29/10/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


29/10/2017

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen. Helen Glover faces her food heaven or food hell.


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Transcript


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Good morning! What a line-up we've got for you - great chefs, knockout dishes, and a host of famous faces.

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So take a seat, make yourself comfy, and enjoy another serving of Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

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Welcome to the show. Now, over the next hour and a half, we've got some

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great moments from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

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Coming up, Chris Evans and James Martin

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swap roles as Chris cooks up a big breakfast.

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Andrew Turner is here with a sweet treat.

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He makes a mango and yoghurt egg

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before serving on top of a brioche pain perdu.

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Clare Thompson rustles up her savoury take on

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a bread and butter pudding.

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She pan-fries sausages and sourdough before baking with cauliflower and radicchio.

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And top chefs Paul Rankin and Michael Caines

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battle it out in the omelette challenge.

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And then it's over to Mark Hicks,

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who's serving up a sumptuous steak salad.

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He pan-fries the steak before serving alongside crispy shallots,

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wild mushrooms, and a watercress salad.

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And finally, Olympic champion Helen Glover faces her food heaven or food hell.

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Will she get her food heaven, chocolate lava cake,

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or her food hell, chilli and lemon grass pork?

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Keep watching to the end of the show to find out.

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But first, Nic Watt is here with a Japanese-inspired seafood dish,

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and he's got a very young,

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handsome and very talented man

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helping him out in the kitchen.

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-Nic, good to have you here.

-Thank you.

-It was a pretty special night last night, wasn't it?

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-I think so, I hope you enjoyed it.

-Nic opened a restaurant last night.

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Canary Wharf.

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So are you going to be a little bit tired and shaky this morning?

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I'm a little knackered, it was sort of a 1am finish and a 6am pick up.

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-It was a beautiful meal, I have to say. I haven't eaten at Roka before...

-Oh, thank you.

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-..but it was absolutely fantastic.

-Cool.

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-Now, is this typical of the dishes you serve at Roka?

-It is, it is.

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We've really, I've built this dish off one of the dishes from the Charlotte Street restaurant...

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-OK.

-..and sort of incorporated it into something that can be more versatile for home.

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-Cool!

-And ingredients you can source.

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-Apart from the big, big prawn we've got here, what's the dish?

-OK, so we've got the big prawn.

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I'm going to make a simple pesto-style, I'd call it...

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-OK.

-..of some coriander...

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-Mmm-hmm.

-..some yuzu, which is a Japanese citrus fruit...

-OK.

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..some garlic, some yuzu cosho, which

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is like a Japanese mustard, almost.

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-Following this, yeah?

-Oh, God!

-We're lost already, yeah?

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It's got a little bit of power, it's going to give it that zing.

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-Uh-huh.

-That brightness I'm talking about.

-OK.

-Some ginger, some chilli

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-paste, some water - that's going to make the pesto.

-Mmm-hmm.

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And the aioli, baked potato, some garlic, lemon, poached egg,

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-ginger juice, white miso, which is fermented soybean paste.

-OK.

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-Again, very available.

-Yeah.

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You're going quickly whack on some julienne of daikon for me...

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-Daikon, right.

-..and crush me a little bit of garlic.

-OK.

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-And I'm going to start working with these prawns.

-I shall try and keep up with this.

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-Can I ask a question, already?

-Of course!

-Please do.

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Where do you get ingredients like that from?

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-Well, good question.

-They just sound so exotic and fancy.

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I've selected ingredients for this, it is all available from an Asian grocer.

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I mean, they might sound exotic but really there's only two

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ingredients you might struggle for and one is this yuzu peel...

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-Yeah.

-..which is just the skin of Japanese citrus.

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-Yeah.

-And if you...

-Yuzu peel.

-And-and where would you...?

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Is this from Japan?

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It's from Japan, but essentially it's a frozen product.

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So if you didn't get yuzu peel,

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you could easily replace it with lemon juice.

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Yeah, it is very lemony.

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-Daikon is also known as mooli, yeah?

-Also know as mooli.

-Japanese radish.

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-Japanese radish.

-OK.

-Absolutely. I mean, that's available all over the shop.

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There's no difficulty with that.

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-I think you can get this in Indian shops, I believe, as well.

-Yeah, yeah.

-OK.

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-So...

-And what's it doing on that dish?

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-The daikon?

-Yeah, it's quite peppery, do you say, or...?

-It's a little peppery, but really what it

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-does, it actually gets you salivating, to be honest.

-OK.

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So the whole point of this is just to wash your mouth

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and get it sort of fresh, to cleanse your palate.

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Why, cos of the spice that's going in the dish?

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-It's a powerful dish.

-Yeah.

-It's got a lot going on.

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So what's the idea of chopping the meat up and stirring it through?

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Why don't you just sort of baste it and...?

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-Because, for what we're trying to do here, we're just going to grill it.

-Mm-hmm.

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So I just want sort of the pesto to really wrap around the dressing

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and...

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And the prawn itself is quite meaty and it's quite chunky, so...

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-Is it quite, I mean, a prawn that size, is it quite tough?

