22/01/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


22/01/2017

John Torode takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 22/01/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Good morning and welcome to another helping

0:00:020:00:03

of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

0:00:030:00:05

This morning we have a galaxy of Michelin-starred chefs

0:00:050:00:07

cooking up some delicious winter fare,

0:00:070:00:09

so please, get yourselves comfortable, sit back

0:00:090:00:12

and enjoy today's seriously sumptuous menu.

0:00:120:00:15

Don't go anywhere because I have some of the country's top chefs

0:00:360:00:39

cooking up top-notch food for a whole host of stars,

0:00:390:00:42

all of them with their knives and forks at the ready.

0:00:420:00:46

Coming up on today's show...

0:00:460:00:48

James Martin cooks up a winter warmer for George Lamb

0:00:480:00:51

with his take on figgy dowdy pudding.

0:00:510:00:54

Adam Bennett chooses to take it slow with braised ox cheek.

0:00:540:00:57

The cheek is cooked for at least two hours

0:00:570:01:00

with pickled walnuts and smoked anchovies,

0:01:000:01:02

and it's all served with glazed carrots

0:01:020:01:05

and good old-fashioned mashed potatoes.

0:01:050:01:07

Plus the genius that is Jun Tanaka is here to get his game on.

0:01:070:01:11

He's dishing up a home-smoked pigeon

0:01:110:01:14

served with a salad of beetroot, apples and walnuts.

0:01:140:01:17

Battling it out for the omelette challenge glory

0:01:170:01:20

are Adam Byatt and Simon Hulstone.

0:01:200:01:22

But can Simon make a respectable time

0:01:220:01:24

at his first outing at the hobs? Let's see.

0:01:240:01:27

Then it's over to Paul Foster,

0:01:270:01:29

who is cooking a dish that is literally bursting with beef.

0:01:290:01:32

He is serving up a sirloin, brisket and a tartare,

0:01:320:01:36

and he even manages to find something to do

0:01:360:01:39

with a heel tendon, too.

0:01:390:01:41

And finally, the very funny Al Murray

0:01:410:01:43

faces food heaven or food hell.

0:01:430:01:46

Did he get his food heaven - peach crumble tart with vanilla ice cream?

0:01:460:01:49

Or did he end up facing his food hell -

0:01:490:01:51

baked rice pudding with raspberry sauce?

0:01:510:01:54

You can find out how he got on at the end of the show.

0:01:540:01:57

But first, over to the prince of Cornish fish.

0:01:570:02:00

Rick is still the king, of course.

0:02:000:02:03

It is Nathan Outlaw, and he is cooking up a tasty turbot dish

0:02:030:02:07

that is sure to get your stomach rumbling.

0:02:070:02:09

-Great to have you on the show.

-Thank you.

0:02:090:02:11

-Happy New Year to you.

-You too.

-What are we cooking, then?

0:02:110:02:13

We've got this lovely turbot that I have cut on the bone.

0:02:130:02:16

So I'll just cook it on the bone.

0:02:160:02:17

And then we're going to make a gratin

0:02:170:02:19

from the potatoes, the turnips, some shallots, garlic and thyme.

0:02:190:02:22

A bit of fish stock as well.

0:02:220:02:23

Then I'm going to make a seaweed butter,

0:02:230:02:25

and what I've got here is some dehydrated sea lettuce,

0:02:250:02:27

which you can find all over the UK.

0:02:270:02:29

Forage carefully, but it is all over the UK.

0:02:290:02:31

-You can find that all over the UK?

-You can. What we've done here,

0:02:310:02:34

the girls out the back have quite kindly dehydrated it.

0:02:340:02:36

You can buy a product like this,

0:02:360:02:38

-but something like nori sheets for sushi will work the same way.

-OK.

0:02:380:02:42

That's going to have some lemon zest, some garlic

0:02:420:02:44

and a shallot in there as well for some butter.

0:02:440:02:46

You want me to do these? Peel and do the potatoes.

0:02:460:02:48

-So you want to get the fish on as well first of all.

-Yeah.

0:02:480:02:51

I'll whack this up a bit. There you go.

0:02:510:02:52

-Now, we said that this is farmed.

-Yeah.

0:02:550:02:57

But they do halibut as well, which is farmed, as well, which is good.

0:02:570:03:00

Yeah, there is all sort of fish you can get farmed,

0:03:000:03:02

and farmed fish is getting better, the way that they do it.

0:03:020:03:06

You know, ideally, I'd like to be using wild,

0:03:060:03:08

but this time of year, you know,

0:03:080:03:11

people have not always got the right amount of money...

0:03:110:03:13

You know, something like this is expensive, turbot,

0:03:130:03:15

so farmed turbot is a good substitute.

0:03:150:03:17

There's nothing wrong with it.

0:03:170:03:19

So, I'm just going to get it going in the pan.

0:03:190:03:21

So, a hot pan with some light rapeseed oil and some seasoning.

0:03:210:03:25

A lot of the difference is you don't get the size that

0:03:250:03:27

you would get normally if you line catch them as well.

0:03:270:03:29

No, they are not as old, so...

0:03:290:03:32

But that's why I am going to cook it on the bone -

0:03:320:03:34

-that just keeps it a bit moister.

-OK.

0:03:340:03:36

-Right, boulangere potatoes.

-Yeah.

0:03:370:03:40

The classic way, but we're going to do these slightly different

0:03:400:03:42

with not just potatoes in here.

0:03:420:03:44

Yeah, so the idea for this dish sort of came from that classic,

0:03:440:03:46

when you're doing the lamb leg or shoulder

0:03:460:03:49

over the boulangere potatoes.

0:03:490:03:51

I thought it would be nice to do something with...with fish.

0:03:510:03:55

Especially, you're cooking something like this -

0:03:550:03:57

it takes a little bit longer to cook.

0:03:570:03:59

So it works really, really well.

0:04:000:04:02

And everyone, hopefully...

0:04:020:04:04

We're pretty cold in the old...in the studio today,

0:04:040:04:07

so this should warm me up a little bit.

0:04:070:04:08

Pretty cold is an understatement. LAUGHTER

0:04:080:04:12

We'll warm it up - don't worry.

0:04:120:04:13

My mushrooms that I was using earlier are frozen - it's that cold.

0:04:130:04:16

Anyway, so, basically, we're just going to slice these thinly,

0:04:160:04:20

and then these are just with...

0:04:200:04:21

Got a little bit of veg stock here, or fish stock, I suppose.

0:04:210:04:24

Yeah, some fish stock.

0:04:240:04:25

You're going to get some natural juices coming out of the fish

0:04:250:04:27

when it bakes on top as well.

0:04:270:04:29

Now, last time I saw you,

0:04:290:04:31

you were moving the two-Michelin-star restaurant.

0:04:310:04:34

Now you're sort of limbo with the two-Michelin-star restaurant.

0:04:340:04:37

How's it going? Cos you're in a building site at the moment, yeah?

0:04:370:04:40

Yeah, it's pretty much a building site at the moment.

0:04:400:04:42

There's not much going on there.

0:04:420:04:44

But we're hoping to be open for sort of early March.

0:04:440:04:48

So, we're moving it to Port Isaac.

0:04:480:04:50

Lovely little Cornish fishing village.

0:04:500:04:53

You might have seen Doc Martin and things like that,

0:04:530:04:55

-that same village.

-I've been there.

0:04:550:04:56

Yeah, you've been there. I know you've been there.

0:04:560:04:59

But... Yeah, so that is going to open in the New Year.

0:04:590:05:01

But at the moment, the Fish Kitchen is open in Port Isaac,

0:05:010:05:04

and the pub is open,

0:05:040:05:05

and The Capital is open in London, so still, still busy.

0:05:050:05:09

Right. Now, we've got...

0:05:090:05:12

The idea of this is we've got the potatoes cooking already in here.

0:05:120:05:15

So I'm going to make the potato dish.

0:05:150:05:18

But the potato has been cooking for how long in there?

0:05:180:05:20

They've been cooking for about half an hour to 40 minutes.

0:05:200:05:24

We've got it on about 220 degrees - quite high.

0:05:240:05:27

Cos what's nice is to get a bit of colour on the potatoes on top.

0:05:270:05:29

I love boulangere with the crunchiness on top

0:05:290:05:31

-and the softness underneath.

-Yeah.

0:05:310:05:33

So this is how we make it.

0:05:340:05:36

-We basically just... Don't need to butter the dish, really.

-No.

0:05:360:05:39

-Normally this is just done with potatoes, by the way, but...

-Yeah.

0:05:390:05:43

You know what, I'll take these out

0:05:430:05:45

and then you can pop the fish on the top of this one.

0:05:450:05:48

This is one that has been in for about 45 minutes.

0:05:480:05:51

-Right, do you want to pop the fish on?

-Yeah.

0:05:510:05:54

And I'll pop it back in the...

0:05:540:05:55

Leave the skin on while you bake it at this stage,

0:05:580:06:00

and that just protects the fish as well.

0:06:000:06:02

-There you go.

-Thank you.

-They are going to go in.

0:06:020:06:04

What I will do is I will turn that up as well.

0:06:070:06:09

-OK, so they want to cook for about five minutes in there.

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:06:100:06:13

Right, what's next? What are you making now?

0:06:130:06:15

I'm going to make the seaweed butter.

0:06:150:06:17

So what I've done here is chopped some shallots.

0:06:170:06:21

I've also chopped the garlic and thyme for your boulangere as well.

0:06:210:06:24

Right.

0:06:240:06:26

Which I will pass over and put a few on top.

0:06:260:06:29

On there.

0:06:300:06:32

So what fish will people be buying this time of year, then?

0:06:320:06:35

You mentioned that nobody goes out - just dayboats.

0:06:350:06:37

Well, at this time of year, you need to sort of think in advance.

0:06:370:06:41

That's the advantage of closing the restaurant down in Cornwall

0:06:410:06:44

this time of year because the markets are not open.

0:06:440:06:47

-I think my first market will be this week.

-Yeah.

0:06:470:06:50

And, you know, so you've always got to think ahead

0:06:500:06:53

when you're using fish at this time of year.

0:06:530:06:55

But don't be afraid to freeze fish.

0:06:550:06:58

There's nothing wrong with freezing really fresh fish.

0:06:580:07:01

The problem is, with freezing fish, when you smell it in the fridge

0:07:010:07:03

and you think, "That stinks a bit, let's put it in the fridge."

0:07:030:07:06

Don't do that. That is the wrong thing to do.

0:07:060:07:08

-LAUGHTER

-But people do it.

0:07:080:07:09

You'd be surprised. People do that.

0:07:090:07:11

You want to get it nice and fresh.

0:07:110:07:12

If you see something that's a good bargain...

0:07:120:07:15

Don't do that.

0:07:150:07:17

See something that is a really, really good bargain,

0:07:170:07:21

basically, buy it, and as long as you clingfilm it down nicely,

0:07:210:07:25

you can get it in the freezer, it's fine.

0:07:250:07:27

I'm just going to blitz up this seaweed.

0:07:280:07:32

Now, you mentioned you could do that

0:07:350:07:37

-with the little nori seaweed as well, the little...

-Yeah.

0:07:370:07:40

-The... The sushi seaweed.

-Yeah, that's right.

0:07:400:07:43

So if you have trouble finding actual seaweed like this,

0:07:430:07:47

you can just get the seaweed from the nori.

0:07:470:07:51

Sometimes you can get some flakes available.

0:07:510:07:53

I buy mine from a company in Cornwall

0:07:530:07:56

called Cornish Seaweed Company - very original.

0:07:560:07:58

But they go out and forage and then they do this for you,

0:07:580:08:00

they dehydrate it.

0:08:000:08:02

Right, so this goes on the top.

0:08:020:08:04

Then we just finish those with a bit of seasoning. Right.

0:08:040:08:06

So tell me about the butter, then.

0:08:060:08:08

What else have you put in there? Some shallots?

0:08:080:08:10

Yeah, some shallots in there, a bit of garlic

0:08:100:08:12

and then some lemon zest.

0:08:120:08:14

There's your potatoes.

0:08:160:08:19

-Stock over the top.

-Yep.

0:08:190:08:21

Now, this would be named after the old...the bakers oven

0:08:210:08:23

that they have over in France.

0:08:230:08:25

The bakers used to bake the bread in these woodfired ovens

0:08:250:08:28

and then you would take the potatoes up

0:08:280:08:30

and cook them in the remaining heat from the bread oven.

0:08:300:08:35

I think it's a really nice way of...

0:08:350:08:36

Like, if you've got any meat or fish cooking in there,

0:08:360:08:39

it just collects all them flavours,

0:08:390:08:40

and once you present it, as you'll see in a minute,

0:08:400:08:42

we just put it in the centre of the table, and it is lovely.

0:08:420:08:45

-So...

-Ideally, you wanted to blitz this a little bit finer.

0:08:450:08:48

You do want to blitz this a bit finer.

0:08:480:08:51

But, as you do on live TV, it never works out as you want it to.

0:08:510:08:54

A bit different to rehearsal, yeah.

0:08:540:08:56

Right, I'll get the broccoli in.

0:08:560:08:58

So, a bit of salt.

0:08:580:09:00

-And then what you do is you just get some clingfilm...

-Yeah.

0:09:010:09:05

..and mould the actual butter...

0:09:050:09:07

..into a sausage shape.

0:09:090:09:11

And you can keep that seaweed butter like that in the fridge,

0:09:110:09:13

or even freeze it.

0:09:130:09:15

Freezing it, I always find, works really well as well.

0:09:150:09:18

I'll put that in there.

0:09:200:09:21

So, salted or unsalted butter?

0:09:260:09:28

I suppose unsalted, cos the seaweed is quite salty.

0:09:280:09:30

Yeah, unsalted butter is much better for it.

0:09:300:09:32

But depends what you like, really.

0:09:320:09:34

Both will work really well, so... I've used unsalted.

0:09:340:09:37

And you get something like that.

0:09:370:09:39

So what's 2015 hold in store for you?

0:09:390:09:41

Because I believe that you are working on a new book

0:09:410:09:43

as well - anything else?

0:09:430:09:44

Yeah, the first two books have done really, really well,

0:09:440:09:47

so the publisher has very kindly said, "Would you do another one?"

0:09:470:09:51

So we've actually got another two books coming out

0:09:510:09:53

in the next four years.

0:09:530:09:54

So people do enjoy cooking fish at home.

0:09:540:09:57

And you are off to St Moritz, isn't it?

0:09:570:09:59

You don't strike me as a St Moritz type of guy.

0:09:590:10:02

No. What you saying?

0:10:020:10:04

Well, I'm just saying... Me and you go a bit quick, downhill.

0:10:040:10:07

Yeah, very quick.

0:10:070:10:08

I won't be... I won't be skiing.

0:10:080:10:11

I'll just be cooking, I think, so, yeah.

0:10:110:10:14

Basically, it's a festival in St Moritz that's...

0:10:140:10:18

-This is happening this month?

-It's happening this month.

0:10:180:10:20

And basically what we're doing is, in St Moritz,

0:10:200:10:22

the history of St Moritz skiing is it was started by the British.

0:10:220:10:26

So, for 150 years the British have been going to St Moritz,

0:10:260:10:29

and this year they are celebrating by doing

0:10:290:10:32

a special week of dinners with British chefs.

