29/01/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


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29/01/2017

John Torode takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


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Good morning. It's time again for creative cooking, great food and enthusiastic chefs.

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So, sit back and enjoy as we dish up another portion of

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Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Top chefs, stunning cookery, hungry celebrities

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and a couple of omelettes - if you can call them that -

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lie ahead in the next 90 minutes.

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Coming up on today's show...

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James Martin bakes his ultimate scones and serves them with jam

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and clotted cream for American actress Jennifer Carpenter.

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Tom Kitchin gets patriotic with his take on

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the Scottish staple - haggis.

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He rolls the haggis in pork skin before steam-cooking it

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and serving it with pickled neeps and crispy tatties.

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Plus, Bulgarian firecracker Silvena Rowe is in

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the kitchen once again, and she puts James in his place.

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She makes sure he's pulling his weight as he helps her cook up

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scallops and black pudding with a potato, celery and apple mash.

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Two of the capital's top chefs - Aggi Sverrisson and

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Jason Atherton - go into battle at the Omelette Challenge hobs.

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Jason is determined

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to avoid disqualification as he looks to move up the board.

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Then it's over to Judy Joo, who's combining some of

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the wonderful flavours of Korea to create a mouthwatering meal.

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She's cooking up her ultimate Korean fried chicken

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with a pickled radish and a duo of tasty sauces.

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Believe me, it looks great.

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And finally, the wonderful Emma Willis faces her food heaven

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or food hell.

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Did she get food heaven -

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herb-crusted rack of lamb with potatoes and spinach timbale?

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Or did she end up facing her food hell -

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honey confit duck legs with puy lentils?

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You can find out what she got at the end of the show.

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But first, over to Tristan Welch.

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A chef who, over the years,

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worked for the likes of Gordon Ramsay, Gary Rhodes

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and Michel Roux Jr before commanding his own award-winning kitchen.

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That's quite an impressive CV.

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Well, here he is cooking with a brown paper bag.

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Over to you, Tristan.

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-In a bag, this stuff?

-In a bag, yeah.

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No, it's a beautiful way of cooking, actually.

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We're going to take some fantastic bacon,

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which I've actually cured myself.

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-Cured yourself?

-Yeah.

-This is a dry cured?

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Yeah, absolutely.

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So what we do is we take a belly of pork and rub some salt,

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sugar, herbs and all that sort of stuff into it.

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So "dry" meaning it's actually just the dry salt.

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-And wet cure, you would put water in it?

-A brine, yeah.

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You make a brine, you add some water to it and sit it in there nicely.

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We're going to take a nice chunk of that.

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-This is the reason why I think... I don't know what you think...

-That's beautiful, isn't it?

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But dry-cured bacon is always better than a wet-cured bacon?

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Yeah, well, no moisture comes out when you cook it.

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Basically, you're not adding anything else to it

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other than the seasoning.

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But if you're curing it in a brine,

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what you're doing is, essentially, you're adding water to it.

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Also, you're paying for water at the end of the day,

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aren't you, really?

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-And as a Yorkshireman, you won't do that, will you?

-Exactly.

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No way, no way. Right, what else we got going?

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I've got this fantastic bacon there.

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I've put it into cold chicken stock.

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We bring it up gently - the reason for that being

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-it's going to take some of the salt out of it.

-OK.

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And while that's coming up,

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I'm going to trim these carrots up a bit.

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Now, if you go to your butcher's,

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you can find a whole piece of bacon like that, you could easily buy it.

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-But it's belly pork that you've used there?

-Yeah, but do you know what?

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-It's so easy to do yourself at home.

-Right.

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You just take a little tray like this, a little bit of salt,

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sugar, some herbs and spices on the bottom.

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-Yeah.

-And then place your pork belly on top of it.

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Turn it over every day for four days. Then what we do,

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we hang it for another four days in the wine cellar.

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If you haven't got a wine cellar...

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You're preparing it a bit in advance. That's eight days.

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How much time has everyone got?

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Don't know if they've got eight days.

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Yeah, but it's worth the wait. It's worth the wait.

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Look at the marbling and the colour on it.

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You don't see that every day. That's just beautiful.

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-What part of the pig is that, then?

-It's underneath the belly.

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-The belly bit.

-Oh, that's why it's called pork belly.

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Right. I'm a slow learner.

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LAUGHTER

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Does what's it says on the tin.

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It's the bit that does the least amount of work -

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that's why it's got a percentage of fat that's increased.

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-Ah, I see.

-It's basically half fat to meat.

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Exactly. That's the reason why I like it.

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It's got that great meat-to-fat ratio.

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And also, it's got a great rind.

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And I think part of the beauty of bacon is that fantastic

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gelatinous sticky rind you get on it.

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Shall we have a RIND of applause now, shall we?

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Rind of applause. Thank you very much.

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Right.

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Right, so, in the bottom there's some carrots

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and there's some celery.

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We're just going to pop it in the bag here as well.

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Don't stand on celery.

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LAUGHTER

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-How can I work with this?

-Go on.

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Right. So, we're going to remove our bacon from the pan now.

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It's just lightly blanched.

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I'll tell you what, this stock is perfect for pea and ham soup.

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If you keep this stock nice and hot...

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This is chicken stock you've got there?

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Yeah, just chicken stock, but it's flavoured with bacon now.

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Keep that stock nice and hot, pour it over some frozen...

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Put some frozen peas in a blender, pour it over some frozen peas,

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blend it up, instant pea and ham soup.

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Yeah, exactly. You can take the trimmings of that

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-and put it through it as well, if you want to.

-There's no trimmings on this. It's all good.

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The bacon's dry. We're just going to rub a little bit of oil on it

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and that's going to help it cook nice and evenly on all sides.

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Now, this doing this thing in a bag, it's not a specific bag -

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it's just like a normal brown paper bag?

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It's actually from the greengrocer down the road from me.

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That's it. I think it's got a fantastic flavour.

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It's going to hold in that beautiful moisture and give it

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that slight woodiness of flavour.

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You'll taste it in a minute.

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It's cooking it en papillote, which we've done before -

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-it's done in tinfoil or greaseproof paper.

-Yeah. This is proper en papillote.

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This is "paper-bag-lote."

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This is home brewed.

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This is beer I've brewed myself at the restaurant.

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It's gold dust here.

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-Wow!

-Look at that. It's beautiful.

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He didn't really - he just peeled the label off on the way here.

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Get out of it. James, just taste that.

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That has got so much love and care in it.

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We're going to pop this in the oven, about 130 degrees.

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-Is it a beer or a lager?

-It's an ale. It's a proper ale.

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-OK.

-It says "1066" on the side.

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It's the bottle of Hastings! Come on!

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LAUGHTER

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Are we still on?

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-I'm just prepping up these little onions.

-Yes.

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You want them just basically cut in half and just opened out a bit.

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This is a great quick vegetable.

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If you've got these small, little onions, you just peel them,

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cut them in half, and make sure the root end is cut off,

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so when they cook they'll separate into these beautiful little pieces,

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and they're so sweet and flavoursome.

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They take a couple of seconds to saute off.

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-You'll see how quick.

-There you are.

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-You're basically just opening these out?

-Yeah.

-No need to chop them.

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No, no need to chop. Just like that.

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You don't need to open up that much cos you can see there

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where they're just opening up gradually as the heat hits the pan.

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We're cooking that for how long in the oven? Cos I missed that.

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That takes about two and a half, three hours.

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And that pork is going to go all sticky and gelatinous

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and get that real beautiful saltiness in the bacon out.

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And it'll go into the carrots, as well,

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and the beer'll help it steam.

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Bacon in Chinese cooking?

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Of course, we invented it.

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You invented it?

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Honestly.

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You've got bacon in there.

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You can cook that way with chicken, I suppose as well.

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You just reduce the cooking time down a bit.

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Oh, yeah, you can do it with anything.

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You can even do it with sausages, I suppose.

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Something like that, chicken breast, anything.

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Did you really invent... Did you really invent bacon?

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-I think he's joking.

-All right.

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Cos I thought Gary Rhodes invented bacon.

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Well, the Chinese pretty much invented everything.

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Football, apparently, as well. It was the latest thing, wasn't it?

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They invented ice cream - I know that.

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Some more of your home brew in there.

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Some of the old home brew in there, yeah.

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Incidentally, that's not for sale,

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otherwise I'd get in so much trouble.

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And then we're just going to finish off with a little bit of cream.

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-OK.

-First of all I'll bring my...

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If you don't mind just popping a bit of cream in the pan?

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Yeah, I'll do that.

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-Just double cream in there, yeah?

-Yeah, just a dash of double cream.

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And this is the exciting bit.

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We've got our pork here, which has been...

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It's a great way... You can take it to the table, actually.

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-Serve it like that.

-You could. In fact, should we?

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-Probably not.

-All right.

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-Stick it out.

-Such a chicken, honestly.

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So open it up there and you've got that fantastic aroma about it.

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Looks good to me.

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And the carrots have taken on that beautiful flavour as well.

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Do you want me to season that off for you while you do...?

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-If you wouldn't mind, please, Chef.

-There you go.

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And now I'm just going to carve it.

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Crikey, that is hot.

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And a nice, easy way to carve it is to just turn it on its back.

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Skin-side down.

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We're getting a lovely smell over here, aren't we?

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Will the fat crispen up or not?

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No, the fat won't crispen up. I don't want the fat crispy.

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I want it sticky and gelatinous.

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All that flavour is going to stick to the carrots and the rest of

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the onions and stuff like that.

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-There you go.

-I'm just going to take a spoon here.

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Going to serve up a...

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Serve it up now. I'll put the onions and the carrots on there as well.

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They cook quite quickly, those onions.

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They look like they've got a nice, little bite to them.

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They're so sweet. And that beer just gives it a little bitterness.

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For me, that's what onions are about.

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Fantastically sweet.

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Some of these carrots and celery, you can just see there,

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oozing with flavour there.

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Some celery as well.

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Put that on there.

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We turn this bacon up over like so.

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Pop it on top.

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Oh, dear!

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I forgot a grate of nutmeg over the onions - that's always nice.

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-No, I've got it.

-Thank you very much.

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-I'll clean that for you.

-Lovely.

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Just a grate of nutmeg cos I think onions and nutmeg

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marry so well with it.

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And there we are. Bacon in a bag.

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-Easy as that.

-Fantastic.

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It looks absolutely delicious. There you go.

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It tastes nice and sticky.

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There you go. Dive into that.

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-I'll tell you what. Absolutely... God, look at that!

-Proper grub.

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There you go. Dive into that.

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But the idea is that keeping that fat on there,

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it doesn't become crispy, it becomes sticky.

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It becomes sticky and it's going to help the onions

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and all the other flavours come together beautifully.

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-What are you girls having?

-We'll wait for you.

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-What do you reckon?

-Oh, that is wonderful!

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-Worth the effort?

-Yeah.

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I mean, I drove from Aberdeen this morning - it was worth it.

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Literally, you don't have to...

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If you don't have your own sort of stuff, you can go to a butcher's,

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-get the dry-cured.

-Get the dry-cured bacon.

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I think it's far superior to any wet-cured bacon.

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But, yeah, your butcher's, they'll sell you

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a beautiful slab of bacon like that, and it's so versatile, really.

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A great way to use up that stock as well.

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-Happy with that, guys?

-That's amazing.

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I think you can safely say Tristan's got that one in the bag.

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HE CHUCKLES

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You can have that one, Tim Vine.

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Coming up, James serves up traditional scones with jam

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and clotted cream for actress Jennifer Carpenter.

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But first, it's over to Rick Stein, who's off to Borough Market

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in London and then he dishes up the perfect poached hake.

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All my chef friends, when they heard I was making this programme

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about the food of Britain, said I had to see Borough Market.

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It's been here since medieval times when drovers weren't allowed

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to take their cattle across the Thames and into the City.

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But we miss something, a lot of us chefs in Britain,

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that we don't have markets like this to inspire us.

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And, really, what cooking is all about is products.

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I mean, this is the first time I think I've ever been to a market

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in this country where I've thought,

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"This is like France. This is like Italy."

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I know this isn't British, but it's an addiction of mine. Iberico ham.

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The flavour of these air-dried hams from the Iberico black pig

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is a combination of slight tartness and sweetness,

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which largely comes from a diet of acorns.

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And look at the quality of this lamb from the Lakeland Fells.

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The depth of colour. It's almost like mutton.

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And this fish was really interesting.

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Brilliant fish. I mean, look at this wild sea trout.

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But this is from the North West, too.

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I asked Les Salisbury, why bring it down here?

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It makes me happy being able to do what I do on here -

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putting this selection of fish on.

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Whereas up north, it's just like you're selling your cod,

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your haddock, your plaice, and that's all you can sell, really.

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Don't you think we should have markets like this all over the country?

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I think that would be nice, yeah. Yeah.

0:12:240:12:27

They do all over Europe. I've seen lovely markets in France.

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It's just up north, we seem to struggle.

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Do you think the people are more adventurous down here?

0:12:330:12:35

They are more adventurous here.

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They don't mind trying things for the first time.

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Take hake, for example. It's a lovely fish.

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But I'm sure with attractive markets like this everywhere,

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there'd be no problem.

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This is Manze's, the oldest eel and pie shop in London.

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They're an Italian family who've been here since 1878.

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There used to be loads of these eel and pie shops in London,

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but now they're an endangered species.

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Can I have one pie, mash, liquor and eels?

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And could I have a cold sarsaparilla, as well?

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This isn't the sort of food you'd want to eat in a smart restaurant.

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But here, with the Victorian tiles,

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long benches and marble-topped tables, it seemed just right.

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So, this is esoteric stuff.

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Why? Pie, mash, liquor and eels.

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First of all, it was eel pie.

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But the long-nosed eels in the Thames died out in

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the Industrial Revolution.

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They carried on making meat pies. The mash was always with it.

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But the liquor was the cooking juice from the eels.

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Then, if you wanted, you could have the eels as a side order,

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which is what I've just had today - and very nice it is, too.

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What I find really interesting - I've been here for an hour now -

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is just looking at the different types of people in the queue.

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Yep. You've got long benches and you'll have someone that's not got

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a bean, basically, sitting next to you.

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Someone that's just come over in a taxi from the City and it's,

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"Shove along a bit, mate," "Right, OK, not a problem.

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And they'll sit there, and that's how they carry on.

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They don't just come in once in a blue moon.

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Some of them are in twice, three times a week for it.

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They come in and meet their friends and things like this,

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sort of like a social gathering.

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Young mums bring their kids in,

0:14:160:14:18

wean them off of the milk and onto the mash and liquor

0:14:180:14:20

and away they go, so another generation of customers is born.

0:14:200:14:24

Now then, just because most of this series is about everything

0:14:270:14:30

but fish, don't get any idea that it's still not my first love.

