Hotpots Nigel Slater: Eating Together


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Hotpots

Food writer and cook Nigel Slater takes a tour of the diversity in modern British home cooking. Nigel discovers three one-pot dishes with origins from around the world.


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I've grown up with food that says home.

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Dishes that mean a lot to me are part of who I am.

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But while it's comfortable to stick with

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what you know in the kitchen, I want to explore new ways of cooking.

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There you go, you can carry that.

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Are we going to cook in the garden?

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In the garden, yes, like it used to be!

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'I'm going on a tour to meet home cooks all around Britain...'

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Oh, look at that.

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'..who are mad about their food.'

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I'm just one boy who loves to cook.

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'To find out what culinary secrets they can teach me.'

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-Chicken soup?

-Well, you need a chicken, don't ya?!

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This is my excuse to see what makes other cultures tick.

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And to meet distant cousins of my favourite recipes.

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It's home and abroad.

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Dishes that share the same basic idea,

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but with origins and ingredients a long way from our shores.

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My journey will take me around the world.

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The beauty is I won't even need a passport.

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And as a thank you, I'll invite everyone I meet to a meal

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that puts all their dishes on one table in a celebration

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of what makes us different, and what brings us together.

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One of the most ancient forms of cooking was to put

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everything in one pot and cook it very slowly.

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The hotpot.

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These steaming feasts of slow-cooked treasures allow individual

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flavours to mingle, making real one-pot wonders.

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Made across the world, many hotpots are much-loved family recipes,

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but before I meet the talented people who will show me

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their signature slow cooking, I want to make one of my favourites,

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that speaks of old-fashioned Britain, the Lancashire Hotpot.

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I can't think of anything more welcoming to come home

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to on a winter's night.

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There's something very easy about it, very good-natured.

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I think of it as a very uncomplicated thing

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in a complicated world.

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Traditionally, this could use any cut of lamb,

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but I like chops. Searing the meat intensifies the flavour.

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The real magic happens when all the ingredients come together.

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Celery, onions, carrot and swede just say Britain to me.

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This is OUR hotpot. It's the one that we're most famous for.

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SIZZLING

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So, when the lamb's brown on both sides, I'm going

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to put it into the pot.

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Brown the onions, followed by the celery and chunky carrot.

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With every hotpot, you look at the ingredient list

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and it's an ingredient list of the landscape, it's that area,

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it's totally connected to where it's come from.

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And that happens throughout the world.

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Just a couple of tablespoonfuls of flour, you really don't need much.

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I know it's unfashionable to use it but I like a thick, rich sauce.

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A couple of bay leaves in, a few sprigs of thyme.

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To pull everything together and make a gravy, you need liquid.

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I'm using a jellied beef stock.

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It will draw out the individual flavours,

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making it much more than the sum of its parts.

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And, yes, of course, you can use water if you want to

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because you've got masses of flavour there already.

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Season it well, bring it up to the boil, then turn

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the heat down a bit and leave to simmer for ten minutes.

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When it's thickened a little, spoon into a deep casserole

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and leave on a lowish heat.

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This is the bit I really love. It's the topping.

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Sliced potatoes that go crisp on top

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and underneath they soak up some of the gravy.

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So this has been simmering away for quite a while,

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it's got really thick,

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a lot of the flavours have come out from the meat into the gravy.

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There's no need to boil the potatoes or peel them,

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I like to leave them nice and rustic.

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A few thyme leaves, it's not particularly traditional, that's

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just me, and then, just so it gets really golden, some melted butter.

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It's now that the hotpot comes into its own.

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An hour or more to slowly cook in a low oven, allows the meat

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and veg to give it all they've got.

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Patience isn't just a virtue, it makes the best hotpot.

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It's my Lancashire Hotpot.

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You know, there are some dishes that follow you throughout your life

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and this is mine.

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The simplest recipe imaginable.

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It has nothing to do with the cook,

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you just stir a few ingredients together, put it in the oven,

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and they all get on with things themselves.