0:10:320:10:35

So I've been invited over there along with Jason Atherton,

0:10:350:10:39

I think... Who else is going? Angela Hartnett is going as well.

0:10:390:10:42

So there's a few of us. It'll be just good fun.

0:10:420:10:44

So, what I've done with the butter, I've just put it into a hot pan,

0:10:440:10:47

and what you do is just get that butter

0:10:470:10:49

-until it's a sort of nut brown colour.

-Yeah.

0:10:490:10:52

Peel the skin off at the end.

0:10:520:10:54

Yeah, peel the skin off of the turbot.

0:10:540:10:56

A good indicator to know that it's done

0:10:560:10:58

is just to check with a knife at the thickest part,

0:10:580:11:00

and it should just be clear.

0:11:000:11:01

And it is. Lovely.

0:11:010:11:03

OK, broccoli is done.

0:11:030:11:04

This is just a bit of purple sprouting broccoli.

0:11:040:11:06

Yeah, any seasonal sort of vegetable will go nice with this.

0:11:060:11:09

I'd like just to eat the boulangere and the fish,

0:11:090:11:11

but just put some broccoli with it.

0:11:110:11:14

So the butter just over the top of the fish.

0:11:150:11:17

Like that. You can do this for as many people as you want.

0:11:190:11:21

You can do a whole turbot if you wanted to as well.

0:11:210:11:23

Serve it in the middle of the table.

0:11:230:11:25

-That would be a nice thing to do.

-Yeah.

0:11:250:11:26

That looks delicious.

0:11:280:11:29

But it's all about this butter, you were saying, the seaweed butter.

0:11:290:11:32

I think it's lovely, the flavour. I mean, it's beautiful.

0:11:320:11:36

-There you go.

-So, give us the name of this dish, then.

0:11:360:11:38

We've baked turbot with potatoes and turnips with seaweed butter.

0:11:380:11:41

Looks fantastic.

0:11:410:11:43

And do you want to carry the broccoli? I've got this one.

0:11:480:11:51

-You get the hot one.

-Yeah. There you go. Right.

0:11:510:11:55

And you get to dive into this.

0:11:550:11:57

Basically just put it in the middle of the table

0:11:570:12:00

-and everybody just dives, I'm presuming...

-Yeah, that's it.

0:12:000:12:02

-Get stuck in.

-Lose this out of the way.

0:12:020:12:05

There you go. Well, dive in. Tell us what you think.

0:12:050:12:07

Right, OK. Thank you.

0:12:070:12:10

Yeah, work your way through it.

0:12:110:12:13

-So that's it. Literally five minutes will cook it.

-Yeah...

0:12:140:12:17

And it'll continue to cook, as well, on there.

0:12:170:12:20

I'd leave it for about five minutes when it comes out, just to rest,

0:12:200:12:23

but it's beautiful as it is.

0:12:230:12:25

-And the butter is just delicious with it.

-Mm!

-Amazing.

0:12:250:12:27

-It's to warm you up.

-The seaweed really works there.

0:12:270:12:29

Great tip on freezing fish there.

0:12:330:12:35

And from a great man who knows more than a thing or two about seafood.

0:12:350:12:40

Coming up, James serves up figgy dowdy pudding for George Lamb,

0:12:400:12:44

but first, it's over to Rick Stein,

0:12:440:12:47

who is off on a garlic festival in the Isle of Wight,

0:12:470:12:50

although he's having a little trouble finding the garlic.

0:12:500:12:53

I'm on my way from Southampton to the Isle of Wight

0:12:540:12:57

for their famous annual Garlic Festival.

0:12:570:13:00

On the way over, I met this really nice chap.

0:13:000:13:03

He really loved his food.

0:13:030:13:04

I think he said his name was Onslow.

0:13:040:13:07

He was going over for Cowes Week.

0:13:070:13:09

And with all those large yachts from all over the world,

0:13:090:13:12

there was a serious smell of money in the air.

0:13:120:13:14

No doubt people would be eating lobster and popping champagne corks

0:13:140:13:19

over in the marquees.

0:13:190:13:21

But I had other things on my mind.

0:13:210:13:23

I'd never been to a garlic festival before,

0:13:230:13:26

and I didn't really know what to expect.

0:13:260:13:28

I'd heard that garlic grows really well on the island,

0:13:280:13:31

and it was a must of things I had to do

0:13:310:13:34

on my gastronomic tour of Britain.

0:13:340:13:36

But it didn't look very garlicky to me.

0:13:370:13:39

So, we've got a circus, candyfloss, um...

0:13:410:13:45

There's a doll's house shop over there,

0:13:450:13:47

some sumo wrestlers up there.

0:13:470:13:49

There's a clairvoyant.

0:13:500:13:53

And the army are here -

0:13:530:13:54

there's lots of big army trucks.

0:13:540:13:56

Um...

0:13:560:13:57

Almost forgotten what we've come here for...

0:13:580:14:01

Oh, the garlic... I wonder where it is.

0:14:010:14:04

Now, this was worth coming for -

0:14:040:14:06

freshly barbecued corn on the cob brushed with hot butter.

0:14:060:14:10

It had that mouth-popping crunch when the veg has just been picked

0:14:100:14:13

and still retains its sugar content.

0:14:130:14:16

That's the first thing to go, actually,

0:14:160:14:17

when it's been lying around.

0:14:170:14:19

Ah, getting warmer.

0:14:190:14:20

Moules mariniere and a nice smell of garlic from some moules Provencales.

0:14:200:14:25

Did you say you had some garlic fudge?

0:14:250:14:27

Yeah, we've got chocolate and vanilla.

0:14:270:14:29

-Could I have vanilla one?

-Yeah.

0:14:290:14:32

Only in Britain could anyone come up with this - garlic fudge.

0:14:320:14:36

Now, this is a first for me.

0:14:360:14:38

Oh, dear.

0:14:450:14:48

But the day was full of happy eaters,

0:14:480:14:50

mainly eating hot dogs.

0:14:500:14:52

Actually, garlic was a symbol of

0:14:520:14:54

our emerging culinary sophistication in the '60s,

0:14:540:14:57

a point recognised by the garlic growers Colin and Jenny Boswell.

0:14:570:15:01

When you walked along the street 25 years ago

0:15:030:15:05

and you smelt that smell of garlic coming out of a bistro or something,

0:15:050:15:08

it said to you...

0:15:080:15:10

Immediately in your mind, it said it was good times.

0:15:100:15:13

It meant wine and drink, probably in a foreign country.

0:15:130:15:17

Now, when I smell garlic today, I still think of good times.

0:15:170:15:21

God, you are so right.

0:15:210:15:23

I mean, thinking about it, I started my restaurant 25 years ago,

0:15:230:15:26

and it was garlic.

0:15:260:15:28

I can remember I went to a seafood bar in Falmouth,

0:15:280:15:32

and it was that smell of hot shellfish and garlic,

0:15:320:15:35

and it was just so exotic.

0:15:350:15:37

And I was thinking, "Yeah, I want to do this!"

0:15:370:15:39

Now this was a dish that was on the menu

0:15:390:15:42

of every bistro in the late '60s -

0:15:420:15:44

sauteed chicken with 40 cloves of garlic.

0:15:440:15:47

You joint a couple of chickens, joint in for saute -

0:15:480:15:51

that means on the bone.

0:15:510:15:53

And then you fry it gently in butter to get a nice brown colour,

0:15:530:15:57

and then 40 cloves of garlic - seriously!

0:15:570:16:01

I mean, that was so adventurous.

0:16:010:16:03

Season heavily, and then some white wine.

0:16:030:16:06

I can remember once using Mateus rose

0:16:060:16:08

when I couldn't get some Hirondelle.

0:16:080:16:10

Then chicken stock, and put the lid on

0:16:110:16:14

and leave it to cook very, very gently.

0:16:140:16:16

And that's it - it's ready.

0:16:180:16:20

You just turn it out on the plate,

0:16:200:16:22

reduce the liquid down a little bit,

0:16:220:16:24

nap it over the top and serve it.

0:16:240:16:26

Well, what with?

0:16:260:16:28

Well, these days, it would be mashed potato,

0:16:280:16:30

but then it was pilaf rice because that was very trendy.

0:16:300:16:34

One discovery I made at the Garlic Festival

0:16:360:16:38

was this humble bacon sandwich.

0:16:380:16:41

It was made from collar

0:16:410:16:42

and it had a lovely, old-fashioned swiney flavour.

0:16:420:16:46

There had to be something special about this bacon.

0:16:460:16:49

That's a really good flavour.

0:16:490:16:50

It is, isn't it? It's totally different.

0:16:500:16:52

One thing led to another on this trip.

0:16:520:16:54

I was supposed to be looking at other garlic products,

0:16:540:16:57

but I had to find out where this great bacon came from.

0:16:570:17:00

How cheering to see these little piglets

0:17:020:17:05

rooting around in the sandy soil.

0:17:050:17:07

You only have to look at how happy these pigs were

0:17:080:17:10

to realise that this family, the Pierces,

0:17:100:17:13

were doing something right.

0:17:130:17:15

I'm sure it's got a future.

0:17:150:17:17

These pigs here, you know, they are doing things they should be doing.

0:17:170:17:20

They are rooting around, they are biting my toes now.

0:17:200:17:22

and that's what it's all about.

0:17:220:17:24

And they have to create their own environment -

0:17:240:17:26

I think that's what's key to it.

0:17:260:17:27

I mean, pigs are so intelligent.

0:17:270:17:28

You know, it gets too hot out here, they've got to go in the wallow,

0:17:280:17:32

get a coat of mud, protect themselves from the sun.

0:17:320:17:34

That's what it is all about -

0:17:340:17:35

letting the animals do what they should be doing.

0:17:350:17:37

They are not bored. They make their own beds -

0:17:370:17:39

all we do is provide them with a lump of straw.

0:17:390:17:41

It's up to them to shake it up

0:17:410:17:43

and put it round in the hut how they want it.

0:17:430:17:45

I think that's key to it, you know,

0:17:450:17:47

letting animals express their own natural behaviour.

0:17:470:17:49

I suppose if any dish summed up the style of cooking in this series,

0:17:520:17:56

it's this.

0:17:560:17:57

So, a coating for the chops.

0:17:570:18:00

I'm going to use sage,

0:18:000:18:01

which I think is a really nice flavour,

0:18:010:18:04

but you do have to use it with discretion,

0:18:040:18:06

in other words, not too much,

0:18:060:18:08

because it's very, very strong.

0:18:080:18:10

And I'm going to mix that with

0:18:100:18:11

some already roughly chopped shallots,

0:18:110:18:14

and just chop it up really finely to make a coating.

0:18:140:18:18

And now I will just put that in this bowl here with a bit of butter,

0:18:180:18:22

a little bit of salt and pepper in there, too.

0:18:220:18:27

And now for the chops. What a lovely cut of meat that is.

0:18:310:18:36

Just going to score the chops about half an inch apart one way

0:18:360:18:41

and half an inch the other.

0:18:410:18:43

Do the same thing on that side.

0:18:430:18:45

And just put some of the coating on one side.

0:18:470:18:51

Just spread it in with my knife...

0:18:510:18:54

like that.

0:18:540:18:55

And do this exactly the same on the other side.

0:18:570:19:00

And then we will pan fry them. Gently.

0:19:000:19:03

The problem with so much sort of intensive meat is it is flavourless.

0:19:030:19:08

You taste something like this pork

0:19:080:19:10

and it's got, as the French say about wine, gout de terroir,

0:19:100:19:13

you can taste almost where it comes from.

0:19:130:19:16

And the fat is just a delight.

0:19:160:19:18

When you taste it, it's just this feeling of fineness.

0:19:180:19:21

So many people, so many people dislike fat, and why?

0:19:210:19:27

The fat in meat is where the flavour is, you know?

0:19:270:19:30

And it is just like people keep going at me when I'm cooking fish

0:19:300:19:33

and saying, you know, "Too much butter, too much cream."

0:19:330:19:36

I don't put too much butter and cream with my fish,

0:19:360:19:38

but occasionally I love it.

0:19:380:19:40

And occasionally I like a fatty bit of pork,

0:19:400:19:43

I like a piece of sirloin with lovely well-aged fat on it.

0:19:430:19:47

You know, we are all so sort of driven in this world these days

0:19:470:19:50

by sort of worries about health, and so much of it is just rubbish.

0:19:500:19:56

I mean, there is only one maxim as far as eating I'm concerned with,

0:19:560:20:00

and that is moderation in all things,

0:20:000:20:02

you just keep things level.

0:20:020:20:03

OK, well, let's add the cider now,

0:20:050:20:07

which is the sort of splendid addition to this dish.

0:20:070:20:11

This is farmhouse rough Somerset cider.

0:20:110:20:16

So we will just leave that to cook away now

0:20:160:20:18

for about five to six minutes.

0:20:180:20:20

By the time they have cooked, the cider will have reduced down

0:20:220:20:24

to a lovely rich sauce smelling of apples.

0:20:240:20:28

Add butter, a little bit of parsley,

0:20:280:20:30

shake it all together and pull the pan off the heat.

0:20:300:20:34

As I said at the start, this is the type of food we love at home,

0:20:340:20:39

and the sort of food I search for

0:20:390:20:40

on my travels in pubs and restaurants and never found.

0:20:400:20:44

I got beef rendang and creole chicken - but not this.

0:20:440:20:48

And I would serve it with some early sprouting broccoli

0:20:500:20:53

and some sauteed potatoes, and that's it.

0:20:530:20:55

Going further east into the heart of Dorset

0:21:020:21:05

to a blueberry farm run by Janet and David Trehane.

0:21:050:21:09

The blueberries are from America

0:21:090:21:11

and are a cultivated form of our native bilberries,

0:21:110:21:14

so how did they get here?

0:21:140:21:15

Back in 1949,

0:21:160:21:18

there was parson on Lulu Island in British Columbia,

0:21:180:21:21

and he wanted to cheer us up because we were so miserable after the war.

0:21:210:21:26

So he wrote and put an advert in a little newspaper,

0:21:260:21:29

a trade magazine, horticultural trade magazine,

0:21:290:21:32

and said anybody in Britain could have 100 plants for free as a gift.

0:21:320:21:36

Only four people took up the offer.

0:21:360:21:39

My father was one of them. And those 100 plants thrived.

0:21:390:21:42

Autumn is my favourite season.

0:21:430:21:45

I love picking ripe fruit from bushes and trees.

0:21:450:21:49

I think blueberries are typically American -

0:21:490:21:52

they are easy on the eye, they are sweet,

0:21:520:21:54

they are plump, they are over-juicy,

0:21:540:21:56

and now they are over here.

0:21:560:21:58

They have got a flavour which is all their own

0:21:580:22:01

which is totally addictive

0:22:010:22:03

and, above all else, I think they are so versatile.

0:22:030:22:08

Now, this is a blueberry compote, and it works a treat.

0:22:090:22:13

First, you add some orange zest

0:22:130:22:15

and then the juice of about one lime.

0:22:150:22:18

And then a cup or so of sugar

0:22:180:22:19

and about half a pint of water.

0:22:190:22:22

Now, you put that all in a pan

0:22:220:22:24

and you put it on a very gentle heat

0:22:240:22:27

and bring it up to the boil very slowly.

0:22:270:22:29

The object is to poach the blueberries

0:22:290:22:32

but not have them bursting on you.