0:14:300:14:35

And, actually, hake is one of my favourite fish.

0:14:350:14:38

It's a member of the cod family.

0:14:380:14:40

We eat too much cod and not enough hake.

0:14:400:14:43

And it's a shame, to me - we ought to eat more.

0:14:430:14:46

There's plenty of hake fishing going on off the coast of Ireland

0:14:460:14:50

and the coast of Cornwall, particularly, but all the fish,

0:14:500:14:53

sadly, is going into Spanish trawlers and straight over to Spain.

0:14:530:14:58

Why don't we eat it?

0:14:580:14:59

Well, this dish will, I hope, help you

0:14:590:15:02

to understand what a great fish it is.

0:15:020:15:04

So, this is a poached fillet of hake with a sauce verte -

0:15:060:15:10

green sauce, that is -

0:15:100:15:11

and butter beans with chilli in them.

0:15:110:15:13

It's such a great combination

0:15:130:15:15

and doesn't half go down well in the restaurant.

0:15:150:15:18

First, to make the sauce verte.

0:15:180:15:20

You get some green herbs

0:15:200:15:21

like chervil, chives, tarragon, parsley,

0:15:210:15:24

and green leaves, like lamb's lettuce,

0:15:240:15:26

and just blanch them briefly in boiling water.

0:15:260:15:29

Then drop them into a colander

0:15:290:15:31

and put it under the cold water tap to set the colour.

0:15:310:15:34

Squeeze the moisture out of them and drop them into the blender.

0:15:340:15:38

So, first of all, some mild French mustard.

0:15:380:15:41

And now garlic.

0:15:410:15:42

And next to some lemon juice, just to tarten everything up,

0:15:420:15:46

about the juice of half a lemon.

0:15:460:15:48

And a couple of egg yolks to bind everything up.

0:15:480:15:52

And a good pinch of salt.

0:15:520:15:54

Lid on. And now for the olive oil.

0:15:560:15:59

This is one of my favourite sauces for poached fish.

0:15:590:16:02

It's just all those herbs just very lightly blanched.

0:16:020:16:05

You can taste everything in them.

0:16:050:16:07

And, in fact, hake is a perfect fish for poaching.

0:16:070:16:09

Everybody goes for salmon, but its dense texture

0:16:090:16:11

is quite similar to salmon, and it works just as well.

0:16:110:16:15

It's very pleasing to have a poached white fish.

0:16:150:16:18

You can serve this cold, as well. It's extremely nice like that.

0:16:180:16:21

There we are. That's done.

0:16:210:16:23

So next, to poach the fish.

0:16:260:16:27

I've just made a very simple court bouillon

0:16:270:16:30

with some parsley stalks, onions, black peppercorns and water.

0:16:300:16:34

Now, it's very, very gentle poaching

0:16:340:16:35

because it's such a soft fish.

0:16:350:16:37

And the butter beans - these are rather plump Spanish ones.

0:16:370:16:41

And I'm mixing them with some chopped tomato and chilli,

0:16:430:16:45

and a great deal of parsley.

0:16:450:16:48

Some salt.

0:16:480:16:50

And my favourite white pepper is called Wynad,

0:16:500:16:52

and it is from Kerala in India.

0:16:520:16:54

And finally, some really good Spanish olive oil.

0:16:540:16:58

This is a great combination.

0:16:580:17:00

I just warm it all through very gently.

0:17:000:17:02

I don't want to dispel any of those fresh flavours.

0:17:020:17:06

Now, the fillets of hake are done.

0:17:060:17:08

I like presenting fish like this -

0:17:080:17:10

peeling off the skin at the last minute.

0:17:100:17:12

It leads a lovely sheen on the fish.

0:17:120:17:15

And finish with the beans and a nice spoonful of sauce verte.

0:17:170:17:22

People are always asking me what my food is all about,

0:17:240:17:26

what is it like,

0:17:260:17:27

and I would say this dish is what my food is like.

0:17:270:17:30

It's sort of quintessential me.

0:17:300:17:32

When I'm travelling around the country

0:17:320:17:34

having not always wonderful food,

0:17:340:17:36

this is the sort of thing I'm thinking about,

0:17:360:17:38

you know, because it's sort of delicate and it's fun, really.

0:17:380:17:41

You look at it and you think, "Oh, I'd love to eat that."

0:17:410:17:44

This is it.

0:17:440:17:45

And there are plenty more hake recipes

0:17:500:17:52

on the Saturday Kitchen website if you fancy trying it this weekend.

0:17:520:17:55

Now, for my masterclass this week I'm going to help you

0:17:550:17:57

and help out one of our viewers.

0:17:570:17:59

Pam Cousins - she e-mailed us to say,

0:17:590:18:01

"What's the perfect way of making scones?"

0:18:010:18:03

Now, a lot of people are into baking in the UK.

0:18:030:18:05

Well, this is my sort of idea of making scones.

0:18:050:18:08

-Now, you probably don't know what I'm talking about, do you?

-No.

0:18:080:18:10

Well, I'm going to make these scones.

0:18:100:18:12

Now, this is plain flour - this is not a strong flour.

0:18:120:18:15

450g of plain flour.

0:18:150:18:17

75g of butter.

0:18:170:18:20

I use firm butter for this one - not room-temperature butter.

0:18:200:18:23

75g of caster sugar.

0:18:230:18:26

And then, instead of using self-raising flour,

0:18:260:18:29

which is basically plain flour and baking powder,

0:18:290:18:31

I actually like to make my own.

0:18:310:18:32

So I use 450g of flour, five teaspoons of baking powder,

0:18:320:18:37

pinch of salt

0:18:370:18:39

and then you rub this together with your fingers.

0:18:390:18:41

Now, this is how I got into cooking when I was a young kid

0:18:410:18:44

because my grandmother used to sit and watch Coronation Street

0:18:440:18:47

for half an hour whilst rubbing butter and flour together

0:18:470:18:50

with her fingers to make things like parkin

0:18:500:18:53

and Yorkshire curd tarts.

0:18:530:18:55

You are looking at me with this blank expression on your face.

0:18:550:18:57

You're speaking another language.

0:18:570:18:59

But the idea is whenever you make anything that's pastry related,

0:18:590:19:04

you rub it in by hand.

0:19:040:19:06

The minute you start to make it by machine...

0:19:060:19:08

It's different to making bread. Bread, you would use a machine.

0:19:080:19:11

This one, you want to get it nice and light,

0:19:110:19:13

and because you want the texture quite delicate,

0:19:130:19:15

it's this process that you get,

0:19:150:19:16

by rubbing the butter and the flour together by hand,

0:19:160:19:20

it works the flour less,

0:19:200:19:22

and as it works the flour less, it becomes nice and short.

0:19:220:19:24

This is exactly what's wrong with America,

0:19:240:19:26

because we go to the freezer section in the grocery store

0:19:260:19:29

and you open up and there's your pie crusts, et cetera.

0:19:290:19:32

No, you've got to do it, and it doesn't take long.

0:19:320:19:35

This will take about three or four minutes to do this.

0:19:350:19:39

But it is great to get kids involved in it and stuff like that.

0:19:390:19:42

But the idea if it is...

0:19:420:19:43

This is how I, like I was saying, learned

0:19:430:19:45

to cook when I was a young kid, by watching my parents do this.

0:19:450:19:47

You're making me feel bad about my childhood,

0:19:470:19:49

like I missed out on something really important.

0:19:490:19:51

Well, you had things very, very different to that.

0:19:510:19:53

I mean, we mentioned the fried food,

0:19:530:19:55

but what is this about biscuits and gravy?

0:19:550:19:57

Oh, yeah, I love biscuits and gravy.

0:19:570:19:58

My grandfather used to spend, like, two hours putting on a show

0:19:580:20:02

like he was making the most elaborate dish in the world.

0:20:020:20:04

But it was the easiest thing in the world to make.

0:20:040:20:07

It was just regular biscuit and then a white gravy that goes over it,

0:20:070:20:11

and it's a morning dish.

0:20:110:20:12

You put a sausage in the gravy.

0:20:120:20:15

Why you making that face? It's delicious.

0:20:150:20:17

-Is it?!

-I should cook it for you sometime.

0:20:170:20:20

-It is actually quite healthy, too.

-Really?

0:20:200:20:22

Because he uses veggie sausage and a skimmed milk.

0:20:220:20:24

-But it is amazing.

-Sounds even more delicious.

0:20:240:20:26

You're really selling it there.

0:20:260:20:29

You're really selling it there, yeah.

0:20:290:20:31

-Biscuits and gravy, it is really popular in the South.

-Is it?

-Yes.

0:20:310:20:35

These are popular all over the UK, scones,

0:20:350:20:37

but it's how you serve them that makes it a little bit controversial.

0:20:370:20:41

Do you put the jam on the bottom or the jam on the top?

0:20:410:20:43

But we'll get on to that once I have made them.

0:20:430:20:45

At this point, you can pop the sultanas in there if you want,

0:20:450:20:47

but all the crumb is gone. And then I...

0:20:470:20:50

This is also a thing - I put two medium-sized eggs in here.

0:20:500:20:53

Some people don't put eggs in.

0:20:530:20:55

It does make it slightly shorter, if you want,

0:20:550:20:57

but this is almost like a foolproof recipe.

0:20:570:20:59

135ml of milk,

0:20:590:21:02

and this is where, on our website, it's slightly different.

0:21:020:21:05

So if you do print it off our website,

0:21:050:21:06

there is more milk than you will need -

0:21:060:21:08

there's a little mistake on it.

0:21:080:21:11

So, literally, you bring this together with your hands

0:21:110:21:14

and you slowly add the milk.

0:21:140:21:16

And this is where, over in the US, if you're making this,

0:21:160:21:19

you need to be careful because

0:21:190:21:20

the flours absorb different amounts of liquid.

0:21:200:21:22

So one standard recipe will alter massively

0:21:220:21:26

the different types of flour that you use.

0:21:260:21:28

So that should be about there.

0:21:280:21:30

-I think this show is inspiring me to cook.

-Is it?

0:21:300:21:34

It is going to change my life - I just know it.

0:21:340:21:35

Do you think we'll do well in America if we were over there...?

0:21:350:21:38

-Yes, I do.

-Do you think so?

-Yeah, because no-one knows how to cook!

0:21:380:21:41

Well, Jamie Oliver has tried, I know that,

0:21:410:21:43

but, you know, it's a bit of a struggle, but there you go.

0:21:430:21:46

And then we bring this all together like that.

0:21:460:21:48

And it should be this texture. You see?

0:21:480:21:50

If it's dry when it goes in the oven,

0:21:500:21:52

it's going to be dry when it goes out of the oven,

0:21:520:21:54

so you have got to put a little bit of moisture in there.

0:21:540:21:57

I can see why kids would like this. It makes a mess. A fun mess.

0:21:570:22:00

You bring this together. A tiny bit of flour,

0:22:000:22:02

and this is why a flour shaker is always quite good.

0:22:020:22:04

And mould this together. And just bring this together.

0:22:040:22:06

And I am going to roll it all out and cut it up.

0:22:060:22:09

But we mentioned, you know, after your time in Kentucky,

0:22:090:22:12

you went to this...

0:22:120:22:14

-Is it The Juilliard School in New York?

-Yeah.

0:22:140:22:17

It's quite difficult to get into that acting school as well.

0:22:170:22:19

Yeah, they take seven women a year,

0:22:190:22:21

and it's...maybe a 15-minute audition,

0:22:210:22:23

so I guess I just had the best 15 minutes of my life.

0:22:230:22:26

Is that something that you wanted to do, acting, when you were young?

0:22:260:22:29

When I was eight years old, I made a very focused decision

0:22:290:22:31

in an announcement my parents that that was what I was going to do.

0:22:310:22:34

And I never came up with a plan B, so it had to work.

0:22:340:22:36

And that school in particular, was it?

0:22:360:22:38

Well, I guess when I was about 14,

0:22:380:22:41

I started trying to decide what was the best school,

0:22:410:22:44

and Juilliard was always the goal.

0:22:440:22:46

Because you did well before you were there.

0:22:460:22:48

Even before you graduated, you already on Broadway.

0:22:480:22:51

Yeah, I left school to do a Broadway show

0:22:510:22:53

with Liam Neeson and Laura Linney, The Crucible.

0:22:530:22:56

-I got very lucky. I got very lucky.

-But then went on...

0:22:560:22:59

After doing Broadway and stuff like that,

0:22:590:23:01

-was that a big steep learning curve for you, Broadway?

-Huge!

0:23:010:23:04

Arthur Miller was actually alive and involved in that production,

0:23:040:23:08

so I remember bowing with him on one side and Laura on the other,

0:23:080:23:11

thinking, "I could just die now." I'm glad I didn't die.

0:23:110:23:14

But right after that I moved to Los Angeles

0:23:140:23:17

and started waiting tables, like a good actress does.

0:23:170:23:20

And... Because I couldn't get work!

0:23:200:23:23

-But you hear stories about that.

-Yeah.

0:23:230:23:25

But it just so happened to you,

0:23:250:23:27

but, also, it happened quite quickly.

0:23:270:23:29

It did. About a year.

0:23:290:23:31

Because then you went into so many different things.

0:23:310:23:33

But thrillers were the big thing.

0:23:330:23:34

-Quite serious parts, would you say?

-Yeah.

0:23:340:23:36

-I guess I'm a really good screamer.

-Right.

0:23:360:23:39

I did Exorcism Of Emily Rose,

0:23:390:23:41

and right after that, got into Dexter.

0:23:410:23:44

And Dexter, tell us about Dexter, then,

0:23:440:23:46

-because anybody that doesn't know about it - HUGELY popular.

-Yeah.

0:23:460:23:49

I mean, in the States, what, five million people a week?

0:23:490:23:51

I don't know. I don't pay attention to that. It's too much pressure.

0:23:510:23:54

-Nearly as many people who watch this. Nearly as many.

-Yeah.

0:23:540:23:57

-But you are on series...

-You are about to start on...

0:23:570:24:00

I think March 30th at ten o'clock, you all start watching season six.

0:24:000:24:03

And I'm about eight weeks away from shooting season seven.

0:24:030:24:07

-And that is on the FX channel?

-Yeah.

0:24:070:24:09

-Ten o'clock, 30th.

-I'm not going to tell you what happens.

0:24:090:24:12

-And you are filming series seven?

-Yeah, about to start seven.

0:24:120:24:15

But you play a policewoman in it, and it is based on...

0:24:150:24:18

Anybody that hasn't seen it, it's quite a dark set-up story

0:24:180:24:21

-based on a novel, isn't it, really?

-Yeah.

0:24:210:24:23

That's what it started off as.

0:24:230:24:25

Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay.

0:24:250:24:27

-So it is best on this character, Dexter, he's a...

-Serial killer.