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Sometimes, I think that that is actually

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the best dinner in the world.

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For me, this is a rustic classic for any day of the week.

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But hotpots vary across the globe and for some cultures, it's

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a dish for celebration.

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I've come to North London to find out about an Iranian hotpot

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made for very special occasions.

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-Yasmin, I'm Nigel.

-Nice to meet you, Nigel.

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Lovely to meet you. What a fabulous shop!

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Isn't it gorgeous?

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'Born in Britain, Yasmin spent her early years

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'and summer holidays in Iran, and continues to cook dishes

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'celebrating ingredients of her ancestral home.'

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Now, you're going to tell me off about pomegranates

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because shall I tell you something?

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-I buy them ready done.

-Noooo!

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-I know.

-What you miss, Nigel, is the real joy.

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It's proper fruits of your labour stuff because actually what I

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love about a pomegranate is you kind of have to work at it a bit.

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Do you know what I mean? It's not like biting into an apple.

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You have that little ceremony around opening it

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and getting the seeds out.

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How many do we need?

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I think two will do us.

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'We're going to use these pomegranates to make a dish

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'called fesenjan.

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Fesenjan is an exciting duck or chicken

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hotpot often served on special occasions. It has a wonderful blend

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of sweet and sour flavours that melt together during hours of cooking.

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So, this is actually a very simple recipe, just a few ingredients.

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Just three.

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Three is the magic number, pomegranate molasses,

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walnuts and chicken, cooked down in a casserole

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and that pretty much sums up Iranian food.

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-And tell me again - fesenjan.

-Fis-in-joon.

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Fis-in-joon.

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-I'll get it.

-You'll get it by the end.

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What's the first thing?

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OK, well first thing we want to do is grind up the walnuts.

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'Like pomegranates, walnuts are plentiful in Iran.

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'Finely ground, they're mixed with nothing but water to become the

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'backbone of Yasmin's rich hotpot, brought to a boil and simmered.'

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So, I want you to just have a look at the colour.

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This is something that's going to change over time.

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Yes, this is porridge colour.

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It is, isn't it?

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Sort of colour of oatmeal right now.

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The longer you cook them,

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the more flavour is released and the more the oils are released.

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So, that's all you need to do, goodbye for now.

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'This dish comes from Northern Iran, where Yasmin spent long summers

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'and celebrated Iranian New Years in the 1980s,

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'a time when political unrest shook family life.'

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Gran cooking outside.

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You know, say if we were making fesenjan,

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she would get a local duck from the land, bring it up and we'd

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all help her pluck it, she'd have the walnuts from her walnut trees.

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She'd have the pomegranates from the pomegranate trees.

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-Eat local.

-Eat local, and I love that.

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'Iran's revolution in 1979, saw the monarchy overthrown

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'and an Islamic regime take power.

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'It was a turbulent time for many people.'

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I remember being four years old and going to visit my uncle, who

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was in prison at the time for political activity,

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and we all went to visit him and the prison guards wouldn't let us in.

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It was a really, really painful thing for the family,

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My grandmother not being able to see her son

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and so I said I wanted to go in. And I was always a bit bolshy,

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and so the prison guards let me in, so all my family waited outside.

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Because it was New Year, I really wanted to take my uncle

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something, and so I had a little bit of Iranian nougat,

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wrapped up, which is a very traditional Iranian sweet,

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made with rose water and pistachios, and I remember going in

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and obviously, you know, prison guards wouldn't search

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a four-year-old, they wouldn't think I had it

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and I was able to take that in.

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I was able to give it to my uncle.

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It felt really special.

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That little symbolic gesture of taking someone a special food to

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mark a special day, can mean so much.

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Even in those troubled times.

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Although it's been 30 years since Yasmin settled in Britain,

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she is more determined than ever to share the evocative flavours

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of her childhood, the essence of Iranian, or Persian, cuisine.

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For me, right now, one of the things I'm most

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enjoying about exploring Persian food here in the UK, sharing it with

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my friends, with people who've never had it before, people like you.

