it's a clever thing to be buying the three,

0:32:390:32:42

because if there's a weak link in there,

0:32:420:32:45

you've got the strength in the other, and so I think as a grouping,

0:32:450:32:49

I've gone with an estimate of 80 to 120,

0:32:490:32:51

and one of the three just might be the killer punch in it.

0:32:510:32:55

Paula chose the three, paid 85, which seems a reasonable amount.

0:32:550:33:00

That's a lot I'm sort of happy with, at a purchase of £85.

0:33:000:33:04

-OK. So good buys so far, yes.

-Yeah.

0:33:040:33:06

It begs the question, will they need their bonus buy?

0:33:060:33:09

Well, let's find out what it is.

0:33:090:33:11

OK, you Blues, you gave Gary £175.

0:33:130:33:18

Gary, would you like to reveal how you spent that money?

0:33:180:33:20

Well, I got you this.

0:33:200:33:22

Oh, I like.

0:33:220:33:24

Love it. Absolutely love it.

0:33:240:33:25

-Yeah, it's not bad at all.

-Do you know who it is?

0:33:250:33:27

-No.

-Not a clue.

-Right.

0:33:270:33:28

This is the last Czarina of Russia.

0:33:280:33:32

-Right.

-Czarina Alexandra Feodorovna,

0:33:320:33:36

and the reason I got this is that this year marks

0:33:360:33:41

the 100th anniversary of their abdication from power.

0:33:410:33:46

-Right.

-Right, OK.

-So there's a lot of interest...

0:33:460:33:48

-Yeah.

-..going on, memorabilia around this family.

0:33:480:33:52

-So what do you two think of it?

-I really like the shape of it.

0:33:520:33:56

I actually like the whole thing.

0:33:560:33:57

Yeah, brilliant clear image, isn't it? Tidy case. I think everything, everything's perfect on it.

0:33:570:34:01

How much did you pay for it?

0:34:010:34:03

I paid...

0:34:030:34:05

-..£10.

-You are joking me.

-Ah, can't go wrong! Can't go wrong.

0:34:050:34:08

-Wow.

-A steal.

-Yes.

0:34:080:34:11

Well, remember, you two, you don't have to make your minds up now.

0:34:110:34:14

Wait until you've sold your first three items.

0:34:140:34:16

-OK.

-And that's when you make the decision.

-Yeah.

0:34:160:34:18

In the meantime, let's find out what the auctioneer has to say

0:34:180:34:21

about Gary's Czarina.

0:34:210:34:23

I don't want to get personal, but I think me and thee...

0:34:250:34:27

-Yeah.

-..are probably older than that photograph frame.

0:34:270:34:30

-Would you say?

-100%.

-Right, OK.

-In both cases.

0:34:300:34:33

So as for the metal, I mean, it's obviously... It's not silver, is it?

0:34:330:34:36

-No.

-What have you put it down as?

0:34:360:34:37

We've just put it down as silver-plated.

0:34:370:34:39

OK. So the real bonus is the subject.

0:34:390:34:42

We're looking at the last Czarina of Russia.

0:34:420:34:44

It's got to be the leading light, I think,

0:34:440:34:46

or the leading lady in this combination.

0:34:460:34:48

It has. What's the estimate?

0:34:480:34:50

Well, I'm sorry, but it's a miserable £5 to £15.

0:34:500:34:53

But I really couldn't get any more enthusiastic than that.

0:34:530:34:55

OK. Gary did not go overboard.

0:34:550:34:58

He spent £10 on it.

0:34:580:35:00

I think he's redeemed with the price rather than the object.

0:35:000:35:02

OK. Well, it all boils down to the auctioneer today.

0:35:020:35:05

-Who's that going to be?

-I suppose that's got to be me, then.

0:35:050:35:08

-It's got to be you.

-Yeah.

-Safe pair of hands, as usual.

0:35:080:35:11

£10. 12, 15.

0:35:130:35:16

So it's auction day. The moment of truth has arrived.

0:35:170:35:20

-Yes.

-There's no going back, is there?

-No.

-How are we feeling?

0:35:200:35:23

-Excited.

-Excited.

-Really excited.

-Yes.

-Here's your first lot.

0:35:230:35:26

It's your level crossing green man illuminated sign.

0:35:260:35:29

-You paid £65 for it.

-Right.

-It's coming up now.