0:24:270:24:32

-Yeah, but he is also works in the police force as a...

-Yeah.

0:24:320:24:35

-Blood splatter analyst.

-Yes. Blood splatter analyst.

0:24:350:24:37

-Forensic scientist, we call it.

-Yeah.

0:24:370:24:39

But the whole lot is based on that.

0:24:390:24:41

I mean, it must have been when they were first bringing it to the air,

0:24:410:24:44

a little bit controversial, but also, you know, people thinking

0:24:440:24:47

"Oh, it might last a series," or stuff like that,

0:24:470:24:49

but not the following that it it's got all over the globe now.

0:24:490:24:52

I never thought it would actually see the light of day.

0:24:520:24:54

I thought I was just shooting the pilot

0:24:540:24:56

and that no-one would actually put a serial killer on TV.

0:24:560:24:58

But, apparently, people really like championing a serial killer.

0:24:580:25:03

It's been a lot of fun and really challenging,

0:25:030:25:05

and I think the sixth season is going to change everything.

0:25:050:25:08

It all kind of... The whole mould of the show breaks down

0:25:080:25:12

at the end of season six,

0:25:120:25:13

and so series seven and eight will be totally different beasts.

0:25:130:25:17

It's something different. That has made him excited

0:25:170:25:19

-cos I know you are a big fan of it, aren't you?

-Yeah.

0:25:190:25:22

Right, so, when you've got these scones,

0:25:220:25:24

you, basically, use the cutters,

0:25:240:25:25

put a little bit of flour on it like that

0:25:250:25:27

and just pop them out like that.

0:25:270:25:29

You can see it's quite moist at this point.

0:25:290:25:31

And then what I do is lift these up. Only roll it once.

0:25:310:25:34

Once you've rolled it, cut it,

0:25:340:25:36

re-roll it one more time otherwise you start stuffing it up.

0:25:360:25:39

These bits are good tips.

0:25:390:25:41

You place these on here and you can cook these.

0:25:410:25:43

Because these are great for the kids, but also great for the cook,

0:25:430:25:47

because you can just take little wedges out of them.

0:25:470:25:49

Egg wash.

0:25:490:25:51

Now, what you need to do with this one

0:25:510:25:53

is then just an egg yolk over the top like that.

0:25:530:25:57

-Why? For browning?

-Just for browning.

0:25:570:26:00

But what I do is double egg wash.

0:26:000:26:01

So once you've made these, pop them in the fridge

0:26:010:26:05

and allow them to chill for about a good 20 minutes.

0:26:050:26:09

And then egg wash them again just before they go in the oven.

0:26:100:26:14

So these would be chilled, egg washed...again,

0:26:140:26:17

hot oven.

0:26:170:26:18

This is set at 450 degrees Fahrenheit,

0:26:180:26:21

which helps you cos I know you are Fahrenheit over there.

0:26:210:26:23

About 225 in the UK. Gas mark 6 or 7. Quite a high oven.

0:26:230:26:28

-And we end up with these.

-Nice!

-Scones.

0:26:280:26:30

Now, you need it quite high

0:26:300:26:32

because of the glaze that you get with the egg yolk, you see.

0:26:320:26:34

Now, this is where you get controversial in the UK.

0:26:340:26:37

Do you put the butter on, do you put the cream on...?

0:26:370:26:41

Whatever you put on first.

0:26:410:26:43

But the idea being is you've got these delicate scones.

0:26:430:26:46

Some butter.

0:26:460:26:48

Butter is very good for you.

0:26:480:26:50

I don't know why you gave me that look.

0:26:500:26:52

This is what I've been talking about for years on this show,

0:26:520:26:54

but nobody has ever listened to me, you know what I mean?

0:26:540:26:57

Thank you very much. You can come back again.

0:26:570:26:59

And then we've got the jam.

0:26:590:27:00

This is strawberry jam,

0:27:000:27:03

which we place on here as well.

0:27:030:27:05

Now, some people would put the jam on last.

0:27:050:27:09

But then we've got clotted cream.

0:27:090:27:11

Now, I know you were looking at this wondering what it was.

0:27:110:27:14

Clotted cream has got an origin status,

0:27:140:27:17

which is basically like champagne or Stilton.

0:27:170:27:20

You can only produce champagne and Stilton

0:27:200:27:22

in Stilton or in Champagne.

0:27:220:27:24

Clotted cream, same thing - Devon, Cornwall.

0:27:240:27:27

And you've got clotted cream,

0:27:270:27:30

which is milk that they take out,

0:27:300:27:33

they place in what looks like a big washing machine

0:27:330:27:36

and it brings the cream, the fat, to the top,

0:27:360:27:39

and they put it into a little pot.

0:27:390:27:41

And then steam it over a... What we call a bain-marie,

0:27:420:27:45

over a tray of hot water.

0:27:450:27:46

-And it sets into that.

-(Wow!)

0:27:460:27:49

And there you have proper food. Scones, jam and clotted cream.

0:27:490:27:54

Now, you might want to take... Are you going to do it this way?

0:27:540:27:56

-I was going to do it this way.

-I do it this way as well.

0:27:560:27:59

I feel so bad for the audience, they can't try this.

0:27:590:28:01

Oh, don't worry about them.

0:28:010:28:02

LAUGHTER

0:28:020:28:04

I'm so lucky.

0:28:060:28:08

SHE LAUGHS

0:28:080:28:09

Why would you put gravy over the top of that?

0:28:090:28:11

-I will show you some day.

-Yeah.

0:28:110:28:13

-That is delicious.

-This is amazing.

0:28:130:28:15

Well, I think Jennifer was impressed by James's scones.

0:28:200:28:22

Loving your work, James.

0:28:220:28:24

Today we're taking a look back at some of the tastiest recipes

0:28:240:28:27

from the Saturday Kitchen archives,

0:28:270:28:28

and there's still loads of inspiring dishes to come.

0:28:280:28:31

Up next, an authentic Scottish chef cooking an authentic Scottish dish,

0:28:310:28:35

and it's Tom Kitchin with his haggis, neeps and tatties.

0:28:350:28:39

Right, here with the first haggis recipe of the day

0:28:390:28:41

is the mighty Mr Tom Kitchin.

0:28:410:28:43

And I say it is a mighty recipe by a mighty chef.

0:28:430:28:46

There's a lot going on here, so...

0:28:460:28:48

Yeah, there's a lot going on, but, you know, we've got to push

0:28:480:28:50

the boundaries a wee bit on the old haggis, neeps and tatties.

0:28:500:28:53

OK. So break it down a bit.

0:28:530:28:54

I'm going to do the pickle and I am going to do the little galette

0:28:540:28:57

and the mashed potatoes.

0:28:570:28:58

Exactly. If you could get that on, James, that would be great.

0:28:580:29:01

I am going to braise this pork skin.

0:29:010:29:03

I'm going to braise that in a mirepoix of vegetables,

0:29:030:29:05

and we're going to add some red wine, port

0:29:050:29:07

and Madeira on top of that.

0:29:070:29:09

So we've got garlic, bay, this is veg stock in here.

0:29:090:29:12

-Veg stock in there, yeah.

-Thyme. Peppercorns.

0:29:120:29:14

A sweet and sour liquid. It's really great.

0:29:140:29:17

We're doing it with the neeps today.

0:29:170:29:20

-Sugar and salt.

-What do the southerners call turnips, neeps?

0:29:200:29:23

-Well, that to me...

-That's what? That's a turnip or a swede?

0:29:230:29:26

-That's a swede to me.

-That's a swede?

0:29:260:29:28

That's a neep to me.

0:29:280:29:29

-On Twitter, there's a debate raging about turnips and swedes.

-Is there?

0:29:290:29:34

This is the thing - people need to get out more.

0:29:340:29:37

I thought neeps were parsnips.

0:29:370:29:39

OK. So I'm going to do a mirepoix.

0:29:420:29:44

So a bit like you were braising

0:29:440:29:45

a steak at home, or something like that.

0:29:450:29:48

We've got the carrots, the onions, the bouquet garni,

0:29:480:29:51

some garlic.

0:29:510:29:53

We'll braise that down.

0:29:530:29:55

And then I've got some red wine and some port.

0:29:550:29:59

And a little bit of Madeira,

0:30:000:30:02

-which will give it a really nice sweetness as well.

-OK.

0:30:020:30:05

And then I'm going to pop this pork skin in there.

0:30:050:30:08

You can just ask your butcher for this.

0:30:080:30:10

It's the skin of the belly, James,

0:30:100:30:12

so they've just taken it off the belly.

0:30:120:30:14

And then we'll braise that in the oven. Cover that up.

0:30:140:30:17

Got my stock.

0:30:190:30:20

And we'll pop that in the oven.

0:30:200:30:21

Do you celebrate in the restaurant the traditional way, then,

0:30:210:30:24

or is it...something slightly different for you?

0:30:240:30:26

Yeah, well, we do.

0:30:260:30:27

We don't do it in the main restaurant, we do it in the pub.

0:30:270:30:30

Right.

0:30:300:30:31

-Because it normally involves quite a lot of whisky.

-Right.

0:30:310:30:35

And, yeah, the pub is the best place for that, really.

0:30:350:30:38

So we do it there. OK.

0:30:380:30:41

OK, we're basically slicing these. This is to go in...

0:30:410:30:43

We're going to pickle these, basically, aren't we?

0:30:430:30:45

So we're doing the neeps today.

0:30:450:30:47

You could do turnips, you could do carrots.

0:30:470:30:49

Anything. It's lovely in a salad, it would be absolutely lovely.

0:30:490:30:52

And you just boil your liquid.

0:30:520:30:54

You've got that really sweet and sour flavour.

0:30:540:30:56

And then just infuse the vegetables, the raw vegetables inside,

0:30:560:31:00

and let them cool.

0:31:000:31:01

And there will be a nice kind of crunch to the vegetables.

0:31:010:31:04

I feel like I'm on a shopping channel.

0:31:040:31:07

I've got gadgets everywhere.

0:31:070:31:08

-Right, that's that one.

-They're not James Martin gadgets.

0:31:080:31:11

-And this one.

-Yeah. OK.

0:31:110:31:13

And I've got my haggis.

0:31:130:31:15

-So I poached my haggis off.

-I don't like this machine.

0:31:150:31:18

So when you cook the haggis, just into smoking...

0:31:180:31:22

Ooh!

0:31:220:31:23

You love it, Chef.

0:31:250:31:27

Oh, that's lovely. Is that not good?

0:31:270:31:29

That looks like it feels good to do, like... No?

0:31:290:31:34

It feels like this bit should belong to about 2.30 in the morning

0:31:340:31:38

on some shopping channel on some satellite thing.

0:31:380:31:41

That's good. Otherwise you'd be doing it by hand.

0:31:410:31:44

That's a good gadget, that.

0:31:440:31:45

-People would find that very interesting.

-Yeah.

-Lovely.

0:31:450:31:49

-He's such a drama queen. Ugh!

-There you go.

0:31:490:31:52

-What are you doing now, then?

-OK, so I've braised my...

0:31:520:31:54

This is the skin that I just braised, we braised earlier.

0:31:540:31:57

So because we've got the red wine and the veal stock in there,

0:31:570:32:00

it's got this lovely dark braised colour now.

0:32:000:32:04

And then put it onto a piece of tinfoil.

0:32:040:32:06

Butter the tinfoil lightly.

0:32:080:32:10

And then, using my hands, I'm going to put the haggis...

0:32:100:32:13

-Is that just traditional haggis?

-Traditional haggis, chef. Yeah.

0:32:130:32:17

It's really good.

0:32:190:32:20

And of course, everyone has got their favourite.

0:32:200:32:22

Some people like it really spicy, some people less.

0:32:220:32:25

But this one is one of my favourites.

0:32:250:32:27

But the cooking of it is quite crucial - you mustn't boil it.

0:32:270:32:29

Yeah, you don't want to boil it because it might burst the bag.

0:32:290:32:33

Because some people say you are better putting it in the oven.

0:32:330:32:35

What is the best way?

0:32:350:32:37

I think in a simmering or smoking water is the best way to do it.

0:32:370:32:40

-In what, smoking water?

-Yeah.

0:32:400:32:42

So the pan's not boiling,

0:32:420:32:43

you can just see the smoke coming off the top.

0:32:430:32:46

-OK.

-Right, they're done.

0:32:460:32:48

That's a nice way to use it, isn't it?

0:32:480:32:50

Rolling that up there to create the boudin.

0:32:500:32:54

Our next gadget is this one.

0:32:540:32:55

-With the mash.

-Uh-huh.

0:32:560:32:58

Mash, with the tatties.

0:32:580:33:00

And this one, I just twist like that.

0:33:000:33:02

So if you were doing this for your Burns Night,

0:33:020:33:04

you would have this ready in the fridge like that

0:33:040:33:07

before your friends come around.

0:33:070:33:09

And as your friends come round, you can just go...

0:33:090:33:11

And we've got a steamer here.

0:33:110:33:13

And just pop it in the steamer.

0:33:130:33:15

We'll take out this one.

0:33:150:33:17

You've kept the liquor from the pork there, haven't you?

0:33:170:33:19

Yeah, exactly.

0:33:190:33:21

So here we've got the liquor from the pork that we braised

0:33:210:33:23

and we're going to use that for the sauce.

0:33:230:33:26

Never throw away your cooking liquor from any braised dish that you do

0:33:260:33:32

because you can always make a really nice sauce from it.

0:33:320:33:35

We'll bring that down, we'll reduce it.

0:33:350:33:38

Now, these galettes look good, Chef.

0:33:380:33:40

A little bit better than rehearsal, I could say.

0:33:400:33:44

That was a bit of a... That was a bit of a dig, wasn't it?

0:33:440:33:46

LAUGHTER

0:33:460:33:48

Keep your eye on the sauce, it's burning.

0:33:480:33:50

Right, I'm on it, Chef. What do you want me to do now?

0:33:500:33:52

No, you're doing well.

0:33:520:33:53

-Right, OK, so we've got the sauce reducing.

-Galettes are on.

0:33:530:33:56

-I'm on with the mash. Pickle is done.

-Right.

0:33:560:34:00

-I'll bring these over.

-So, how long...

0:34:010:34:03

-So you can allow that to go cold and then reheat it?

-Yeah, exactly.

0:34:030:34:07

So you do the preparation beforehand, have that all ready.

0:34:070:34:10

You could even do it the day before.

0:34:100:34:12

And then we can just steam it off when your friends come around.

0:34:120:34:15

And these turnips, as well, these neeps,

0:34:150:34:18

they would last a good few days in the pickling liquid,

0:34:180:34:21

and like we said earlier, you could do any vegetable.

0:34:210:34:23

It would be really nice, bring something really sharp to the salad.

0:34:230:34:26

Yeah. I'm assuming you want that, as well, to cut through

0:34:260:34:30

the fattiness of the pork as well.

