Episode 28 University Challenge


Episode 28

The quarter-final stage continues as teams representing two more universities fight it out to reach the next stage of the competition. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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Transcript


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APPLAUSE

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Asking the questions, Jeremy Paxman.

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Hello. Two more teams who've already battled hard

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to get into this quarterfinal stage of the competition

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now have to fight even harder to get out of it,

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with not one but two victories required

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before they make the sunlit uplands of the semifinals.

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Now, the team from the University of Edinburgh

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appear to relish a close-run thing,

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having arrived at this stage with two wins,

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both by the smallest of margins, five points,

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against Ulster University in round one

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and University College London in round two.

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With an accumulated score of 335 and an average age of 22,

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let's meet the Edinburgh team again.

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Hi, I'm John, I'm from Edinburgh,

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and I'm studying Russian and history.

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Hi, I'm Stanley, I'm from Edinburgh,

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and I'm studying for an MSc in speech and language processing.

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And here's their captain.

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Hi, I'm Innis, I'm from Glasgow, and I'm doing a PhD in chemistry.

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Hi, I'm Philippa, I'm from Oxford and I'm studying biology.

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APPLAUSE

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It was also a close-run thing for the team

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from Emmanuel College Cambridge in their first-round match

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against St Hugh's College Oxford, which they won by 170 points to 155.

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But Strathclyde University let them off rather more lightly,

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with a margin of 105 points to 170.

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Their accumulated score of 340, therefore,

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is just five points ahead of their opponents tonight.

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So we may be in for another close match.

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With an average age of 19, let's meet the Emmanuel team once more.

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Hi, I'm Ed, I'm from Manchester,

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and I study physics.

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Hello, I'm Kitty, I'm from Hampshire,

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and I study Arabic and Hindi.

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Here's their captain.

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Hi, I'm Alex Mistlin, I'm from Islington in north London,

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and I'm studying politics and international relations.

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Hi, I'm James, I'm from Bristol, and I'm reading medicine.

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APPLAUSE

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OK, the rules never change, so fingers on the buzzers,

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here's your first starter for ten.

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Which major city links a sunflower

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whose tubers are eaten as a vegetable...?

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-Jerusalem.

-Jerusalem is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Emmanuel College, you get the first set of bonuses.

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They're on alliteration.

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"Whereat, with blade, with bloody blameful blade,

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"he bravely broached his boiling, bloody breast."

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These words appear in the prologue

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to a play within which play by Shakespeare?

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-Midsummer Night's Dream has a play within a play.

-No, but it's not...

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I think it might be. No? I think it is.

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What are the chances of it...?

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Shall I say it?

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A Midsummer Night's Dream?

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Correct. It's the prologue to Pyramus and Thisbe, of course.

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"The fair breeze flew, the white foam flew,

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"the furrow followed free."

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These words appear in which narrative poem of 1798?

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Not Rime Of The Ancient Mariner?

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-That's a good shout.

-Yeah, good shout.

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-Rime Of The Ancient Mariner?

-Correct.

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Which early 20th-century novel ends with the words,

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"So we beat on, boats against the current,

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"borne back ceaselessly into the past"?

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-The Great Gatsby.

-Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Sorry it was so easy for you! LAUGHTER

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Ten points for this.

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In a televised interview, which physicist said,

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"I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing.

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"I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing

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"than to have answers which might be wrong"?

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He gives his name to diagrams used in...

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Feynman.

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Richard Feynman is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Three questions on tall statues for you, Edinburgh.

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What is the three-word English name of the prominent statue

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in the Art Deco style, dedicated in 1931, which

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stands at 22.95 degrees south, 43.21 degrees west?

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THEY CONFER

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-Christ the Redeemer.

-Correct.

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Similar in height to Nelson's Column and completed in 1967,

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a sword-wielding female statue commemorating which battle

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stands at 48.74 degrees north, 44.53 degrees east?

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Is it Stalingrad? Could be a shield, sword...

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OK. Stalingrad.

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-Correct.

-Nice one.

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And, finally, which statue stands at 40.68 degrees north,

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74.04 degrees west?

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Built to the design of Bartholdi, it was dedicated in 1886.

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Statue of Liberty.

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The Statue of Liberty.

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Correct.

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APPLAUSE

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Ten points for this.

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The style of visual art known as Gandhara

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is particularly associated with what religion?