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It's because I get to connect to Iran through something positive.

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And a simple thing like having a cup of fragrant tea with a nice

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bit of saffron sugar just reminds me

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of all the positive experiences that one can have in Iran.

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-The good stuff.

-The good stuff. Yeah.

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Oh, glossy, really glossy.

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'Two hours on the heat has thickened the sauce,

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'intensifying the taste, ready for a fruity element.'

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-I know what that is - pomegranate.

-It is.

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Pomegranate molasses.

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That's...wow, two, three tablespoons.

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'The sharpness of the pomegranate is sweetened with cinnamon

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'and brown sugar, and enhanced by powdered angelica root.

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'A spoonful of tomato puree, and finally the chicken,

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'which will slowly take on these ancient flavours.

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'Preparing pomegranates the proper way is part of what makes

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'this dish authentic.'

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Grand! This is so much darker!

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It's rich and it's glossy

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and it's completely changed in the time it's been in the pot.

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'The rich, dark sauce of the fesenjan is bejewelled with

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'the gemstones of the pomegranate.'

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Oh, how absolutely gorgeous.

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And it is just walnuts and water?

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It's just walnuts and water, that's all that is.

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-Gorgeous. It's really quite fruity.

-It's very fruity.

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And that lovely sweet, sour thing going on.

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Do you know what this tastes of to me? My Christmas.

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Oh, really?

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Yeah, I'm thinking nuts, pomegranates,

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slow cooking, chicken.

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It's got a very festive, festive taste to it.

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Yasmin's fesenjan is about so much more than its classic Iranian

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ingredients, it's full of a heritage she's proud of.

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Oh, thank you so much for this. It's just so beautiful.

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'This is an ancient dish, reminiscent of happy celebrations,

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'and it makes me think of another country where family

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'and friendship is at the very heart of their cooking.'

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Brazilian brothers Anderson and Andre moved to

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the UK as teenagers, but their love of Latin flavours came with them.

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-Cheers.

-Cheers.

-Chin-chin.

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'They're going to cook me THE national dish of Brazil - feijoada.

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'This carnival of a hotpot uses ingredients we're all

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'familiar with now, but which originated in South America.'

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And the most important part obviously is the black beans.

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-Ah, the black beans.

-That's what forms the feijoada.

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These have been soaked overnight.

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And just to add a bit of Brazilian heat, we've got

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Grandmother's special chilli sauce.

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That's your grandmother's?

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Yes, she made that one.

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'These aren't just Grandma's ingredients - feijoada is

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'a recipe passed down through generations of Brazilian families.'

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That's the main inspiration for our cooking,

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our grandmother, she's a big part of our life,

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she was always around, helping my mum, raise both my brother

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and I.

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And we have her to thank for this recipe.

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We do, yes.

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There's my brother and I on the beach, enjoying ourselves,

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sporting the famous Speedos, as you do when you are on Copacabana beach.

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And that is the reason why my brother

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decided to learn how to cook.

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Yeah.

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The girls. Yeah, just to score some extra points with

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the ladies.

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It was one of the reasons.

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It's a good enough reason.

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'The word feijoada derives from the Portuguese for beans,

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'but, if anything, Andre

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'and Anderson's recipe seems to be an homage to pork.'

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I just can't believe how much you've got, it's awesome.

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So, a mixture really of both fresh meats and cured.

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Yes, the cured meats give it a really nice flavour.

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When would you normally eat this, I mean traditionally?

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You will avoid eating this during the week because it's

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quite a heavy dish. I remember my father would eat this on the weekend

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and then he would go to the sofa and have a nap for a couple of hours.

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It is a heavy dish, but worth the time and effort you put in to it.

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What really intrigues me here is the size of the pieces.

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This is a seriously rustic dish, isn't it?

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-It is.

-There's no finesse.

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-There's no finesse.

-Oh, who wants finesse?!

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This is home cooking at its best.