0:34:300:34:31

Exactly, Chef, yeah.

0:34:310:34:33

Then, with our haggis, we're going to trim the ends.

0:34:330:34:36

-Do you want me to use this sauce?

-A little bit of that, please, Chef.

0:34:390:34:42

OK. No problem.

0:34:420:34:44

So these little galettes, you just colour them on one side

0:34:440:34:46

and then just flip them over.

0:34:460:34:47

-Yes, please.

-All right.

0:34:470:34:49

-Like that?

-Thank you.

-Flip it over.

0:34:520:34:54

So, do you do all the walking in with the haggis

0:34:550:34:57

and that kind of stuff?

0:34:570:34:59

Yeah, as a young commis chef, actually,

0:34:590:35:01

when I was at Gleneagles as a young commis chef,

0:35:010:35:03

we used to have lots of Americans and tourists coming.

0:35:030:35:06

And sometimes had three or four Haggis presentations a night,

0:35:060:35:10

and as a young chef, we had to have the whisky as well.

0:35:100:35:14

So by the end of the night, you know, you were all over the shop.

0:35:140:35:17

-They didn't give you a cup of tea, or black tea or something?

-Exactly.

0:35:170:35:20

Right. OK, so the sauce is coming down nicely there.

0:35:200:35:24

Tom, when you said you did a haggis presentation, what do you mean?

0:35:240:35:27

Is there a certain way of

0:35:270:35:28

walking out with it, or...?

0:35:280:35:30

Yeah, so it's a really amazing, amazing presentation.

0:35:300:35:35

So the piper pipes you in and you hold the haggis like this,

0:35:350:35:38

you walk behind the piper and he plays the music.

0:35:380:35:41

And then you do the address to the haggis.

0:35:410:35:43

-Really?

-It's really amazing.

0:35:430:35:44

-Have you never seen it?

-No!

-You'll have to look it up.

0:35:440:35:47

-We've got to get you to Scotland.

-Yeah.

0:35:470:35:49

Come to Cafe Spice on Monday.

0:35:490:35:51

Now, explain to us what's in haggis,

0:35:510:35:53

because you can have different types, can't you?

0:35:530:35:55

Yeah, so traditionally it's the pluck of the mutton

0:35:550:35:57

and then all the different spices and the oats.

0:35:570:36:00

OK.

0:36:000:36:02

Just be careful inviting me places,

0:36:020:36:03

cos I will take you up on these things.

0:36:030:36:05

No problem.

0:36:050:36:07

It's slightly coloured. That one's all right.

0:36:070:36:10

It's OK, yeah.

0:36:100:36:11

And then we're going to put the neeps over the top.

0:36:110:36:14

OK. The sauce.

0:36:150:36:17

-OK.

-Do you want some salt and pepper in here?

-Yes, please, Chef.

0:36:200:36:23

Then we'll put a wee dollop on this side.

0:36:230:36:26

Lovely. Thank you.

0:36:280:36:31

-There we go.

-Is that it?

0:36:330:36:35

It's a small spoon.

0:36:370:36:38

OK. It's quite rustico, this one.

0:36:400:36:42

And then we go for the sauce.

0:36:440:36:45

All right.

0:36:480:36:49

Got the galette.

0:36:510:36:52

And that's just the reduced sauce we've just done from the liquor.

0:36:520:36:55

-The liquor from there.

-OK.

0:36:550:36:57

And then we've got the crispy galette on top.

0:36:570:37:00

-So, give us the name of this dish, then.

-OK.

0:37:000:37:02

There we have a modern-day haggis, neeps and tatties.

0:37:020:37:05

-How good does that look?

-Yeah.

0:37:050:37:06

With one burnt little galette there.

0:37:110:37:14

I'm ready with my napkin.

0:37:140:37:15

-Oh, you're ready with a napkin. Look at that.

-Thank you.

0:37:150:37:18

-Ooh, look! Wow.

-Get straight in there.

0:37:180:37:20

Oh, that looks gorgeous.

0:37:200:37:22

It's fantastic how that fat just holds it all together.

0:37:220:37:24

Yeah, and give it that real richness that you see.

0:37:240:37:26

-Those neeps should cut through that as well.

-Oh, gosh, that's quite...

0:37:260:37:29

-What's the word? Gela...?

-Gelatinous.

-Gelatinous.

0:37:290:37:32

-Taste it, though, it's not...

-Tastes very nice.

0:37:320:37:34

I do like pork belly, so I shouldn't...

0:37:340:37:36

Yeah, it's from there, exactly, yeah.

0:37:360:37:40

-Mm.

-Because on the pork belly, that would be the really crispy part.

0:37:400:37:42

But because we've braised it, it's lovely and soft.

0:37:420:37:45

-It's nice and rich.

-Very rich.

-Very rich.

0:37:450:37:48

-Do you like that?

-Mm!

-There you go.

0:37:480:37:50

I think we're all shouting at the telly,

0:37:560:37:57

"The galettes are burning! The galettes are burning!"

0:37:570:38:00

Of course we are.

0:38:000:38:01

Next, over to the pioneering TV chef -

0:38:010:38:04

the late, the great Keith Floyd.

0:38:040:38:06

This place, Hector, reminds me of that camping trip we went on.

0:38:060:38:10

Do you remember?

0:38:100:38:11

And it's really good to get back to nature

0:38:110:38:13

and experience life without all those modern conveniences.

0:38:130:38:15

Well, Livingstone Island's a bit like that campsite,

0:38:150:38:18

only a lot warmer.

0:38:180:38:19

# Let's take a trip to Victoria

0:38:190:38:22

# This time we'll look at the falls. #

0:38:220:38:25

HE HUMS

0:38:250:38:27

# Oh, the hills are alive

0:38:340:38:36

# With the sound of hippopotamuses. #

0:38:360:38:38

HIPPO GRUNTS

0:38:390:38:42

And the end of my first day in the bush.

0:38:440:38:46

Where else can you do your ablutions with a view like this?

0:38:460:38:49

The last elephants I saw in the bathroom were pink ones.

0:38:490:38:51

This is absolutely the real thing.

0:38:510:38:53

I'm going to enjoy Africa.

0:38:530:38:55

Those few glimpses of big game got me rather excited,

0:39:020:39:05

so I'm off on safari to the Kruger National Park.

0:39:050:39:08

It's about the size of Wales and is full of animals.

0:39:080:39:11

The best way to cover all these vast distances is by plane.

0:39:110:39:15

They use them like cars over here.

0:39:150:39:17

Mind you, this chap doesn't look old enough to drive.

0:39:170:39:20

Having cleared the landing strip of any marauding beasts,

0:39:200:39:22

intrepid travellers whisk straight into the bush

0:39:220:39:25

and back into a time when the whole of Africa was a giant game park.

0:39:250:39:29

Not so very long ago, the only people to travel into the bush

0:39:290:39:32

would be game hunters

0:39:320:39:33

paying thousands of pounds to shoot the animals.

0:39:330:39:35

Today's visitors just want to shoot them with cameras, not guns.

0:39:350:39:39

The rangers say it's terminally dangerous

0:39:530:39:55

to step out of the vehicle,

0:39:550:39:57

and they have no end of gruesome stories about foolish tourists

0:39:570:39:59

who have met a sticky end by doing just that.

0:39:590:40:02

Of course, it could be just to frighten you and add to the excitement

0:40:060:40:09

but I, for one, am not prepared to take the risk with this leopard.

0:40:090:40:12

Particularly as she is heavily pregnant and guarding her

0:40:120:40:16

lunch up a tree.

0:40:160:40:18

Leopards are nature's epitome of single mums as father

0:40:180:40:21

disappears the moment he's put her in the family way.

0:40:210:40:23

Life's tough in Africa.

0:40:230:40:25

Running down the spine of South Africa are

0:40:390:40:41

the Drakensberg Mountains, which tower up to 3,000 metres.

0:40:410:40:45

This area is a playground for mountaineers,

0:40:450:40:47

walkers and general lovers of the great outdoors.

0:40:470:40:50

Long ago, the bushmen lived a happy Stone Age existence in these

0:40:510:40:54

mountains but they all fell prey to the advance of the new breed of settlers.

0:40:540:40:58

One thing the settlers brought with them was

0:41:000:41:02

a new industry and that's what I'm off to see now.

0:41:020:41:05

Struthio camelus, if you want to be scientific about it.

0:41:050:41:08

Or ostrich to you and me.

0:41:100:41:13

Ostrich farming has been going on in the Klein Karoo area for well

0:41:130:41:16

over 100 years, and today, there are approximately 300,000 of these

0:41:160:41:20

strange-looking birds scurrying around the veld.

0:41:200:41:23

Originally, they came from the Middle East but ostriches are now

0:41:230:41:26

extinct in that part of the world and nearly all of them are living here.

0:41:260:41:30

They're the largest and strongest of all living birds

0:41:300:41:32

and as far as the farmer is concerned, they are big business.

0:41:320:41:36

"Never, ever, ever," they said, "work with animals and children."

0:41:400:41:44

This director, this ex-director we just fired this morning,

0:41:440:41:47

Mike Connor, has got this brilliant idea of...

0:41:470:41:49

No, we're not, Mike. Seriously. ..surrounding me with ostriches.

0:41:490:41:52

Now, ostriches do not bury their head in the sand, although I feel

0:41:520:41:55

a bit like doing that because it seems

0:41:550:41:56

a shame to invite them to lunch and then eat one of them, but

0:41:560:41:58

that's precisely what we're going to do because ostrich meat is...

0:41:580:42:01

Which is down here, chopped up by the way, Chris.

0:42:010:42:03

Is really good stuff.

0:42:030:42:04

It's low in cholesterol, it's very flavoursome,

0:42:040:42:06

it has a good gamey flavour. You can stir-fry it, you could use it in

0:42:060:42:09

steaks, you can casserole it, you can do what you like with it.

0:42:090:42:12

And I'm simply going to make a casserole,

0:42:120:42:14

using, again, my trusty wok.

0:42:140:42:16

Onto the mighty burner there, which is really good.

0:42:190:42:22

Ostriches are a really cash-intensive crop,

0:42:220:42:26

because you can have the feathers for decoration,

0:42:260:42:29

you can make jewellery from the shells

0:42:290:42:31

from these things, you can use them as containers for your

0:42:310:42:34

ingredients and of course, when you ask for half a dozen best

0:42:340:42:37

free-range eggs, it takes on a whole different meaning here in

0:42:370:42:40

South Africa because these contain the equivalent of 24 chickens' eggs.

0:42:400:42:43

Anyway, enough of all of that. We've got some oil in there -

0:42:430:42:46

we'll whack that right up.

0:42:460:42:48

Onions go in next.

0:42:590:43:01

Just brown the meat and onions for a little while.

0:43:030:43:06

Excuse me, can I have a little drop of wine?

0:43:110:43:13

This is called Ostrich Wine. It's got your photo on the front.

0:43:130:43:16

We'll have a glass of that while that's browning.

0:43:160:43:19

HE LAUGHS

0:43:190:43:21

I can see some complaints coming in here.

0:43:260:43:28

Ostriches around us, wildlife,

0:43:280:43:30

you know, animal rights and stuff like that. But I can assure you,

0:43:300:43:33

that these things are beautifully reared. Even when they take

0:43:330:43:35

their feathers from them, it's done in a most humane way.

0:43:350:43:38

And, of course, when they're ready for the table at

0:43:380:43:40

about 15 months, they're dispatched in a most humane way as well.

0:43:400:43:43

We'll pop in some carrots

0:43:500:43:52

and some little bits of bacon because this meat is quite fat-less

0:43:520:43:56

so some nice pieces of fatty bacon really help with the flavour.

0:43:560:44:01

Now, this stuff, which is like the rocket fuel of

0:44:010:44:06

the '50s, is the local schnapps and, of course, they're very keen on

0:44:060:44:09

that down here - it's the perfect way to season the meat and

0:44:090:44:13

flame it off before you add the... Oh, my goodness me. Hold on.

0:44:130:44:16

It might all take off if we're not careful.

0:44:160:44:18

Put a load of that in and stand back, Chris,

0:44:180:44:20

because it's going to go up like nobody's business.

0:44:200:44:23

I hope.

0:44:230:44:25

They just... You just nicked my water. I told you not to do that.

0:44:290:44:32

Anyway...

0:44:320:44:33

..into that, we pour a large bottle of red wine...

0:44:350:44:38

..a dollop of tomato puree...

0:44:450:44:47

..and just let it simmer away.

0:44:520:44:54

If you'd like a lightly fried egg for breakfast,

0:44:570:45:01

this is the one for you.

0:45:010:45:03

Quite a tricky operation.

0:45:070:45:09

It's quite a big membrane just inside there.

0:45:090:45:12

Of course, I've already...

0:45:120:45:14

It looks as though I've committed the fatal error and already broken

0:45:140:45:18

the yolk, but never mind, there's always a first time for everything.

0:45:180:45:22

One egg.

0:45:250:45:27

I think... I do some daft things on this programme, you know.

0:45:280:45:34

This is really ridiculous.

0:45:340:45:36

Trying to cook an ostrich egg in the middle of a field,

0:45:360:45:38

deep in darkest, wonderful South Africa where the wine flows

0:45:380:45:42

happily, the smiles are frequent, but this is total madness.

0:45:420:45:45

I can't bring myself to cook that thing

0:45:450:45:47

and I'm jolly well not going to, so there.

0:45:470:45:49

I'm going to have a drink instead.

0:45:490:45:51

Now's the time to add a few mushrooms...

0:45:520:45:55

..into my ostrich au vin, and a wonderful boerewors, which is made

0:45:580:46:05

from ground pork, ostrich and speck, and that just sits on the top and

0:46:050:46:10

poaches in there for another - I don't know - 15 or 20 minutes or so.

0:46:100:46:15

And then we'll have a really splendid,

0:46:150:46:18

very warming kind of a dish for a winter's day.

0:46:180:46:20

Although, in fact, it's about 90 degrees. Lid back on.

0:46:200:46:24

The ostriches have all come to have a snack.

0:46:240:46:27

And so, another cooking sketch ends in total chaos

0:46:320:46:36

as the birds fight back.

0:46:360:46:38

My farmer chum Alex tells me that ostriches need to eat strange things

0:46:380:46:41

like rocks, pebbles, spoons and wine bottles to help their digestion.

0:46:410:46:46

Somehow, dear Hector, I can't help feeling that chicken farming

0:46:460:46:50

would be a safer way of earning a living.

0:46:500:46:53

As for the camera crew,

0:46:530:46:54

they were unimpressed. And having chased away the birds,

0:46:540:46:56

they turned that egg into a huge, delicious, massive omelette.

0:46:560:47:00

It's in townships like this one in Plettenberg that most

0:47:070:47:10

black Africans spend their lives.