-It is.

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-Because it's wild, actually, it's not like from a pond.

-Right.

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-You know, so it's not sort of soft...

-Yeah, yeah.

-..loose muscle.

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Hasn't got that pappy taste that a lot of prawns have?

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Exactly. So we chop it up, just so it makes it a little bit more

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-palatable and also it allows the dressing to get all around the meat there.

-Uh-huh. OK.

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-Right, so bit of daikon there. I'll leave that to one side.

-Yeah.

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-So what are you doing here? Just run us through this.

-So, what I've done, I've taken some scissors,

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-and I've just run through the back of the prawn.

-Mmm-hmm.

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And I'm just going to take out the vein...

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-OK.

-..which is not so nice.

-Ugh!

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-Yeah, we don't want that.

-No, we don't want that part! I removed that part for you guys.

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And then all I'm going to do is just slice it in half

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and really just sort of chunk it up into bite-size pieces.

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There's nothing overly technical about this stage.

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-Any of you familiar with Nic's restaurant?

-Yes.

-Yeah?

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-I've dined there a few times.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, it's fantastic.

-Good.

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Oh, there we go. That's positive, that's positive!

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-Absolutely.

-That's a good start!

-One of my favourites in London.

-Is it?

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Yeah, it's one of my favourites.

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So then this part's really easy.

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-I've just added that pesto-like consistency into here.

-Mmm-hmm.

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It's going to be a little punchy, and into the bowl,

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mix it round all the meat,

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-and I'm just going to open that back out.

-OK.

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Do you want a hand with this, or...?

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-Um...yeah, just hold that open, that'd be super.

-OK.

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And we're just going to spoon this in, and we're just going to use

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the actual shell, cos the shell also has all those lovely flavours.

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That should be pretty good now.

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Now you're going to grill this, but could you barbecue it in summer, or...

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-Well, the good thing about...

-..roast it off?

-..what

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I'm doing is you can absolutely barbecue it. It's perfect for it.

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It's actually how we do it in the restaurant. And you can use...

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This recipe would translate straight on to, on to lobster,

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crayfish, or small prawns...

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-Oh, OK.

-..no problem.

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Now, at your restaurant last night... Your restaurant is pure theatre, I have to say.

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-There's a lot of drama associated because...

-There is, there's a...

-A lot of flames, a lot of smoke.

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What's all that shouting about? That was quite scary.

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-"Hai!"

-Every time you read out an order, "Hai!"

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-What was all that about?

-Yeah.

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-We want the theatre, one part, most definitely.

-Yeah.

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But also what's important is it's a noisy restaurant, there's a lot going on.

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-And what I say to the guys is, "I want to know that you've heard me."

-Right.

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-"I don't want to hear your voices cos I like the sound of them."

-Everyone heard them!

-Yeah.

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-So, I want to know they've heard me, so when I call the food out...

-Yeah.

-..because there's a lot going on.

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-As you see, there's a lot of energy in the room.

-Yeah.

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So I need them to know, on my call, "You've heard me."

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-Right.

-Full stop.

-OK.

-Just answer me in...

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-So then if they haven't, you can shout at them?

-Yeah, I...

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You were getting a little bit tetchy at times, I noticed last night.

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I'm not such a shouter and screamer, but...

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-Now, what's this egg business you're doing here?

-OK, I'm just poaching an egg.

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So what I've done, I've just added into the water for...

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-That was close, wasn't it?

-Is that all right?

-Absolutely.

-Nearly lost it!

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-So why do you drop it in the boiling water like that?

-It's just a little trick.

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You drop it into the boiling water in the shell, give it 30 seconds and it just almost, I guess, er...

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-It quickly semi-blanches it.

-Seals the inside.

-Exactly, and you crack it in.

-Nice trick.

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-And theoretically you end up with a...

-Yeah? OK.

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-And then it holds it together when it...

-Yes, yeah, absolutely.

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-..it blanches? OK.

-So now we go on to the aioli.

-Mmm-hmm.

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-We've got a bit of potato.

-Oh, right. What's that going to do?

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-Thicken it?

-What's that? What, just a jacket potato that you've...?!

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I brought jacket potato, just for that familiarity factor.

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LAUGHTER

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Never seen anyone do that with a jacket potato. It's really clever.

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-Do you want make to check the prawns?

-Yes, please. Absolutely.

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So, the jacket potato actually is just to sort of fluff up the aioli, make a nice, light aioli.

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OK. Needs a little bit longer, I think, Nic.

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So what happens, does it cook all the way through?

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-Do we need to turn that around, or...?

-You might want to just get a spoon and just move the meat

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-around in that prawn there.

-It's not quite there, give it another 30 seconds.

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-OK.

-OK.

-So I've just got some garlic, adding some garlic in here.

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I'm going to add a little...

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So is this a sort of a traditional dip, or is this your kind of

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-Western take on...?

-The aioli itself is kind of traditional.

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-Yeah.

-..in its form - the potato, the lemon juice.

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-I knocked back a little bit of the garlic.

-Yeah.

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-I reduced the garlic a little bit.