0:22:320:22:34

So as it begins to foam, stir it around

0:22:340:22:38

and then pour in some arrowroot,

0:22:380:22:40

and as you know, that will thicken it very slightly.

0:22:400:22:43

But the great thing about arrowroot is it keeps the juice clear,

0:22:440:22:48

albeit a bit thick.

0:22:480:22:50

Now pour that into a bowl and let it cool down a little.

0:22:500:22:54

Now, you're going to serve this with some yoghurt ice cream.

0:22:540:22:56

I love yoghurt ice cream.

0:22:560:22:58

And the thing is, you are going to serve,

0:22:580:23:01

of course, the ice cream cold,

0:23:010:23:03

but the compote slightly warm.

0:23:030:23:06

And it is the contrast between the sweet acidity of the blueberries

0:23:060:23:09

and the creaminess of the yoghurt that works so well.

0:23:090:23:12

Delicious-looking dish from Rick there. Pork, yeah.

0:23:180:23:22

This week's masterclass is we're going to make a custard,

0:23:220:23:24

a little masterclass dish.

0:23:240:23:26

So first thing we're going to do is put some cream in here.

0:23:260:23:29

We're going to put a touch of cream. There you go.

0:23:290:23:33

We're going to add some sugar and some egg yolks to this.

0:23:330:23:35

Now, I'm going to make a custard. We put some vanilla in.

0:23:350:23:38

And this is a standard, standard custard recipe

0:23:380:23:40

that we can use for ice creams.

0:23:400:23:42

So a little bit of milk.

0:23:420:23:43

-And we won't call it creme anglaise.

-Creme anglaise.

0:23:430:23:46

It's not called creme anglaise, there, Chef - it's called custard.

0:23:460:23:48

The French have classed it creme anglaise.

0:23:480:23:50

But we'd like to thank Alfred Bird,

0:23:500:23:52

who was the guy that invented custard,

0:23:520:23:54

-ie the custard that us Brits...

-Bird's Custard.

0:23:540:23:57

-He invented it.

-Yeah.

0:23:570:23:58

He was a pharmacist in 18...

0:23:580:24:00

late 18th century.

0:24:000:24:02

And he invented this because his wife didn't eat eggs.

0:24:020:24:05

And he also invented baking powder

0:24:050:24:07

because his wife didn't eat yeast as well.

0:24:070:24:09

-That's how they were invented.

-What an industrious man Alfred was.

0:24:090:24:11

Industrious man, you see.

0:24:110:24:13

So what we're going to do is throw in our eggs now.

0:24:130:24:15

Now, roughly, for ice cream, one egg sets 100ml of milk or cream.

0:24:150:24:20

So, for a litre, you are looking about ten eggs for this one.

0:24:200:24:24

So I've got 200ml of each in there.

0:24:240:24:26

-Four eggs.

-I've never seen eggs split like this before.

0:24:260:24:29

-You'd normally go shell to shell, wouldn't you?

-Yeah.

0:24:290:24:31

But you can keep the egg whites.

0:24:310:24:33

You can freeze these, which is really nice.

0:24:330:24:35

And then what we need to do is bring this to the boil.

0:24:350:24:37

Now, we have infused vanilla in here.

0:24:370:24:40

And the sugar is the important bit.

0:24:400:24:42

Now, I'm doing this in a large pan - purely for the fact

0:24:420:24:44

the surface area is quite important with custard.

0:24:440:24:46

A lot of people do it in a small pan and you end up with it splitting.

0:24:460:24:49

If you do it in a large pan like this,

0:24:490:24:50

you can actually see it before it splits.

0:24:500:24:53

So, we put the sugar in.

0:24:530:24:54

Now, the sugar needs to be in

0:24:540:24:56

before the milk and the cream comes to the boil,

0:24:560:24:58

but not too early, cos if we add the sugar too early,

0:24:580:25:01

this will actually cure the egg yolk

0:25:010:25:05

so you'll end up with the little yellow spots in here

0:25:050:25:07

that you can't get rid of.

0:25:070:25:09

So that can then be poured onto our egg yolks.

0:25:090:25:13

So we just bring this to the boil like that.

0:25:130:25:15

Pour that onto our egg yolks. Keep it whisking.

0:25:150:25:17

Put the pan back on the heat.

0:25:170:25:19

So the large pan has got a big surface area

0:25:200:25:23

which we've got on there.

0:25:230:25:25

You see? Put the sieve back in.

0:25:250:25:27

And then we carefully whisk this - using a whisk.

0:25:280:25:31

Traditionally, you would be taught at college with a wooden spoon.

0:25:310:25:34

-Wooden spoon, yeah.

-But if you use a large whisk

0:25:340:25:36

and a large surface area on the pan, you can actually see it cooking.

0:25:360:25:39

The optimum temperature is about 75 degrees as it starts to curdle.

0:25:390:25:44

But if you use a whisk,

0:25:440:25:45

you can actually see the bubbles start to disappear.

0:25:450:25:48

So keep it on the heat.

0:25:480:25:49

And you can actually see it just bubbling around the edge...

0:25:490:25:53

but the more you mix it,

0:25:530:25:54

the more the bubbles will start to disappear and the thicker it gets.

0:25:540:25:58

If it boils, it curdles, and it's ruined.

0:25:580:26:00

So you are just taking it on and off the heat all the time.

0:26:000:26:02

You can actually see it start to thicken up there.

0:26:020:26:05

And at this point, just as it starts to thicken up,

0:26:050:26:08

I can then pour that through a sieve.

0:26:080:26:12

Like that.

0:26:120:26:13

Take that off the heat.

0:26:130:26:15

And then if you use the ladle,

0:26:150:26:17

you can actually see it where it's nice and thick.

0:26:170:26:20

As Daniel Galmiche would call it, the perfect creme anglaise.

0:26:210:26:24

But that is how you make custard.

0:26:240:26:25

Now all we need to do with that is just cool that down,

0:26:250:26:27

put it in an ice cream machine - that is how you make ice cream.

0:26:270:26:31

But with this, I'm going to do what they call a figgy dowdy,

0:26:310:26:33

which is a naval sort of pudding.

0:26:330:26:36

It's a traditional, old-school pudding.

0:26:360:26:38

Reason why it has got a naval influence is it has got rum.

0:26:380:26:41

But you basically soak the rum in the sultanas and the raisins

0:26:410:26:45

and you end up with this, with a bit of water.

0:26:450:26:47

And the idea is you just basically throw everything together.

0:26:470:26:50

So we've got the flour, we've got sugar, we've got suet.

0:26:500:26:54

-Easy to do on a boat, this, just throwing it altogether.

-Easy.

0:26:540:26:56

And you've always got rum, haven't you, really?

0:26:560:26:58

You can throw it all in together.

0:26:580:27:00

So it's basically one pan, and you basically leave this to steam.

0:27:000:27:02

So you can start off with the sultanas and the raisins.

0:27:020:27:06

Throw those in like that.

0:27:060:27:08

And then some water.

0:27:080:27:11

Not all pure rum, of course.

0:27:110:27:13

That can go in there. And we leave that to soak.

0:27:130:27:16

And you can see the difference.

0:27:160:27:17

What will happen is these will actually start to...

0:27:170:27:19

-Really plump up.

-..plump up. There you go.

0:27:190:27:21

And we're going to use the mixture.

0:27:210:27:23

So that is why we just put a little bit of water in there,

0:27:230:27:25

and we throw everything all in together.

0:27:250:27:27

So, started off with a career in music, straight out of school.

0:27:270:27:31

-Yes.

-And you kind of fell into it, you were saying...

0:27:310:27:33

We were going to a lot of nightclubs,

0:27:330:27:36

and the dance music scene was really big,

0:27:360:27:39

and a mate of mine said, "I reckon I could do this."

0:27:390:27:41

And I said, "All right, well, I'll be your manager."

0:27:410:27:43

And we started putting out 12 inches and running little nightclub nights

0:27:430:27:47

and they became a band called the Audio Bullys,

0:27:470:27:50

and they did pretty well and we signed to Virgin

0:27:500:27:52

and went round the world for a couple of years

0:27:520:27:54

-and had a great time.

-As you do.

0:27:540:27:56

Lily Allen - you've got a connection there as well?

0:27:560:27:58

Yeah, I managed Lily. I managed Lily for a couple of years,

0:27:580:28:01

and then I wasn't able to get Lily a record deal...

0:28:010:28:04

-You WEREN'T able to get her one?

-No, no.

0:28:040:28:06

In spite of having all this great music.

0:28:060:28:09

And, unfortunately, if you can't get people a record deal,

0:28:090:28:12

then you can't really be their manager for much longer.

0:28:120:28:16

So we had to go our separate ways, but it all turned out nicely.

0:28:160:28:20

She's had an amazing career, and I got to go off and be a TV presenter.

0:28:200:28:25

Before the TV sort of stuff,

0:28:250:28:26

you were into radio as well, weren't you?

0:28:260:28:28

Kind of. Actually, I started doing a little bit of telly

0:28:280:28:32

and then I kind of deviated towards radio a bit.

0:28:320:28:36

And then when the radio thing took off,

0:28:360:28:38

the telly kind of blew up a little bit.

0:28:380:28:40

But a whole mix and match of TV stuff that you've done from...

0:28:400:28:43

-I've done the lot.

-You've done the lot!

-Yeah.

0:28:430:28:45

A lot of live stuff as well. But some interesting stuff.

0:28:450:28:48

You are looking for young talent as well now.

0:28:480:28:50

Yeah, it's our third year.

0:28:500:28:52

We've been doing this kind of talent search

0:28:520:28:55

for young people, young artisan, young tradesmen and women

0:28:550:28:58

and people who aren't just absolutely focused on being famous

0:28:580:29:02

or being a singer, or an actress, or an actor, or whatever.

0:29:020:29:06

And it's really nice to be a part of something that celebrates

0:29:060:29:08

people who are working hard and are really proud of what they do,

0:29:080:29:12

you know, essentially the people who make the country tick along.

0:29:120:29:17

And we've done best young butcher, best young baker,

0:29:170:29:21

-best young candlestick maker...

-Hairdresser.

-Hairdresser.

0:29:210:29:24

And plumber and mechanic and all sorts, really.

0:29:240:29:28

And then you are on to this farmer, so tell us about this farmer.

0:29:280:29:31

The farmer, I think, is on this weekend. And it was...

0:29:310:29:36

You know, it's amazing to see these guys

0:29:360:29:38

who are like 23, 24 some of them,

0:29:380:29:41

and they are running HUGE farms.

0:29:410:29:43

-Tough job.

-Yeah, it's brutal.

0:29:430:29:45

You know, massive herds of cattle and really...

0:29:450:29:49

You know, just really impressive people,

0:29:490:29:51

who are able to kind of run these huge farms

0:29:510:29:55

and they are up in the middle of the night

0:29:550:29:57

milking hundreds of cows every day, and, yeah, it was impressive.

0:29:570:30:01

Cos you've got a tough job as well

0:30:010:30:03

-cos you are doing this thing for Channel 4 as well.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:30:030:30:06

Cos I was watching last night.

0:30:060:30:08

Probably I'd rather do The Bank Job than milk 500 cows every day.

0:30:080:30:13

So, yeah, I don't know how tough it is compared to that.

0:30:130:30:16

But, yeah, we've got a new game show, it's called The Bank Job.

0:30:160:30:19

We are back for our second series, it's on Friday and Saturday nights.

0:30:190:30:21

And we're in a real bank vault,

0:30:210:30:23

and people come on and try and win hundreds of thousands of pounds.

0:30:230:30:26

And I try and help them do that.

0:30:260:30:28

Well, I don't know if I help them do that - I try and facilitate them.

0:30:280:30:31

-Yeah, you might not be able to help them do that.

-Yes.

0:30:310:30:33

But the first series was a success.

0:30:330:30:35

I mean, some people walked away with, like, half a million quid.

0:30:350:30:37

Yeah, well, there's this kind of funny twist at the end

0:30:370:30:40

where the two last people can double-cross each other

0:30:400:30:43

if they want to,

0:30:430:30:45

and if they both try and double-cross one another,

0:30:450:30:48

then the runners-up, essentially, share the spoils.

0:30:480:30:50

And I didn't think they were going to do it,

0:30:500:30:52

and at the last minute, these two guys,

0:30:520:30:54

they double-crossed each other and they went away with nothing

0:30:540:30:57

and 450,000 was split between the three runners-up.

0:30:570:30:59

So these guys who thought they were dead and buried

0:30:590:31:01

all of a sudden were just like, "Argh!" You know, redemption.

0:31:010:31:04

I'm just going to show you this.

0:31:040:31:05

This is the figgy dowdy in the tinfoil. Just loosely wrapped.

0:31:050:31:09

So don't tighten it up otherwise it's going to be tight.

0:31:090:31:11

Then we take a shirtsleeve.

0:31:110:31:13

This was often called shirtsleeve pudding. There you go.

0:31:130:31:16

And then we pop that in here like that.

0:31:160:31:19

Everyone has got one of those lying around(!)

0:31:190:31:21

LAUGHTER Why not? Yeah. There you go.

0:31:210:31:23

And we just, basically, pop that in there.

0:31:230:31:25

Well, my granny used to do this

0:31:250:31:26

-and it used to be in either an old pair of tights...

-Yeah.

0:31:260:31:29

But the idea of a shirtsleeve, or tights,

0:31:290:31:32

is that it used to expand as the pudding cooks

0:31:320:31:35

otherwise it becomes too tight.

0:31:350:31:36

So we just basically tighten it up like this.

0:31:360:31:39

Now, as well as doing stuff on your own - and we basically steam it,

0:31:390:31:42

the steamer is over here, you can make yourself a steamer.

0:31:420:31:45

Basically just a pot, cloth in the bottom, water.

0:31:450:31:49

Just half fill the pot.

0:31:490:31:51

Obviously, you don't allow any of that water

0:31:510:31:53

to go on top of the pudding.

0:31:530:31:55

-And then pop the pudding in.

-Is that how you do it?

0:31:550:31:57

You just put a pot upside down inside another pot

0:31:570:32:00

-and that's a steamer?

-That's it.

0:32:000:32:02

-And I can do fish like that, too?

-Yeah.

-Great.

0:32:020:32:05

-There you go.

-A new thing everyday.

-And put the lid on.

0:32:050:32:08

Steam that for about three hours, and we end up with this,

0:32:080:32:10

which is all in the pot there.

0:32:100:32:13

Now, apart from doing stuff on your own, like I've said,

0:32:130:32:15

we've seen you with your father as well.

0:32:150:32:17

Now, that was interesting, that one in Namibia.

0:32:170:32:20

Yeah, we went on an adventure.

0:32:200:32:22

We went off to live with the Himba tribe in Namibia,

0:32:220:32:25

and it was amazing.

0:32:250:32:27

They are this kind of really ancient nomadic tribe

0:32:270:32:29

who live out in the middle of nowhere,

0:32:290:32:32

and they live a very, very basic existence.

0:32:320:32:35

And it was...

0:32:350:32:37

Being out in landscape like that,

0:32:370:32:39

it literally is at the end of the Earth.

0:32:390:32:41

You know, you fly down to South Africa

0:32:410:32:43

then you fly on to Windhoek, which is the capital.