0:47:100:47:12

Nobody knows how many, as the population keeps changing and

0:47:120:47:16

new shacks are always being thrown together.

0:47:160:47:18

It's a higgledy-piggledy, ramshackle place but I liked it.

0:47:180:47:22

It had a great atmosphere and soon I made some brilliant new chums.

0:47:220:47:26

-Hi, how are you?

-Hello, I'm fine thank you, and you?

-Nice to see you.

0:47:260:47:30

-Great stuff, excellent. Thanks.

-OK. Welcome home.

0:47:300:47:32

-Thanks a lot, indeed.

-OK.

-Brilliant! Where's the kitchen?

0:47:320:47:35

So, I've been frying a few pieces of chicken in my lovely wok.

0:47:370:47:41

It's my greatest, latest toy, this machine.

0:47:410:47:44

I really like it. So I'm going to cook a very simple chicken stew.

0:47:440:47:47

So, I fried off all the bits of chicken in some oil and then I'm

0:47:480:47:51

going to add onions and garlic into my trusty wok.

0:47:510:47:55

Just give them a little bit of a brown...

0:47:570:47:59

..for a second or two. This is a most fascinating place, you know.

0:48:010:48:05

The name of this village in English is Dangerous Bush.

0:48:050:48:08

There's about 3,000 souls who live in these houses around here.

0:48:080:48:11

There's no proper electricity, there's no running water, but

0:48:110:48:15

for all of that, it's a jolly happy sort of set-up.

0:48:150:48:18

So, chicken and onions in there,

0:48:190:48:21

some whole peppercorns go in next, to add a little bit of spice to it.

0:48:210:48:26

Whole, whole peppercorns. A sprinklation of salt.

0:48:260:48:30

Walking around these townships, you know, Chris, is incredibly

0:48:320:48:36

thirsty work and you occasionally have to have

0:48:360:48:38

a little slurp of beer, which is quite nice because that's exactly

0:48:380:48:41

how I'm going to cook this chicken today. With some beer.

0:48:410:48:44

Some beer, a couple of bay leaves, a few sprigs of parsley,

0:48:510:48:58

some carrots and some potatoes...

0:48:580:49:01

In fact, I think we could add a little drop more beer.

0:49:080:49:12

Later on, I'm going to add... As that's cooked down a bit,

0:49:200:49:24

I'm going to add some squash, some mushrooms and some green beans

0:49:240:49:28

and a little bit, still later on, I'm going to make

0:49:280:49:31

the ubiquitous mealie meal with some cabbage and some cabbage stalks.

0:49:310:49:35

All that is later.

0:49:350:49:36

In the meantime, I'm going to wander around and see my new neighbours.

0:49:360:49:39

See how they're all getting on.

0:49:390:49:42

It's not exactly smart suburbia either.

0:49:420:49:45

The shacks are just put up on any available bit of land

0:49:450:49:48

and modern facilities are very few and far between.

0:49:480:49:51

MUSIC PLAYS

0:49:510:49:53

But, despite the poverty,

0:49:560:49:58

there's a great community spirit and there's still room for a bit of fun.

0:49:580:50:02

Education may be pretty basic but at least it's there.

0:50:020:50:06

These kids don't have to go down to the video shop every day to

0:50:090:50:12

enjoy themselves and there's not a computer game in sight.

0:50:120:50:16

Chicken cooked with squash and beans and mushrooms and potatoes

0:50:160:50:20

and carrots and beer. OK.

0:50:200:50:23

Under the critical eye of my latest, greatest chum, Onika.

0:50:230:50:27

Let's hope all this fits in. I think it will, Onika.

0:50:270:50:31

-We're going to be OK here.

-Yes.

-Yes, we're going to be all right.

0:50:310:50:35

Right, there's that bit.

0:50:350:50:36

A little bit of garnish on there before I finish completely.

0:50:360:50:40

Which will be a little bit of parsley and I might put

0:50:400:50:44

a little bit of paprika over that just to spice it up a little bit.

0:50:440:50:47

There. There's the completed dish, Chris.

0:50:490:50:51

In the meanwhile, where's my spoon? I keep losing things.

0:50:510:50:55

Ever since you came along, I've gone to bits, you realise that?

0:50:550:50:58

THEY LAUGH

0:50:580:50:59

Right, oil in there, a bit of your Aromat flavouring,

0:50:590:51:03

a little shake two or more?

0:51:030:51:06

-More.

-More, more, more.

0:51:060:51:08

-OK.

-OK?

-You can put some salt in now.

0:51:120:51:14

-Add some salt. Excellent.

-A pinch of salt.

-A pinch of salt.

0:51:140:51:17

-OK. And a little tiny bit more.

-Yes.

0:51:170:51:20

And I'm going to put a little bit of cayenne pepper in just to

0:51:200:51:24

make it a bit spicy. Not too much, just a little bit like that.

0:51:240:51:27

-You can put more.

-Oh, good.

-It is not strong.

-This is not strong.

0:51:270:51:31

Oh, right? All through this country I've been told off

0:51:310:51:34

for making things too spicy.

0:51:340:51:36

Oh, here we go. Mother is in charge. Everything is all right.

0:51:360:51:39

-You can stir.

-Oh, right. I can stir it now. That's even better.

0:51:410:51:44

Now, can you can put them in a ring

0:51:440:51:47

-and then use this one, this spoon, a wooden spoon.

-With that one?

0:51:470:51:50

OK, with a wooden spoon. How much will I put in, my darling?

0:51:500:51:52

-Because I don't really know this.

-Can you measure it with this cup?

0:51:520:51:56

Oh, right.

0:51:560:51:58

Then we will see what is... How much to... OK.

0:51:580:52:02

OK. Start with that.

0:52:020:52:04

Will you pour it in? You hum it, love, and I'll sing it.

0:52:040:52:06

You know, there we are. Stir that.

0:52:060:52:08

Do you always look so severe when you're giving cookery lessons?

0:52:090:52:12

-Why don't you ever smile?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:52:120:52:14

You're being so bossy, it's not fair.

0:52:140:52:16

-Can I stir it?

-Yes, all right, you do it. I've given up.

0:52:180:52:20

I can't cope here.

0:52:200:52:22

It's all throughout this series, one African woman can do

0:52:220:52:25

what 12 film crew can't - it's amazing, isn't it?

0:52:250:52:28

That meal I cooked costs just a few rand - nothing to you and me.

0:52:340:52:38

But even that is beyond the pockets of many of the people here.

0:52:380:52:41

So, everyone tries to help each other and the youngsters

0:52:410:52:44

and the unemployed at least get one hearty meal each day.

0:52:440:52:48

Strange how school dinner ladies seem the same the world over, isn't it?

0:52:490:52:53

-With the chicken, it's very nice.

-Mm-hmm.

0:52:550:52:59

But I've never experienced to eat an unskinned potato.

0:52:590:53:04

-But I will eat it now.

-Ah, OK.

0:53:040:53:07

Well, we thought, and I believe, that when you leave the skin on

0:53:070:53:10

the potato, it means that more of the nutrition is saved inside it.

0:53:100:53:15

You know? That's why I did it that way,

0:53:150:53:17

because I saw this as relatively simple but filling kind of

0:53:170:53:22

meal with chicken and vegetables,

0:53:220:53:24

not at all sophisticated, and I thought it would be a good idea...

0:53:240:53:28

Well, actually, I didn't think that at all.

0:53:280:53:30

It was my assistant who said, "Leave the potatoes on." Scott!

0:53:300:53:32

You're fired.

0:53:320:53:34

Onika, do you think that I've got any chance of getting a job as

0:53:360:53:40

a cook here in Plettenberg?

0:53:400:53:42

If you go to the hotels, they don't cater for our meals,

0:53:440:53:49

the only cater for...

0:53:490:53:52

I want to say, they don't cater this other food.

0:53:520:53:55

This is our traditional food. They only cater their own food.

0:53:550:54:00

Even the chefs are doing... They prepare other people's food,

0:54:000:54:04

not our own traditional food.

0:54:040:54:07

I think that this mealie meal with the spinach is absolutely

0:54:070:54:11

fabulous and I totally agree with you.

0:54:110:54:13

I travel all over the world and I have to stay in hotels where

0:54:130:54:17

they're serving me...

0:54:170:54:18

If I'm in Africa, they're serving me Italian food,

0:54:180:54:20

if I'm in Egypt, they're serving me German food.

0:54:200:54:22

I would much rather have the food of the region, I really would.

0:54:220:54:26

A true master at work.

0:54:310:54:33

As ever on Best Bites, we're looking back at some of the best recipes

0:54:330:54:37

from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:54:370:54:39

Still to come on today's show, Jason Atherton and Aggi Sverrisson

0:54:390:54:43

square up at the hobs in the Omelette Challenge.

0:54:430:54:46

Judy Joo gets all creative with Korean food.

0:54:460:54:49

She makes her ultimate Korean fried chicken served up with pickled

0:54:490:54:53

radish cubes. And Emma Willis faces her food heaven or food hell.

0:54:530:54:58

But did she get a food heaven - herb crusted rack of lamb with

0:54:580:55:02

potatoes and a spinach timbale?

0:55:020:55:03

Or did she end up facing her food hell -

0:55:030:55:05

honey confit duck legs with puy lentils?

0:55:050:55:08

You can find out at the end of the show.

0:55:080:55:11

Now time for Silvena Rowe, who's cooking a delicious scallop and

0:55:110:55:15

black pudding dish with some help from James,

0:55:150:55:17

who's looking little on edge.

0:55:170:55:19

Right, now, cooking next is a woman in charge of the food at

0:55:190:55:22

the incredibly popular London-based Polish restaurant Baltic.

0:55:220:55:25

She is also the world's leading expert on all

0:55:250:55:28

areas of Eastern European cooking.

0:55:280:55:30

Well, that's what she told me and I'm not going to argue with her.

0:55:300:55:33

-It's Silvena Rowe. Good to have you on the show.

-Come, come, come to Mamma.

0:55:330:55:36

-Right, OK, lovely.

-Twice.

-Yes, lovely. Right.

0:55:360:55:39

It's in my contract, now, remember. That's what I come here for, really.

0:55:390:55:41

OK, what are we cooking, then?

0:55:410:55:43

-But in case you're wondering what I'm cooking...

-Yeah, fire away.

0:55:430:55:45

I'm doing scallops, actually, I'm frying scallops with black

0:55:450:55:48

pudding served on potato, apple and celery mash.

0:55:480:55:51

-But this isn't normal black pudding.

-No, this is kaszanka.

0:55:510:55:54

This is Polish black pudding.

0:55:540:55:56

It's very flavoursome, but, basically, if you really can't get

0:55:560:55:58

hold of it, which... I'd be very surprised,

0:55:580:56:00

because there's so many Polish delis all over the place,

0:56:000:56:02

basically, go for really good quality British black pudding.

0:56:020:56:05

What is it about this one that makes it different?

0:56:050:56:07

It's a very grainy, it's full of delicious barley,

0:56:070:56:10

nutty barley, so it's very,

0:56:100:56:11

very good for you and of course we have British scallops here, diver's

0:56:110:56:14

scallops, and I've seen those... I've been actually diving with them.

0:56:140:56:17

I haven't actually gone diving but I've been with the divers

0:56:170:56:20

diving and do you know how fast they are? They are so, so very fast.

0:56:200:56:23

Fast little suckers on the bottom of the sea and you actually have to go

0:56:230:56:26

and catch them one by one so those are the real McCoy, the real thing.

0:56:260:56:30

-Real hand-dived cut scallops caught by you?

-Absolutely.

0:56:300:56:32

No, no, no, I didn't catch any, I was just observing.

0:56:320:56:35

-It was very scary, actually because they are extremely fast.

-They are.

0:56:350:56:38

But the thing that amazes me is when I went to see these in Scotland

0:56:380:56:40

being caught, how far out they are and they're not...

0:56:400:56:43

They're literally about sort of from here to you away.

0:56:430:56:46

And there's a diver going round...

0:56:460:56:47

Listen, statistically, two people... Respect to these guys,

0:56:470:56:50

seriously, because two divers a year lose their lives. Respect.

0:56:500:56:54

You know, so it's a statistic and respect to these guys because

0:56:540:56:57

-this is the best quality of scallops you can get.

-There you go.

0:56:570:57:00

-Yes, so...

-You were told.

-Beautiful.

0:57:000:57:02

Basically on a scallop, I'm going to show you how

0:57:020:57:04

to open them, yeah? There's a round shell and a flat shell.

0:57:040:57:07

Now, the round shell, you keep flat on the board,

0:57:070:57:10

which we've got here, and the flat shell you keep towards you.

0:57:100:57:13

Use a table knife for this, not a cook's knife. Use a table knife,

0:57:130:57:17

and run the table knife up against the flat side of the shell

0:57:170:57:21

and if you cut through, there's a little membrane

0:57:210:57:23

and it'll just open up like that.

0:57:230:57:25

Now, if you use a table knife, it won't cut through the scallop,

0:57:250:57:28

because otherwise, if you did cut through the scallop, I would get shouted at.

0:57:280:57:31

Well, absolutely, and you know what?

0:57:310:57:33

I don't want the roe so get rid of the roe for me, please,

0:57:330:57:35

because I do not love the roe, I use the roe for other things like

0:57:350:57:38

delicious sauce, maybe a little bit of powder to flavour my sauces,

0:57:380:57:41

but for this dish I do not wish to have the roe.

0:57:410:57:43

You don't want the roe? Just the scallop?

0:57:430:57:45

-So make sure it's out of there, please.

-OK. Yes, Chef. I'm doing it.

0:57:450:57:48

Thank you very much. You see,

0:57:480:57:49

I used to do this job but now, you know, in the world of Baltic,

0:57:490:57:52

in the world of Chez Kristoff, I don't do that kind of thing,

0:57:520:57:55

I've got my commis to do it, I've got 27 gorgeous Polish boys

0:57:550:57:59

working and they are the best people you can have in the kitchen.

0:57:590:58:02

-Are they hand-picked by you, are they?

-Absolutely.

0:58:020:58:05

You know, lots of stages they have to go through, but, you know,

0:58:050:58:08

the criteria is pretty high.

0:58:080:58:09

Especially with the choice we have nowadays of Polish, you know,

0:58:090:58:13

-around here. By the way, back to the dish. Sorry.

-Back to the dish go on.

0:58:130:58:16

-They're distracting me, these guests, they're very noisy.

-GUESTS: Sorry.

0:58:160:58:20

And, Theo, you've suddenly become very vocal now that you're all...

0:58:200:58:22

"I've finished, I can relax now."

0:58:220:58:24

This is not the Weakest Link after all, is it, darling?

0:58:240:58:27

-Oh, no, don't bring that one on.

-No, no.

0:58:270:58:29

-It will be revealed at some point.