-Mmm.

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-And then my take is the miso, the white miso.

-OK.

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And that's just to give it that sort of,

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it gives it a beautiful depth of flavour...

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-Yeah.

-..and, debatably, it brings in a little bit of that umami flavour.

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-But presumably you get a lot of Japanese in your restaurants?

-Yes, we do.

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I mean, do they take well to you sort of, not meddling with the dishes, but you know...

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-..adjusting, shall we say?

-"Meddling".

-"Meddling".

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LAUGHTER

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Sounds like I'm doing something wrong, eh?

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-No, not meddling, but just sort of adjusting the dishes.

-Yeah.

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-Yes, they do.

-Cos the old Italians would get very upset, wouldn't they?

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Well, what I do is, with all the Japanese techniques,

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-we follow the technique with authenticity.

-Yeah.

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-But we, then we enhance the flavours.

-Yeah.

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-We give them a boost.

-OK.

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-Now, where we up to?

-I'm just...just adding my egg into my aioli...

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-OK.

-..which I've just poached.

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Now, what's the reason for lightly poaching it? Could you, like, just sort of lightly boil it, or...?

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You could. Some people just add yolk.

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-You just want a slightly cooked egg, yeah?

-Yes, absolutely.

-OK. Just to, what, enrichen it?

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-Yeah. Fatten it up, richen it up.

-Mmm-hmm.

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-And it's a different technique to the mayonnaise.

-OK.

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And then that miso is just going to give it that little boost.

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-So hopefully...

-And what is miso?

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-Unless you've told these guys and I've missed it.

-Miso is fermented soy bean paste.

-Right.

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-It's often used for marinades.

-Uh-huh.

-..miso soups...

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-OK.

-..and this one here, as I said, it's just going to give it

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a little bit of a boost in, sort of, the background flavours there.

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OK. Nearly there.

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So, here we go.

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OK. So that's potato's kind of bounded, it's going to make it a bit sort of velvety

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-by the looks of it, as well, isn't it?

-Absolutely, absolutely. So I'm just going to spoon this into here.

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Mmm!

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-There's the aioli.

-And this is a dip? For the, to go with the, er...?

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-Yeah. Actually, at the restaurant, we serve this with lobster.

-Yeah.

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-The lobster we do on the grill. Very sort of similar flavours.

-Yeah.

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-And the idea is, you know, you've got that sort of richness of the prawn...

-Yeah.

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You've got that full flavour and, particularly with this one,

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we've got the really strong flavours of the dressing.

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-OK, so it's kind of like muting it slightly, is it?

-Yeah.

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Now, you've recently had a new baby, Nic, yeah?

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I have, I've got a little boy.

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-But in doing so, you sent your family off to Crewe...

-Yeah.

-..so they wouldn't wake you up.

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LAUGHTER

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-That's...that's very nice.

-Something along those lines!

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-Was your wife happy about that?

-Well, that's... I think she is!

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No, I mean, in the middle of opening a restaurant,

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as you know, it's really hectic times,

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so, you know, just to keep things as simple as possible

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and that, you know, it's not too dramatic I'm just...

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You might want to check that. You all right with that?

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-Yeah, I'm pretty good with that.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-Brilliant.

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Just going to add a squeeze of lemon in that.

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So all I'm going to do...

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-It looks amazing. Looks amazing.

-It smells amazing!

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-You can smell it, huh?

-Yeah!

-Mmm!

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I think it's going to be quite pokey, actually.

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-Here we go.

-Quite a lot of chilli went in there.

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And the black sesame seeds, is that for show or do they give...?

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-The black sesame is...

-Some kind of smoky...?

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-It just again brings in a little bit of aromats into the dish.

-Mmm.

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-And what I'm just squeezing on top there...

-Little bit of texture as well, huh?

-Yes.

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-This is a little bit of lemon balm.

-Mmm-hmm.

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So what you've got here is the wild tiger prawn

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with chilli yuzu dressing and white miso aioli.

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-Simple as that.

-Wow!

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Look at that. That looks stunning.

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-It's a real sort of...

-Wow!

-..real centrepiece.

-Whoa!

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We could do a few of those, lay them down the table.

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Unfortunately, you've all got to share one.

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-Wow!

-Wow!

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I've tried some in rehearsal, it was delicious, I have to say, so you guys carry on.

0:11:190:11:22

Absolutely, carry on.

0:11:220:11:24

-So, I mean, when you say you could use lobster or prawns...

-That's mine!

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LAUGHTER

0:11:270:11:29

..you're going to get a slightly different texture, aren't you?

0:11:290:11:31

Yeah. So, for this, if I was to use prawns,

0:11:310:11:34

I would use the same dressing, I would just get the small prawns.

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-Mmm.

-Just use them in the marinade...

-Wow!

-..and just barbecue them,

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-just as straight small prawns.

-Just skewer them and that's what you...?

0:11:390:11:42

What was the robata grill?

0:11:420:11:43

Robata grill is what we've got at the restaurant.

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-It's an open charcoal grill.

-Mmm-hmm.