0:35:290:35:32

Lot number 110. This is a level crossing green man.

0:35:320:35:36

So are you going to start me at 80 for it?

0:35:360:35:38

80? 50 to go, then.

0:35:380:35:39

-50? 30.

-Come on.

-Go on.

0:35:390:35:40

-Come on.

-£20, anybody? 20 is bid.

0:35:400:35:42

-Yes, 20.

-At 22, 25, five.

0:35:420:35:44

28, 28, 30. At 30 bid. 32 now, £30 bid.

0:35:440:35:47

-Two now, surely.

-Go on, go on, go on, go on.

0:35:470:35:49

38. 38. 40? 40 bid.

0:35:490:35:51

Two. 42. 45.

0:35:510:35:53

-Yes!

-Oh, yes.

-At 48.

0:35:530:35:55

Bid 50. 55. 60. 60. Five.

0:35:550:36:00

At £65, are we all done, then? No more bids from anywhere else?

0:36:000:36:03

Sells at 65.

0:36:030:36:05

Oh.

0:36:050:36:06

-Well...

-Wiped its face.

0:36:060:36:08

..didn't make a loss, you didn't make a...

0:36:080:36:10

-I know.

-So, second item coming up,

0:36:100:36:11

it's the late-20th-century art glass vase.

0:36:110:36:14

you paid £12 for it.

0:36:140:36:16

-Either way, here it comes.

-Yes.

0:36:160:36:17

This is the art glass vase.

0:36:170:36:19

There we go, some really good naturalistic colours in there.

0:36:190:36:21

Who's going to start me at £40?

0:36:210:36:24

-£40, anybody?

-40.

0:36:240:36:25

£40, halve it, 30.

0:36:250:36:27

Start me at £20, then.

0:36:270:36:29

£20, anybody? Offer me 10.

0:36:290:36:30

£10, anybody? 10 bid. £12 now, do I see?

0:36:300:36:32

12, 15, 18.

0:36:320:36:34

-Yes.

-20. Two.

0:36:340:36:35

Five. No.

0:36:350:36:37

-This is more like it.

-Oh, yes. Yes, yes.

0:36:370:36:39

£22. Are we all done?

0:36:390:36:40

Last call for the glass, then, selling at 22 in the stripes.

0:36:400:36:42

-Oh, come on!

-Good man.

0:36:420:36:45

-Very good.

-Well done.

0:36:450:36:46

£10 ahead. OK.

0:36:460:36:47

All right. That's the way to be.

0:36:470:36:49

So the third item is the early-20th-century hammered copper

0:36:490:36:52

Art Nouveau bowl. You paid 45.

0:36:520:36:54

-Yeah.

-We're just about to find out.

-Yes.

-Let's see. Coming up now.

0:36:540:36:57

Lot number 114 is a large early-20th-century

0:36:570:37:01

copper Art Nouveau-style bowl. Who's going to start me at £80 for it?

0:37:010:37:04

£80, anybody? 80. 50 to go, then. 50, who's first?

0:37:040:37:07

-50.

-Go on.

-50, I'm bid. 55, do I see?

0:37:070:37:09

50 bid, five anywhere else, surely.

0:37:090:37:11

At £50. Are we all done?

0:37:110:37:12

-Come on!

-Last call for you at £50.

0:37:120:37:15

-It's a profit.

-Well, it's a profit.

-That's it.

0:37:160:37:19

You lost five, you've now lost £15.

0:37:190:37:22

-Wow.

-Oh.

-We're now in a situation

0:37:220:37:24

whereby you have the option of going with the bonus buy.

0:37:240:37:28

Remember it's that interesting garden marker.

0:37:280:37:31

David paid 35.

0:37:310:37:33

-I would say no.

-All right.

0:37:330:37:34

-OK.

-No.

-All right. OK.

-I won't be offended.

0:37:340:37:36

Well, it'll be interesting. Let's find out, coming up now.

0:37:360:37:39

Lot number 119.

0:37:390:37:40

A late Victorian or Edwardian wrought iron garden marker.

0:37:400:37:44

£30. £30.

0:37:440:37:46

20 to go, then, surely.

0:37:460:37:48

£20, anybody? £10, surely somebody's going to bid that.

0:37:480:37:51

Ten, they do. Ten bid, 12 now, do I see?

0:37:510:37:53

Ten. 12 now. Have a look at what we're selling.