0:32:430:32:45

And then we travel for three days in a van

0:32:450:32:47

and then finally you arrive at

0:32:470:32:48

this little kind of kraal, they call them,

0:32:480:32:50

where they've got the...

0:32:500:32:52

It looked like something out of an old Western movie,

0:32:520:32:54

all the families and the animals are all fenced in

0:32:540:32:57

in the middle of this huge, huge kind of savanna.

0:32:570:33:00

-It was breathtaking.

-It was great. I did watch that one.

0:33:000:33:03

What we do is take the figgy dowdy, look.

0:33:030:33:05

How big a portion do you want?

0:33:050:33:07

I mean, that will do. That looks good.

0:33:070:33:09

-What, that bit or that bit?

-Yeah, yeah. On the left.

0:33:090:33:11

And then, obviously, you've got your custard

0:33:110:33:14

which is over the top.

0:33:140:33:15

Wow.

0:33:150:33:17

And the custard will get thicker the longer, obviously, you leave it.

0:33:170:33:20

But the idea is you've got a simple, little, warm custard.

0:33:200:33:23

And do it last-minute, really, that custard.

0:33:230:33:25

You wouldn't want to do it and then keep it in the fridge -

0:33:250:33:27

you can almost do it last-minute. Nice and easy.

0:33:270:33:30

That's amazing.

0:33:310:33:33

-Happy with that?

-Very much so.

0:33:330:33:35

You've got to say, everyone is certainly delivering

0:33:400:33:42

when it comes to top tips today.

0:33:420:33:44

Hope you were taking notes on the custard there.

0:33:440:33:47

As always on Best Bites,

0:33:470:33:48

we're looking back at some of the tastiest recipes

0:33:480:33:51

from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:33:510:33:53

There is still so much more to come, so don't go anywhere.

0:33:530:33:56

Up next, Adam Bennett is cooking the ultimate comfort food.

0:33:560:34:00

Keep watching - this one is a cracker.

0:34:000:34:03

-So what are you going to make for us today, then?

-Right, we're making...

0:34:030:34:05

-Not as fancy as the competition...

-No.

-..but full-on flavour.

0:34:050:34:08

We're taking some flavours that we used in the competition

0:34:080:34:10

but what we're going to do is a home-cooked version.

0:34:100:34:13

So we're making the ultimate comfort food,

0:34:130:34:15

starting with searing our ox cheeks.

0:34:150:34:18

-Now, these ox cheeks...

-So they're going to go straight in.

0:34:180:34:20

-These are the decent-sized ox cheeks there?

-Yeah.

0:34:200:34:22

Portion size, if you're hungry.

0:34:220:34:24

-Straight in the pan.

-Straight in.

0:34:240:34:26

A nice bit of colour on them.

0:34:260:34:27

When we do this at work we'll spend a good ten minutes

0:34:270:34:30

colouring them to really...

0:34:300:34:32

So tell us about the restaurant, then, first of all.

0:34:320:34:34

-Right...

-Where abouts is it?

0:34:340:34:35

It's a new venture. It's with my old boss from Simpsons, Andreas Antona.

0:34:350:34:39

It's in Kenilworth. It's called The Cross at Kenilworth.

0:34:390:34:43

-Yep.

-It's, as I say, three months into it,

0:34:430:34:46

it's going very well and we're doing some lovely dishes there.

0:34:460:34:51

We're actually able there to do this sort of very good comfort food

0:34:510:34:54

alongside some quite classy stuff that we might have cooked

0:34:540:34:56

-at the old venue.

-So how do you get involved in a competition

0:34:560:34:59

like the Bocuse d'Or? Is it Brian Turner goes around tasting all

0:34:590:35:02

the dishes in every restaurant in England and picks a chef?

0:35:020:35:04

Well, I think being press-ganged was the sort of way I would describe it.

0:35:040:35:08

I mean, if I'd have known what I was getting into

0:35:080:35:11

I might have been a little bit reluctant,

0:35:110:35:13

but luckily I didn't know and before I knew it,

0:35:130:35:15

I was already doing it.

0:35:150:35:16

The truth is, James, that we do travel the country,

0:35:160:35:19

we do have talent spotters

0:35:190:35:21

and it's not just people like Adam, who are great cooks,

0:35:210:35:25

this competition in front of these 3,000 people

0:35:250:35:27

takes a lot of time, a lot of...

0:35:270:35:29

You've got to be mentally fit, physically fit,

0:35:290:35:32

you've got to have a family who backs you up

0:35:320:35:34

and a boss who backs you up.

0:35:340:35:35

So it's not as easy as just finding someone who...who just can cook.

0:35:350:35:40

-Right, I'm just going to get rid of that.

-OK.

0:35:400:35:42

I'll just put it in the back here.

0:35:420:35:44

OK. So we're going to take these out.

0:35:440:35:47

As I said, we'd spend a little bit more time sealing those

0:35:470:35:49

back at the restaurant, but...

0:35:490:35:51

Right, now our carrots have gone in there with some sugar,

0:35:510:35:53

-carrots and a little bit of butter in there.

-Yep.

0:35:530:35:55

Carrot juice we've got in there, which really brings out the flavour.

0:35:550:35:59

-So this is the braising part of it. It's going to go in now.

-Yep.

0:35:590:36:02

So this vegetable here, we'd get it nice and caramelised if we had time.

0:36:020:36:06

We're going to deglaze that with a bit of red wine.

0:36:060:36:10

-Now, this is much more robust, this sort of cooking.

-Yeah.

0:36:100:36:12

Just to get a little sense about what you've been doing and

0:36:120:36:15

-what it takes, really, we've got a couple of pictures...

-Sure.

0:36:150:36:18

..from the dishes that you've been doing.

0:36:180:36:19

So tell us about the first one that we've got here.

0:36:190:36:22

OK, well, that's based on boiled beef and carrots cos we like to get

0:36:220:36:24

a bit of Englishness, or Britishness, in there.

0:36:240:36:26

That's a tube of carrot, which is really nice and fondant and soft,

0:36:260:36:30

and it's filled with salt beef and mustard.

0:36:300:36:34

Salt beef and mustard, and what about the next one?

0:36:340:36:36

-The next on...

-This one looks fantastic.

0:36:360:36:39

Yeah, that's actually cabbage, onions and Wiltshire bacon,

0:36:390:36:41

but obviously it's been done in the Bocuse d'Or style.

0:36:410:36:44

-But all these have got to be hot, presented hot?

-That's right.

0:36:440:36:47

It's a hot competition,

0:36:470:36:48

it's not just cold work that you put together.

0:36:480:36:50

And then the final one, how it all comes together.

0:36:500:36:53

-You've got this picture here.

-Yeah.

0:36:530:36:55

I mean, that looks seriously impressive.

0:36:550:36:56

So that's all three garnishes with the addition of braised ox cheek

0:36:560:37:00

and tail and we've used the pickled walnuts

0:37:000:37:03

and smoked anchovies in that as well -

0:37:030:37:06

the same ingredients that we're using today.

0:37:060:37:08

-I'm just about to put the smoked anchovies in.

-But it's not just

0:37:080:37:11

the beef dish you gotta to do, you gotta do a fish dish as well?

0:37:110:37:14

That's right, a fish dish is also going on at the same time.

0:37:140:37:16

You've got five-and-a-half hours to finish the whole thing

0:37:160:37:19

and there's two chefs cooking it. So it's pretty intense.

0:37:190:37:22

-Pretty intense.

-Yeah.

-Just to recap what you've got in there,

0:37:220:37:25

-you've got smoked anchovies gone in there.

-Yeah.

0:37:250:37:28

I don't think we've had those on Saturday Kitchen for a while.

0:37:280:37:30

You don't want the smoked anchovy flavour to take the forefront here,

0:37:300:37:33

it's a bit of an umami flavour that goes on and gives you

0:37:330:37:36

that sort of savouriness.

0:37:360:37:38

Because most people think of anchovies and lamb together...

0:37:380:37:41

-Yeah, that's right.

-..not anchovies and beef.

0:37:410:37:43

I mean, if you can taste the anchovy at the end, then you've put too much

0:37:430:37:46

in, basically. You just want a little hint.

0:37:460:37:47

-OK.

-OK, so now that's all together,

0:37:470:37:49

we're going to return our ox cheeks...

0:37:490:37:52

to the pan.

0:37:520:37:53

-A little wash of the hands.

-OK.

0:37:540:37:57

So then we'll put a lid on that and you've got a few choices here,

0:37:580:38:01

you can either braise it at about 160 for two to two-and-a-half hours.

0:38:010:38:05

-Yep.

-Or it can go into a pressure cooker for 40 minutes.

0:38:050:38:08

Or, alternatively, we do it for eight hours overnight

0:38:080:38:12

at about 80 degrees. So you've got a few choices there.

0:38:120:38:16

Right, we've got our carrots here, just to show you that, and you want

0:38:160:38:19

these almost taken out and now reducing down with this liquor.

0:38:190:38:21

Yeah, once they're sort of tender,

0:38:210:38:23

and you need to be looking at reducing the glaze

0:38:230:38:27

down so we get a nice syrupy coating on there.

0:38:270:38:29

OK, I'll do that over here.

0:38:290:38:30

I know you want to talk about... I'll move this over here

0:38:300:38:32

-for you anyway.

-OK, lovely.

0:38:320:38:34

If you give us a cloth, I'll move this over here.

0:38:340:38:35

-So this is the finished article when it's been braised.

-That's right.

0:38:350:38:38

So this is post-braising and we're now going to strain that.

0:38:380:38:42

All we do is, this liquor has got all the flavour there, but in terms

0:38:420:38:45

of texture, we need to reduce it a little.

0:38:450:38:47

So into a hot pan.

0:38:470:38:49

Braising is coming back as a style of cooking these days because

0:38:490:38:52

it's economical and you can get a good piece of meat.

0:38:520:38:55

-It's very tasty.

-You say that, but things like the ox cheeks now...

0:38:550:38:59

-It used to be that you were able to give them away...

-Sure.

0:38:590:39:01

but now they've become more popular and because of that,

0:39:010:39:04

-they're more expensive.

-They've become more expensive than they were

0:39:040:39:06

but still relay those against a roasting piece of meat

0:39:060:39:09

-or a fillet of meat, and they're still a good price.

-Yep.

0:39:090:39:12

Although we're using ox cheek, pig cheeks are fantastic

0:39:120:39:16

as well to braise like this as well, aren't they?

0:39:160:39:18

Again, you get that really unctuous texture with that.

0:39:180:39:20

So I'm just chopping a bit of parsley.

0:39:200:39:22

I've already chopped some walnut which we're going to drop

0:39:220:39:25

into the sauce just at the end,

0:39:250:39:27

so we get a nice bit of freshness

0:39:270:39:29

and a nice bit of piquancy from the walnuts.

0:39:290:39:33

So we'll just chop this...

0:39:330:39:35

That sauce is coming down nicely there.

0:39:350:39:38

But these competitions, I've seen the Americans and everybody,

0:39:380:39:43

they spent months away from their kitchen practising, practising, practising.

0:39:430:39:47

Yep, and thousands of pounds as well.

0:39:470:39:49

-How do you mix the two together, really?

-Well, I've got...

0:39:490:39:51

Are you looking for sponsors, James?!

0:39:510:39:54

But how do you mix the two together, then?

0:39:540:39:57

Well, the first time round, my boss gave me four or five months out,

0:39:570:40:00

which was, you know, an absolute godsend,

0:40:000:40:02

and that's what most of the successful teams have to do.

0:40:020:40:05

This time around, we're looking at it slightly differently

0:40:050:40:07

because I've got to mix in with the new business but...

0:40:070:40:10

I suppose because you've seen it before, you know what to expect.

0:40:100:40:14

Mentally, we're halfway there. We've just got to do the work.

0:40:140:40:17

When the Americans came last year, James, they came in their own plane,

0:40:170:40:20

DC-10, or whatever it was,

0:40:200:40:22

Thomas Keller having two teams and they had backups of everything,

0:40:220:40:25

all their own equipment and shipped it all in,

0:40:250:40:27

and they still came lower than we came. So we were...

0:40:270:40:30

-Thomas Keller was not a happy bunny, I have to say.

-Right, OK.

0:40:300:40:33

I was chuffed to bits!

0:40:330:40:35

Right, we've got our mashed potato here.

0:40:350:40:37

So we've got carrots reducing down.

0:40:370:40:39

Did you say you've got some carrot juice in there as well?

0:40:390:40:41

That's right, I just think it adds that extra bit

0:40:410:40:44

of carroty sort of zing to it.

0:40:440:40:45

Then we're going to finish it with a bit of lemon juice

0:40:450:40:48

-because it's quite a sweet...

-There you go.

-..sweet finish.

0:40:480:40:50

But these are a good way for people to cook carrots at home,

0:40:500:40:52

if they want to do them slightly differently?

0:40:520:40:54

Oh, yeah, yeah. You get a real...

0:40:540:40:56

A really lovely texture from these carrots.

0:40:560:41:00

Do you want that that softer or...?

0:41:000:41:02

-That looks good to me, James.

-Is that all right?

0:41:020:41:04

Plenty of butter in there?

0:41:040:41:06

Of course there's butter in there, it's James Martin!

0:41:060:41:09

"Is there enough butter in there?"

0:41:090:41:10

-I can tell it's his first time on the show.

-Quite right, too.

0:41:100:41:14

You show him, lad.

0:41:140:41:15

-OK. I might just put a little bit more now.

-Why not?

-Get it in there.

0:41:150:41:19

-So you've reduced this liquor down...

-Yeah.

0:41:190:41:22

..and then these pickled walnuts as well. Surprisingly enough,

0:41:220:41:25

I've never tasted ox cheeks and pickled walnuts together.

0:41:250:41:28

No, neither have I but I know this is a great dish,

0:41:280:41:30

and pickled walnuts are very British.

0:41:300:41:33

But the key to it is not too much of the anchovy?

0:41:330:41:35

Yeah, you don't want it to taste of fish, you just want that sort of...

0:41:350:41:38

So is the same liquor that you did with the carrots that we saw

0:41:380:41:41

-on the picture there?

-Not quite. It gets a little bit more technical

0:41:410:41:44

because we're using heatproof gels and all that sort of thing,

0:41:440:41:47

when we do Bocuse, which is not what

0:41:470:41:48

you want to be doing at home, really.

0:41:480:41:51

OK, a good dollop of that.

0:41:510:41:54

Let's go ox cheek next.

0:41:540:41:56

-It smells delicious from here already.

-Yep.

0:41:560:42:00

OK. One of those on there.

0:42:000:42:03

A few carrots.

0:42:050:42:06

You need a spoon for the sauce as well.

0:42:060:42:09

You can tell this dish is nice because we've got silence

0:42:110:42:14

-in the studio.

-Absolutely!

-You can hear a pin drop in here.

0:42:140:42:17

I've got nobody talking to me in my ear.

0:42:170:42:19

There's nothing, it's just all gone quiet!

0:42:190:42:21

We're waiting for the food.

0:42:210:42:23

OK, so his is the best bit. Look at that.

0:42:230:42:26

That care and attention to detail.

0:42:290:42:31

That looks pretty good to me, doesn't it, that? Shall we keep it over here?

0:42:310:42:34

I think we just keep it over here...

0:42:340:42:36

-Yeah, yeah, come on!

-So tell us the name of this, then.