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-Essentially, it's barbecue.

-Yeah.

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-But the good part about it is you're cooking on skewers.

-Mmm-hmm.

0:11:490:11:52

So you're not putting the fish in a pan or on the grill.

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-So you're getting a nice, clean, smoky taste.

-Exactly, and it's all...

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-Ooh!

-Good? Do you like that, Jayne?

0:11:580:11:59

-Is that your kind of...

-Really amazing.

-..nosh?

0:11:590:12:02

-That's the sort of food I would go to a restaurant for...

-Yeah.

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..because it's the sort of food

0:12:050:12:07

-that I wouldn't be confident enough to...

-No.

0:12:070:12:10

-..attempt at home...

-I mean, the ingredients, huh?

-..and it's just amazing.

0:12:100:12:13

-What about you?

-It's really delicious.

-That's a bit of a departure.

-Really delicious.

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High praise all round there for Nic and, I think you'll agree, I haven't aged a bit!

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Coming up, Chris Evans treats James Martin to breakfast,

0:12:240:12:27

but first Rick Stein is on the French coast sampling mussels.

0:12:270:12:31

This is Sharont, an absolute mecca for seafood lovers.

0:12:340:12:38

The mussels here are world famous.

0:12:380:12:40

These muddy kids are collecting tiny clams,

0:12:410:12:44

which they'll no doubt flog to the nearest restaurant.

0:12:440:12:48

I'm off collecting mussels with Jean-Paul Boutellier.

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To him, this is the centre of the universe.

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He describes his fishing grounds as a large wine glass,

0:12:540:12:58

filled to the brim with a perfect cocktail of seawater and fresh.

0:12:580:13:02

It was a shipwrecked Irish sailor, some 800 years ago,

0:13:030:13:07

who came up with the idea of growing the mussels on these bouchots.

0:13:070:13:12

All they have to do, it seems, as mother nature's been

0:13:120:13:14

so bountiful, is to devise a contraption that takes all

0:13:140:13:18

the strain out of harvesting,

0:13:180:13:20

but they've got a very special way of cooking them, too.

0:13:200:13:24

HE SPEAKS FRENCH

0:13:240:13:27

What he's saying is that they have to arrange the mussels that

0:13:270:13:30

way up because, when they open under the fire, they go open

0:13:300:13:34

like that, so the ash can't fall down in,

0:13:340:13:36

because they're open underneath.

0:13:360:13:38

He's just said that these are for special occasions,

0:13:380:13:42

festive occasions or big family occasions,

0:13:420:13:45

when you sit down and you eat your mussels,

0:13:450:13:47

and drink lots of nice Sharont...

0:13:470:13:50

white Sharont wine with it.

0:13:500:13:52

Sounds very good. Wouldn't mind joining in myself, actually!

0:13:520:13:55

HE SPEAKS FRENCH

0:13:550:13:58

It's really important to keep alive these traditions in this

0:14:030:14:06

age of fast food - a sentiment which I totally agree with.

0:14:060:14:10

-Sante!

-Sante!

0:14:120:14:14

I tried this once in Padstow, on the beach.

0:14:140:14:17

It's called an "eclade", but I made a right

0:14:170:14:19

pig's ear of it cos all the ash went into the mussels!

0:14:190:14:22

I was just thinking, this is a very handy little dish you could

0:14:260:14:29

do in somewhere like Bournemouth,

0:14:290:14:30

where there's plenty of pine trees and plenty of fresh moules around.

0:14:300:14:34

HE SPEAKS FRENCH

0:14:360:14:39

You can see they're starting to cook

0:14:410:14:43

cos there's all this liquid coming out from them.

0:14:430:14:46

HE SPEAKS FRENCH

0:14:460:14:48

Once the fire has died down, it's easy to waft away the ashes.

0:14:500:14:53

HE SPEAKS FRENCH

0:14:550:15:00

Oui.

0:15:000:15:01

Cos he's put them upside down,

0:15:010:15:03

there's no ashes on there at all, and here we go.

0:15:030:15:06

They're beautiful!

0:15:070:15:08

I thought, I have to say,

0:15:080:15:10

I thought there'd be a bit of a taste of Yellow Pages in there,

0:15:100:15:12

but, no, just the taste of that piny wood smoke.

0:15:120:15:16

Absolutely delicious and so simple!

0:15:160:15:18

No sauce there. And so easily done.

0:15:180:15:21

Can I have another? Un oeuf?

0:15:210:15:22

-VOICEOVER:

-"Un oeuf"? What am I talking about? I meant, "un autre".

0:15:220:15:26

When somebody shouts "Duck," it's a little confusing cos there's

0:15:390:15:41

lots of ducks on the canal, but that's not what they mean.

0:15:410:15:44

I'm told that many people have given up their houses for a life

0:15:500:15:53

on board a barge pootling up and down the canals of France,

0:15:530:15:57

and I'm beginning to understand why.

0:15:570:15:59

See you later.

0:15:590:16:00

I had to do the touristy bit.

0:16:060:16:08

I'd promised Bernard I'd go and see the abbey cloisters.