-No, go on.

0:58:290:58:32

Because the bit that you did... These guys did the Weakest Link and,

0:58:320:58:36

-Theo, you got a cooking question, didn't you?

-Yeah, I got...

0:58:360:58:39

-Yeah, the answer was...

-And guess who did very well on it?

0:58:390:58:42

This has not gone out yet.

0:58:420:58:43

-But Theo actually got a cooking question...

-And the answer was

0:58:430:58:46

cod fillet and it should have been codpiece.

0:58:460:58:48

And, you know, Theo didn't get it, but never mind, we still love him.

0:58:500:58:52

-You know.

-Then I banked all that money.

0:58:520:58:54

-Yeah, but how much money did we raise?

-24,000.

0:58:540:58:57

So, when it comes out, people must watch it.

0:58:570:58:59

-It's chefs being clever.

-Can we go back onto the black pudding?

0:58:590:59:02

Black pudding. Well, this is delicious black pudding.

0:59:020:59:04

Basically, what I'm doing with it, I'm frying it up.

0:59:040:59:06

You can put in the oven if you want, but I'm breaking it

0:59:060:59:09

because I like little piles on the top of my scallops.

0:59:090:59:11

I love black pudding.

0:59:110:59:12

My father used to make our own black pudding and at the restaurant

0:59:120:59:15

now, I occasionally do black pudding but mostly I do white pudding,

0:59:150:59:18

-boudin blanc.

-You make it?!

-Yeah! I make my own.

0:59:180:59:21

I use veal and chicken and sometimes when I feel very

0:59:210:59:23

extravagant, I put a touch of truffle, but like me and Theo were

0:59:230:59:27

saying earlier, truffle is so expensive at the moment, it's ridiculous,

0:59:270:59:30

really, so basically, a bit of foie gras sometimes because we do

0:59:300:59:34

a lot of foie gras in the restaurant.

0:59:340:59:36

It's a very Eastern European thing, you know, because, of course,

0:59:360:59:39

the best foie gras in the world does come from Hungary.

0:59:390:59:42

And Bulgaria.

0:59:420:59:43

Does it? I thought it was French.

0:59:430:59:46

Well, you go to France and you will see it's all imported from

0:59:460:59:49

-Hungary and Bulgaria.

-All right. There you go.

0:59:490:59:51

What I'm doing here, I'm chopping up my vegetables quite finely,

0:59:510:59:55

I'm chopping up my potatoes...

0:59:550:59:56

You're so slow - what's happened to you?

0:59:560:59:58

-You've been racing cars, haven't you?

-Just carry on.

0:59:581:00:00

Go on, you're all right.

1:00:001:00:02

That's what's been happening to you and of course I've not been here

1:00:021:00:04

for quite some time, too busy with my kitchens to keep you intact.

1:00:041:00:07

Chopping up the potatoes in small squares and basically I want to put

1:00:071:00:11

all my vegetables altogether because, you know,

1:00:111:00:14

I don't want to be messing up with boiling first the potatoes

1:00:141:00:16

and then adding celery and then adding the potatoes,

1:00:161:00:19

then on top of it, the apple, so the apple actually is going

1:00:191:00:22

to go last and is going to be in quite large chunks because it will

1:00:221:00:26

actually be cooking at the same time as my potatoes.

1:00:261:00:29

So, this is one of the dishes we will now be doing and we are

1:00:291:00:32

already doing at Baltic because it reflects the strong flavours

1:00:321:00:36

of the food, and I love the black pudding, and you know what?

1:00:361:00:39

Silvena, you can pause for breath if you want.

1:00:391:00:41

Yeah, no, no, no, I've promised you, you set me up...

1:00:411:00:44

I was going to ask you a question but you keep talking.

1:00:441:00:46

Well, I'm helping you out.

1:00:461:00:48

It's like in EastEnders, it's like a domestic.

1:00:481:00:50

But, Kara, you do know men.

1:00:501:00:52

They can't do two things at the same time so while he's doing salts,

1:00:521:00:54

let him do that, one thing at a time, make his life easy,

1:00:541:00:57

make his life nice and easy. Come on, ask the question.

1:00:571:01:00

Do you want the scallops putting in the pan?

1:01:001:01:03

I can do that, hello. I'm near to the pan here, this is what I do.

1:01:031:01:06

Right, so, basically,

1:01:061:01:08

all I want to do is just caramelise them ever so gently.

1:01:081:01:11

I'm boiling all of my vegetable and fruit here, and basically,

1:01:111:01:14

what I want, I want to cook equally, at the same time.

1:01:141:01:17

So, the potatoes, chop finely and then the apple slightly larger.

1:01:171:01:20

So, if you mash it using that real masculine power that you,

1:01:201:01:24

only you, and nobody else possesses, not that I haven't got any power

1:01:241:01:28

on me, I suppose, but, you know, while I'm here I may as well use you.

1:01:281:01:32

So, mash it real fine.

1:01:321:01:33

I'm not worried about it being terribly,

1:01:331:01:35

terribly fine because I really like the chunky nature of it.

1:01:351:01:38

It goes quite well with the chunky style of my black pudding

1:01:381:01:42

which is nearly ready here.

1:01:421:01:44

I like it slightly caramelised, slightly crunchy on the top.

1:01:441:01:48

-Now...

-Do you want me to season this?

-Oh, yes, please.

1:01:481:01:51

If you would, please, yes. I like good seasoning, yes, go for it.

1:01:511:01:55

Now, you've been travelling as well, haven't you, really?

1:01:551:01:57

Yep, I've been a lot. I mean, I love travelling for food.

1:01:571:02:00

I like eating, as you can see - I'm not a slim little girl, unfortunately.

1:02:001:02:03

-I'm not saying a word.

-No, of course you're not, darling.

1:02:031:02:06

You're too afraid. But, yes, I have been travelling quite a bit.

1:02:061:02:09

I've been back to Russia again, I've been to Afghanistan,

1:02:091:02:12

I've been to New Orleans where I had the most

1:02:121:02:15

fabulous Cajun food, I'm off to Istanbul,

1:02:151:02:17

I'm off to the southern part of Turkey and Syria...

1:02:171:02:19

I would have said, "You're a bit like this mash.

1:02:191:02:21

-"You've got all the lumps in the right places."

-Yes!

1:02:211:02:24

-Oh, thank you so much.

-There you go.

-Thank you.

1:02:241:02:26

That's what I want to hear, that's why I'm here, really.

1:02:261:02:28

I don't come here to cook.

1:02:281:02:30

-Everybody can cook.

-Right, I've got out of that one.

1:02:301:02:32

-Oh! You... Now...

-You see? He's getting confused. Isn't that sweet?

1:02:321:02:35

Yeah, I forgot to put that in it. So where have you been?

1:02:351:02:37

I've been to Afghanistan.

1:02:371:02:39

I cooked for a very special man but I'm not allowed to reveal who.

1:02:391:02:42

He has almost a whole province there so he entertains there and it

1:02:421:02:46

was the most amazing experience of my life because

1:02:461:02:48

nothing is available there, you have to source it out.

1:02:481:02:51

You know, like you grow your little vegetables, your pretty little vegetables.

1:02:511:02:54

-Right, you cooked for a man that you can't mention?

-Yeah.

1:02:541:02:57

But you can work it out. It's obviously somebody...

1:02:571:02:59

OK, it's from Russian origin and it's somebody extremely big

1:02:591:03:02

and important in this country, but he loves good food.

1:03:021:03:05

And everything you want you have to go and source it out. You go to

1:03:051:03:08

the field, you choose an animal and then a few hours later, you have it.

1:03:081:03:12

-You go to the field and choose an animal?

-Well, yes.

1:03:121:03:15

Well, not the field, to the farm, I should say. Field, farm, whatever.

1:03:151:03:18

Anyway, and then New Orleans was fascinating as well, it was

1:03:181:03:21

lovely to see New Orleans after all those years and months of repair.

1:03:211:03:26

It's lovely, love. But can we get the mash on the plate? Because rugby is going to be on in a minute.

1:03:261:03:30

Can I have some chervil, please? Yeah, OK, so the mash goes onto the plate,

1:03:301:03:33

-like three little dollops and, Theo, this is real restaurant food, by the way.

-Is it? Oh...

1:03:331:03:38

None of this Sunday Kitchen kind of Sunday roast dinner thing.

1:03:381:03:42

-This is what we do here, real chefs.

-It looks very elegant.

1:03:421:03:45

OK, so, basically,

1:03:451:03:47

what I've asked James to do now is chop up some chervil for me.

1:03:471:03:51

I've got the scallops nearly done,

1:03:511:03:54

I'm going to position them on the top of my mash.

1:03:541:03:56

Basically, if you're not keen on that mash,

1:03:561:03:58

go for any sort of mash you like, go for sweet potato mash.

1:03:581:04:01

It's going to look absolutely fabulous because it's going

1:04:011:04:03

to be screaming in colour. Chilli.

1:04:031:04:05

You can add chilli to that, no problem.

1:04:051:04:07

If I knew you were coming I would have done that, but hey,

1:04:071:04:09

hopefully you will love it.

1:04:091:04:11

Now, what I'm going to do is use some of my black pudding,

1:04:111:04:16

a little pile on the top and side.

1:04:161:04:20

-Yep.

-And are you ready?

1:04:201:04:22

I'm ready, I'm ready. I'm like a coiled spring.

1:04:221:04:25

Well, that's what we want to hear.

1:04:251:04:27

LAUGHTER

1:04:271:04:28

OK, and finally a little sprinkle and voila.

1:04:281:04:33

Isn't that looking princely and gorgeous?

1:04:331:04:35

So, Silvena, remind us what that dish is again.

1:04:351:04:37

This is a very rustic and very sophisticated scallops topped with

1:04:371:04:40

black pudding, served on potato, apple and celery puree.

1:04:401:04:43

And I, being a bloke, didn't do any of it.

1:04:431:04:45

Wonderful, right. This is where you get to try it.

1:04:501:04:53

Now, Oliver and Theo, you do like it, don't you?

1:04:531:04:55

LAUGHTER

1:04:551:04:57

-I love it.

-Dive in. Tell us what do you think.

1:04:571:05:00

Have you ever had black pudding before?

1:05:001:05:02

-No, I know you're not an offal lover.

-Thank you.

1:05:021:05:04

No, I haven't really but I'm looking forward to giving it a whirl.

1:05:041:05:08

-But I just took some off there.

-Try a little bit of the flavour.

1:05:081:05:11

See what do you think because it's very earthy, very nutty,

1:05:111:05:14

very kind of gritty, very crispy. It's quite nice.

1:05:141:05:16

-It's lovely. That's very nice.

-That's very sweet of you, thank you.

1:05:161:05:20

A fantastic dish from a formidable lady.

1:05:251:05:28

Great stuff as always, Silvena.

1:05:281:05:30

Thank you. Now, time for the Omelette Challenge.

1:05:301:05:33

Today, Jason Atherton takes on Aggi Sverrisson and Jason is determined

1:05:331:05:38

to avoid disqualification.

1:05:381:05:40

Let's see how they get on.

1:05:401:05:42

Right, let's get down to business.

1:05:421:05:44

The chefs that come on the show battle it out against the clock...

1:05:441:05:46

how to make three-egg omelette. Now, usual rules apply.

1:05:461:05:49

Aggi, you're not on the board so there's no point looking for you.

1:05:491:05:51

But Jason halfway there, 22.96 seconds.

1:05:511:05:55

You always disqualify me, always.

1:05:551:05:56

Well, I want a decent omelette now, guys,

1:05:561:05:58

-let's put the clocks on the screens.

-Be fair for once.

-I will be fair.

1:05:581:06:01

You can use a little bit of oil.

1:06:011:06:02

-Yeah, thank you.

-I'm letting you use a little bit of that.

1:06:021:06:04

Are you ready? Three, two, one, go.

1:06:041:06:06

GONG

1:06:211:06:23

GONG

1:06:271:06:28

LAUGHTER

1:06:281:06:30

Oh, dear, oh, dear. James...

1:06:311:06:34

-Why'd you make me do this?

-You see!

1:06:341:06:36

Why do you make me jeopardise my professional reputation?

1:06:361:06:40

You do that yourself, you don't need me. Yes, right.

1:06:401:06:45

Anyway, don't come to Pollen Street for omelettes.

1:06:461:06:50

-Shell?

-Shell.

1:07:031:07:05

I thought it was seaweed but that's a little bit stuck...

1:07:051:07:08

Accidents happen.

1:07:081:07:10

I don't know whether I should have a spoon or a straw for this one.

1:07:121:07:15

But I'll have the little bit on the edge.

1:07:151:07:18

Mm. Jason, that's lovely. Right. Next.

1:07:191:07:22

Jason.

1:07:231:07:25

-Do you think you beat your time?

-No, never. Never in a million years.

1:07:251:07:29

Either way, you're not going on, you did it in 21.88. Aggi!

1:07:291:07:32

-Never in a million years.

-Have you been practising?

-No.

1:07:361:07:40

He has, he told me this morning. Two omelettes you made, yesterday.

1:07:401:07:42

That's what you said. Two omelettes.

1:07:421:07:44

You did it, unbelievably, in 16.56 seconds, which puts you third.

1:07:441:07:52

APPLAUSE

1:07:521:07:53

No chance.

1:07:551:07:57

You must be joking me!

1:07:571:07:59

No way. Right...

1:07:591:08:01

Easy, now. LAUGHTER

1:08:011:08:03

That was a little mean.

1:08:081:08:09

I've seen worse omelettes than that make the board.

1:08:091:08:12

Oh, well.

1:08:121:08:13

Now, time for Judy Joo,

1:08:131:08:15

who took time out from travelling between her restaurants

1:08:151:08:18

in London and Hong Kong

1:08:181:08:19

to show us a thing or two about Korean cuisine.

1:08:191:08:22

Things get a little too spicy for James.

1:08:221:08:24

All the way from Korea, making her debut with us on Saturday Kitchen,

1:08:241:08:28

-it's Judy Joo. Great to have you on the show, Judy.

-Thank you!

1:08:281:08:31

Your first time on the show.

1:08:311:08:32

-Not your first time on television, though.

-No.

1:08:321:08:34

-We'll get into that a bit later.

-Yep.

1:08:341:08:35

Your trademark dish, what are you going to do?

1:08:351:08:37

I am making the ultimate Korean fried chicken,

1:08:371:08:39

and Korean fried chicken is not like any other fried chicken

1:08:391:08:41

you've ever had. It's not like Southern fried chicken,

1:08:411:08:44

it's not like Thai chicken wings, it's its own unique dish.

1:08:441:08:46

We've got a lot of people with pens and paper ready for this

1:08:461:08:49

who have been tweeting.

1:08:491:08:50

Why on earth they've got pens and paper

1:08:501:08:52

and don't use the internet for tweeting,

1:08:521:08:53

I've got no idea, for the recipe.

