Episode 1 University Challenge


Episode 1

In the opening match of the quiz series for students, the University of Edinburgh takes on Ulster University for a place in the second round. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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Transcript


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Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman.

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APPLAUSE

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Hello. Welcome to the 2017-18 University Challenge.

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About 130 institutions applied to take part,

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and we'll be meeting 28 teams who acquitted themselves well

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on our test paper over the next few weeks.

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They do it for a few fleeting moments of fame,

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a year's stewardship of the University Challenge trophy,

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and whatever soggy crisps are left in the laughingly-named

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hospitality suite.

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Each first round winner goes through to the next

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stage of the competition, and the four teams with the highest

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losing scores will also come back in play-offs.

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Now, Edinburgh University is a 16th century foundation whose alumni

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have included the politicians Gordon Brown, Amber Rudd and Ruth Davidson,

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the philosopher David Hume, and the writer Sir Walter Scott.

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Conan Doyle studied there and modelled Sherlock Holmes on

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Joseph Bell, a surgeon and lecturer in the university's medical school.

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More recently, its Roslin Institute saw the cloning of Dolly the Sheep,

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and in 2013 its Emeritus Professor, Peter Higgs,

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was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics.

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With an average age of 22, and representing around

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36,000 students, let's meet the Edinburgh team.

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Hi, I'm John, I'm from Edinburgh,

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and I'm studying Russian and History.

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Hi, I'm Stanley, I'm from Edinburgh,

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and I'm studying for an MSc in Speech and Language Processing.

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And their captain...

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Hi, I'm Innis, I'm from Glasgow,

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and I'm doing a PhD in Chemistry.

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Hi, I'm Philippa, I'm from Oxford, and I'm studying Biology.

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APPLAUSE

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Ulster University's origins lie in the mid-19th century with

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the Belfast School of Design,

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and the present institution received its Royal Charter in 1984.

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With 27,000 students, it is Ireland's largest university,

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and the team's members are drawn from its four campuses

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in Belfast, Jordanstown, Coleraine, and Derry/Londonderry,

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where the university's conflict resolution centre, INCORE, is based.

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With a mixed blessing of being the most senior team in the

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competition, with an average age of 50, let's meet the Ulster team.

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Hello, I'm Cathal McDaid from Buncrana in County Donegal,

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and I'm studying for a Masters in English Literature.

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Hi, I'm Kate Ritchie, I'm from Waringstown, County Armagh,

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and I'm studying Fine Art.

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And this is their captain...

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Hi, I'm Ian Jack. I'm originally from Peterhead in Aberdeenshire,

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and I'm reading for a PhD in Pharmacy.

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Hi, I'm Matthew Milliken, from Cumber in County Down,

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and I'm studying for a PhD in Education.

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APPLAUSE

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Right, the rules are the same as ever.

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Starter questions are solo efforts,

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they're worth 10 points, you answer them on the buzzer,

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and bonuses are worth 15 points, and you can confer on those.

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There's a five-point penalty

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if you interrupt a starter question incorrectly.

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Fingers on the buzzers, here's your first starter for 10.

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The white witch moth, at up to 30 centimetres,

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the large flying fox at 1.5 metres or more,

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the wandering albatross at 3.63 metres,

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and the Hughes H-4 Hercules Spruce Goose...

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BUZZ

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Wingspan.

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Wingspan is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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The first set of bonuses are on travel guides, Ulster.

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"All you've got to do is decide to go

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"and the hardest part is over - so go."

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This is the self-stated philosophy of which travel guide publisher,

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founded in the 1970s by Maureen and Tony Wheeler?

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Lonely Planet?

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Er, Lonely Planet? Lonely Planet?

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Rough Guide? Lonely Planet?

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Lonely Planet, maybe?

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Lonely Planet?

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Lonely Planet is right.

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Secondly, the choice of name for which series of

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boutique hotel guides was described by one of its founders as, quote,

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"A sort of two fingers up at the other guidebooks,

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"which were all a bit 'No sex, please, we're British'"?

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The, erm, the Blue Guide, is it?

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Which one? I never get to these places now.

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Er, what do you think? No idea.