0:16:080:16:11

He said the were an important way point for the pilgrims on

0:16:110:16:14

their way down south to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.

0:16:140:16:18

But my main interest in coming to Moussac is a fruit that's

0:16:200:16:23

grown in the surrounding hills.

0:16:230:16:25

We're not far from Moussac

0:16:270:16:29

and that's where the best fruit in the whole of France comes from

0:16:290:16:32

and, to me, the best fruit are cherries.

0:16:320:16:34

I mean, just look at these branches here -

0:16:340:16:36

they're sort of groaning with the weight of fruit.

0:16:360:16:39

And over here we've got apricots,

0:16:390:16:41

and they're going to be ready in a couple of weeks or so.

0:16:410:16:44

Excuse me while I eat another cherry!

0:16:440:16:46

But down there...

0:16:460:16:48

..you see that strange tractor and contraption in the distance?

0:16:490:16:53

That is the most important crop n the area - kirsy melons -

0:16:530:16:57

and it's the first melons of the season.

0:16:570:17:00

And this is day one for all the Dussac family.

0:17:000:17:03

I had to use my special form of telepathy that would

0:17:030:17:06

prompt them to ask me if I'd like to taste one of these delicious,

0:17:060:17:10

sweet melons, and my answer would be, "Not half!"

0:17:100:17:14

-Lovely colour.

-Yeah.

-Wow! Look at that!

0:17:140:17:18

Let's try some, then.

0:17:190:17:21

Fantastic.

0:17:290:17:30

Mmm!

0:17:320:17:34

That's just the southwest of France in a bite.

0:17:360:17:39

It's sunshine, it's honey, honey, sweetness. Delicious!

0:17:410:17:45

Do you know? I think that's the best melon I've ever tasted.

0:17:450:17:49

Yeah.

0:17:490:17:51

Nicholas was just saying they've sort of hit the jackpot with

0:17:510:17:54

this particular crop

0:17:540:17:55

because all the other growers planted their melons about

0:17:550:17:59

two weeks earlier than they did, in March,

0:17:590:18:02

and unfortunately everybody else was hit by a frost.

0:18:020:18:06

So that, in fact, although they planted later, they're

0:18:060:18:09

the only ones around with a really good crop,

0:18:090:18:12

so they got top prices and just hit the jackpot!

0:18:120:18:15

Whoops!

0:18:160:18:17

Nothing beats a ripe melon picked early in the morning

0:18:170:18:20

in the field where it was grown,

0:18:200:18:22

but this is a really good way to serve melon at home.

0:18:220:18:25

Melons, I think, have had some pretty bad

0:18:250:18:28

luck in the past in the way they've been treated by us chefs.

0:18:280:18:31

We make those horrid chilled balls from them, covered in some

0:18:310:18:35

raspberry or kiwi fruit coulis.

0:18:350:18:38

Or they're more commonly had with the inevitable dried

0:18:380:18:41

piece of Parma ham.

0:18:410:18:43

I've had LOTS of those.

0:18:430:18:44

This is different.

0:18:440:18:46

It's melon with its sister, the cucumber,

0:18:460:18:49

and beautiful ripe tomatoes, all

0:18:490:18:51

sharing one large family-size plate,

0:18:510:18:54

with slices of fromage de chevre - goat's cheese.

0:18:540:18:58

I made this for a lunch party the other day,

0:18:580:19:01

intending it to be a starter. But after some good bread,

0:19:010:19:05

a chilled bottle of Chateau de Cazeneuve...

0:19:050:19:08

Mmm! ..and some more good cheese, it was quite enough.

0:19:080:19:12

So, sprinkle it with some coarsely chopped fresh garden mint,

0:19:120:19:15

and now for the dressing.

0:19:150:19:17

It's a standard dressing, made with olive oil, red wine vinegar,

0:19:170:19:21

a little sugar and some salt,

0:19:210:19:22

and that adds, along with the mint, a spike of sharpness.

0:19:220:19:25

Great stuff as always from Rick.

0:19:360:19:38

Now, normally at this point I would cook for our guests but,

0:19:380:19:41

as you heard, Chris is a bit useful at the hobs,

0:19:410:19:44

so you're going to be cooking for me.

0:19:440:19:45

-Well, you work so hard every Saturday morning...

-Not cooking, brilliant.

0:19:450:19:49

..and normally I'm at home and either Tash or I are doing what

0:19:490:19:51

we're going to do today. I'm going to cook you breakfast.

0:19:510:19:53

-We're going to have a posh breakfast for James Martin, how about that?

-There you go.

0:19:530:19:57

CHEERING

0:19:570:19:58

-He looks a bit posh today.

-I do. I look...

-You look pretty good.

0:19:580:20:00

-And to celebrate the new breakfast show, that's why we're doing it.

-Yes, exactly, yeah.

0:20:000:20:04

We'll dedicate this to Sir Terry, OK?

0:20:040:20:06

-So I'm not helping, are you just...?

-Oh, please help. Help away!

0:20:060:20:09

-Come on!

-I'll quite happily... No, you run through it.