1:08:531:08:55

But what does it involve, first of all?

1:08:551:08:56

There's different stages, is that right?

1:08:561:08:58

Many different stages and each stage has a very specific purpose.

1:08:581:09:01

There's a bit of science going on here,

1:09:011:09:02

so you have to kind of pay attention,

1:09:021:09:04

because the thing about Korean fried chicken is you want

1:09:041:09:07

that deep crack and that kind of stained-glassed shell on it,

1:09:071:09:09

-that's what makes it different.

-OK.

1:09:091:09:11

You've got a daikon or mooli, which is an Asian radish,

1:09:111:09:14

and that's going to be our little pickle on the side.

1:09:141:09:16

It's classic pickling liquid.

1:09:161:09:17

Just a bit of tart sweetness to cut through the grease

1:09:171:09:20

when you're eating fried chicken.

1:09:201:09:21

I'm going to use wing.

1:09:211:09:23

I know in this country you don't eat wings as much as Americans.

1:09:231:09:25

-Yep.

-But in America we love our wings and it's a big football thing,

1:09:251:09:30

a bit of a game day thing.

1:09:301:09:32

I'm doing a pre-coat and this starts with some cornflour, some salts,

1:09:321:09:36

some pepper for some flavour

1:09:361:09:38

and this is really just to dry out the chicken,

1:09:381:09:40

because you want your chicken to be dry in order to get

1:09:401:09:43

a really nice, crispy coating on there and some good browning.

1:09:431:09:47

You say that you use the wings, cos last time I was over in America,

1:09:471:09:51

they deep-fried a whole chicken.

1:09:511:09:53

-Yes.

-A whole chicken?

-Yes!

1:09:531:09:55

Yes, I do that at my restaurant.

1:09:551:09:58

It's amazing!

1:09:581:09:59

-It's the best way to cook a turkey too on Thanksgiving.

-It was for me,

1:09:591:10:03

-I only wanted one portion, and they deep-fried the whole chicken.

-Yeah.

1:10:031:10:07

It's actually really good, because it seals it,

1:10:071:10:09

-it seals in all that juice...

-Right.

1:10:091:10:11

..which is fantastic. So anyway, the longer you can let

1:10:111:10:15

this chicken rest with all of this coating on it, the better,

1:10:151:10:19

-so at least an hour. Overnight is probably the best.

-OK.

1:10:191:10:23

That's just going to make it nice and dry

1:10:231:10:25

and that also helps the batter stick.

1:10:251:10:27

How does Korean food differ from other Asian food?

1:10:271:10:31

I'll be honest, I've never tasted Korean food ever.

1:10:311:10:34

-Ever?

-Ever.

-Ever? So this is an education for you?

1:10:341:10:38

-It very much is, yeah.

-Gosh.

-How does it differ?

1:10:381:10:42

It shares the same kind of geography as China and Japan,

1:10:421:10:46

cos it is a neighbour of China and Japan

1:10:461:10:49

and we have a lot of the same ingredients,

1:10:491:10:52

but we really execute everything in our own way.

1:10:521:10:55

One thing that Korea does love is the chilli.

1:10:551:10:58

Garlic, ginger, all of these things, but it's not a tropical country,

1:10:581:11:01

so get away from lemon grass, citrus, anything in Thailand.

1:11:011:11:04

-It's north of the equator.

-OK.

1:11:041:11:06

Actually, I'm going to go on with my recipe here.

1:11:061:11:09

One of the ingredients that Korea is known for is gochujang.

1:11:091:11:13

This is a fermented chilli paste, which is absolutely fantastic.

1:11:131:11:16

-Do you want to try some?

-Is it like harissa? It's not spicy, is it?

1:11:161:11:19

It's spicy, but it's got a deep earthiness, there's a complexity,

1:11:191:11:23

it's got this umami taste to it, which is really nice.

1:11:231:11:26

It's thick, so you can use it in dressings...

1:11:261:11:28

What do you mean it's not hot?

1:11:281:11:30

HE SPLUTTERS

1:11:301:11:33

-It's heat with flavour.

-What?

1:11:331:11:35

-It's heat with flavour.

-It's fermented, though.

1:11:351:11:37

-You can taste that...

-It is fermented, yeah.

1:11:371:11:40

Now I'm making my batter for the fried chicken and I've got some...

1:11:401:11:43

That's a lot hotter than the one in rehearsal, I'm telling you.

1:11:431:11:46

I've got some secret ingredients. Do you know what matzo meal is?

1:11:461:11:49

Don't give me any more stuff.

1:11:491:11:51

What have you got now?

1:11:511:11:52

I'm using matzo meal, which is a Jewish unleavened bread.

1:11:521:11:57

-You guys don't cook with that that much in this country.

-Not so much.

1:11:571:12:00

-No.

-You guys cook with it, but I'm a New Yorker, so...

1:12:001:12:04

You were talking about kosher salt,

1:12:041:12:05

or you mentioned kosher salt in a recipe.

1:12:051:12:07

Yes, in America we use a lot of kosher ingredients.

1:12:071:12:10

It's got a great grain to it and everything.

1:12:101:12:12

-I'm just mixing also some...

-Although you're a New Yorker...

-Yes.

1:12:141:12:18

-..your restaurant has been open - what? - 13 days in the UK?

-Yes.

1:12:181:12:22

-You're now officially a UK resident as well.

-I'm a UK citizen, yes.

1:12:221:12:26

I just got sworn in.

1:12:261:12:29

What does that involve? Sorry, but what does that involve?

1:12:291:12:33

It involves taking a test.

1:12:331:12:36

-A test?

-A test, I had to take a test.

1:12:361:12:38

I had to study a lot for it.

1:12:381:12:42

-What's in the test?

-The test asks you all kinds of questions,

1:12:421:12:46

like, "How old do you have to be to deliver milk in the country?

1:12:461:12:49

"How many people are in the Welsh parliament?

1:12:491:12:51

-"Who are all the patron saints?"

-I don't think I know that.

1:12:511:12:54

How many people are in the Welsh parliament?

1:12:541:12:56

-I don't really remember.

-You got that question wrong.

1:12:561:12:59

I memorised everything and then I kind of forgot it.

1:12:591:13:02

It's gone in that part of your brain where you just cram, yeah.

1:13:021:13:05

Did I see you put a different liquid in? What was that? Was it alcohol?

1:13:051:13:10

-You made the batter, so tell us about the batter.

-I've used vodka.

1:13:101:13:14

So, vodka, as you know, is an alcohol,

1:13:141:13:17

and it kind of prevents gluten from developing so much,

1:13:171:13:20

so that gives you an extra crispy crust.

1:13:201:13:23

And also, because vodka evaporates quite quickly,

1:13:231:13:26

you get a bit more of a drier crust,

1:13:261:13:28

is what you really want in Korean fried chicken.

1:13:281:13:32

OK. Now, you're going to deep-fry this.

1:13:321:13:34

We've got some already deep-fried in batches, so this gets deep-fried.

1:13:341:13:37

-Yeah.

-But the drying of the chicken's quite crucial first.

-Yes.

1:13:371:13:40

Yes, you have to dry it out.

1:13:401:13:43

And I'm deep-frying it.

1:13:431:13:45

OK. Now, tell us about the restaurant, then, because it's...

1:13:451:13:48

well, based in London.

1:13:481:13:49

-Tell us about it.

-It's in Soho, on Kingly Street.

1:13:491:13:53

It's a pedestrian-only street,

1:13:531:13:55

so there's a lot of people hanging outside, it's got a good vibe.

1:13:551:13:58

We have a DJ going on on certain nights.

1:13:581:14:01

It's a lot of fun, you know.

1:14:011:14:02

-It's been killing me, I'd have to say!

-Yeah.

1:14:021:14:06

I feel like I'm half-dead.

1:14:061:14:08

But it's fun. I'm going to add a little bit more water here.

1:14:081:14:12

And, of course, I said at the top of this

1:14:141:14:16

you were familiar with television,

1:14:161:14:19

because you've got your Korean TV show as well.

1:14:191:14:21

Yes, I do. It's Korean Food Made Simple, which is on weekdays,

1:14:211:14:24

Mondays through Fridays at 6.30, every day.

1:14:241:14:29

It's ten episodes and I'm travelling all around Korea, doing a travelogue

1:14:291:14:33

as well as cooking back in my home kitchen

1:14:331:14:35

and teaching everybody about Korean ingredients

1:14:351:14:38

and how to make things at home in a simple way.

1:14:381:14:41

So, what's the key to it, then?

1:14:411:14:43

-Cos this is the first time I've ever cooked Korean food.

-Yeah.

1:14:431:14:46

You know what?

1:14:461:14:48

I would say that the key

1:14:481:14:50

is really not to take it too seriously.

1:14:501:14:53

There are no rules in cooking. And you really...

1:14:531:14:57

If it tastes good, it's fine, just go with it.

1:14:571:15:01

And you can really just make up your own things.

1:15:011:15:05

-I don't care if it's not entirely authentic.

-Yeah.

1:15:051:15:08

-You can really just...

-So, explain to me...

1:15:081:15:11

I've got two sauces, one I'm about to start, and this one.

1:15:111:15:14

So this is the one that I've got with the majority of soy in here,

1:15:141:15:17

which I'm just thickening with a bit of cornflour in there as well.

1:15:171:15:20

-Yeah.

-We've got ginger, garlic... What else have we got in there?

1:15:201:15:23

-Is that soy sauce that...?

-Ginger, garlic, soy sauce.

1:15:231:15:26

You've got some cornflour to thicken things up.

1:15:261:15:29

-And a lot of sugar.

-A lot of sugar.

1:15:291:15:31

Korean food always has a bit of sugar and sweetness to it.

1:15:311:15:36

I'm just trying to...

1:15:361:15:37

So, tell me about this one that I'm about to do now, then.

1:15:371:15:40

This one is the gochujang glaze. This adds a bit of heat.

1:15:401:15:44

I'm glad you said that and not me.

1:15:441:15:45

-Gochujang is the Korean fermented chilli paste.

-Right, OK.

1:15:451:15:48

-So that's all about this...

-Mix it all together.

1:15:481:15:51

..harissa sort of paste.

1:15:511:15:53

It's kind of like harissa, but it's a bit thicker.

1:15:531:15:56

-Mix it all together.

-I'll get more out of it.

1:15:561:15:59

Yeah, with the spatula.

1:15:591:16:00

Bit of soy sauce.

1:16:001:16:03

There you go.

1:16:041:16:06

-Sugar.

-Yeah.

1:16:061:16:08

-Bubbling away.

-What's that you've got in there?

1:16:081:16:11

That is rice vinegar and some sesame oil.

1:16:111:16:14

-We're working an appetite up over here.

-Give it a good mix.

1:16:141:16:17

You've got the garlic and the ginger going in here.

1:16:171:16:19

-I'll put that in there.

-Yeah.

-That's gone in. The heat comes from...

1:16:191:16:22

-These are classic...

-What is that paste made out of?

1:16:221:16:24

-Is it tomato-based?

-No, no, no, there's no tomato.

1:16:241:16:27

-This is made from Korean chillies, which are their own chillies.

-Right.

1:16:271:16:30

The Portuguese missionaries came over with them

1:16:301:16:32

when they were travelling with Japanese troops

1:16:321:16:34

and they stuck with a vengeance,

1:16:341:16:35

and Koreans just fell in love with the chillies.

1:16:351:16:37

And it's one of the staple ingredients.

1:16:371:16:39

These are really classic, classic Korean ingredients here.

1:16:391:16:42

We have ginger, we have garlic, we've got chillies,

1:16:421:16:44

we've got mirin, we've got a bit of sugar,

1:16:441:16:46

so it's very, very, very balanced, which is great.

1:16:461:16:49

OK. Right, we've got the sesame seeds over the top.

1:16:491:16:51

Dark sesame seeds in this one.

1:16:511:16:53

You've got the chicken we were about to put...

1:16:531:16:55

-I'll leave that one frying.

-Yeah.

-That's going to take about...

1:16:551:16:57

That's going to take a little bit longer.

1:16:571:17:00

-So, we've got the sauces, one of each, in here.

-Yeah.

1:17:001:17:04

-And that's the thick and spicy one.

-And...

1:17:041:17:06

-And when you're ready with the chicken...

-Yep.

1:17:061:17:09

..we're good to go.

1:17:091:17:10

I take it this is a big sort of sharing dish, then, is it?

1:17:101:17:13

It is a big sharing dish, which is fun.

1:17:131:17:17

-We've got some chives on the plate also.

-I'll do that.

1:17:171:17:21

This one's thickened with a little bit of cornflour as well.

1:17:211:17:24

-This has a little bit...

-Chives on there.

-Yeah.

1:17:261:17:30

There you go. Now, people have run out of pen and paper

1:17:311:17:34

because there's a lot of ingredients go in there.

1:17:341:17:36

-The recipe is, of course, on our website.

-Yeah. Here we go.

1:17:361:17:39

And... It's a bit stuck on the bottom. That's fine.

1:17:421:17:45

I'll put a few of these on. I'll bring them across for you.

1:17:451:17:48

-That's good.

-There you go.

1:17:481:17:49

Right. These go on. So give us the name of this dish, then.

1:17:511:17:54

-This is the ultimate Korean fried chicken.

-Yeah.

1:17:541:17:58

With two sauces, the red and the black,

1:17:581:18:00

-and the pickled daikon on the side.

-Sounds pretty good to me.

1:18:001:18:03

Right. You get to dive into this one as well. So...

1:18:101:18:13

-Have a taste of that.

-Whoa.

1:18:141:18:16

-Michael, go.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

1:18:181:18:20

-So, that's the hot...?

-Taste a bit of the darker one.

1:18:201:18:23

Yeah, take those ones, yeah. Dive into those.

1:18:231:18:25

..Little bit more cooking, so that'll be great.

1:18:251:18:27

This batter's immense, isn't it?

1:18:271:18:29

It's that hard kind of batter that you get the good crunch into.

1:18:291:18:32

-It's nice and moist inside as well.

-It kind of seals it, so...yeah.

1:18:321:18:37

-And dive into the sauces as well.

-Those sauces are just fantastic.

1:18:371:18:41

-I like to mix the two sauces together.

-Great dish. There you go.

1:18:411:18:43

When it comes to food, I think Judy's got a long CAREER...

1:18:481:18:52

ahead of her. I'll get my coat.

1:18:521:18:54

Now, when Emma Willis came to the studio

1:18:541:18:56

to face her food heaven or food hell,

1:18:561:18:58

she was looking for lamb, but would she have to make do with duck?

1:18:581:19:02

Let's find out.

1:19:021:19:03

-Food heaven would, of course, be this rack of lamb.

-Oh!

1:19:031:19:06

-This is the cooked one here.