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The style developed from the first century BCE

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in present-day Pakistan and eastern Afghanistan.

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Hinduism?

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Anyone like to buzz from Edinburgh?

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Zoroastrianism?

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No, it's Buddhism. Ten points for this.

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Described by the French socialist Jean Jaures as,

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"The language of a defeated nation,"

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which six-letter term is defined by the OED as

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"a dialect spoken by the people of a particular region

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"which is considered to differ from the standard..."

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Pidgin.

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No. "..the standard or orthodox version"?

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You lose five points, by the way, Edinburgh, sorry.

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Anyone want to buzz from Emmanuel?

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Patois?

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Patois is correct. Yes.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on psychology, Emmanuel.

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The murder of which woman in New York in 1964

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inspired research into the bystander phenomenon

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because it was commonly believed that more than 30 witnesses

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to the event did nothing to intervene?

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Is it Kitty Genovese?

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Nominate Derby.

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-Kitty Genovese?

-Correct.

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In a piece of research now notorious for its unethical processes,

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which behaviourist psychologist worked with his assistant Rosalie Rayner

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to instil certain fears into a baby they nicknamed Little Albert?

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I don't know.

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Skinner? Try...

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Skinner?

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No, it's John B Watson.

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And, finally, the subject of the film The Three Faces Of Eve,

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Chris Costner Sizemore is one of the best-known people to have been given

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what controversial diagnosis,

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known today as dissociative identity disorder?

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It is schizophrenia?

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Mm, do you think so?

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Try schizophrenia.

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Schizophrenia.

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No, it's multiple personality disorder.

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Ten points for this.

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Characterised by Chambers Dictionary as "archaic or jocular,"

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which word, formed by conjoining a pronoun and a verb,

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appears at the start of John of Gaunt's speech in Shakespeare's

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Richard II, that continues, "I am a prophet new inspired"?

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Its meaning is, "I'm of the opinion that".

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-Methinks.

-Methinks is correct.

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APPLAUSE

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These bonuses are on islands.

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Firstly, for five points, a territory of Chile

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in the South Pacific, which island group is named after

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a Spanish navigator who landed there in the 1570s?

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It contains individual islands that bear the names

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of Alexander Selkirk and Robinson Crusoe.

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-Juan Fernandez Islands.

-Oh, yeah.

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-Juan Fernandez Islands.

-Correct.

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Often said to have been named after the leader or leaders

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of a Portuguese naval expedition in the 16th century,

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which atoll in the British Indian Ocean Territory

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is the largest in the Chagos Archipelago?

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Diego Garcia.

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-Diego Garcia.

-Correct.

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And, finally, part of a British Overseas Territory,

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which island group in the South Atlantic is named after

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the Portuguese sailor who discovered it in 1506?

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-Tristan da Cunha.

-Yeah.

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-Tristan da Cunha.

-Tristan da Cunha is correct.

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You take the lead. APPLAUSE

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We're going to take a picture round now.

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For your picture starter, you'll see a still from a film.

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Ten points if you can give me its title.

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Pulp Fiction?

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No. Anyone like to buzz from Emmanuel?

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No?

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OK, I'll tell you. That's from My Beautiful Laundrette.

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So we'll take the picture bonuses in a moment or two.

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Ten points at stake for this starter question.

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Working in a rural hospital during World War II,

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the Dutch physician Willem Kolff is credited with the invention,

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using sausage casings and orange juice cans...

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Dialysis.

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No. You lose five points.

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..using sausage casings and orange juice cans,

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of the first artificial form of which organ of the human body?

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Kidney.

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Kidney is correct, of course.

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APPLAUSE

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So you get the picture bonuses,

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following on from My Beautiful Laundrette.

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It was a forerunner of what the critic B Ruby Rich named

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the New Queer Cinema movement of the late '80s and early '90s.

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Your picture bonuses are three more films representative of this movement.

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Five points for each you can identify. Firstly, for five,

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this is a promotional still from which documentary of 1990?

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-I don't know.

-Do you have any idea?

-No.

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Pass.

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That was Paris Is Burning.

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Secondly, this film of 1991.

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Oh, it's...

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It's Stand By Me.

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-Isn't it...? Are you sure?

-No.

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Isn't that one about kids?

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It's...

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That's River Phoenix and Keanu Reeves.

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Stand By Me.

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No, that's My Own Private Idaho,

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Gus Van Sant's reworking of Henry IV.