0:20:090:20:11

All right. Well, what we're going to do first of all, we're going to do

0:20:110:20:14

this, the posh bacon, the nice bacon, the crispy bacon you get at those posh hotels.

0:20:140:20:17

How do you do that? Well, it's not difficult.

0:20:170:20:19

Couple of baking trays. Now, normally you'd blanch this, wouldn't you?

0:20:190:20:22

-You can blanch it.

-Tell us why you blanch it.

0:20:220:20:24

You can blanch it and dry it off, so it'll get it really, really

0:20:240:20:27

crisp, but this way is a way of doing it so you get it nice and crisp.

0:20:270:20:30

-Oh, all right. OK.

-And you get it nice and flat.

0:20:300:20:32

So what you do is you just place it on there.

0:20:320:20:34

There's no turning over the bacon, no need for a fork or anything.

0:20:340:20:36

-What's next?

-OK. We're going to have posh mushrooms next.

0:20:360:20:39

-You want me to cut the mushrooms up for you?

-OK, thanks.

0:20:390:20:41

-Thanks very much.

-Do you want to do these?

0:20:410:20:43

I'll do the big ones. These are oyster mushrooms.

0:20:430:20:45

The reason that this is going to be posh mushrooms

0:20:450:20:47

is basically cos of the standard of mushroom,

0:20:470:20:49

-but also we're going to fry them off in a bit of butter.

-Yeah.

0:20:490:20:51

-We're going to put some olive oil with the butter in the pan.

-Yeah.

0:20:510:20:54

And the reason we're going to do that is to stop the butter burning, yeah?

0:20:540:20:57

OK. Are you using a proper Ken Hom sort of chopper...?

0:20:570:21:00

Yeah, well, I chop at home with my cleaver cos it's got more

0:21:000:21:02

weight to it and I just find it a lot easier.

0:21:020:21:04

-I don't know why, it just sits in my hand better.

-All right. OK.

0:21:040:21:07

LAUGHTER

0:21:070:21:10

-Yeah.

-I just prefer to chop...to chop with me chopper.

-Right, go on, then.

-OK.

0:21:110:21:16

OK, I'm going to put some butter in here. Now, this is salted butter, I presume, which is why it might burn.

0:21:160:21:20

If you don't want it to burn, use unsalted butter.

0:21:200:21:22

-You going to get some oil...?

-Yeah, OK.

-So, olive oil, half and half.

0:21:220:21:25

OK. Now, they should be quite happy, shouldn't they, in there?

0:21:250:21:28

-Yep.

-Yeah. So we're just...

-So you've got brown cap, as well.

0:21:280:21:31

-Yep.

-Yeah.

-Got brown cap, as well, in there.

0:21:310:21:33

-Yeah.

-And we'll let those go.

0:21:330:21:34

Now, we'll put some lemon in there later, but we won't put it in now, will we, James?

0:21:340:21:38

-No, you put that in later.

-Can I do a toss?

-You can, you can fire away.

0:21:380:21:41

OK. All right. Let's see if we can do this.

0:21:410:21:43

ALL GROAN

0:21:430:21:44

Look at the... You've got loads of them all over the floor!

0:21:440:21:46

You don't need many mushrooms in this breakfast.

0:21:460:21:48

LAUGHTER

0:21:480:21:49

-OK, so that's...

-What's next?

-..the posh mushrooms.

0:21:490:21:52

We're going to put some herbs in with those later.

0:21:520:21:54

So you've got your posh breakfast - posh bacon, mushrooms.

0:21:540:21:56

-Now you need your toast.

-Posh, this is posh toast!

-OK.

-OK.

0:21:560:21:59

-Posh toast, we've got sour bread.

-Yeah.

-OK?

0:21:590:22:01

Tell us about sour bread, James.

0:22:010:22:03

Sourdough's made with a starter, what they call a starter,

0:22:030:22:05

which is yeast and water, and you've almost got like a liquid,

0:22:050:22:09

almost like a...batter, and then you start the mixture with that.

0:22:090:22:13

And you retain some of the mixture before it's baked in the

0:22:130:22:15

oven, and you use that to start the mixture the following day.

0:22:150:22:17

-And that's where you...

-See, he's good, isn't he, eh?

-He's very good.

0:22:170:22:20

None of that was in rehearsal, I tell you!

0:22:200:22:23

-OK, now when you're cutting bread...

-That was a bit wonky in rehearsal.

0:22:230:22:26

-That's straight now!

-When you're cutting bread, what's the secret?

-Get somebody else to do it.

0:22:260:22:30

Let the knife do the work! You put pressure on, it doesn't work. Oops!

0:22:300:22:32

-Do you want some oil on it?

-Yes, want some oil on there.

-Right.

-OK.

0:22:320:22:35

We're going to do posh toast, so we're griddling this in a griddle pan, aren't we?

0:22:350:22:39

-Yeah.

-That's the deal there.

-OK.

-So your olive oil one side...

0:22:390:22:41

-Yeah.

-..and then we'll turn it over later on as we, well, we can olive oil the other side now, but we'll

0:22:410:22:45

-turn it over...