0:42:360:42:39

OK, braised ox cheek with pickled walnuts,

0:42:390:42:41

a little hint of smoked anchovy,

0:42:410:42:42

glazed carrots and a nice, plain traditional mash.

0:42:420:42:45

-How brilliant does that look?

-Well done.

0:42:450:42:47

Right, we get to dive in.

0:42:520:42:54

This is where you get to try this.

0:42:540:42:56

-So have a seat over here. Dive into that one.

-That looks...

0:42:560:43:01

When you say two hours, but really you could just leave...

0:43:010:43:04

-It's indestructible.

-..it overnight.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:43:040:43:06

It's a very forgiving bit of meat.

0:43:060:43:08

But, for me, and I'm probably being a bit...where I come from,

0:43:080:43:11

I much prefer the look of this than to something that looks like

0:43:110:43:14

a work of art. I'm too scared to touch something

0:43:140:43:16

that looks like a work of art.

0:43:160:43:17

Yeah, it's very technical, that kind of stuff as well.

0:43:170:43:19

-And you said heatproof gels?

-Yes.

-Oh, don't talk about that...

0:43:190:43:24

It sounds like it might hurt you!

0:43:240:43:26

Just dive into that. I mean, an amazing sort of flavour

0:43:260:43:28

with the carrots as well, but, I mean...

0:43:280:43:30

It's the power of that, it's just so big.

0:43:300:43:33

After a nice, long walk you come home and that's been in the oven...

0:43:330:43:36

Try that and see what you think.

0:43:360:43:38

-Fantastic!

-That's almost as good...

0:43:420:43:45

That's almost as good as your turkey, that.

0:43:450:43:47

No, it's not really.

0:43:470:43:49

My mouth is watering at the sight of that dish.

0:43:530:43:56

Simple but so effective.

0:43:560:43:58

Now, over to a man who needs little introduction,

0:43:580:44:01

so I'm just going to say,

0:44:010:44:03

here's...Keith!

0:44:030:44:05

'South Africa is rich in natural resources and there's always

0:44:050:44:09

'a good meal to be caught off its shores.

0:44:090:44:11

'Even the early Portuguese explorers were impressed at the amount of

0:44:110:44:14

'fish available along this bit of coast.

0:44:140:44:16

'And for a while, it was a favourite hunting ground

0:44:160:44:18

'for the whaling industry.

0:44:180:44:19

'But today, all that is out of favour and the fishermen are

0:44:190:44:22

'after smaller prey - squid.

0:44:220:44:25

'Not the giant beasts of Jules Verne's imagination,

0:44:250:44:28

'but the small, succulent squid that appear on menus through the

0:44:280:44:31

'world as calamari or some such variation.

0:44:310:44:33

'I don't know what this chap's smoking but it obviously

0:44:330:44:36

'helps with the ancient art of geeing for squid.

0:44:360:44:39

'Anyway, squid fishing is normally done at night.'

0:44:390:44:41

One of the dangers of filming in South Africa is what you do

0:44:410:44:46

at night after sunset and it gets dark.

0:44:460:44:48

The South Africans are so hospitable,

0:44:480:44:51

they force all this wine and drink down you and you can sometimes

0:44:510:44:54

wake up in the morning feeling as rough as an old dog,

0:44:540:44:56

and should you ever happen to have a hangover like I had this morning,

0:44:560:45:00

the best way to cure it is to hire a squid fishing boat

0:45:000:45:02

for the morning around about six o'clock,

0:45:020:45:04

come out for three or four hours in the stiff breeze,

0:45:040:45:07

in a light swell, and you feel absolutely terrific,

0:45:070:45:09

I can assure you. Anyway, that's not to talk about my health,

0:45:090:45:12

it's to talk about cooking squid.

0:45:120:45:13

We've been catching it all morning.

0:45:130:45:16

A bit of oil into the wok. This is going to be a very...

0:45:160:45:19

This is like a Chinese wok, it's absolutely wonderful.

0:45:190:45:22

We'll zap in some onions.

0:45:240:45:26

Very quickly.... we'll zap in some squid.

0:45:280:45:31

A wee drop more oil.

0:45:360:45:37

Switch on the afterburners.

0:45:390:45:41

Splendid.

0:45:450:45:48

In with the peppers.

0:45:480:45:50

Hold on, we're on fire. Turn over, were on fire.

0:45:520:45:55

Turn over, look, we're on fire. Get a bucket of water, somebody!

0:45:550:45:58

Thank you very much. Great stuff.

0:45:580:46:01

"The boy stood on the burning deck, his face as bold as brass!"

0:46:010:46:04

It doesn't really matter, it's not my ship, we'll get a new one.

0:46:040:46:08

Thank you very much. Excellent. Straight over that.

0:46:080:46:11

OK, let's carry on.

0:46:110:46:13

That's great.

0:46:130:46:14

Nothing serious.

0:46:140:46:16

-Brilliant stuff.

-Why don't you put it in that?

0:46:180:46:20

-That would be much better, wouldn't it?

-It is.

0:46:200:46:22

Hold on a sec.

0:46:220:46:24

There we are.

0:46:240:46:25

OK, cooking sketch part two continues.

0:46:250:46:27

So, to recap, after you put the fire out, you add some onions to

0:46:270:46:32

your oil, some squid, some peppers,

0:46:320:46:36

some sliced garlic...

0:46:360:46:38

..some green peppers.

0:46:390:46:41

Some green peppers, some tomato.

0:46:450:46:50

A pinch of salt, a grind of pepper...

0:46:500:46:53

..and some chilli, which you always carry in your pocket,

0:46:560:46:58

because it blows away otherwise.

0:46:580:47:01

We don't need that any more.

0:47:010:47:03

A few little bits of chilli.

0:47:090:47:10

Make it a bit spicy.

0:47:130:47:15

Do you know, people pay thousands of pounds to go on a holiday like this,

0:47:150:47:18

and we do it for nothing - we get it for free.

0:47:180:47:20

A tiny weeny bit of soya sauce.

0:47:200:47:22

Steve, breakfast is ready.

0:47:330:47:36

-Sorry about your ship.

-That's quite all right.

0:47:360:47:38

-As long as it tastes OK, it's fine.

-Good man. Have a go at this.

0:47:380:47:40

Ah! I forgot to put the spinach leaves in.

0:47:400:47:43

It doesn't really matter. It's exactly the same process,

0:47:430:47:46

just at the last moment you chuck those in and stir them round. I forgot.

0:47:460:47:49

It doesn't matter, Steve doesn't like spinach, anyway.

0:47:490:47:53

Although, sailors generally do, don't they?

0:47:530:47:55

Popeye eats a lot of spinach.

0:47:550:47:57

Have a go at that and see what you think.

0:48:040:48:06

It's a bit of chilli and it's a bit spicy but it's very simple

0:48:060:48:08

and very fresh, couldn't be fresher.

0:48:080:48:10

You can come back. No, you...

0:48:130:48:15

-You can sign on as a cook.

-Great stuff!

0:48:150:48:17

'And I will come back - one day when I haven't got the hangover

0:48:180:48:21

'and the seas are calm.

0:48:210:48:23

'In the meantime, onward, ever onward!'

0:48:230:48:26

And I'm sure the train spotters amongst you can tell

0:48:260:48:29

me the details about every nut and bolt on this fine iron horse.

0:48:290:48:32

For me, though, it's just a jolly good way

0:48:320:48:35

of exploring another bit of Africa.

0:48:350:48:37

This must be every boy and every man's dream

0:48:370:48:42

to be standing on the footplate of a real steam locomotive

0:48:420:48:44

and I have to...

0:48:440:48:46

The obvious thing, I've got to cook eggs and bacon in the firebox.

0:48:460:48:50

So let's see if I can do it.

0:48:500:48:52

First of all, you have to put some oil on your frying pan.

0:48:520:48:56

A few rashers of bacon.

0:48:570:48:59

A couple of eggs, and apparently all you do...

0:49:100:49:13

..is that.

0:49:180:49:20

Who needs restaurant cars,

0:49:310:49:33

who needs five-star hotels when you can get a breakfast like that?

0:49:330:49:36

This is the Rovos Rail,

0:49:410:49:43

which the owner assures me is the most luxurious train in the world.

0:49:430:49:46

Years ago, it was how the rich and elegant people explored

0:49:460:49:50

the African bush.

0:49:500:49:51

Steam safaris without any of the discomforts of actually

0:49:510:49:54

traipsing through the place.

0:49:540:49:56

Not a bit like the overnight sleeper to London,

0:49:560:49:58

everyone gets a room to themselves, complete with all mod cons

0:49:580:50:02

and the African countryside rolls gently past the window.

0:50:020:50:04

But as the director keeps saying, I'm not here to enjoy myself.

0:50:100:50:13

Humourless fellow.

0:50:130:50:14

This is one of my dreams come true.

0:50:160:50:19

I always wanted to be a railway engine driver -

0:50:190:50:21

failed the examination but at long last

0:50:210:50:24

I've got myself cooking in a train galley.

0:50:240:50:27

And what a train this is, too.

0:50:270:50:29

Most of the coaches were built in about 1928 in Birmingham.

0:50:290:50:33

The cooking car here I think was built in South Africa itself

0:50:330:50:36

in about 1938.

0:50:360:50:38

It's a wonderful, old, romantic, proper train.

0:50:380:50:41

Anyway, I'm going to cook a very simple steak with mushrooms,

0:50:410:50:45

onions, flamed in brandy,

0:50:450:50:46

a sort of steak sauce chasseur kind of thing.

0:50:460:50:49

So already in the pan I've got some onions, Chris.

0:50:490:50:53

Finely chopped, just taking colour, with some butter,

0:50:530:50:56

OK? Now I'll add a few mushrooms.

0:50:560:50:59

Just a couple. Now, you could use fresh mushrooms.

0:50:590:51:02

Back up to me, please.

0:51:020:51:03

You could use fresh mushrooms or wild mushrooms.

0:51:030:51:06

Any kind of... Chanterelles. You could put truffles in.

0:51:060:51:09

Any kind of mushroom is good in this very simple dish.

0:51:090:51:13

We'll let those cook away for a second.

0:51:130:51:15

Then we add just a few little bits of diced tomato.

0:51:170:51:21

Pop those in.

0:51:210:51:23

Diced tomato, finely chopped onions, mushrooms.

0:51:250:51:28

They're almost cooked now,

0:51:300:51:32

so we'll add a little drop of jolly good South African wine.

0:51:320:51:36

This stuff is called Meerlust and lust is something very

0:51:360:51:40

close to our hearts sometimes.

0:51:400:51:42

A drop of that in there.

0:51:420:51:43

Now, we let that wine reduce away so it flavours the mushrooms,

0:51:470:51:50

the onions and the tomatoes.

0:51:500:51:51

And so it does that more quickly, I'll transfer it onto the heat

0:51:530:51:56

at the back, which has a bigger, stronger flame.

0:51:560:52:00

And into that I'll add a little demi-glace,

0:52:000:52:02

which is just veal or chicken or beef stock, thickened...

0:52:020:52:07

in the usual way. So a little bit of demi-glace

0:52:070:52:10

into there like that.

0:52:100:52:11

Then to enrich it even further... Just test it.

0:52:140:52:17

Very good.

0:52:180:52:20

A bit of pepper I think is needed.

0:52:200:52:23

A little bit of pepper.

0:52:260:52:27

A tiny weeny drop of tomato puree.

0:52:290:52:31

Next thing we do, we just quickly...

0:52:430:52:46

cook our steaks.

0:52:460:52:49

One. A little, tiny bit of butter on each side into a very dry pan.

0:52:490:52:54

I quite like to have the steak fairly rare,

0:52:540:52:56

so we won't cook it for a very long.

0:52:560:52:58

OK, we'll turn the steak over.

0:52:590:53:02

That's absolutely splendid.

0:53:050:53:06

Stand back a bit, Chris, if you will, please.

0:53:060:53:08

I'll have a quick slurp.

0:53:080:53:11

Iced-apple juice -

0:53:110:53:13

very refreshing in a kitchen where the temperature's

0:53:130:53:16

approaching 48 degrees.

0:53:160:53:19

Not to mention the temperature outside, which is pretty horrific.

0:53:190:53:23

Anyway, my steaks are cooked.

0:53:230:53:25

So another good thing they make here in South Africa is brandy, it's cognac.

0:53:260:53:30

So we'll flame the steaks very quickly.

0:53:300:53:34

And that will pull some meat juices out of them,

0:53:340:53:37

which I'll mix with the juice and the sauce that I've got here.

0:53:370:53:40

You see this juice in here, Chris? That's the lovely juice

0:53:400:53:43

from the cognac and the meat - we join those together like that.

0:53:430:53:47

Then quickly take out the meat before it...

0:53:490:53:52

We don't want it to boil in that sauce,

0:53:520:53:54

we just want to use the flavour of it.

0:53:540:53:56

Pop the meat, the steak, onto a crouton.

0:53:560:53:59

I've already fried some little chicken livers as a kind of garnish,

0:54:010:54:04

so we'll pop those round the side.

0:54:040:54:07

Just fried in butter, flamed in cognac, that's all they were.

0:54:070:54:10

Nice little bit of juice that comes out of them as well.

0:54:100:54:12

And then I'll put my sort of chassear sauce around it, like that.

0:54:180:54:23

Like so. Let me just tidy up the plate a fraction.

0:54:300:54:33

Let me add a little sprig.

0:54:370:54:40

Couple of little leaves of fresh rosemary.

0:54:400:54:45

And I think that's a really tasty little snack.

0:54:450:54:48

And, by the way, the meat is ostrich.

0:54:480:54:51

'And so, as the train rumbles on into the night,

0:54:520:54:54

'it's a quick change out of the working togs into something more

0:54:540:54:57

'suitable for the veneer and crystal glass surrounds of the dining car.

0:54:570:55:01

'Oh, to be an Edwardian now that Africa's here.'

0:55:010:55:05

That's absolutely splendid, thank you.

0:55:050:55:07

It's very strange - you find yourself on trains,

0:55:100:55:12

you find yourself on boats, you find yourself on planes,

0:55:120:55:17

and at the end of the day, they basically all go to bed,

0:55:170:55:20

or they sit in the back there just talking and playing Scrabble.

0:55:200:55:24

And what do you do when you're on the road?

0:55:240:55:27

You get a few bottles, you get some fruit, you get some stuff,

0:55:270:55:32

and you make one last one for the road.

0:55:320:55:34

I don't really know what I'm doing here, but I want to try

0:55:360:55:38

to encapsulate, if I can, the kind of spirit of South Africa.

0:55:380:55:44

So, what I thought I would do...

0:55:440:55:47

I thought I'd pour some brandy into a jug.

0:55:470:55:52

And it's only me and you and the camera, so we can drink ourselves,

0:55:530:55:57

and it's not me, it's the piano that's been drinking.

0:55:570:56:00

I thought we'd throw some of the brandy,

0:56:000:56:02

and I thought we'd throw some strawberries in.

0:56:020:56:05

I thought we might take a handful of ice.

0:56:050:56:08

And why not?

0:56:090:56:11

I thought we might put some cane sugar in.

0:56:140:56:17

And then I thought we might take this strange device,

0:56:170:56:21

which looks like an outboard motor.

0:56:210:56:23

Then I thought we'd probably pour what is effectively

0:56:300:56:34

a strawberry daiquiri into the bottom of this moving glass.