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The Blue Guide?

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No, it's certainly not, it's Mr Mrs Smith!

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And finally, founded in Germany in 1827, the name of which

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publisher is synonymous with early 20th century European travel?

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Nominate Milliken. Baedeker?

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Baedeker is correct, yes.

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Right, 10 points for this.

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An Ancient Greek word meaning "a steersman"

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is the source of what five-letter prefix, now commonly used in

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words relating to computers and virtual reality,

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and specifically forming terms relating to the internet?

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BUZZ

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Cyber?

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Cyber is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on fate, fortune and destiny.

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In each case, identify the tragedy by Shakespeare

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in which the following lines occur.

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Firstly - "An admirable evasion of whoremaster man,

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"to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!"

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Tragedies, tragedies... Tragedies. Lear?

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Sure? King Lear?

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Correct.

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Secondly - "Our indiscretion sometimes serves us well

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"when our deep plots do pall: and that should teach us

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"there's a divinity that shapes our ends.

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"Rough-hew them how we will."

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Julius Caesar, or... Will we try that, then? Yeah.

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Julius Caesar.

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No, it's Hamlet.

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And finally - "Men at some time are masters of their fates.

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"The fault is not in our stars but in ourselves,

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"that we are underlings."

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So, it's tragedies...

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Troilus...

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Troilus and Cressida?

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Troilus and Cressida.

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No, that's Cassius to Brutus in Julius Caesar. 10 points for this...

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"If I had been rich,

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"I probably would not have devoted myself to mathematics."

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These are the words of which French scientist,

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the author of Analytic Mechanics?

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A contemporary of Laplace and Lavoisier,

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he gives his name to an equilibrium point in astronomy.

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BELL RINGS

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Lagrange?

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Lagrange is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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So your first set of bonuses, Edinburgh,

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are on Britain and Australia.

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Firstly for five, in 1908

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the Summer Olympics were held in London for the first time.

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In which year did Melbourne become the first Australian city to

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host the Summer Olympics?

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'60s or something, or...? I'm not sure. Not sure.

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Try '60, yeah. Erm, shall we just try...?

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Do you have any idea? I don't know. 1960.

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No, it was 1956.

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On February 14th, 1966, Australia replaced pounds, shillings

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and pence with dollars and cents.

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To the nearest year, how many years

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elapsed before the introduction of decimal currency in the UK?

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Well, that was what...? '70... It was 1973, wasn't it?

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I thought '71. Oh, go with '71. So, five, then.

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Five.

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Correct. How many full decades passed between the appointment

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of Margaret Thatcher and Julia Gillard as the first

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women to become Prime Minister of their respective countries?

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So, '79, and then probably about 2009, roughly.

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I would say three decades. Three decades.

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Did he ask decades or years? Decades. Decades, right.

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Full decades. Three.

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Three is correct. 10 points for this.

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In the 1870s, the Governor-General of India, Lord Lytton, described

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which country as "an earthen pipkin between two metal pots"?

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British forces made two interventions there...

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BELL RINGS

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Afghanistan.

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Your bonuses this time are on biochemistry.

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Firstly, which molecule is the basic building block for

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fatty acid synthesis?

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Er, glycerol? Yeah. Is that...? That's right. Is that right?

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Glycerol.

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No, it's acetyl coenzyme A. Oh, OK, fair enough.

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And secondly, the first reaction of the fatty acid biosynthetic

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pathway involves the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA.

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Which B vitamin acts as a coenzyme in this reaction?

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I really don't know. Erm, do you have any ideas? No.

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It's down to guessing. 12, erm... I don't know.

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B12.

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No, it's B7, Biotin.

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The elongation of the fatty acid chain to 16 or 18 carbons

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occurs with the help of the protein cofactor ACP.

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For what do the letters ACP stand?

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Erm, is it going to be acetyl-Co-something?

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Protein...! It doesn't sound right.

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Erm... Sorry, don't know.

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Shall we just guess something? Go for it.

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Acetyl-colon-estuary protein?

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No, no, it's acyl carrier protein.

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OK. Right, we're going to take a picture round now.