-OK.

-..after about two or three minutes.

0:22:450:22:48

-Yup.

-OK. So, the mushrooms are happy.

0:22:480:22:50

-OK.

-So we've got oil?

-We've got the bacon in.

-Yeah.

0:22:500:22:53

-We've got our posh toast on.

-Eggs!

-Is that too hot?

0:22:530:22:56

-No, it's all right. I'll look after it, don't worry.

-OK.

0:22:560:22:59

James is in charge of the heat, as always.

0:22:590:23:01

-OK, now this is, this is posh eggs, OK?

-Yeah.

0:23:010:23:03

We're going to do a truffle egg. In this pasta jar is a truffle.

0:23:030:23:06

That's a truffle there.

0:23:060:23:08

-Now the truffles are about, what, £2,000 a kilo?

-About that, yeah.

0:23:080:23:11

-£2,000 cash a kilo.

-Cash.

0:23:110:23:13

-Yeah.

-Now the thing about truffles is they reduce by 20% every day.

0:23:130:23:17

-Yeah.

-OK? So if you buy these by the pound, you're losing value by 20%

0:23:170:23:21

every single day because they start to lose their moisture.

0:23:210:23:24

So we want to save as much truffle as we can.

0:23:240:23:26

So how do you get eggs to taste of truffle without using up your truffle?

0:23:260:23:30

Well, you just put them in the jar with the truffle

0:23:300:23:32

for two or three days because these are pervious, they're permeable.

0:23:320:23:36

-Yeah.

-They're porous!

-The shells are.

-Yes.

0:23:360:23:38

That's why you don't put eggs in the fridge.

0:23:380:23:40

Cos they'll taste of everything in there.

0:23:400:23:41

They'll taste of cheese and everything else.

0:23:410:23:43

OK. Now, this egg should, by rights,

0:23:430:23:45

this should taste of truffle, it's as simple as that.

0:23:450:23:47

Just now, just by being in that jar, so...

0:23:470:23:50

-We'll crack the egg.

-OK.

0:23:500:23:52

Posh way to make sure the yolks don't break is to actually

0:23:520:23:55

crack your egg into a dish.

0:23:550:23:57

-That's right, isn't it, James?

-Yeah.

0:23:570:23:59

-See, you should have written a cookbook, not an autobiography!

-OK.

0:23:590:24:02

-Cos then you can get lower to the pan, there.

-Do you want some oil in there?

-Yes, please.

0:24:020:24:05

You can get lower to the pan there

0:24:050:24:07

and you can just...

0:24:070:24:09

There you go, that's quite nice, isn't it? OK.

0:24:090:24:11

-Now, that's a very expensive egg.

-Yeah.

0:24:110:24:14

-That's like...loads and loads of money.

-And it's a duck egg, as well.

0:24:140:24:18

It's a duck egg, yeah. So how do you make a truffle egg on a pittance of a wage?

0:24:180:24:23

You take a normal egg - this is what you do.

0:24:230:24:25

You take a normal egg and you... Can you separate this for me? Cos you're better at it.

0:24:250:24:28

-No, I'll leave you to it, you're all right.

-Come on, please.

0:24:280:24:31

-No, I want to talk to you about your book.

-All right, OK.

-Tell me about your autobiography.

-OK.

0:24:310:24:35

Fascinating read, I have to say. I've read it.

0:24:350:24:37

Have you?

0:24:370:24:38

Yeah. It starts off when you were very young because you were an entrepreneur quite young,

0:24:380:24:42

weren't you? You were interested in loads of different jobs.

0:24:420:24:45

You sold fish, you had your own kissagram company.

0:24:450:24:48

-I was a private detective.

-Private detective!

0:24:480:24:50

20 jobs in, what, 40 years, er, four years?!

0:24:500:24:52

-Oh, more than that. I'd had 19 jobs by the time I was 19!

-Right.

0:24:520:24:55

It all happened, you know, I started to work after my dad passed

0:24:550:24:57

away, and my mum became superwoman cos she had to. She was amazing.

0:24:570:25:01

Cos that was a big turning point in your life.

0:25:010:25:03

-Yeah. My father passed away when I was 13, so I got a job as a paperboy.

-Yeah.

0:25:030:25:06

And somehow got to work in a radio station,

0:25:060:25:09

somehow cut to London, somehow got to work on the telly.

0:25:090:25:11

Somehow made a load of money and then messed it all up!

0:25:110:25:14

-LAUGHTER

-Genius, wasn't it?!

0:25:140:25:16

Then somehow bought... Cos it goes right up to the fact where you bought Virgin Radio.

0:25:160:25:19

-Yeah.

-That's when the book stops.

-That's when it stops, when I bought Virgin Radio.

0:25:190:25:23

-OK.

-OK, now, um...

-Right, come on, then.

0:25:230:25:24

OK, now, now, obviously we've not had this egg in with

0:25:240:25:27

the truffle, so we're going to put a bit of truffle in the white.

0:25:270:25:29

Then we're going to mix. The reason we've separated it is so we can mix the white around.