0:37:530:37:55

12 is bid. At 12.

0:37:550:37:57

-15.

-No!

0:37:570:37:59

Come on. No? What do you mean, no?

0:37:590:38:01

At £15 we're all done and I will sell, then, at £15.

0:38:010:38:06

-Oh!

-Oh!

-Well done.

0:38:060:38:08

-Good decision.

-That was a pretty good decision.

0:38:080:38:12

The good news is you've ended up with a plus of £15.

0:38:120:38:15

-Yes.

-You know, it could be a winning score.

0:38:150:38:18

-You never know.

-You never know.

0:38:180:38:19

But the other well-worn phrase is, not a word to the Blues.

0:38:190:38:22

How are we feeling this morning?

0:38:270:38:28

-Really excited. Very excited.

-A bit nervous, but...

0:38:280:38:31

-Are you regulars at auctions?

-Never been to one before.

0:38:310:38:33

-No?

-A farm auction, but nothing like this.

0:38:330:38:36

-Nothing like this.

-So here's the first lot.

0:38:360:38:38

-It's the table football game. You paid £11 for it.

-Yeah.

0:38:380:38:40

Either way, coming up now.

0:38:400:38:42

This is the table football game. Very nice set, this.

0:38:420:38:45

Who's going to start me at... Where do we want to be?

0:38:450:38:47

£40 for it? 40?

0:38:470:38:48

30 to go, then, surely, £30, anybody?

0:38:480:38:50

30. Start me at ten, then. £10. £10.

0:38:500:38:53

-Ten is bid.

-Hang on.

-Come on, then.

0:38:530:38:55

Any more now? At ten bid. 12 now. 12 is bid.

0:38:550:38:57

I've got 12, 15.

0:38:570:38:59

-Pay attention.

-15. 18? At £15 bid.

0:38:590:39:01

At 15. Any more now?

0:39:010:39:03

At 15. I'll offer you 16 if you like.

0:39:030:39:05

Going, then, at £15.

0:39:050:39:06

-15, it's a good start.

-Not bad.

0:39:060:39:10

It's plus £4, well done, you.

0:39:100:39:13

So here's your second item.

0:39:130:39:14

It's your three industrial-style aluminium and glass shades.

0:39:140:39:17

you paid £29 for these.

0:39:170:39:18

Let's see what they make. Here we go.

0:39:180:39:20

137 are three industrial size aluminium and glass shades,

0:39:200:39:24

really good and stylish.

0:39:240:39:26

Where do you want to be? £40 for them? 40, anybody? 40?

0:39:260:39:29

30, £20, 20, £10.

0:39:290:39:31

-Oh, no!

-£5.

0:39:310:39:34

£5 is bid.

0:39:340:39:36

Five bid. Do I see six?

0:39:360:39:38

Eight bid, ten bid, 12 bid, 15, 18.

0:39:380:39:41

At £18. Are we all done, then?

0:39:410:39:43

-Let's see.

-Another five.

-No, at 18,

0:39:430:39:45

it looks like the switch has been turned off and we sell at £18.

0:39:450:39:49

£18.

0:39:490:39:51

Where's the justice in the world?

0:39:510:39:53

That's minus 11.

0:39:530:39:56

We're now at minus £7.

0:39:560:39:58

It's not... It's not the end of the world.

0:39:580:40:01

So your third item is the three Scandinavian enamel brooches.

0:40:010:40:05

-You paid £85.

-Yes.

-Let's see where we go.

0:40:050:40:08

Lot 139 is the three Scandinavian enamel brooches.

0:40:080:40:12

I suppose, really, we've got to be at least £30 apiece for these,

0:40:120:40:15

haven't we? So start me at £100. 100? 80 to go, then?

0:40:150:40:18

£80, where do you want to be?

0:40:180:40:20

80. 50? 40? £40? £30.

0:40:200:40:22

Oh, no!

0:40:220:40:25

At 30 bid, five now, do I see?

0:40:250:40:26

35? 35 bid. 40, five, 50, five. Five bid.

0:40:260:40:29

60 bid, five.

0:40:290:40:30

65, 70. £70 I'm bid. Five.

0:40:300:40:32

75, 80. 80 bid, 85.

0:40:320:40:34

82, then, let's keep going.

0:40:340:40:36

82 on the net, 85 in the room, 85, 88 now.

0:40:360:40:39

That's right.