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The pork ribs are caramelised along with a bit of chopped onion

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and garlic, to give a sweetness to the feijoada.

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SIZZLING

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Throw a little bit of water in.

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Not much, and we're going to put the lid on and just let them

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sweat for a little bit.

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This is really quite a new method for me,

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I've not seen that before, adding water at that point.

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The way my mum cooks ribs at home,

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she'll do the same process and then she'll repeat these water,

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let the water evaporate maybe five, six times, and then at the end

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you have the softest ribs you've ever had in your life.

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-Yes, it's delicious.

-I can't wait.

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Now the reason why we started cooking... In Brazil there's

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a macho feeling there, cooking is the women's job to do...

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-Oh, really.

-..so you don't get the men in the kitchen.

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Different school of thoughts.

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But we grew up cooking, my dad used to cook a lot

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so he influenced me a lot as well.

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Do you miss Brazil?

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I do, but England has become my home now.

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I love it when I go back - it's fun, it's amazing,

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you just switch off for a couple of weeks

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and then, you know, believe it or not, I get homesick.

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I miss London, yeah, yeah, I do.

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'Once the mountain of pork is tender,

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'it's transferred to a huge casserole, with more chopped onions

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'and garlic and finally the essential black beans.'

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You know, I've got to be honest,

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I don't cook with black beans very often.

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All of the other beans I do cook, but not these and they're beautiful.

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Yeah, very nice, and you'll see once the dish is done, it's like

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the sauce becomes not quite black, but it's a dark-coloured sauce.

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So we'll just throw the beans with the liquid that is left on,

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it doesn't matter.

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'It's only when these meats are cooked slowly

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'together that the real joy of this dish emerges.

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'Distinctive on their own, put together the flavours sing,

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'like a reflection of the cultural diversity in Brazil.'

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The thing about these hotpots, the thing that attracts me

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to them, apart from the fact that it's a whole load of flavours

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all mingling and getting to know one another,

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cooked for a slow time, is the fact that they tell a story.

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They do, yeah. It's beautiful, simple food.

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'Andre and Anderson's three-hour feijoada gives you that

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'uniquely comforting glow only a slow-cooked dish can deliver.'

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-Let's eat!

-Let's eat!

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Look at that. Thank you very much.

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That is beautiful.

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This is good, guys.

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Thank you, I'm glad you enjoyed it.

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It is seriously good.

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It's worth the wait!

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'The brothers may have brought this rich, smokey,

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'purple-hued feijoada to Britain,

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'but it's still Brazil's national dish.

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'There are however, some exotic hotpots,

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'so popular here, they've practically become our own.

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'I'm talking curries.'

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I've come to Cardiff, where there's a thriving Bangladeshi

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community, to meet Enam, who moved here as a three-year-old

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but has never lost his love for traditional Bangladeshi cooking.

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Enam's part of one of the oldest Muslim communities in the UK,

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and his family opened one of the first Indian restaurants in town.

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I adore a bit of spice, and I want Enam to show me his authentic

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curried hotpot, a special one-pot dish fit for honoured guests.

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Tell me what we are cooking?

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Today, we're going to cook the traditional chicken korma.

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Kurma, we call it in Bengali, so it's a Bangladeshi korma.

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It's korma without the cream, and the milk and the sugar,

0:18:360:18:40

so you get natural sweetness coming from the onions and garlic

0:18:400:18:42

and ginger being slow-cooked over two hours.

0:18:420:18:46

First thing, we're going to make the garlic and ginger.

0:18:460:18:49

Wash the ginger with the skin on the ginger.

0:18:490:18:51

We're leaving the skin on? Because I've always peeled ginger.

0:18:510:18:54

I don't know why you've done that,

0:18:540:18:56

we've always kept the skin on the ginger.

0:18:560:18:59

Now I love it when someone tells me

0:18:590:19:00

I've been doing something wrong for 40 years.

0:19:000:19:03

There's no wrong in cooking, really.

0:19:030:19:05

Not really.