0:56:340:56:38

Cos the train, too, is moving.

0:56:390:56:42

And then maybe we would put some double cream...

0:56:420:56:47

Or, actually, it's single cream.

0:56:470:56:50

Maybe this strange bottle of strawberry cream...

0:56:500:56:52

..into there, too, because it's kind of an alcoholic milkshake

0:56:540:56:58

for lonely people late at night on trains,

0:56:580:57:02

who have come from nowhere, and appear to arrive...nowhere.

0:57:020:57:05

Maybe put another couple of strawberries into that one.

0:57:050:57:08

Maybe just a dash of angostura bitters.

0:57:080:57:14

Cos there's always a bitter slice to every kind of life.

0:57:140:57:18

And then, on top of this iced brandy strawberry flavoured alcohol,

0:57:240:57:32

with any luck, we just float some strawberry cream...

0:57:320:57:36

..across the top.

0:57:400:57:42

And we might think, on a night like tonight...

0:57:490:57:52

..of pink ladies and the blues.

0:57:550:57:58

WHISTLE BLASTS

0:57:580:58:01

Africa, I love you.

0:58:010:58:03

TV gold, I think you'll all agree.

0:58:090:58:12

As ever on Best Bites, we're looking back at some of the most

0:58:120:58:15

memorable recipes from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:58:150:58:18

Still to come on today's show - Adam Byatt and Simon Hulstone go

0:58:180:58:22

head-to-head in the omelette challenge,

0:58:220:58:24

but who will come out on top?

0:58:240:58:26

Paul Foster goes all out with Wagyu beef - he serves up

0:58:260:58:30

a perfectly cooked sirloin, alongside a slow-cooked brisket,

0:58:300:58:33

and even a wonderfully fresh Wagyu tartare. A beef fest.

0:58:330:58:39

And Al Murray faces food heaven or food hell.

0:58:390:58:42

Did he get his food heaven,

0:58:420:58:43

peach crumble tart with vanilla ice cream, or did

0:58:430:58:46

he end up with his food hell, baked rice pudding with raspberry sauce?

0:58:460:58:50

You can find out what he got at the end of the show.

0:58:500:58:53

Now, time for Jun Tanaka.

0:58:530:58:56

He's cooking a smoked pigeon salad with beetroot, apples,

0:58:560:58:59

and walnuts, and it must have been cold in the studio,

0:58:590:59:02

as James has kept his coat on. He won't feel the benefit.

0:59:020:59:06

-Good to have you on the show. Welcome back.

-Thanks.

0:59:060:59:08

-And happy new year.

-Happy new year.

-What are we cooking, then, first?

0:59:080:59:10

I'm going to do a warm salad of smoked pigeon, with walnuts,

0:59:100:59:14

beetroot and apples. Now, pigeon's one of those things that people are

0:59:140:59:17

a bit squeamish about,

0:59:170:59:18

because they instantly think about the birds flapping around

0:59:180:59:21

Trafalgar Square, but the one you eat is completely different.

0:59:210:59:25

-Yeah.

-So we've got a woodpigeon, which is wild,

0:59:250:59:27

and the free-range farmed pigeon, a lot plumper.

0:59:270:59:29

-And you see the difference between the two.

-Yeah.

0:59:290:59:31

-This one's stronger, gamier sort of flavour.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:59:310:59:34

-This is a more subtle flavour, and it's a lot plumper as well.

-OK.

0:59:340:59:37

So, for the salad,

0:59:370:59:39

we've got some cooked beetroot - you can buy at any supermarket.

0:59:390:59:41

-Yeah.

-Some walnuts, apples, red onion, some walnut vinegar,

0:59:410:59:45

some Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar, which is a red wine vinegar,

0:59:450:59:48

-and some red chard.

-OK.

0:59:480:59:49

-So, if you could make that salad for me...

-Lovely.

0:59:490:59:51

I love doing all these sort of jobs, you know that.

0:59:510:59:53

-OK, so you're going to cook the pigeon.

-Yeah.

0:59:530:59:54

Now, this is quite interesting - you're going to smoke it in

0:59:540:59:58

the oak chippings as well.

0:59:580:59:59

-So, all you need for that is a pan with a tight-fitting lid.

-Yeah.

0:59:591:00:04

Then you put one of these little steaming things in.

1:00:041:00:06

Make sure you've got aluminium foil at the bottom,

1:00:061:00:09

otherwise it's going to taint the pan.

1:00:091:00:11

-And you'll have to buy a new pan, afterwards.

-Yeah, exactly.

1:00:111:00:14

So, aluminium foil, and the oak chippings you can get from...

1:00:141:00:17

-You can get from garden centres, online now, as well.

-Yeah.

1:00:171:00:20

Or, if you can't get hold of it, just use fresh tea.

1:00:201:00:23

Lapsang Souchong is great - it's got a great, smoky flavour -

1:00:231:00:26

or, for a more delicate flavour, go for a fruit tea or something.

1:00:261:00:29

Yeah. This is hot smoking,

1:00:291:00:31

so it will actually cook it if you leave it for long enough in there.

1:00:311:00:35

Exactly.

1:00:351:00:36

You know, smoking, actually, if you go back far enough,

1:00:361:00:39

was actually a method of keeping insects off drying meats.

1:00:391:00:43

Before refrigeration, freezers, and sort of any way

1:00:431:00:47

of preserving meats, they used to dry the meat out in the sun,

1:00:471:00:50

and they found that insects used to lay their eggs on it,

1:00:501:00:52

and they decided - light a little fire,

1:00:521:00:55

blow the smoke over the meat,

1:00:551:00:58

-and that keeps the insects off.

-Yeah.

1:00:581:01:01

-Nice(!)

-What's he talking about?!

-I don't know!

1:01:011:01:04

Just nod!

1:01:041:01:05

I was trying to give some useful information,

1:01:071:01:09

and then you ridicule me!

1:01:091:01:11

He goes on the computer before he comes on the show,

1:01:111:01:13

and he's found another fact about squab pigeon, haven't you?

1:01:131:01:15

-I did.

-Go on, then.

-I was on the computer, Googling it last night.

1:01:151:01:19

Squab pigeons, you can eat it with a clear conscience,

1:01:191:01:21

because it's only free-range.

1:01:211:01:24

When they're little babies, they're fed a milk,

1:01:241:01:29

and you can't artificially manufacture it,

1:01:291:01:32

-so it's always free-range.

-There you go.

1:01:321:01:35

-Nod again!

-The wonders of Google.

1:01:351:01:38

-Free-range is good.

-So I've got the beetroot here.

1:01:381:01:40

A quick tip - if you've got cooked beetroot

1:01:401:01:42

and don't want it on your hands, the marking of beetroot, take some oil

1:01:421:01:46

and rub it all over your hands first, before you peel it.

1:01:461:01:51

It will actually prevent your hands from going bright red.

1:01:511:01:55

There you go. When you wash it all off, it should, in theory, work.

1:01:551:01:59

My mother taught me this, so

1:01:591:02:01

if it doesn't work, I'll end up with beetroot juice

1:02:011:02:03

all over my hands, but it should work. There you go. So, what's next?

1:02:031:02:06

-So, beetroot puree.

-Yeah.

-I've got some more cooked beetroot.

1:02:061:02:10

Going to peel it.

1:02:101:02:12

-Now, you said you can cook your own beetroot?

-Yep, you can.

1:02:121:02:14

Cook it in the skins, of course, don't you?

1:02:141:02:16

Yeah, because you lose the colour otherwise.

1:02:161:02:17

-Would you roast or boil it?

-I would always roast it.

1:02:171:02:20

Put it inside tinfoil, little bit of garlic, some thyme,

1:02:201:02:24

olive oil, and you bake it in the oven. It takes about an hour,

1:02:241:02:27

and you just test it with a metal skewer, pierce the aluminium foil.

1:02:271:02:31

If it slides in easily, you know it's cooked.

1:02:311:02:34

Just peel that all like that.

1:02:341:02:36

I love how I get the really good jobs by doing this.

1:02:361:02:39

Now, apart from your restaurant,

1:02:391:02:41

you're currently writing another book? Well, your first book.

1:02:411:02:44

My first cookbook, yeah - I'm really excited about that.

1:02:441:02:46

So it's just...

1:02:461:02:48

Starting to write it now.

1:02:481:02:50

Its working title is Simple To Sensational,

1:02:501:02:53

and it's basically in two parts -

1:02:531:02:55

you've got basic recipes that any novice cook can attempt,

1:02:551:03:01

but for each basic recipe I have a more refined version,

1:03:011:03:05

showing that with a few simple tips and tricks and techniques,

1:03:051:03:08

that you can transform something really basic into something...

1:03:081:03:12

-Mother, that didn't work!

-..sensational.

1:03:121:03:14

-Lemon juice and water.

-Yeah.

1:03:141:03:16

She also had me as a child doing the onions, so I was like this.

1:03:161:03:19

Remember those gimmicks you had when you were a kid?

1:03:191:03:21

If you put that in your mouth...

1:03:211:03:23

What does that do?

1:03:241:03:26

-It doesn't make you cry.

-Keeps him quiet!

-Exactly!

1:03:261:03:29

I never learned that until I was about 14!

1:03:291:03:31

There we go, we've diced all that, that's all done.

1:03:311:03:34

-You're going to make a dressing for that in a second.

-Yeah.

1:03:341:03:37

For the puree, really simple -

1:03:371:03:39

chopped beetroot, got some butter in there,

1:03:391:03:41

some red port, and a touch of vinegar. And you just boil that -

1:03:411:03:45

it's already cooked, you just want to boil some of the liquid off.

1:03:451:03:49

This is the red wine vinegar.

1:03:491:03:50

Not the standard red wine vinegar you buy everywhere.

1:03:501:03:53

-This is Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar.

-Yeah, exactly.

1:03:531:03:55

The flavour is totally different.

1:03:551:03:57

Yeah, it's a bit sweeter, and it's thicker in consistency.

1:03:571:04:00

You can get them from Spain and this one's from Australia, I believe.

1:04:001:04:04

-So, there you go. Readily available.

-Whoa!

1:04:041:04:06

The pigeon - now, this is the thing with this -

1:04:061:04:08

you don't want to do this next to your curtains at home, do you?

1:04:081:04:11

-No, you don't.

-Cos it stains them.

1:04:111:04:13

So, literally, if you're doing this, just be careful.

1:04:131:04:16

So, the pigeon, if you look at it,

1:04:161:04:18

it's slightly cooked on the outside, but still raw in the middle.

1:04:181:04:21

It's got a lovely, smoky flavour.

1:04:211:04:22

We just need to pan-fry that for about four minutes,

1:04:221:04:27

and I'm going to pop those in with the legs.

1:04:271:04:29

You want to serve pigeon nice and pink.

1:04:291:04:32

Skin side down.

1:04:321:04:34

But if you left it in there, in the smoker,

1:04:341:04:37

it would actually cook right the way through.

1:04:371:04:39

Yep, but if you did that, the smoky flavour would be a bit too much.

1:04:391:04:42

Bit too much. There you go.

1:04:421:04:43

Right, OK, I'm going to toast off these little hazelnuts as well.

1:04:431:04:47

In this salad, you've got your chopped beetroot, apples,

1:04:471:04:50

diced red onions, a little bit of honey.

1:04:501:04:53

A touch more Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar.

1:04:531:04:56

Beetroot with honey and vinegar is just a fantastic combination.

1:04:561:04:59

It's a real chef's...

1:04:591:05:00

-Talking to Bryn earlier, chefs love beetroot.

-I love beetroot.

1:05:001:05:04

I like beetroot risottos, and all kinds of stuff like that.

1:05:041:05:07

I don't know what it is why people don't go for it.

1:05:071:05:10

Do you think it's the cooking of it?

1:05:101:05:12

It DOES take an hour-and-a-half to roast off in the oven.

1:05:121:05:14

-Why people don't like to use it?

-Yeah.

-It's because...

1:05:141:05:16

-You know when you're at school, the sliced one...?

-Tinned beetroot.

1:05:161:05:20

Yeah. Sort of doused in vinegar with loads of onion inside it.

1:05:201:05:24

I think it's the memory of having that that puts people off.

1:05:241:05:28

-Little bit more.

-Bryn, do you use much beetroot?

1:05:281:05:31

I use beetroot a lot, especially this time of year,

1:05:311:05:33

cos it's a great vegetable. You can pickle it,

1:05:331:05:35

make a puree like Jun is doing now.

1:05:351:05:37

It's so versatile, adds some great flavours into it.

1:05:371:05:40

-Yeah.

-In goes the beetroot.

-It takes a lot of flavours, as well.

1:05:401:05:42

-Yeah.

-Can you just blend that for us?

1:05:421:05:44

No, I'm going to stand out of the way at this point.

1:05:441:05:46

Cos you did it in rehearsal!

1:05:461:05:48

-I'm stepping out of the way!

-OK.

-Give it a quick blitz.

1:05:481:05:51

Oh, that's not too bad.

1:05:511:05:53

-So what you're after is just a light puree, yeah?

-Yeah.

1:05:571:06:00

Get the plate over.

1:06:021:06:04

It's got a really vivid colour, this, hasn't it? Fantastic colour.

1:06:081:06:12

If I pop it into the bowl, you can see the colour of that.

1:06:121:06:15

Amazing colour to it.

1:06:171:06:19

-Right.

-There you go.

-I think we're...

1:06:191:06:21

ready to go and that.

1:06:211:06:23

Fabulous. So, the pigeon that you've got there, turned it over.

1:06:231:06:26

Cooking the legs in there as well.

1:06:261:06:28

-They'll take about what, five, six minutes?

-Yeah.

1:06:281:06:30

-The legs take slightly longer than the breasts.

-Yeah.

1:06:301:06:33

And with the legs, I like to cook them all the way through,

1:06:331:06:35

just because it's a lot easier to eat.

1:06:351:06:38

They tend to be a little bit tougher than the breasts.

1:06:381:06:41

So you want to cook them right the way through.

1:06:411:06:42

And do you think the secret with pigeon is keep the breasts pink,

1:06:421:06:45

-though? That's the thing?

-Yeah, absolutely.

1:06:451:06:47

And if you were doing it in a different kind of recipe,

1:06:471:06:50

-you can roast it on the bone.

-Yeah.

1:06:501:06:51

And keep it really, really moist, but for this recipe,

1:06:511:06:54

taken it off the bone.

1:06:541:06:56

Taken it off the bone, just because you want that smoky flavour

1:06:571:07:00

-to penetrate into the pigeon, so...

-There you go.

1:07:001:07:04

Beetroot goes straight in the middle.

1:07:041:07:06

The colour of it looks fantastic.

1:07:081:07:10

Pigeon breast straight on the top. Couple of legs.

1:07:111:07:15

And then, just to finish off, a few red chard leaves.

1:07:171:07:21

That looks really nice.

1:07:211:07:23

-That's it - simple.

-So, remind us what that dish is again.

1:07:231:07:27

That's woodpigeon salad, smoked, with walnut, beetroot, and apples.

1:07:271:07:31

Simple as that.

1:07:311:07:32

Fantastic. There we go. And now you get to try this.

1:07:371:07:40

Yum-yum-yum-yum-yum-yum-yum!

1:07:401:07:43

-Pigeon at 10:10 in the morning.