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Finally, this film of 1992.

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Could it be Orlando?

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-Has there been a film of that?

-I've no idea.

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Is that a stupid thing to say?

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-Orlando?

-Orlando is correct.

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APPLAUSE Sally Potter's adaptation

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of Virginia Woolf's novel. Right. Ten points for this.

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Listen carefully, give your answers promptly.

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In addition to Oxford, three English cities appear within the names

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of spaces on the standard UK version of the board game Monopoly.

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Name two of them.

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-Kent?

-No.

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Anyone like to buzz from Emmanuel?

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Coventry and Leicester?

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Correct. Liverpool is the other one, as in Liverpool Street station.

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APPLAUSE

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Right, your bonuses now, Emmanuel College, are on the sciences.

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What two-word term denotes the coiled structure

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of an extended polypeptide chain, discovered by Linus Pauling in 1948?

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It has 3.6 residues per turn.

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-Alpha helix?

-Nominate Fraser.

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-Alpha helix.

-Correct.

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Expressed as a number between zero and one,

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what alpha is the name of an index used in psychometric testing

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to measure the internal consistency of a test or scale?

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It's named after the US researcher who developed it in 1951.

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Spearman's...?

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That's statistics, isn't it?

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-Pearson...?

-Spearman's coefficient?

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Spearman's coefficient.

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No, it's Cronbach's alpha.

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And finally, the alpha brainwave has what alternative name, after the

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German scientist who invented the electroencephalographic, or EEG?

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I don't know. When are we talking?

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I don't know.

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-James?

-Don't know.

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Pass.

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It's Hans Berger. Ten points for this.

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Mozart and Salieri,

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the Cossack insurgent Pugachev,

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Vladimir Lensky, and an equestrian statue of Peter the Great

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are characters in works by which literary...?

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Alexander Shostakovich.

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-No.

-It's not Shostakovich, is it?

-I'm afraid you lose five points.

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I'm going to offer it to you, Emmanuel,

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you can hear the whole thing.

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..literary figure? He was killed in a duel in 1837.

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Pushkin.

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Pushkin is correct, yes.

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APPLAUSE

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Three questions on the Seven Churches Of Asia,

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as described in the Book Of Revelation, Emmanuel College.

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In Revelation, which of the seven churches is addressed

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with the words, "Thou hast left thy first love"?

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A major commercial centre of the Roman province of Asia,

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its remains lie near Selcuk in western Turkey.

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THEY CONFER

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-Come on.

-Ephesus.

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Correct.

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Which of the churches is described as "lukewarm"

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and "neither hot nor cold"?

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Thomas Hardy used a form of its name in the title of a novel of 1881.

0:13:280:13:33

Like, D'Urberville?

0:13:380:13:39

-No, don't think so.

-In the Bible...

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Come on, just give me something.

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Hebrews. Is that a thing?

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Hebrews.

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No, it's Laodicea.

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And, finally, which church described as,

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"Having kept my word, and hast not denied my name"?

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It shares its Greek-derived name

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with one of the largest cities in North America.

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-Large cities...

-North America. Like, Toronto or Ottawa...

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Toronto, does that sound like...?

0:14:080:14:10

-I don't think so.

-Vancouver?

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I don't know.

0:14:130:14:15

Try that?

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Nominate Fraser.

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Pff.

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LAUGHTER

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Bad luck!

0:14:210:14:22

Toronto.

0:14:220:14:24

The church of Toronto?! No, it's Philadelphia.

0:14:240:14:26

Right, we're going to take a music round now.

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For your music starter,

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you're going to hear an aria from an opera.

0:14:300:14:32

For ten points, just identify its composer, please.

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OPERA MUSIC PLAYS

0:14:350:14:38

Puccini.

0:14:450:14:46

No. Anyone like to buzz from Emmanuel?

0:14:460:14:48

You can hear a little more.

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MUSIC CONTINUES

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Bizet.

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No, it's Softly Awakes My Heart from Samson and Delilah

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by Camille Saint-Saens.

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So, music bonuses in a moment or two. Another starter question.

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The Oyo Empire and the Aro Confederacy

0:15:210:15:25

were historical states that lay largely within the territory

0:15:250:15:28

of which present-day country?

0:15:280:15:31

The latter was defeated by Britain early in the 20th century.

0:15:310:15:34

Afghanistan.

0:15:430:15:44

No. Anyone like to buzz from Emmanuel College?