0:19:050:19:06

'The korma we're making is to celebrate Eid, the end of Ramadan,

0:19:060:19:10

'a month of fasting observed by Muslims across the world.

0:19:100:19:15

'But that's not until tomorrow, and I'm already hungry.'

0:19:150:19:18

This isn't the only thing we're eating, is it?

0:19:180:19:20

-Um, no...

-Actually, when are we eating?

0:19:200:19:24

Because I'm, I'm confused here.

0:19:240:19:26

When are we eating?

0:19:270:19:28

When are WE eating or when are YOU eating?

0:19:280:19:31

When are we all eating.

0:19:310:19:32

I'm not going to eat without you.

0:19:320:19:34

OK, normally, because it's the month of Ramadan,

0:19:340:19:37

it's sunset, so today it's close to a quarter past nine, I think.

0:19:370:19:41

-That's a long time to go.

-I know.

0:19:430:19:45

I mean it really is. And what about water? What about drinks?

0:19:450:19:48

No, we're not allowed to have no water, no liquid.

0:19:480:19:51

-Seriously?

-It's a test.

0:19:510:19:53

And korma, is, I mean is that the traditional dish for Eid?

0:19:540:19:59

Do you always make it?

0:19:590:20:00

Korma is not only for Eid.

0:20:000:20:01

We are cooking it because the children love it as well.

0:20:010:20:04

It's mild, its delicate flavours.

0:20:040:20:05

I think of it as being quite a gentle, almost sophisticated dish.

0:20:050:20:09

It is. You can't rush a korma.

0:20:090:20:11

You can't rush a korma.

0:20:110:20:13

-A little bit of oil.

-And then a little bit of water, yes?

0:20:130:20:15

Yes, that's right.

0:20:150:20:16

'Like Yasmin's fesenjan, this is a special hotpot.

0:20:160:20:20

'The invested effort from the cook making the dish that bit sweeter.'

0:20:200:20:24

-Quite a soft, almost silky paste?

-That's right, yes.

0:20:250:20:29

Smells really nice.

0:20:300:20:31

So as you're smelling that, it occurs to me

0:20:310:20:34

that if you are cooking all day but you're not allowed to eat at

0:20:340:20:38

this point, and I taste everything,

0:20:380:20:40

all the way through when I'm cooking,

0:20:400:20:42

but you can't?

0:20:420:20:44

I know, but when you're fasting,

0:20:440:20:46

your senses are heightened, especially your sense of smell,

0:20:460:20:50

so everything seems more pungent, more aromatic.

0:20:500:20:53

-So, we have onions.

-That's right.

0:20:560:20:59

Plenty of onions.

0:20:590:21:00

Now for the chicken. This is halal chicken.

0:21:000:21:03

That's right, yes.

0:21:030:21:04

-Are we cooking this on the bone?

-On the bone.

0:21:050:21:07

We're going to heat the pan, put the ghee in, just enough to cover

0:21:070:21:10

the base of the pan. So we're going to put just over half of that in.

0:21:100:21:15

-About like that?

-Yes.

0:21:150:21:17

'You'd expect to find spices at the heart of a curry, and in this korma,

0:21:170:21:21

'whole bay leaves, cinnamon and my favourite, cardamom, are the stars.'

0:21:210:21:25

Who taught you to make this chicken korma?

0:21:270:21:30

My mother taught me and my nan,

0:21:300:21:33

she taught my mother, so it's been passed on.

0:21:330:21:35

So what age are we talking about?

0:21:350:21:37

I used to help my mother out when I was probably ten.

0:21:370:21:40

-I remember.

-Me too.

0:21:400:21:42

So was it a case of being encouraged to cook or did you feel you

0:21:420:21:46

kind of had to?

0:21:460:21:47

Not had to, I wanted to.

0:21:470:21:49

In my house, I enjoy cooking.

0:21:490:21:51

If I cook for you, if you're happy, I'm happy!