0:40:390:40:40

At 85, my bid is in the room at 85.

0:40:400:40:43

No more? Selling, then, in the room, at £85.

0:40:430:40:45

-Oh!

-Got out of that one, got out of that.

-Whew, yes.

0:40:450:40:48

It broke even, didn't it?

0:40:480:40:51

-It did, yeah.

-Having said that,

0:40:510:40:53

it gives you a status quo where you're still minus £7.

0:40:530:40:56

-My word.

-The pressure's on me now.

0:40:560:40:58

This is where you've got to make that decision about your bonus buy.

0:40:580:41:02

-100%.

-You're minus seven.

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:41:020:41:05

-Definitely.

-100%? Cast iron?

0:41:050:41:07

-Definitely.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Gary paid £10.

0:41:070:41:10

Let's find out. Coming up now.

0:41:100:41:11

Lot number 144 showing next.

0:41:110:41:13

This is a hammered photograph frame this time.

0:41:130:41:15

Very nice picture in there of Czarina Alex of Russia.

0:41:150:41:19

Do you want to start me at £20 for it?

0:41:190:41:21

Yes, please. Please do.

0:41:210:41:23

£10?

0:41:230:41:24

£5?

0:41:240:41:25

-Oh!

-Start me at a pound.

0:41:250:41:27

Thank you. £1, I'm bid. One bid, five bid. At six bid, eight bid,

0:41:270:41:30

-ten bid, 12 bid.

-Oh, that's great. Well happy with that.

0:41:300:41:33

18 now, 18 bid. Lady's bid at 18.

0:41:330:41:35

You're out there in the middle. And out on that. Selling at £18.

0:41:350:41:37

-Thank you very much.

-Hey!

-Yes!

0:41:370:41:40

Oh, Gary, I knew you could do it. You are the man.

0:41:400:41:43

You just made yourselves £8.

0:41:430:41:45

You were minus seven.

0:41:450:41:46

You are plus £1.

0:41:460:41:49

-Yes!

-Nice!

-Let's not knock it.

0:41:490:41:51

-This is a positive.

-This is wonderful.

0:41:510:41:54

So it goes without saying, not a word to the Reds.

0:41:540:41:56

-Nope.

-No.

-Absolutely not.

-OK.

0:41:560:41:58

Well, it was a pretty near-run thing. In fact...

0:42:030:42:08

I know that there's only £14 between the runner-up

0:42:080:42:13

and the winner, OK? But we do have a winner today,

0:42:130:42:17

and the winners today...

0:42:170:42:19

-are the Red team with all of a £15 profit!

-Yes!

-Yay!

0:42:190:42:24

Get in!

0:42:240:42:25

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:42:250:42:28

Well, listen, listen, listen, listen, there's no shame.

0:42:300:42:33

There is no shame, Blues, because you also made a profit, albeit £1.

0:42:330:42:38

You made a profit!

0:42:380:42:40

-At least we all won money.

-Exactly!

0:42:400:42:42

I'm in a situation now where I have to give you some money.

0:42:420:42:46

OK, are you ready for this? OK.

0:42:460:42:49

-Treasure that.

-I'm going to cherish that.

0:42:490:42:52

-Remember, it's 50p each.

-All right.

0:42:520:42:55

Make sure you get paid out there, Jonty.

0:42:550:42:57

Turning to the jubilant...

0:42:570:42:59

I mean, you know, you did manage to clock up a £15 profit there.

0:42:590:43:03

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-Well, there you go. A picture of Churchill on the back.

0:43:030:43:07

-Thank you.

-£15.

-Lovely, thank you very much.

0:43:070:43:10

-But my main concern is that you've all had fun, yes?

-Yes.

0:43:100:43:13

-Definitely.

-Excellent, because we hope you at home have had fun watching.

0:43:130:43:17

In the meantime, you can catch us on our website or follow us on Twitter,

0:43:170:43:21

but better still, join us next time for some more Bargain Hunting.

0:43:210:43:25

-Yes?

-Yes!

0:43:250:43:27

Eric Knowles presents from the Southwell Racecourse Antiques Fair in Nottinghamshire. Experts Gary Pe and David Harper guide the way as teams have £300 to spend on three items they hope will make them a profit at the auction in Lincoln. The blues can't agree while the reds pick out an unusual item. Eric also visits the Museum of Timekeeping to find out how certain clocks changed the way we worked.