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For your picture starter, you'll see a map

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marked with a simplified route of an outbound notable expedition.

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For 10 points, I want you to name either of the people

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principally noted for making this journey in the 1830s.

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BUZZ

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Charles Darwin.

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Charles Darwin, and he was on the ship the Beagle, of course,

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captained by Robert Fitzroy.

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So following on from the Beagle's expedition to the Galapagos,

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your picture bonuses are three more maps

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showing the routes of significant expeditions.

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Again, I want you to name

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the person or persons noted for making the journey.

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Firstly, for five, I want the group of people

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who set out on this journey in 1846.

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Was it the...

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settlers for the Wild West, for the West? What were they?

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What were the people called? People heading to...

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1846. So...

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Klondikers, maybe? The Klondikers?

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Klondikers.

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No, those are the Donner Party, or the Donner-Reed Party.

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Secondly, who led this expedition, which ended in mutiny in 1611?

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Erm, what's the name of that bay?

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Hudson Bay. Henry Hudson. Hudson.

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So, Hudson? Hudson?

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It is Henry Hudson, yes.

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And finally, I want the person famous for this journey,

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which began in 1577.

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Oh, er... Is it, er, right round the world, that's Magellan, isn't it?

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No, it's from Britain, though. 1577...

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Sir Francis Drake. Francis Drake.

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Sir Francis Drake.

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It was Sir Francis Drake, yes.

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Right, 10 points for this.

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Paolo Veronese, Tintoretto, and the British artist

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Winifred Knights are among those who've painted which Biblical feast?

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BELL RINGS

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The Last Supper?

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I'm afraid you lose five points.

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It is the occasion of the first miracle attributed to Jesus

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in St John's Gospel. BUZZ

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Wedding Day at Cana.

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The Wedding at Cana is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Ulster, these bonuses are on works composed

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while their author was in prison.

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In each case, name the work and the author.

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Firstly, a Latin work translated into English by both

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Alfred the Great and Elizabeth I,

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and written when its author was imprisoned by Theodoric the Great.

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No.

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No, no idea.

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Sorry, no idea.

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It's The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius.

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Secondly, an English prose narrative printed by Caxton in 1485

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and believed to have been written by

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an incarcerated Warwickshire knight before 1470.

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Was that, erm...?

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No, no, no, erm, Miller's Tale and all that.

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Geoffrey Chaucer?

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Was it Geoffrey Chaucer? Chaucer?

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Is it the author? Geoffrey Chaucer.

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Geoffrey Chaucer.

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No, it's Malory's Morte d'Arthur.

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And finally, an English prose work published posthumously in 1905.

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It takes its title from the first two words of a psalm in the Vulgate.

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THEY CONFER QUIETLY

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A psalm in the Vulgate.

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When did Wilde die?

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De Profundis?

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Is that it? De Profundis? Try it anyway.

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De Profundis. By Oscar Wilde? Yeah.

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Yes, good.

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OK, 10 points for this.

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The wide tract of forest and saltwater swamp known as

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the Sundarbans forms the lower part of the delta of which river?

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BELL RINGS

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The Ganges Brahmaputra?

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The Ganges is correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Right, these bonuses are on Mexico.

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Coahuila, the third largest Mexican state,

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is about twice the size of Scotland and similar in size to which

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Asian country, one of the most densely populated in the world?

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Bangladesh. Bangladesh. Yeah? Er, Bangladesh?

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Correct. What is the second largest Mexican state?

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It shares its name with a major desert

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and is bounded to the west by the Gulf of California.

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Do you have an idea?

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Sono... Sonora? Yeah, that's it. Is that, yeah, Sonora? Try it.

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Is that how you say it? I think that's right.

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OK, er, Sonora.

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Sonora is correct.

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And finally, situated between Sonora and Coahuila,

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what is the largest state of Mexico?

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It's about the size of the UK.

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Is it Chihuahua? That was one that I had in my head.

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Yeah, come on, let's see. I'll try it. Chihuahua.

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Correct. 10 points for this.

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In mathematics, what six-letter term is

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defined as the attribute of being either odd or even?