0:15:440:15:46

Japan?

0:15:480:15:49

No, it's Nigeria.

0:15:490:15:50

Right, ten points for this.

0:15:500:15:52

Listen carefully. I need a seven-letter word here.

0:15:520:15:55

In his treatise On The Equilibrium Of Planes,

0:15:550:15:58

Archimedes outlined the importance of what mechanical component,

0:15:580:16:02

the support or pivot of a lever?

0:16:020:16:05

-Fulcrum.

-Fulcrum is correct, yes.

0:16:050:16:07

APPLAUSE

0:16:070:16:09

So, you'll be thrilled to hear you get the music bonuses.

0:16:110:16:14

We heard Saint-Saens earlier as a starter.

0:16:140:16:17

That piece was written for the mezzo-soprano Pauline Viardot.

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As a performer, teacher, composer and leader of a Paris salon,

0:16:210:16:24

she was an important influence on many now better-known composers.

0:16:240:16:28

Firstly, for five, can you give me the composer of this work?

0:16:280:16:32

Viardot gave its premiere in 1870.

0:16:320:16:34

OPERA MUSIC PLAYS

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It sounds a bit like Wagner, if you ask me, but...

0:16:460:16:49

What's the name of the work?

0:16:490:16:50

I do not know.

0:16:500:16:52

-The name of the work?

-Is it the opera or just...?

0:16:520:16:55

-What were we asked for?

-The composer.

0:16:550:16:57

Just the composer.

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Is it Wagner?

0:16:590:17:00

No, it's Brahms, his Alto Rhapsody.

0:17:000:17:02

Secondly, I want the composer of this work,

0:17:020:17:04

one of several he dedicated to Viardot.

0:17:040:17:07

OPERA MUSIC PLAYS

0:17:090:17:13

THEY CONFER

0:17:130:17:21

We'll try Schubert.

0:17:270:17:29

No, that's Faure, Chanson De Pecheur.

0:17:290:17:31

And finally, here, I want the name of this operatic role,

0:17:310:17:35

rewritten in French for Viardot by Hector Berlioz.

0:17:350:17:39

OPERA MUSIC PLAYS

0:17:390:17:44

THEY CONFER

0:17:500:17:57

Is it in Carmen? I don't know...

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That would be in French in the first place, wouldn't it?

0:18:000:18:03

Oh, yeah, true, so it can't be that.

0:18:030:18:05

-Does anyone have any thoughts?

-No, sorry.

0:18:050:18:07

Tosca.

0:18:070:18:09

No, it's Orpheus.

0:18:090:18:10

Ten points for this.

0:18:100:18:12

Which three letters begin the name of the element

0:18:120:18:15

between titanium and chromium in the periodic table? The...

0:18:150:18:18

V-A-N.

0:18:180:18:20

V-A-N is correct, yes.

0:18:200:18:22

APPLAUSE

0:18:220:18:25

You get a set of bonuses on the playwright, Laura Wade.

0:18:250:18:28

Wade is perhaps best known as the author of which play,

0:18:280:18:31

first staged at the Royal Court Theatre in 2010

0:18:310:18:34

and later adapted as the film The Riot Club?

0:18:340:18:38

It concerns a privileged Oxbridge club similar to the Bullingdon.

0:18:380:18:41

-Posh.

-Posh is correct.

0:18:410:18:44

In 2003, Wade adapted for the stage Young Emma,

0:18:440:18:47

a memoir by which Welsh author

0:18:470:18:50

whose other works include The Autobiography Of A Super-Tramp?

0:18:500:18:54

-Don't know.

-No.

-No.

0:18:540:18:56

Dylan Thomas?

0:18:560:18:58

Dylan Thomas.

0:18:590:19:01

No, it's WH Davies.

0:19:010:19:02

In 2015, which novel did Wade adapt for the stage?

0:19:020:19:05

The debut novel of Sarah Waters, it follows the lives

0:19:050:19:08

of the musical performers Kitty Butler and Nan King.

0:19:080:19:11

I don't know.

0:19:140:19:15

Sarah Waters... Is she not...?

0:19:150:19:18

She wrote Instance Of The Fingerpost, I think,

0:19:180:19:20

-but I don't think it's that.

-Sarah Waters?

-I don't know.

0:19:200:19:23

Pass.

0:19:230:19:24

It's Tipping The Velvet. Ten points for this.