0:21:510:21:53

'The intensity of this dish comes from the way Enam cooks his onions

0:21:550:21:59

'and spices so slowly, nothing like the korma you get from a takeaway.'

0:21:590:22:05

So all those little bits that have stuck on the bottom?

0:22:050:22:08

Yes.

0:22:080:22:09

Now, this is actually helping to get them off.

0:22:090:22:11

That's right, it just comes off easily.

0:22:110:22:13

Is that enough?

0:22:130:22:14

Yes, you can put the lid on it now.

0:22:140:22:16

How come there was ever these westernised recipes?

0:22:180:22:21

I think it was the original restaurants

0:22:210:22:23

when they came it was more to suit the Western palate,

0:22:230:22:25

as the Western palate at that time was more sort of roast dinners

0:22:250:22:28

and fish and chips and nowadays, look at it, you just go on to

0:22:280:22:31

-any high street, you've got Mexican, Thai...

-It's great.

0:22:310:22:34

..African - all sorts.

0:22:340:22:36

I tell my children this, I say we're at a time where this country

0:22:360:22:40

and maybe a few other countries in the world where you can go to

0:22:400:22:43

the supermarket and get any vegetables

0:22:430:22:45

from any part of the world.

0:22:450:22:46

We're blessed and grateful for that as well.

0:22:460:22:48

Yeah, I'm with you there, definitely.

0:22:480:22:51

It's time to put the chicken in now.

0:22:510:22:53

I know that I've got a recipe that

0:22:540:22:56

I call my quick korma, and I reckon you can do it in about half an hour.

0:22:560:23:00

I mean, I think it's quite delicious.

0:23:000:23:03

Well, if yours is a quick korma, this should be called a slow korma!

0:23:030:23:06

We put the lid on and put the heat up.

0:23:080:23:11

'Enam's slow-cooked curry takes nearly two hours.

0:23:110:23:14

'As I've learned, you can't rush a korma.

0:23:140:23:17

'Ramadan gives Muslims a renewed appreciation of food

0:23:200:23:25

'and when Eid finally arrives, a shared feast with family is

0:23:250:23:30

'the best way to celebrate the breaking of the fast.

0:23:300:23:33

'Taking some traditional sweet treats is the least I can do.'

0:23:350:23:38

Yes, beautiful.

0:23:380:23:40

-Bye-bye.

-Thank you.

0:23:400:23:42

Thanks very much, come in.

0:23:450:23:47

This looks to me like you've been cooking all day and night?

0:23:470:23:50

This is just normal. You've got this fish...

0:23:500:23:53

You've got cupboards full of stuff.

0:23:530:23:55

Carp cooked with tomatoes, garlic, onions, coriander.

0:23:550:23:59

Lamb chop bhuna.

0:24:010:24:02

Meat or chicken pilau.

0:24:020:24:03

This looks just completely awesome.

0:24:090:24:11

This is family and friends and me. Thank you!

0:24:110:24:15

You're most welcome.

0:24:150:24:16

'Enam's traditional Bangladeshi korma couldn't be more

0:24:180:24:21

'different to the takeaways I'm used to.

0:24:210:24:24

'The intense and sophisticated flavours of those slow-cooked

0:24:240:24:28

'onions have redefined korma for me.'

0:24:280:24:30

These hotpots may have come from all over the world, but wherever

0:24:310:24:35

they originated somebody discovered that if you cook what you

0:24:350:24:39

have around you very slowly you will never be disappointed.

0:24:390:24:43

These dishes share a common DNA,

0:24:430:24:46

but each one has its own unique identity.

0:24:460:24:49

As a contrast to their meat-rich recipes,

0:24:510:24:54

but inspired by their slow-cooking techniques, I'm going to

0:24:540:24:57

create a one-pot celebration of vegetables.

0:24:570:25:01

Enam's onions, that he cooked down for so long with that little

0:25:010:25:05

bit of water, and they became soft and translucent.

0:25:050:25:08

Love that!

0:25:080:25:09

See, just starting to go golden on the edges.