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In economics, the same term is denoted by one of the letters

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in the abbreviation of the theory of exchange rates known as PPP.

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BELL RINGS

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Parity.

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Parity is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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You get a set of bonuses, Edinburgh, on football and poetry.

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In 2010, who wrote the poem Achilles,

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after David Beckham sustained an injury to his Achilles tendon

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that kept him out of that year's World Cup?

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Is it Pam Ayres or something?

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It's the kind of thing she might write about. Is it Carol Ann Duffy?

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Does she not write about...? I think it might be, unless she's dead.

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Do you want to try that?

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She isn't dead, no, you're OK. Carol Ann Duffy.

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Correct. Which Scottish poet tells the story of a declining football

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club in his 1993 collection Nil Nil?

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His other works include God's Gift To Women and The Book Of Shadows.

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No idea, sorry.

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Erm...

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The Book Of Shadows...

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Did you have an idea? The year, what was the year?

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Oh, I can't even remember. '93, '93. Sorry, I don't know. Fielding?

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Come on. Fielding.

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No, it's Don Paterson.

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Finally, who said, "I liked the idea that poetry was unpopular,

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"that it was like being the goalkeeper..."?

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In 2015, he was elected Professor of Poetry at Oxford.

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I have really no idea, sorry, I don't know any poetry.

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Any living poet?

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I don't think there's any point, we'll just pass. Sorry.

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That was Simon Armitage. OK.

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Right, we're going to take a music round now.

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For your music starter you're going

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to hear a version of a theme song of a television show.

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10 points if you can tell me its composer.

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JAUNTY FLUTE TUNE PLAYS

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Howard Goodall. Yes.

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The theme from Blackadder.

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So, Ulster, you get a set of music bonuses.

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Three more of Howard Goodall's themes for television.

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This time for the points I'll need the title of the programme

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each was written for.

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Firstly for five...

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# The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want... #

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It's the Vicar of Dibley.

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It is. Very enjoyable. Secondly.

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CHORAL SINGING

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THEY CONFER

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Mr Bean?

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Mr Bean. Mr Bean is correct.

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And finally...

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DRUM INTRO

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# It's cold outside... #

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Red Dwarf. Red Dwarf is right.

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APPLAUSE

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10 points for this.

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After a long-legged and long-necked bird,

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what name is given to the dwarf shrub Vaccinium Oxycoccus?

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Originally known...

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Crane. No. You lose five points.

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Originally known in England as marshwort or fenberry.

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It is cultivated commercially for its dark red acidic fruit.

0:16:590:17:03

Cranberry. Correct.

0:17:080:17:10

Right, these bonuses are on animals whose common name closely

0:17:130:17:17

resembles their scientific name,

0:17:170:17:19

for example the Western gorilla known as Gorilla gorilla.

0:17:190:17:23

In each case identify the animal from the description.

0:17:230:17:26

A single word answer is sufficient in each case.

0:17:260:17:29

Firstly, the largest land mammal of North America,

0:17:290:17:32

hunted almost to extinction in the 19th century?

0:17:320:17:34

I need a precise five-letter name.

0:17:340:17:36

THEY CONFER

0:17:360:17:38

It's five letters.

0:17:380:17:40

What's another... Bison? Bison.

0:17:400:17:42

Bison. Bison is correct.

0:17:420:17:45

Secondly, a common green lizard of Central and South America,

0:17:450:17:49

mostly herbivorous, they may grow to over two metres in length?

0:17:490:17:52

How close is chameleon? I don't think they are really...

0:17:560:17:59

Try it. Shall we just try that?

0:17:590:18:01

Chameleon. No, it's iguana.

0:18:010:18:03

And finally, a medium-sized cat with distinctive tufted ears,

0:18:030:18:07

native to the forests of Europe and Asia?

0:18:070:18:10

Lynx? Yeah. Lynx.

0:18:100:18:12

Lynx. Lynx is correct.

0:18:120:18:13

10 points for this.

0:18:130:18:15

Born in 1772, the utopian thinker

0:18:150:18:17

Charles Fourier made many unusual predictions,

0:18:170:18:21

among them that, once the rain of universal harmony began,

0:18:210:18:26

the seas would lose their salinity...