-Look how lovely that looks.

-Yeah.

1:19:061:19:08

It could be with dauphinoise potatoes,

1:19:081:19:10

-with cream and butter and garlic.

-Mm!

1:19:101:19:12

Little herb crust to go with it,

1:19:121:19:14

-with a little spinach and basil timbale to go with it.

-Lovely.

1:19:141:19:16

Alternatively, of course, it could be duck.

1:19:161:19:19

Duck legs for this one, salted,

1:19:191:19:21

classic duck confit cooked in duck fat

1:19:211:19:23

with some lentils to go with it,

1:19:231:19:25

-and a bit of sherry vinegar to finish it all off.

-Mm.

1:19:251:19:27

LAUGHTER

1:19:271:19:28

Viewers at home were a bit undecided,

1:19:281:19:30

but it was down to these guys to decide which one you would get.

1:19:301:19:34

You look terrified and you look like you're about to really enjoy this.

1:19:351:19:38

-Both of them are, because both of them chose duck.

-Oh!

1:19:381:19:40

There you go, so we lose this one out of the way.

1:19:401:19:42

So it's a bit like Bullseye.

1:19:421:19:43

This is what you could have won. There you go.

1:19:431:19:45

So we'll lose this out the way. That's your lamb.

1:19:451:19:48

And then, alternatively, we've got this duck over here.

1:19:481:19:51

Now, classic duck confit.

1:19:511:19:52

-We're going to start off from the end, if that makes sense.

-Yeah.

1:19:521:19:55

We're going to start off

1:19:551:19:57

by just putting the finished article in our oven, really.

1:19:571:19:59

So these are the bits that we're about to make.

1:19:591:20:02

So this is the duck confit legs.

1:20:021:20:03

Now, these have been cooked in duck fat just gently

1:20:031:20:06

for about sort of an hour, an hour and 15 minutes.

1:20:061:20:10

-OK.

-Like that.

1:20:101:20:12

And we're just going to basically take the bone out, like that.

1:20:121:20:14

These are these wonderful sort of duck confit legs...

1:20:141:20:17

which I'm going to show you how to make them in a second.

1:20:171:20:19

So you just take these out.

1:20:191:20:21

Drain off a little bit of excess fat.

1:20:211:20:24

And then what we're going to do is grab some honey.

1:20:241:20:26

I'm going to grab this as well.

1:20:261:20:28

Just a little bit of honey over the top.

1:20:281:20:31

Just a touch.

1:20:311:20:33

-All of it.

-Just a little!

-A little bit.

-All of it.

1:20:331:20:35

And then these are going to go straight in the oven.

1:20:351:20:37

Quite a hot oven for this.

1:20:371:20:39

Now, this is the end part of the cooking, really,

1:20:391:20:41

but the beginning of it

1:20:411:20:42

starts with our duck legs that we've got on here.

1:20:421:20:44

Now, what we need to do with these is weigh the duck legs.

1:20:441:20:48

-OK.

-So, it's 15g of salt per kilo, that's what we're looking for.

1:20:481:20:52

Not that I'm ever telling you,

1:20:521:20:53

-cos you're never going to make this again anyway.

-No, I'm not.

1:20:531:20:56

But for this, 15g of salt per kilo.

1:20:561:20:57

A little bit of garlic, some rosemary, some thyme.

1:20:571:21:00

And all we do is, we just rip up the rosemary, rip up the fresh thyme.

1:21:001:21:03

Now, this was a dish that I first sort of learnt how to do in France,

1:21:031:21:08

but the recipe has never really changed, really.

1:21:081:21:11

Now, you would measure the salt for this. This is table salt.

1:21:111:21:16

Not sort of sea salt.

1:21:161:21:18

15g of salt per kilo. A bit more rosemary over the top.

1:21:181:21:22

A bit more garlic in there as well underneath.

1:21:221:21:25

And you've got... Basically, we leave that in the fridge.

1:21:251:21:27

-Yeah?

-24 hours.

-OK.

-All right?

1:21:271:21:30

And it's important to leave it for 24 hours,

1:21:301:21:31

and the texture just changes slightly

1:21:311:21:34

and the meat sort of darkens down, which we've got in here.

1:21:341:21:37

-All right?

-Oh, right, OK.

-So, you're salting it.

1:21:371:21:39

And then what you do is wash off the excess salt.

1:21:391:21:44

Like that. And the guys are chopping up my veg

1:21:441:21:47

to go with that little garnish to go with it.

1:21:471:21:49

I feel like you do in school.

1:21:491:21:52

And then what we do is, we get some duck fat.

1:21:521:21:54

Now, this has become popular, goose fat, duck fat, in here.

1:21:541:21:57

And then you basically... This is the confit side of it.

1:21:571:22:00

You place the duck legs in there

1:22:001:22:03

and gently cook it for about an hour and a half...

1:22:031:22:06

hour and a half, and you end up with what we've just put in the oven.

1:22:061:22:09

-OK.

-All right?

-Yeah.

-And you roast that off in the oven.

1:22:091:22:12

A hot oven like this will take about six to seven minutes.

1:22:121:22:14

But from cold... And you can actually buy these ready-made

1:22:141:22:18

in the supermarket in a tin.

1:22:181:22:19

You're not going to buy them either, but you can.

1:22:191:22:22

It's that look on your face.

1:22:221:22:23

I haven't seen that look on your face...

1:22:231:22:25

a look on a guest's face since Bill Oddie came on the show.

1:22:251:22:29

-Yeah?

-And...we cooked him mallard.

-Did you?

1:22:291:22:34

Which wasn't really the greatest thing to cook, really, was it?

1:22:341:22:37

He had that same sort of look that you're giving me now, really.

1:22:371:22:39

Maybe the look on my face is similar to the look on your face this morning when we met

1:22:391:22:43

and you said you'd watched Big Brother last night.

1:22:431:22:45

No, that was more... That was more of a shock, to be honest.

1:22:451:22:48

So we're going to start off...

1:22:481:22:49

We're going to finish off our garnish to go with this.

1:22:491:22:52

Now, this properly comes from France, this one.

1:22:521:22:54

It's a nice little Puy lentil dish, and we start off with some butter.

1:22:541:22:57

-I like lentils.

-You like lentils?

-Yeah.

-Right.

1:22:571:23:00

-So, we need some... Can you chop that up?

-Yeah.

1:23:001:23:02

Nice and fine. That's it. Chop it up.

1:23:021:23:05

That's it, chop it nice and fine.

1:23:071:23:09

The key to this is to make sure they're all the same size, really,

1:23:091:23:12

as the lentils, that's the idea of this one.

1:23:121:23:15

So, this is going to go in here, like that.

1:23:151:23:17

You said we should all be watching about this guy tonight, this...

1:23:171:23:21

-Yeah.

-Does that give the game away?

-No, no, no, not at all.

1:23:211:23:24

-Has he gone through or not?

-I can't tell you, can I?

1:23:241:23:26

-That WOULD give the game away.

-Yeah.

1:23:261:23:28

But his name is Bob, and he's just incredible.

1:23:281:23:31

Really, really good.

1:23:311:23:33

-How old is he?

-Um...

1:23:331:23:36

-I think...

-Can't you say that bit?

-I think he was...

1:23:361:23:38

-Yeah, I think he was, like, fifties.

-Right.

1:23:381:23:42

Late fifties. Mid to late fifties, yeah.

1:23:421:23:44

-Right, we're going to saute this lot together.

-That looks lovely.

1:23:441:23:48

Now, ideally, we'd put bacon in, but we don't have any.

1:23:481:23:51

Unless we've got some in this fridge over here.

1:23:511:23:54

Might have a little bit of bacon in the bottom.

1:23:541:23:57

No, we've got a bit of hake.

1:23:571:23:59

Bacon? We're about to get some bacon.

1:23:591:24:01

LAUGHTER

1:24:011:24:03

The crew's had it all for breakfast, you see?

1:24:031:24:06

So, ideally, you'd put bacon in there.

1:24:061:24:08

-You'll find...

-What's that?

-What's that?

1:24:101:24:13

-In that little shot glass.

-I thought you'd be interested in that.

1:24:131:24:16

-Vinegar.

-Oh!

-Yes.

1:24:161:24:18

But we're going to throw this in. Now, you put bacon in this normally.

1:24:181:24:22

-It's coming. On the way.

-There you go.

1:24:221:24:25

Come on, bring it in. No...

1:24:261:24:28

LAUGHTER

1:24:321:24:33

Looks lovely.

1:24:331:24:35

I'm just going to stick with the wine. That's going to go in.

1:24:381:24:41

And we're going to chop this...

1:24:411:24:42

We're going to put this in. This is proper beef stock, all right?

1:24:421:24:46

Or duck stock.

1:24:461:24:47

In we go with the lentils. Now, these are the little Puy lentils.

1:24:471:24:51

You can buy these in a tin, but it's much better if you cook it this way.

1:24:511:24:54

-How long do they take?

-20 minutes.

-Oh, OK.

-30 minutes.

1:24:541:24:57

-They go in, all right?

-Yeah.

1:24:571:24:58

Puy lentils, fantastic. Make amazing soups.

1:24:581:25:01

Wonderful. Very different to the one that Jose used, as in colour.

1:25:011:25:05

Slightly different in taste as well.

1:25:051:25:07

But the idea is, we bring this to the boil

1:25:071:25:09

and we cook this for about sort of 20, 30 minutes,

1:25:091:25:11

and what we end up with is this.

1:25:111:25:13

-All right?

-Ohh.

-Which we've got there.

1:25:131:25:15

Now, funnily enough, this has got bacon in it, this one.

1:25:151:25:19

By magic. And then we're going to use some of this.

1:25:191:25:21

Now, this is sherry vinegar.

1:25:211:25:24

-Oh, that smells nice.

-That's proper, you see?

1:25:241:25:26

And we just put a touch of sherry vinegar.

1:25:261:25:28

I think that's the key to this, I don't know about you.

1:25:281:25:31

-The acidity.

-Bit of acidity in there, bit of sherry vinegar.

1:25:311:25:33

-If you can just baste the duck that's in the oven.

-Yeah.

1:25:331:25:37

Just with a little spoon.

1:25:371:25:38

I'm going to finish this off with some butter and salt and pepper,

1:25:381:25:42

really, for this one, all right?

1:25:421:25:44

Like that.

1:25:461:25:47

-So, how long does The Voice go on for, then?

-Um...

1:25:471:25:50

-It finishes the end of March...

-Right.

-..I believe.

1:25:501:25:53

-Not too big a run, then.

-A few months.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

1:25:531:25:57

-And then what next for you, then? What...?

-Well...

1:25:571:26:00

-Are you back in the Brother thing?

-In the Brother thing?

-Yeah.

1:26:001:26:03

Yeah, Big Brother finishes in a week and a half. Then The Voice.

1:26:031:26:08

-And then Big Brother starts again in June.

-Oh, does it?

1:26:081:26:11

So you could watch the whole series.

1:26:111:26:14

-Yeah!

-Yeah(!)

1:26:141:26:16

-Yeah.

-No!

-I might just watch...

1:26:161:26:19

No, I was just... There you go.

1:26:191:26:21

-Right. Coriander gone in.

-Let's talk about coriander instead.

1:26:211:26:24

Not that I'm changing the subject!

1:26:241:26:25

Don't get me on that guy about the teeth again. Right...

1:26:251:26:28

-Salt. You've got some black pepper?

-Yeah.

1:26:281:26:31

That's that one. There you go.

1:26:311:26:33

-How are we doing with the duck?

-Yeah, it's ready. Do you want it?

1:26:331:26:35

Yeah, so take it out and just put it on the stove.

1:26:351:26:38

That's it.

1:26:381:26:40

And just... See, the duck legs,

1:26:401:26:41

the secret is, don't boil these duck legs.

1:26:411:26:43

-You've just got to...

-Keep them low?

-Just gently... Look at that!

1:26:431:26:47

-Now, look at that!

-That is...

-Lovely.

-Yeah...

1:26:471:26:51

Look at that. Right, a bit of black pepper.

1:26:511:26:54

And then what we're going to do is grab a spoon,

1:26:551:26:57

and you season these afterwards, all right?

1:26:571:26:59

Lentils and beans, you season them after you cook them.

1:26:591:27:02

There you go.

1:27:021:27:04

-Mm! Right...

-You're going to love it.

-Am I?

1:27:051:27:08

-Yeah, you'll love it.

-Promise?

-Yeah, I promise.

1:27:081:27:10

And we put the lentils on it.

1:27:101:27:12

And the key to this dish, really, is the way that you cook the duck,

1:27:131:27:17

is that it's cooked in that duck fat.

1:27:171:27:19

-Do you want to put...?

-Yeah.

-So it's really duck-y.

1:27:191:27:21

-So it's duck-y.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

1:27:211:27:23

But there's nothing better than when it's cooked in its own fat.

1:27:251:27:28

See? Look at that.

1:27:281:27:30

Bit of that, look. You don't need to do anything with it,

1:27:301:27:32

none of that poncey bits of coriander.

1:27:321:27:34

-Just that.

-It does look good.

-Just that. Are you going to try it?

1:27:341:27:37

OK!

1:27:371:27:38

-Have you got any mint sauce?

-LAUGHTER

1:27:411:27:44

If I had to watch an hour and a half of Big Brother,

1:27:441:27:47

you've got to try this for a minute.

1:27:471:27:48

Dive in.

1:27:521:27:53

-Do you just cut it like normal?

-Yeah.

-Do you want a hand?

1:27:561:28:00

-There you go. Look at that.

-Oh, it's very tender, isn't it?

1:28:001:28:03

How soft is that?

1:28:031:28:04

-Do the face...

-We are waiting for her face.

1:28:061:28:10

-Well, it's not that bad.

-It's really, really nice.

1:28:101:28:12

-There, see?

-It is, you see?

1:28:121:28:14

-It's delicious, actually.

-Well, it's going to be.

1:28:141:28:16

It's the way that you cook it in that fat, and normally...

1:28:161:28:20

It just melts in your mouth.

1:28:201:28:21

Well, in France, they either serve it like that, just roasted...

1:28:211:28:24

Alternatively, what you can do is take the cold duck,

1:28:241:28:26

rip it together with the cold fat,

1:28:261:28:28

mix 50/50 together and call it a rillettes.

1:28:281:28:30

-Smother it on toast, it's brilliant.

-It's gorgeous.

-So good.

1:28:301:28:33

Well done, James.

1:28:381:28:39

I think you made Emma QUACKERS for the duck in the end.

1:28:391:28:43

Unfortunately, that's all we have time for this morning.

1:28:431:28:45

I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back at some delicious dishes

1:28:451:28:48

that have featured on Saturday Kitchen over the years.

1:28:481:28:51

I know I have. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you next week.

1:28:511:28:54