0:25:130:25:16

I love the touch of velvet that aubergines bring to the party.

0:25:230:25:27

Big wide frying pan. Plenty of olive oil.

0:25:270:25:30

Aubergines adore oil, they just drink it up.

0:25:300:25:33

I just want them to colour a little bit,

0:25:350:25:37

so as soon as those are golden and soft, I'll whip them out.

0:25:370:25:41

And I've got courgettes as well,

0:25:430:25:45

and they'll be adding quite a bit of moisture to this.

0:25:450:25:48

Tomatoes. Just chop these up.

0:25:500:25:52

These will break down so you don't need to cut them

0:25:520:25:55

into pieces that are too small.

0:25:550:25:56

I've got these lovely little golden ones here,

0:25:560:25:58

but you can use anything you've got.

0:25:580:26:00

I've put quite a few of these in because they're providing us

0:26:000:26:03

not only with the juice but also masses of flavour.

0:26:030:26:06

So the onions are really soft, and into there, I'm going

0:26:080:26:11

to put all these tomatoes.

0:26:110:26:12

Again, low heat and a lid.

0:26:160:26:18

All of these dishes are about nourishment,

0:26:200:26:22

they're about filling people, and I've chosen beans.

0:26:220:26:25

Not the soaked and long-cooked beans that Andre and Anderson used,

0:26:250:26:29

but canned beans, and I'm using a mixture.

0:26:290:26:31

Some haricot beans and my favourite little beans, flageolet.

0:26:310:26:35

Into that I'm going to tuck the courgettes and the aubergines

0:26:410:26:45

and, you know, if you want to put garlic in now do.

0:26:450:26:48

I'm not going to because I want these flavours to sing

0:26:480:26:50

and garlic can be a bit of a bully.

0:26:500:26:52

There's something enchanting about that moment

0:27:010:27:03

when Yasmin broke the pomegranate over the top of her fesenjan

0:27:030:27:07

and suddenly the dish came to life.

0:27:070:27:09

We don't grow pomegranates here, but beetroots and carrots we do,

0:27:130:27:16

and they are my jewels to adorn this dish.

0:27:160:27:19

And there we are. That's my hotpot.

0:27:210:27:23

There's a little bit of all my friends in that.

0:27:250:27:28

Every idea they've given me, from the jewelled crust,

0:27:280:27:31

the slow-cooked onions and those boys' beans.

0:27:310:27:34

It's all in there.

0:27:340:27:35

An hour in the oven lets it soak up the heat and soften.

0:27:410:27:45

Great things happen when ingredients meet

0:27:520:27:55

and spend a bit of time together.

0:27:550:27:57

No matter where in the world you

0:27:570:27:59

go home to, it's like a hug waiting for you when you open the door.

0:27:590:28:04

Hotpots are one of the simplest and most rewarding dishes to cook,

0:28:040:28:08

you just have to take your time.

0:28:080:28:10

-That's for you.

-Lovely.

0:28:110:28:14

Well, listen, thank you

0:28:140:28:15

all very much for bringing your lovely food.

0:28:150:28:18

I just cannot tell you what I've learnt

0:28:180:28:19

and the pleasure I've had from cooking with you all.

0:28:190:28:22

And, um, this is to you all. Thank you.

0:28:220:28:24

-Cheers!

-Cheers!

0:28:260:28:28

MUSIC: Ho Hey by The Lumineers

0:28:280:28:30

Nigel's tour of the flavours of Britain takes him from the old classic Lancashire hotpot to three melt-in-the-mouth one-pot dishes with origins from around the world.

He meets Yasmin, whose special Iranian fesenjoon takers her back to her childhood in Iran, he gets a lesson in Brazil's national dish feijoada from brothers Andre and Anderson, and he discovers the delicate flavours of a traditional Bangladeshi korma as he joins Enam and his family to celebrate Eid.

Inspired by their dishes, Nigel creates a luxurious bean hotpot bejewelled with beetroot and carrot.