0:19:240:19:27

With about 30,000 species,

0:19:270:19:29

teleost are a diverse infraclass of what general type of vertebrate,

0:19:290:19:34

distinguished by having...?

0:19:340:19:36

Fish.

0:19:360:19:37

Fish is correct, yes. APPLAUSE

0:19:370:19:39

Your bonuses are on Chaim Weizmann,

0:19:390:19:41

the first president of Israel and a noted chemist.

0:19:410:19:44

Weizmann was born in the Russian Empire in 1874,

0:19:440:19:48

not far from the city of Pinsk.

0:19:480:19:50

In what present-day country is Pinsk?

0:19:500:19:53

Do you have any idea?

0:19:530:19:55

I THINK it's in Belarus.

0:19:550:19:56

We'll just try that. Belarus.

0:19:560:19:58

-Correct.

-Well done.

0:19:580:20:00

In 1915 in Manchester, Weizmann developed a process

0:20:000:20:02

known as ABE fermentation for use in the manufacture of munitions.

0:20:020:20:08

For what common solvent does the letter A stand in this case?

0:20:080:20:12

-Yeah, that's an idea.

-Yeah.

0:20:120:20:14

Alcohol.

0:20:140:20:16

-No, it's acetone.

-Oh.

-Sorry.

-Don't worry.

0:20:160:20:18

And, finally, a shortage of grain for acetone production

0:20:180:20:21

led to an exploration of other sources.

0:20:210:20:24

This included organised collections, for example, by Boy Scouts,

0:20:240:20:27

of what nut-like seeds, which are inedible, usually, to humans?

0:20:270:20:31

Could it be beech nuts?

0:20:330:20:35

Maybe. I don't have anything else to suggest. Anyone...? No?

0:20:350:20:38

Beech nuts.

0:20:380:20:39

No, they're conkers, or horse chestnuts.

0:20:390:20:41

Beech nuts are definitely edible. Ten points for this.

0:20:410:20:44

Which French sociologist introduced the term anomie

0:20:440:20:47

to describe that condition in which norms for conduct are

0:20:470:20:51

either absent, weak or conflicting

0:20:510:20:53

in his ground-breaking study in 1897, Suicide?

0:20:530:20:57

Durkheim.

0:20:580:20:59

Durkheim is right. Your bonuses now are on...

0:20:590:21:01

APPLAUSE

0:21:010:21:03

..human prehistory.

0:21:030:21:04

Dated to around 200,000 years before the present,

0:21:040:21:07

early remains of Homo sapiens were discovered in 1967

0:21:070:21:10

in the Omo River Valley in which east African country?

0:21:100:21:14

-That's in Ethiopia.

-Ethiopia.

0:21:140:21:15

-Correct.

-Well done.

0:21:150:21:17

Described as being among the oldest anatomically-modern humans in Africa,

0:21:170:21:21

other early remains have been unearthed at Jebel Irhoud

0:21:210:21:25

in which Mediterranean country?

0:21:250:21:27

I don't know that at all.

0:21:280:21:30

Turkey?

0:21:300:21:31

No, I think it's...Israel.

0:21:320:21:34

-I'm happy with that.

-I don't know.

-I'm not really sure, but...

0:21:350:21:37

-Israel.

-No, it's Morocco.

0:21:370:21:40

The cave paintings at Lascaux in southern France

0:21:400:21:42

are estimated by radiocarbon dating to be how old?

0:21:420:21:46

You can have 2,000 years either way.

0:21:460:21:48

-Not the faintest idea. Sorry.

-I wouldn't know where to start.

0:21:480:21:51

Maybe 40,000?

0:21:530:21:54

40,000. Is that what we're saying?

0:21:540:21:56

-40,000.

-No, it's 17,000.

-OK.

0:21:560:21:59

Right, we're going to take a second picture round.

0:21:590:22:01

For your picture starter, you're going to see a portrait

0:22:010:22:03

of a literary figure. Ten points if you can identify him.

0:22:030:22:06

John Donne.

0:22:090:22:10

No. Anyone like to buzz from Emmanuel?

0:22:100:22:14

Is it Moliere?

0:22:140:22:15

No, it's not. It's Jonathan Swift.

0:22:150:22:18

So we'll take the picture bonuses in a moment or two.

0:22:180:22:21

Ten points at stake for this.