0:18:260:18:29

Lemonade? ..and turn into pink lemonade. You are right.

0:18:310:18:34

Right, your bonuses this time, Edinburgh, are on physics.

0:18:360:18:40

In each case I will read a fragment of the full

0:18:400:18:44

definition of an SI base unit, simply name the unit, please.

0:18:440:18:47

Firstly, between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the

0:18:470:18:52

caesium 133 atom.

0:18:520:18:53

Seconds, yeah?

0:18:530:18:55

Second. Correct.

0:18:550:18:57

Next, a force equal to 2 x 10 to the -7 Newton per meter of length.

0:18:570:19:01

THEY CONFER

0:19:030:19:07

There is a very discrete number for base units, I can't really think.

0:19:070:19:11

Erm... Ampere perhaps.

0:19:110:19:12

Ampere.

0:19:120:19:14

Ampere is correct.

0:19:140:19:16

And finally, 1/683 watt per steradian.

0:19:160:19:21

Probably...be candela.

0:19:210:19:23

The others don't seem to have much relevance.

0:19:230:19:26

Candela. Correct.

0:19:260:19:28

10 points for this, that gives you the lead.

0:19:280:19:30

Fingers on the buzzers, please.

0:19:300:19:32

In biology, what term describes a solution that has the same

0:19:320:19:35

osmotic pressure as another particular solution...

0:19:350:19:39

Isotonic.

0:19:390:19:41

Correct.

0:19:410:19:42

These bonuses could let you retake the lead.

0:19:440:19:47

They are on the US Nobel laureate Jody Williams.

0:19:470:19:51

Jody Williams received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999 for her

0:19:510:19:56

work in the ICBL, the international campaign to ban what?

0:19:560:20:00

Erm...

0:20:000:20:01

Land mines!

0:20:010:20:03

Land mines. Correct.

0:20:030:20:05

From 1986 to 1992, Williams was deputy director of a medical

0:20:050:20:10

aid organisation in which Central American country?

0:20:100:20:14

THEY WHISPER

0:20:160:20:19

El Salvador.

0:20:210:20:22

Correct.

0:20:220:20:23

In 1999, 120 states signed a convention banning the use,

0:20:230:20:28

production, sale and stockpiling of antipersonnel mines.

0:20:280:20:33

After which Commonwealth capital is it named?

0:20:330:20:36

Commonwealth capital?

0:20:360:20:39

Yeah, try that.

0:20:400:20:43

Ottawa. Ottawa is correct.

0:20:430:20:45

That gives you the lead. 10 points for this.

0:20:450:20:47

Literally meaning to show a fig,

0:20:470:20:49

what word for a type of informer in ancient Athens entered

0:20:490:20:53

English in the 16th century with the meaning of a false accuser?

0:20:530:20:57

It has since come to mean a servile flatterer...

0:20:570:21:00

Sycophant.

0:21:020:21:03

Sycophant is correct, yes.

0:21:030:21:05

You retake the lead

0:21:070:21:08

and your bonuses this time are on a Yorkshire landowning family.

0:21:080:21:12

Born in 1826, Sir Tatton Sykes is described as an inveterate

0:21:120:21:16

restorer of what?

0:21:160:21:18

He spent much of his own money on projects for which

0:21:180:21:21

his employees included GE Street and Temple Moore.

0:21:210:21:25

I'd be guessing, I don't know.

0:21:250:21:28

Any sensible guesses? Furniture? No. Erm...

0:21:280:21:31

Castles. No, they were churches, mainly in the East Riding.

0:21:310:21:35

Sykes's son Mark was a diplomat who give his name, in part, to

0:21:350:21:40

a secret accord of 1916 concerning the dismemberment of which Empire?

0:21:400:21:45

The Ottoman.

0:21:450:21:46

Ottoman. Correct.

0:21:460:21:48

Sir Mark Sykes's son Christopher produced the authorised biography

0:21:480:21:52

of which major novelist, born in London in 1903?

0:21:520:21:55

Born 1903?

0:21:550:21:59

Somerset Maugham, I don't know.