-Do you like pigeon?

1:07:431:07:45

-I've never had pigeon in my life.

-Never had pigeon?

-No. Look at that.

1:07:451:07:49

I'm just going to show people, just to say that this pigeon here,

1:07:491:07:52

if you cut it through, look, there you go.

1:07:521:07:56

-Oh, my God.

-Beautiful. Beautiful. That's how it should...

1:07:561:07:58

-That looks wonderful.

-That's how it wants to be. Dive into that.

1:07:581:08:01

-Tell us what you think of that.

-Don't look.

1:08:011:08:04

I wouldn't normally use a knife and fork.

1:08:041:08:06

You could do this with duck as well.

1:08:061:08:09

-Mmm!

-Nice?

1:08:091:08:11

SHE SMACKS LIPS

1:08:111:08:12

-That's lovely.

-Have a bit with the beetroot, tell us what you think.

1:08:121:08:14

And I hate beetroot, but this looks really good.

1:08:141:08:17

-Look at that!

-Try it with the puree.

1:08:201:08:23

-It's lovely.

-Pass it down.

-I can't believe that's beetroot.

1:08:231:08:26

Yeah, beetroot, like you say, the puree,

1:08:261:08:28

-and the raw and the cooked really do go well together.

-Yeah.

1:08:281:08:31

-Yeah, definitely.

-And particularly with the apple,

1:08:311:08:33

-adds a nice little flavour to it as well.

-Yep.

1:08:331:08:35

Yeah, there's a freshness to it.

1:08:351:08:37

-The secret of that dressing is the vinegar.

-And the honey.

1:08:371:08:40

Sweetness and sharpness. Works well with beetroot.

1:08:401:08:44

If people want to try that smokiness at home,

1:08:441:08:46

or want to try doing chicken, you can do that exactly the same way.

1:08:461:08:49

-Yep, or a piece of salmon.

-Do you want a bit more?

1:08:491:08:51

-Just flash it through the oven to finish it off.

-Exactly.

1:08:511:08:54

-Happy with that?

-It's delicious.

-Bryn doesn't even get a look-in!

1:08:541:08:58

-He's had some!

-It's surprising,

1:08:581:08:59

the amount of flavour from the time it's been smoked.

1:08:591:09:02

-A lot of depth in flavour from the smoking. It's beautiful.

-Mm.

1:09:021:09:04

That dish looked amazing,

1:09:091:09:11

and they all thought it tasted pretty good, too.

1:09:111:09:14

Now it's omelette challenge time.

1:09:141:09:16

Today, Adam Byatt takes on Simon Hulstone, and as it's Simon's

1:09:161:09:20

first time, he just wants to get his face on the board.

1:09:201:09:24

Surely he can manage that, can't he?

1:09:241:09:26

Right, let's get down to business.

1:09:261:09:28

It's the omelette challenge - you know the story by now.

1:09:281:09:30

Adam's sitting pretty good in the blue part of our board.

1:09:301:09:33

You think you can go any higher?

1:09:331:09:35

Er, possibly, I think so.

1:09:351:09:37

Simon, your first time on here. Who would you like to beat?

1:09:371:09:40

Er, it's got to be Mr Turner, really, hasn't it?

1:09:401:09:42

Mr Turner, that should say 28 DAYS, to be honest, not 28 seconds.

1:09:421:09:45

So, usual rules apply. Let's put the clocks on the screens, please.

1:09:451:09:48

Three egg omelette, cooked as fast as you can. Are you ready?

1:09:481:09:50

-I'm ready.

-Three, two, one, go.

1:09:501:09:52

Oh, pretty confident.

1:09:551:09:57

-Yeah. Nearly had fried eggs for a minute, there.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

1:10:021:10:06

-See the concentration on their faces?

-It's brilliant.

1:10:081:10:11

GONG SOUNDS

1:10:131:10:15

-Simon, Simon, Simon.

-Come on, Chef, give me that.

1:10:171:10:21

I don't know whether I need a fork or a straw.

1:10:211:10:23

-Oh, dear.

-I seasoned it.

1:10:241:10:27

Do you know? There's... HE LAUGHS

1:10:271:10:29

That's cooked, James, don't worry.

1:10:291:10:31

People actually feel sorry for me after four years of this.

1:10:311:10:33

-Mm.

-Is that nice?

-Both different, yeah.

1:10:371:10:41

Simon, take that to France.

1:10:411:10:43

-Oh, Chef.

-Adam...

-Any good?

1:10:431:10:47

-Think you're quicker?

-Erm, not... Probably similar, I'd imagine.

1:10:481:10:53

-28.88.

-Oh, really?!

-No, 21.88.

1:10:531:10:56

21. Not quick enough. Both pretty useless, to be honest.

1:10:561:10:59

Simon, I don't mean to be condescending,

1:11:031:11:05

but a quick tip for you - you're supposed to cook the eggs.

1:11:051:11:08

Anyway, now time for Paul Foster, who I think is determined

1:11:081:11:12

to use every piece of equipment in the kitchen for just one dish.

1:11:121:11:16

What's the name of the dish, first of all?

1:11:161:11:18

It's Wagyu beef, and this is incredible.

1:11:181:11:21

Look at the marbling of that fat.

1:11:211:11:23

And this is perfect Wagyu for me - I don't like it too white,

1:11:231:11:26

-I still like it to have some meat in it.

-Yeah.

1:11:261:11:28

So that's the sirloin. This is the brisket.

1:11:281:11:31

And the brisket, we're going to slow cook in beer.

1:11:311:11:33

-Now, this is English Wagyu, this one.

-It's English Wagyu, yeah.

1:11:331:11:36

It's from a farm - a really, really small producer,

1:11:361:11:39

-near Stonham in Suffolk.

-Yeah.

1:11:391:11:41

I went to see the farm a couple of weeks ago, and it's fantastic.

1:11:411:11:44

Yeah, one of those, erm...

1:11:441:11:47

One of those experiences where you meet somebody that's as

1:11:481:11:50

passionate as you are, and I believe that if you buy or produce

1:11:501:11:54

-the best, most incredible ingredients...

-Yeah.

1:11:541:11:57

..add some skill and some passion, and you get great food.

1:11:571:12:00

It's quite a simple formula.

1:12:001:12:01

Yeah. You don't have to mess around with it too much, do you really?

1:12:011:12:04

-No.

-This stuff is good.

-No. Not at all. When it's amazing it takes...

1:12:041:12:07

Doesn't need a lot of components, a lot of different ingredients.

1:12:071:12:10

So what am I doing here?

1:12:101:12:12

Is this thing called black garlic or is this smoked garlic?

1:12:121:12:15

This is smoked and fermented so this is like a black garlic.

1:12:151:12:17

It's got a really treacly flavour. I'm going to make a dressing,

1:12:171:12:20

like a gastrique, so sugar, vinegar, black garlic.

1:12:201:12:23

We're just going to roast it off and blend it so it's nice and sweet and sour.

1:12:231:12:27

You can buy this in the supermarket now, can't you, this black garlic?

1:12:271:12:30

-You can, yes. It's really good stuff.

-OK. There you go. Right.

1:12:301:12:33

-What does Wagyu mean?

-What is Wagyu?

1:12:331:12:37

-Wagyu is the herd, that's the breed of the beef.

-OK.

1:12:371:12:42

It was originally bred... Excuse me.

1:12:421:12:45

..bred as a working cow and what they found from eating it was that

1:12:451:12:52

you get this amazing intermuscular fat which adds all that moisture,

1:12:521:12:56

all that flavour.

1:12:561:12:58

From that they changed it from a working cow and bred it into a food.

1:12:581:13:04

And it's been going for years in Japan.

1:13:041:13:08

Yeah. It traditionally costs... very, very expensive.

1:13:081:13:11

But now, as it comes to this country and we are producing our own,

1:13:111:13:14

-it gets a lot cheaper as well.

-Exactly.

1:13:141:13:17

But Australia do quite a lot...

1:13:171:13:19

Even America they do some Wagyu as well.

1:13:191:13:21

What do you think...? For me personally I prefer Wagyu to Kobe.

1:13:211:13:27

-Yeah.

-Because Kobe is almost too tender.

-Slightly sweeter, yeah.

1:13:271:13:31

Yeah, me too.

1:13:311:13:33

I prefer this and I think this personally for

1:13:331:13:36

me it's better for the English market.

1:13:361:13:38

People can be put off by how fatty and soft it is.

1:13:381:13:41

So I'm just going to lift this brisket up.

1:13:411:13:43

See how it's got a lovely colour? Oh!

1:13:431:13:46

We are under pressure today because Matt is a bit of a chef as well.

1:13:461:13:49

-You were in Hell's Kitchen as well, weren't you?

-Yes, I was.

1:13:491:13:51

Utmost respect for that industry now. It was an amazing experience.

1:13:511:13:56

-Actually Gordon is in Caesars as well.

-He is. But you came, what?

1:13:561:14:00

It was third you came? Or something like that.

1:14:001:14:03

I don't know what I came. I just know that I was there for...

1:14:031:14:05

-It was definitely hell and it was definitely a kitchen.

-All right.

1:14:051:14:09

LAUGHTER

1:14:091:14:10

It's good enough then, isn't it? It's good enough.

1:14:101:14:14

Right, so what's next?

1:14:141:14:16

It messes you up, this. That's why I wear aprons in the kitchen.

1:14:161:14:19

-I don't wear posh shirts in the kitchen.

-So the beef has gone in.

1:14:191:14:21

The beef has gone in. Some beer, just a good, light bitter.

1:14:211:14:24

And then some chicken stock, a nice brown chicken stock.

1:14:241:14:28

Do you offset that with a bit of sweetness as well...?

1:14:281:14:31

Yes. Just some nice runny honey.

1:14:311:14:33

Obviously, bitter is bitter so you just need to offset that, balance

1:14:331:14:38

that out, and this will reduce down to a nice glaze once it's braised.

1:14:381:14:42

-OK.

-Now there's what you said about the gastrique.

1:14:421:14:45

That's the sugar and vinegar gone in there with the black garlic.

1:14:451:14:50

OK, I'm going to blitz that together.

1:14:501:14:52

The beef is going to take about three hours.

1:14:521:14:55

Around 140 degrees, really nice and slow, and break those muscles down.

1:14:551:14:59

-I'll just open this oven up.

-I keep missing that.

1:14:591:15:03

Do you have to keep basting that or does it just sit there?

1:15:031:15:06

No, as long as you cover it well, you can...

1:15:061:15:08

It's got enough fat to keep it moist.

1:15:081:15:11

Now, tell us about Mallory Court. It's had a big refurbishment.

1:15:141:15:18

You've been there, what, about a year now?

1:15:181:15:20

-It will be a year coming up February.

-Yes.

1:15:201:15:22

It's a stunning place and I'm a local guy so I've known

1:15:221:15:26

a lot about it. It had a Michelin star for years.

1:15:261:15:29

Last year had a refurb on the ground floor and it's a beautiful place.

1:15:291:15:32

-A lovely country house. You came not long ago, didn't you, had the tasting menu?

-Yes.

1:15:321:15:35

Yes, it's stunning.

1:15:351:15:37

It's an honour to work there and represent it, really,

1:15:371:15:40

as I know so much about it.

1:15:401:15:42

And I've grown up with it being this really iconic place in Warwickshire.

1:15:421:15:47

Yeah.

1:15:471:15:49

So some of the beef as well I'm just going to cut into a tartare.

1:15:491:15:54

Sirloin is so soft, it's like fillet, so you can eat it raw.

1:15:541:15:59

So we are going to tartare one bit and then...

1:15:591:16:01

-I'll give you a little bowl there. There we are.

-Brilliant.

1:16:011:16:03

And then basically with the other part you're going to pan fry it.

1:16:031:16:06

Yes. So this part here. A red hot pan. A tiny bit of oil.

1:16:061:16:11

And this is a technique that I'm not going to claim.

1:16:131:16:17

It's something that Heston does.

1:16:171:16:19

It's a brilliant, brilliant technique.

1:16:191:16:21

-And basically you add the steak to a red-hot pan...

-Yeah.

1:16:211:16:24

..turn it every 20-40 seconds, keep turning.

1:16:241:16:27

And what you do,

1:16:271:16:28

you don't lose any heat from the pan so you build up a really nice crust.

1:16:281:16:33

I'll just move this.

1:16:331:16:35

I mean, a lot of people with Wagyu, the expense part of it,

1:16:351:16:38

that's what people are worried about.

1:16:381:16:41

But if you buy the UK one, the prices are much, much cheaper.

1:16:411:16:43

It is much cheaper. It's still expensive.

1:16:431:16:45

-But you get what you pay for, don't you, at the end of the day?

-Yeah.

1:16:451:16:49

What's the comparable price between normal steak and...?

1:16:491:16:52

-Is it...?

-It varies, really.

1:16:521:16:54

-Sometimes, about 15, 20 times more.

-Really?

-Yeah, yeah.

1:16:541:16:58

Yeah. Right, so we've got... That's your little bit of tartare.

1:16:581:17:02

So what's next, then? Every 20 seconds you're going to turn that.

1:17:021:17:04

Every 20 seconds. You'll see it build up a lovely crust.

1:17:041:17:07

We've got a sauce over here which I'll keep blitzing. What's next?

1:17:071:17:11

-So this is the finished brisket.

-Yeah.

1:17:111:17:14

Brisket I'm a fan of anyway.

1:17:161:17:18

But Wagyu brisket is even better. Cos it's got all that fat inside,

1:17:191:17:24

it stays really moist. So you see you've got this beautiful piece.

1:17:241:17:28

I've got some finished stock here and I'm just going to glaze the brisket up.

1:17:281:17:34

We've done a lot of things in my year on this show but getting

1:17:341:17:36

-the tendons in the fryer is a first for me.

-OK.

1:17:361:17:39

-So can we get the tendons in the fryer?

-We can get them in the fryer.

1:17:391:17:42

These are heel tendons, so from the Achilles heel.

1:17:421:17:45

-If you could watch that steak for me.

-Yes.

1:17:451:17:47

So, from the Achilles heel, we've braised these,

1:17:471:17:49

cook them really slowly, about four, five hours.

1:17:491:17:52

And then sliced them, dehydrate them,

1:17:521:17:54

-and then just cook them 180 in the fryer.

-Right.

1:17:541:17:57

And you'll notice they'll puff up like a really nice puffed crisp.

1:17:571:18:01

Poppadoms.

1:18:011:18:02

-They go like a pork cracker, really, that kind of stuff.

-Yes.

1:18:021:18:05

-Poppadoms.

-They take about 30 seconds.

-Paul, how much time it takes to make these?

-Two days.

1:18:051:18:10

-You should have bought a packet of poppadoms!

-Yes!

1:18:101:18:13

HE LAUGHS

1:18:131:18:14

-Anybody can do it at home, it's easy.

-See how they're puffing up?

-Yes.

1:18:141:18:18

You've got to make sure you keep pushing them down

1:18:181:18:20

so all those brown bits go nice and white. If they've got any brown bits on it they're going to be tough.

1:18:201:18:25

You actually cook the muscle itself,

1:18:251:18:27

or cook the tendon itself, and then dry it out, that's the key to it.

1:18:271:18:30

That's the key, yeah.

1:18:301:18:32

-OK.

-OK. So they are ready. If you can take that steak out of the pan.