0:22:210:22:22

Who was proclaimed King of England during his return journey

0:22:220:22:26

from the Ninth Crusade? Having visited his lands in France,

0:22:260:22:30

he landed in England almost two years later,

0:22:300:22:33

his coronation taking place in August 1274.

0:22:330:22:36

-Edward I.

-Correct.

0:22:380:22:40

APPLAUSE

0:22:400:22:42

You get the picture bonuses. In 1973,

0:22:420:22:44

the International Astronomical Union named a crater on Deimos

0:22:440:22:48

after Jonathan Swift, who was the geezer you failed to identify.

0:22:480:22:51

He speculated in Gulliver's Travels that Mars had two small satellites.

0:22:510:22:55

Your picture bonuses are three more writers who have had Martian craters

0:22:550:22:59

named after them in recognition of their speculative fiction.

0:22:590:23:03

Firstly, for five, who's this?

0:23:030:23:05

-Asimov, maybe?

-Yeah.

0:23:060:23:09

-Asimov?

-Asimov is correct.

0:23:090:23:11

The Martian Way is an early example of a terraforming story set on Mars.

0:23:110:23:15

Secondly...

0:23:150:23:17

Truman Capote?

0:23:200:23:21

-Did he do speculative fiction?

-I don't know. Just...

-Not sure.

0:23:210:23:26

Truman Capote?

0:23:260:23:28

Truman Capote?! No. SCATTERED LAUGHTER

0:23:280:23:30

It's Edgar Rice Burroughs,

0:23:300:23:31

who wrote a series of novels centring on a Martian adventurer.

0:23:310:23:34

And, finally...

0:23:340:23:35

That looks like Kafka, doesn't it?

0:23:370:23:39

But it's not...

0:23:390:23:40

-Shall we say Kafka?

-No.

-It's not Kafka.

0:23:400:23:43

Who is it, then?

0:23:430:23:44

Kafka.

0:23:460:23:48

Doesn't look at all like him.

0:23:490:23:50

-No, it's HG Wells.

-Oh.

0:23:500:23:52

Of course, Mars was the source of the invasion

0:23:520:23:55

in The War Of The Worlds.

0:23:550:23:56

Right, we're going to take another starter question now.

0:23:560:23:58

Rene Antoine de Reaumur explained how different alloys of what metal

0:23:580:24:03

could be distinguished by the amount of carbon they contain?

0:24:030:24:06

-Iron.

-Iron is correct.

0:24:080:24:10

APPLAUSE

0:24:100:24:12

You get a set of bonuses on Angela Merkel. Born in Hamburg,

0:24:140:24:16

Angela Merkel entered which East German university in 1973?

0:24:160:24:20

Founded in 1409, its noted other alumni include

0:24:200:24:24

Leibniz, Goethe and Wagner.

0:24:240:24:26

What was the one that's near to Berlin?

0:24:260:24:29

-Um...

-I've got a friend that's...

-Potsdam? Is it Potsdam?

0:24:310:24:34

-Do we have any idea?

-I can't remember.

0:24:340:24:37

Potsdam.

0:24:370:24:39

No, it's Leipzig.

0:24:390:24:40

In 2000, Merkel became the first woman

0:24:400:24:43

and the first non-Catholic to lead which political party?

0:24:430:24:46

I need the three-word name, either in English or German.

0:24:460:24:51

Christian Democratic Union.

0:24:510:24:52

Correct.

0:24:520:24:54

In 2013, Merkel became the third three-time Chancellor

0:24:540:24:57

of post-war Germany.

0:24:570:24:59

Give the surnames of both the other two.

0:24:590:25:01

I'm not much help here, I'm afraid.

0:25:020:25:04

Helmut Kohl was one.

0:25:040:25:08

Helmut Kohl and...

0:25:080:25:10

-Schmidt?

-And Kohl.

-OK.

0:25:100:25:13

Schmidt and Kohl.

0:25:130:25:14

-No, it was Konrad Adenauer and Kohl.

-Sorry.

-Don't worry.

0:25:140:25:17

Ten points for this.

0:25:170:25:19

What given name is shared by

0:25:190:25:20

the creator of the Dukes cancer classification system,

0:25:200:25:23

the Vice Admiral who took charge of the British fleet at Trafalgar

0:25:230:25:26

after the death of Nelson,

0:25:260:25:28

and a seventh century saint who became Bishop of Lindisfarne?

0:25:280:25:31

Cuthbert?

0:25:360:25:37

Cuthbert is correct, yes.