0:21:590:22:02

Do you have any idea? No.

0:22:020:22:04

Let's have it, please.

0:22:070:22:08

Somerset Maugham.

0:22:080:22:10

No, it's Evelyn Waugh.

0:22:100:22:11

Right, we're going to take a second picture round.

0:22:110:22:13

For your picture starter you'll see a photograph of an actor,

0:22:130:22:16

10 points if you can give me his name, please.

0:22:160:22:18

Yul Brynner.

0:22:190:22:21

Yul Brynner is correct.

0:22:210:22:22

APPLAUSE

0:22:220:22:24

No-one is saying anything.

0:22:270:22:30

Yul Brynner was one of a select few to have won both a Tony

0:22:300:22:33

Award and an Academy Award for playing the same role on stage

0:22:330:22:36

and then on screen.

0:22:360:22:38

For your bonuses, three more actors who achieved the same

0:22:380:22:40

distinction, five points for each you can name.

0:22:400:22:43

Firstly...

0:22:430:22:44

THEY CONFER

0:22:460:22:49

Joel somebody... Oh...

0:22:490:22:51

I can't remember his name. No.

0:22:540:22:56

Joel Edwards.

0:22:560:22:57

It was Joel Grey, I'm afraid.

0:22:570:22:59

Secondly, the actor on the right in this picture.

0:22:590:23:02

A Man For All Seasons.

0:23:040:23:06

No, no...

0:23:060:23:07

THEY WHISPER

0:23:070:23:12

Richard Harris.

0:23:130:23:15

No, that's Paul Schofield.

0:23:150:23:17

And finally, the actor on the right here.

0:23:170:23:21

Rex Harrison.

0:23:210:23:22

Rex Harrison.

0:23:220:23:23

Rex Harrison, indeed. He played Henry Higgins in My Fair Lady.

0:23:230:23:26

Right, 10 points at stake for this.

0:23:260:23:29

Known in English by a two-word name, which historical German

0:23:290:23:33

province was divided between the Soviet Union and Poland in 1945?

0:23:330:23:38

It's capital was...

0:23:380:23:39

East Prussia.

0:23:410:23:43

East Prussia is correct, yes.

0:23:430:23:45

You take the lead and your bonuses are on the films of Martin Scorsese.

0:23:450:23:51

Which 1974 comedy drama concerns a widow who heads to California

0:23:510:23:56

with her young son in search of a better life

0:23:560:23:59

but ends up waitressing in Arizona?

0:23:590:24:02

Ellen Burstyn won the Best Actress Academy Award for her

0:24:020:24:05

title performance.

0:24:050:24:06

I don't know. Does anyone know?

0:24:060:24:08

Quiz Show, did you say? Yeah.

0:24:080:24:10

Erm...Quiz Show.

0:24:100:24:13

No, it's Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More.

0:24:130:24:16

Secondly, in Scorsese's controversial film adaptation of

0:24:160:24:19

Nikos Kazantzakis's book, The Last Temptation Of Christ,

0:24:190:24:22

which British singer songwriter

0:24:220:24:24

and actor played Pontius Pilate?

0:24:240:24:26

No idea. Does anyone have any ideas?

0:24:260:24:29

Pass. It was David Bowie.

0:24:290:24:30

Finally, Scorsese's first film to be shot in 3D,

0:24:300:24:35

what is the title of the 2011 story of a boy who

0:24:350:24:38

lives in the Gare Montparnasse in Paris in the 1930s?

0:24:380:24:41

Hugo? Are we happy with that? Yep.

0:24:410:24:43

Hugo. Hugo is correct.

0:24:430:24:45

10 points for this.

0:24:450:24:46

APPLAUSE

0:24:460:24:48

Minor characters in which Victorian novel include the auctioneer

0:24:480:24:51

Borthrop Trumbull, Mrs Cadwallader,

0:24:510:24:54

wife of the Rector of Tipton and Freshitt,

0:24:540:24:56

the Tory lawyer Frank Hawley and the lady's maid Tantrip?

0:24:560:25:00

Pickwick Papers.

0:25:060:25:08

Anyone like to buzz from Ulster?