1:18:331:18:39

-There you go.

-OK. Sea salt straight away.

1:18:391:18:42

As you've still got that bit of oil on there, you want it to stick.

1:18:421:18:45

Yeah.

1:18:451:18:46

-That's it. Simple.

-Right. I'm there with this. The sauce is done.

1:18:461:18:51

-The steak's ready.

-That's there.

-And then we're almost there.

1:18:531:18:57

-This brisket, you just put in a glaze, do you?

-Yes.

1:18:571:19:00

Yes, a glaze of the beer, chicken stock and honey,

1:19:001:19:04

add sometimes a bit of Cabernet Sauvignon vinegar,

1:19:041:19:07

just to cut through the bitterness and the fat.

1:19:071:19:11

But it's important to taste the finished liquor and then see how much it needs.

1:19:111:19:15

OK. These look great, though, don't they?

1:19:151:19:18

There's just a nice little bit of the tartare on it as well.

1:19:181:19:20

Yeah, they're lovely. So for the tartare,

1:19:201:19:23

classically you'd have egg yolk,

1:19:231:19:25

-gherkins, et cetera.

-Yeah.

-I just like a little bit of shallot,

1:19:251:19:27

a little bit of parsley, let the beef shine.

1:19:271:19:30

And I've got a really interesting ingredient to go on top of that,

1:19:301:19:33

which is a cured egg yolk.

1:19:331:19:34

Which, it looks quite unappetising,

1:19:341:19:37

-it looks like dried apricot.

-Right.

-So, again, another long process.

1:19:371:19:40

Something we have to do well ahead of time.

1:19:401:19:43

We salt an egg yolk for 12 hours and then wash it off really well,

1:19:431:19:47

dehydrate it, and then you end up with this.

1:19:471:19:51

And we use it to finish dishes. We'll grate it over the top.

1:19:511:19:53

And you get this lovely creamy texture and it adds

1:19:531:19:55

a layer of seasoning as well.

1:19:551:19:57

Beautiful. Right, and there's your little brisket

1:19:571:20:00

that I shall lift up

1:20:001:20:01

with your sauce and then you can start to plate it up.

1:20:011:20:03

-I'll just get the...

-If you look after the broccoli.

-..broccoli done.

1:20:031:20:06

Drain that off. You just want that with a bit of butter in here?

1:20:061:20:09

Yes, just a bit of butter, a little bit of sea salt.

1:20:091:20:11

-Right. Bit of salt. I'll get you a plate.

-OK.

1:20:111:20:16

And a bit of butter.

1:20:161:20:17

That's the only be to eat the Wagyu, as well. It's got to be rare.

1:20:171:20:21

Well done, you may as well turn veggie.

1:20:211:20:25

OK.

1:20:251:20:27

And then what about this gastrique that you've got in there?

1:20:281:20:31

Is that a little sauce that's going to go round the edge?

1:20:311:20:33

Yes, that's a little dressing, so it's slightly sweet and sour,

1:20:331:20:36

almost like an Asian influence on there,

1:20:361:20:38

-but with a British take on it.

-There's your broccoli.

-OK.

1:20:381:20:41

-Buttered and seasoned.

-Brilliant.

1:20:411:20:44

Purple sprouting, it's great broccoli.

1:20:441:20:47

Height of its season now. Works with loads of different things.

1:20:471:20:51

Use the leaves, use the stalk, don't waste any of it.

1:20:511:20:53

-A little bit of the dressing.

-There you go.

1:20:581:21:00

-This is this strong garlic, smoked garlic...?

-Yes.

1:21:001:21:03

And there's a lot of garlic in there. What did you do,

1:21:031:21:06

-about four cloves or something?

-All of it.

-All of it. Brilliant.

1:21:061:21:09

LAUGHTER

1:21:091:21:10

You know, it tastes nothing like that rawness you get from garlic.

1:21:101:21:13

-Do you want a bit of the sauce?

-Yes, I'll glaze a bit of the...

1:21:131:21:15

Glaze a bit of the brisket.

1:21:151:21:17

-And finish with some parsley oil.

-So give us the name of this dish, then.

1:21:171:21:21

So we've got English Wagyu,

1:21:211:21:24

brisket and sirloin, with crispy heel tendon.

1:21:241:21:27

-That's what it is.

-Brilliant.

1:21:271:21:29

A crispy heel tendon. Ever had one of those?

1:21:351:21:37

I've been called that a few times!

1:21:371:21:40

LAUGHTER

1:21:401:21:42

Right. Well, dive into that one cos this is really, really special.

1:21:421:21:46

-Help yourself.

-A plate of indulgence.

-There you go.

1:21:461:21:49

-Have a try of that.

-Yeah, poppadoms for me!

1:21:491:21:53

Yeah! Tell me what you think.

1:21:531:21:55

-The beef, you just want to flash fry it.

-Yeah.

1:21:551:21:57

Get a really nice crust, caramelise it, get that Maillard reaction,

1:21:571:22:01

get the flavour going.

1:22:011:22:03

-This is beautiful.

-Mm.

-Happy with that?

-Incredible.

1:22:031:22:06

I think that's what you call a homage de boeuf,

1:22:101:22:13

and what a homage it was. Well done, Paul.

1:22:131:22:16

Now, when Al Murray came to the studio to face his food heaven

1:22:161:22:19

or food hell, he was pushing for peach.

1:22:191:22:22

But would he have to resign himself to rice? Let's find out.

1:22:221:22:25

Right, it's time to find out whether you've sent Al

1:22:251:22:28

to food heaven or food hell. Al, just to remind you,

1:22:281:22:30

your version of food heaven would be this.

1:22:301:22:32

Yeah, golden syrup. Look at that.

1:22:321:22:34

Which I could turn into a treacle tart.

1:22:341:22:36

-Beautiful British pint of golden syrup.

-Alternatively, it could be

1:22:361:22:39

-this stuff over here, the dreaded rice.

-Eurgh.

1:22:391:22:41

-Rice pudding?

-Rice pudding, though.

-Yeah?

1:22:411:22:43

-How do you think the viewers have done?

-Come on.

-I don't know.

1:22:431:22:46

I've no idea. Do the public love me?

1:22:461:22:49

That's the question.

1:22:491:22:51

-No.

-Aw!

1:22:511:22:53

They love you, but don't love golden syrup, so get rid of that, guys.

1:22:531:22:56

-There go the ratings for tonight, Al.

-They've gone for food hell.

1:22:561:22:59

-Rice, rice, baby. OK, right.

-58%, so it was close.

-Oh, it was close,

1:22:591:23:02

-that's all right, then.

-Quite close. So, Raymond, if you can get on

1:23:021:23:05

-and do the raspberries for me that would be great.

-OK. Raspberry man.

1:23:051:23:08

We're just going to do a quick and simple warm raspberries.

1:23:081:23:10

We've got some raspberries, icing sugar, touch of water there,

1:23:101:23:13

warm them up. Now, for our rice pudding.

1:23:131:23:15

What I've got here, I've got some Thai jasmine rice.

1:23:151:23:17

-Oh, get you.

-Oh, yes. Well, we thought you were coming,

1:23:171:23:20

blow the budget and all that.

1:23:201:23:22

Instead of pudding rice, we've got some Thai jasmine rice.

1:23:221:23:24

Now, the secret, I think, with rice pudding is just to gently

1:23:241:23:27

wash the rice first. See how much starch is coming out there?

1:23:271:23:29

-Yeah, it's incredible.

-With pudding rice in particular,

1:23:291:23:32

it can be very, very thick and stodgy.

1:23:321:23:34

To stop that just wash it slightly.

1:23:341:23:36

Then into there now, we're going to put some double cream.

1:23:361:23:39

-Just a small amount.

-Yeah, yeah.

-Low fat food, you know.

1:23:391:23:43

After I've had that broccoli soup with the cream and the...

1:23:431:23:45

-Give that a quick stir.

-Yeah, OK.

-Light and healthy.

1:23:451:23:48

Matt's buttered our dish there.

1:23:481:23:50

Raymond... Raymond's just sauteing off the fruit.

1:23:501:23:53

-Little bit of icing sugar...

-Yeah.

-..touch of berries,

1:23:531:23:56

some raspberries. Raspberries are really good anyway.

1:23:561:23:58

Little bit of Kirsch would be very nice with that.

1:23:581:24:00

We haven't got Kirsch, Raymond, so you have to use water.

1:24:001:24:03

There you go. You've blown the budget with your black truffle.

1:24:031:24:06

-Here's our Kirsch.

-And we've got some sugar.

1:24:061:24:07

-Now, I'm going to use golden...

-What sort of man has a black truffle

1:24:071:24:10

-in his pocket permanently?

-Don't ask him, don't ask him, I don't know.

1:24:101:24:13

There you go. Touch of that.

1:24:131:24:14

-If you can split me a vanilla pod as well.

-Yeah.

1:24:141:24:16

So, Matt's got a vanilla pod there. It's always important

1:24:161:24:18

to buy Bourbon vanilla pod. Bends without it snapping, you see.

1:24:181:24:21

-It's not chocolate, before you say it.

-Nice and fat one.

1:24:211:24:23

That's an unusual name, Bourbon vanilla pod, isn't it?

1:24:231:24:26

Comes from Madagascar, vanilla pods. There we go.

1:24:261:24:28

-We've got some nutmeg.

-Yeah.

-Freshly grated nutmeg, which I love.

1:24:281:24:31

Do you like rice pudding, Raymond?

1:24:311:24:32

-Are you a big fan?

-I love it completely.

1:24:321:24:35

-Mine is the best in the world, OK?

-Yours is the best, is it?

1:24:351:24:38

I took about six hours... Of course it is.

1:24:381:24:40

It's absolutely amazing. I love it completely.

1:24:401:24:42

There we go, straight in there.

1:24:421:24:44

Including the pod. Go on, throw the whole lot in.

1:24:441:24:46

-Now, all we're doing is just...

-I give you a good recipe

1:24:461:24:48

because I find that completely wasteful, you know that.

1:24:481:24:51

You stick that in there and then take it out afterwards.

1:24:511:24:53

You can cure it with a bit of syrup, you could use...

1:24:531:24:57

Raymond, put that in your pocket with the truffle and take it home.

1:24:571:24:59

It's so wasteful, so bad.

1:24:591:25:02

Right, we're just going to... Basically, what you want to do

1:25:021:25:05

is just warm this up, Raymond. So don't allow it to boil too much.

1:25:051:25:08

Just warm it up.

1:25:081:25:09

And then Matt's got a butter dish and we take the whole lot.

1:25:091:25:13

See, there's quite a small amount of rice.

1:25:131:25:14

-There's not very much rice in there.

-But it'll absorb in nicely.

1:25:141:25:18

-You want the raspberries?

-No, no, no, no.

1:25:181:25:21

The secret of this is to gently cook it, I find.

1:25:211:25:24

So gently cook it in an oven, and I always find rice pudding

1:25:241:25:27

when it's cooked on the stove can be quite thick and heavy.

1:25:271:25:30

I always think rice pudding's better off in the oven

1:25:301:25:32

cos you've got that skin on the top, which I love, the skin over the top.

1:25:321:25:35

But pop it in the oven, which we've got over here.

1:25:351:25:37

Now, this goes in about 350 Fahrenheit,

1:25:371:25:40

so about 160 degrees centigrade,

1:25:401:25:43

and it needs to cook for about 30 to 40 minutes,

1:25:431:25:45

something like that.

1:25:451:25:47

You end up with this really rich...

1:25:471:25:48

Mine cooks for three hours.

1:25:481:25:50

And, Raymond, you can take that home as well, there you go.

1:25:521:25:55

-Should be shot, James.

-Come on! It's delicious.

-Completely.

1:25:551:25:58

If you were in my kitchen, you wouldn't last two minutes.

1:25:581:26:03

I applied for a job, but you didn't have any when I was 16.

1:26:031:26:06

I learned something, definitely.

1:26:061:26:08

What about him and his omelette, though?

1:26:081:26:11

Icing sugar, rather than brown sugar.

1:26:111:26:14

And icing sugar, if you caramelise it with icing sugar,

1:26:141:26:17

-you almost get this sort of mottled sort of texture to it.

-Wow.

1:26:171:26:22

But also with icing sugar, the great thing about this,

1:26:221:26:24

when you caramelise anything, like on a lemon tart

1:26:241:26:26

or anything like that, you don't taste the grains. You just taste

1:26:261:26:29

the sugariness and the caramel.

1:26:291:26:31

Just over the top of there.

1:26:311:26:33

Look at that.

1:26:331:26:34

Delicious.

1:26:351:26:37

We've got a spoon there.

1:26:371:26:39

And all we do now...

1:26:391:26:40

-That looks lovely.

-It does look good.

1:26:401:26:43

That looks creamy and delicious.

1:26:431:26:44

Creamy, delicious.

1:26:441:26:47

There you go.

1:26:471:26:49

It's all lopped on the side there.

1:26:491:26:51

Little bit more on there.

1:26:511:26:54

And then we've got some of these lovely warm raspberries.

1:26:541:26:56

I just serve them whole because they are so lovely like that.

1:26:561:26:59

Yeah, yeah, delicious. Again, just nice and simple like that.

1:26:591:27:01

You can do a strawberry sauce with it if you want,

1:27:011:27:03

but that, I just think, is delicious. Girls! Look at them,

1:27:031:27:06

-they're all ready. Bring over the glasses.

-Spoons.

-Dive in.

1:27:061:27:08

Al, that's your idea of food hell, would you believe?

1:27:081:27:11

Eating irons.

1:27:111:27:12

I can't believe it, but there you go.

1:27:121:27:14

-Well, yeah.

-Girls, you've got some irons there.

1:27:141:27:18

Raymond, dive in. We've got some wine to go with this.

1:27:181:27:20

There you go, Al.

1:27:201:27:22

James, I'm quite amazed because...

1:27:221:27:25

Cheers!

1:27:251:27:26

What are you quite amazed about? What's wrong with it?

1:27:291:27:31

I'm amazed, the recipes are so simple, they're so accessible.

1:27:311:27:36

Yet, there's so many of these wonderful cookery shows,

1:27:361:27:39

yet nobody cooks at home. Can you tell us why?

1:27:391:27:41

-Cos they're all watching television.

-Exactly.

1:27:411:27:45

Has it changed your mind about rice, Al?

1:27:451:27:48

Absolutely. That...

1:27:481:27:50

That's the best rice pudding I've ever eaten.

1:27:501:27:53

"Best rice pudding I've ever eaten."

1:27:531:27:54

-That is unbelievably good.

-It's nice with the raspberries.

1:27:541:27:57

The raspberries just cut through,

1:27:571:27:58

adds a little bit of sharpness to it.

1:27:581:28:00

Raymond's raspberries, I think, are the clincher.

1:28:001:28:02

Oh, they would be, yeah. I've actually made that once before

1:28:021:28:04

-with clotted cream. Girls, you like that?

-That's fantastic.

-Cheers.

1:28:041:28:07

Cheers, ladies.

1:28:071:28:08

I think we can all agree - rice is very nice.

1:28:131:28:16

I'm afraid that's it for the show today.

1:28:161:28:19

I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back at some of the

1:28:191:28:21

delicious dishes from the Saturday Kitchen store cupboard.

1:28:211:28:24

I'll see you back soon. Thanks for watching.

1:28:241:28:27