0:25:370:25:38

APPLAUSE

0:25:380:25:40

These bonuses are on dinosaurs of the late Jurassic period.

0:25:420:25:45

In each case, name the dinosaur from the description.

0:25:450:25:48

Firstly, which quadrupedal, herbivorous dinosaur had bony plates

0:25:480:25:52

embedded in the skin of its back and a name meaning "roof lizard"?

0:25:520:25:57

-Is that brachiosaurus?

-I think stegosaurus.

-I think it's...

0:25:570:25:59

-Brachiosaurus is arms, isn't it?

-OK, so...

0:25:590:26:02

-I think stegosaurus. Stegosaurus.

-Correct.

0:26:020:26:04

Which carnivorous dinosaur has a name meaning "other lizard"

0:26:040:26:08

or "different lizard"?

0:26:080:26:10

-I feel like xenosaurus.

-Xenosaur? I don't know. Allosaur?

0:26:100:26:13

-Allosaurus.

-Yeah, go with that.

0:26:130:26:14

-Allosaur.

-Allosaurus is correct, yes.

0:26:140:26:17

And, finally, which quadrupedal, herbivorous dinosaur grew to

0:26:170:26:20

more than 26 metres in length and has a name meaning "double beam"?

0:26:200:26:24

-Diplodocus?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:26:240:26:26

Diplodocus.

0:26:260:26:27

Diplodocus is correct. Ten points for this.

0:26:270:26:29

APPLAUSE

0:26:290:26:31

Having taken the silver medal three times previously,

0:26:310:26:34

which country won the men's Olympic football tournament

0:26:340:26:37

for the first time in...?

0:26:370:26:39

Argentina.

0:26:390:26:40

No, you lose five points, I'm afraid.

0:26:400:26:43

..when they beat Germany in a penalty shoot-out in 2016,

0:26:430:26:47

in the final?

0:26:470:26:48

Brazil?

0:26:490:26:50

Brazil is correct, yes.

0:26:500:26:52

APPLAUSE

0:26:520:26:54

You get a set of bonuses on European history, this time, Edinburgh.

0:26:540:26:57

Characterised by rising levels of inflation and unemployment,

0:26:570:27:00

the phrase "the Two Red Years"

0:27:000:27:03

refers to the period from 1919-20 in which European country?

0:27:030:27:08

-Is that not Germany?

-Germany... Weimar?

-I'm not sure.

0:27:080:27:11

It could either be the Weimar Republic,

0:27:110:27:13

or, if it was only two red years, then...

0:27:130:27:15

-Let's have it, please.

-Just say something.

0:27:150:27:17

Hungary.

0:27:170:27:18

-No, it's Italy.

-Oh.

0:27:180:27:20

Under its Italian name of Fiume, which present-day Croatian city

0:27:200:27:23

was made a free state by the first Treaty of Rapallo in 1920?

0:27:230:27:29

THEY CONFER

0:27:290:27:34

We just have to try something.

0:27:340:27:36

-Zadar.

-Zadar.

0:27:360:27:38

No, it's Rijeka.

0:27:380:27:39

And, finally, which treaty of 1929

0:27:390:27:41

established the Vatican City...? GONG

0:27:410:27:43

And at the gong, Emmanuel College Cambridge have 110,

0:27:430:27:46

Edinburgh have 125.

0:27:460:27:48

APPLAUSE

0:27:480:27:49

Well, you just had it snatched from your grasp

0:27:510:27:53

at the end, there, Emmanuel.

0:27:530:27:55

But, you know, that's how it goes. Thank you very much for joining us.

0:27:550:27:59

You've got to play and win twice more to stay in the competition.

0:27:590:28:03

Edinburgh Uni have to play once more to stay in the competition.

0:28:030:28:06

Congratulations to you.

0:28:060:28:08

I hope you can join us next time for another quarterfinal match.

0:28:080:28:10

But until then, it's goodbye from Emmanuel College Cambridge.

0:28:100:28:13

-ALL:

-Goodbye.

0:28:130:28:14

-It's goodbye from Edinburgh University. ALL:

-Goodbye.

0:28:140:28:16

And it's goodbye from me. Goodbye.

0:28:160:28:18

APPLAUSE

0:28:180:28:19

The quarter-final stage continues as teams representing two more universities fight it out to reach the next stage of the competition. Jeremy Paxman asks the questions.


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