0:25:080:25:11

Middlemarch.

0:25:110:25:13

Middlemarch is correct, yes.

0:25:130:25:15

These bonuses could give you the lead again.

0:25:160:25:19

They are on words that contain the Latin word "ergo"

0:25:190:25:22

meaning therefore.

0:25:220:25:23

For example, undergod, overgoes and ergophobia.

0:25:230:25:26

In each case give the word from the definition.

0:25:260:25:30

First an arbour or covered walk

0:25:300:25:32

formed of horizontal trellis work supported on columns.

0:25:320:25:36

Pergola.

0:25:360:25:38

Pergola. Correct.

0:25:380:25:40

Secondly, one who squanders money on possessions,

0:25:400:25:44

a wastrel or spendthrift.

0:25:440:25:46

Sorry, we don't have it.

0:25:530:25:54

That's a scattergood.

0:25:540:25:56

And finally, a disease of cereal grasses,

0:25:560:25:58

it's particularly associated with rye.

0:25:580:26:01

Ergotism.

0:26:020:26:03

Yes, ergotism, correct.

0:26:030:26:05

10 points for this.

0:26:050:26:07

The reign of which British monarch

0:26:070:26:08

saw the publication of Robinson Crusoe

0:26:080:26:11

and Gulliver's Travels, the death of Sir Isaac Newton

0:26:110:26:13

and the bursting of the South Sea Bubble?

0:26:130:26:17

James II.

0:26:170:26:19

No, anyone like to buzz from Ulster?

0:26:190:26:20

You may not confer.

0:26:200:26:22

George II.

0:26:230:26:24

No, it was George I. 10 points for this.

0:26:240:26:27

What Greek derived term

0:26:270:26:29

describes a fast heart rate above 100 beats a minute?

0:26:290:26:33

Tachycardia.

0:26:340:26:36

Tachycardia is correct.

0:26:360:26:38

These bonuses could give you the lead again.

0:26:380:26:41

They are on the seven summits as defined by the Italian

0:26:410:26:45

mountaineer Reinhold Messner.

0:26:450:26:47

That is the highest mountain on each continent.

0:26:470:26:50

In each case, name the peak from it's geographical coordinates.

0:26:500:26:53

First, 3.06 degrees south, 37.36 degrees east.

0:26:530:26:58

Kilimanjaro.

0:26:580:26:59

Kilimanjaro. Correct.

0:26:590:27:02

Secondly, 32.65 degrees south, 70.02 degrees west.

0:27:020:27:07

Aconcagua. Correct.

0:27:070:27:10

Finally, 27.99 degrees north and 89.93 degrees east.

0:27:100:27:16

Everest.

0:27:160:27:18

Correct. 10 points for this.

0:27:180:27:20

"Somehow it seems to fill my head with ideas, only

0:27:200:27:23

"I don't know exactly what they are."

0:27:230:27:26

In Through The Looking Glass, Alice says this of which poem?

0:27:260:27:29

Jabberwocky.

0:27:330:27:34

Jabberwocky is correct. GONG!

0:27:340:27:37

APPLAUSE

0:27:370:27:41

Who knows, if we'd had another five minutes you might have

0:27:410:27:44

gone on to answer all the bonuses correctly

0:27:440:27:46

and take the lead again, but 160,

0:27:460:27:48

I would guess, is probably one of the highest-losing scores

0:27:480:27:51

and you will probably come back, I would have

0:27:510:27:53

thought, for one of the play-offs, so congratulations to you.

0:27:530:27:56

Edinburgh, it was pretty tight. Yeah.

0:27:560:27:58

Nip and tuck all the way, I thought, but you did it in the end,

0:27:580:28:02

congratulations. I hope you can join us next time for another first-round

0:28:020:28:05

match, but until then it's goodbye from Ulster University... Goodbye.

0:28:050:28:09

It's goodbye from Edinburgh University... Goodbye.

0:28:090:28:12

And it's goodbye from me, goodbye.

0:28:120:28:14

APPLAUSE

0:28:140:28:16

In the opening match of the quiz series for students, the University of Edinburgh takes on Ulster University for a place in the second round.

Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.