0:25:290:25:33

-OK?

-Yeah.

-Then we're going to reconstitute the yolk...

-Yeah.

0:25:330:25:36

..back to its original white, which I... I think this is quite nice. OK?

0:25:360:25:39

-Cos truffle oil's not very expensive, is it, really?

-No.

0:25:390:25:42

-Well, it's about, what, £9 a bottle for that?

-Er, yeah.

0:25:420:25:44

I mean, also you can put that with a little bit of olive oil

0:25:440:25:47

and it'll last even longer, so...

0:25:470:25:49

OK. So we're just going to put that in there now.

0:25:490:25:51

That's the home-made, poor man's truffle egg.

0:25:510:25:53

-Right.

-And hopefully they shouldn't taste too dissimilar.

0:25:530:25:55

Having used the brilliant, genius, non-cracking method to

0:25:550:25:58

actually pour the egg into the pan, we've cracked the yolk...

0:25:580:26:02

-I know!

-..which is not fantastic.

-It's all right. I'm doing that.

0:26:020:26:05

So tell us about radio then, you know. I mean, obviously

0:26:050:26:07

-it's known now you're going to be taking over the breakfast show.

-Yeah, from Terry Wogan.

0:26:070:26:12

-And when do you start that? When are you starting?

-We start that on January 11th.

-Yeah.

-OK?

0:26:120:26:15

Let's use the big plate, shall we?

0:26:150:26:17

-Yeah.

-Do you want to put that there? OK.

0:26:170:26:19

I've got two... Oh, you've got two dishes, haven't you?

0:26:190:26:21

-Oh, yes, we have.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:26:210:26:22

Now the great thing about Terry and his Togs...

0:26:220:26:24

-Yeah.

-..is that, what do you think the average age of a Tog is?

0:26:240:26:27

-I've got no idea.

-Well, have a guess. Terry's 71, you know.

-Er...

0:26:270:26:31

-50.

-53 is the answer.

-I wasn't far off!

-OK.

0:26:310:26:33

So that means they're all worried about, you know,

0:26:330:26:37

will I be too loud, will I be too quiet?

0:26:370:26:39

-Where have I gotta be?

-Yeah.

0:26:390:26:41

I don't know whether to be loud or quiet.

0:26:410:26:43

But if you're 51, right, that means

0:26:430:26:44

-that in 1977, when the Sex Pistols were at number one...

-Yeah.

0:26:440:26:48

..you were 19, so technically I could play punk and we'd be all right.

0:26:480:26:51

-Oh, OK. There you go.

-That's what I'm thinking.

0:26:510:26:53

-That's all right.

-What do you think?

-Sounds good to me.

0:26:530:26:55

-OK.

-So, herbs in there?

-Yeah, yeah. That's great.

-OK.

0:26:550:26:57

-Now you want put the lemon in?

-Er, yeah, put the lemon in.

0:26:570:27:00

-There you go.

-In with the mushrooms. That's great.

0:27:000:27:02

You know how to get more juice out of a lemon?

0:27:020:27:04

-Yeah, with a fork.

-Microwave.

0:27:040:27:06

-Oh, really?

-Yeah. Eight seconds.

0:27:060:27:08

-Yeah?

-Or with a fork.

0:27:080:27:09

-No. Literally, eight seconds and it warms up the lemon.

-OK.

0:27:090:27:12

Put it in for 18 seconds, you end up with a walnut, but...

0:27:120:27:14

-OK. That's good.

-There you go. Right, you got that?

-Yes.

-That's your, one egg.

0:27:140:27:18

-One egg, not great, I'm sorry. We've cracked the yolk there. Do apologise about that.

-OK.

0:27:180:27:21

-And then we've got on here our bacon.

-Yeah. Posh bacon.

0:27:210:27:24

-OK.

-Posh bacon.

0:27:240:27:26

That's what we did earlier. OK.

0:27:260:27:28

So this is the genuine truffle egg. This is the expensive one.

0:27:280:27:31

-OK?

-Yeah, I've got that one.

0:27:310:27:32

-All right.

-Let me get that one out for you.

-OK.

0:27:320:27:34

We've got that going on there. Shall we turn this up a bit?

0:27:360:27:39

So, come on, your autobiography, was it, the...?

0:27:390:27:42

When it was launched, it was called Mad Thursday, wasn't it?

0:27:420:27:44

Wasn't there 800 books launched on the same day?

0:27:440:27:46

-Super Thursday...

-Super Thursday, you're calling it?

-..yeah, it was called.

0:27:460:27:50

You've just finished your book tour, haven't you?

0:27:500:27:52

Yeah. Book tour was very interesting!

0:27:520:27:54

LAUGHTER

0:27:540:27:55

Yeah. Signing is interesting, isn't it? Because you have to go to this warehouse in Glasgow.

0:27:550:27:58

The central distribution place for all British books is in Glasgow,

0:27:580:28:01

which I find quite strange. Have you been to that warehouse?

0:28:010:28:04

I haven't, but there's one in Northampton, isn't there?

0:28:040:28:06

Oh, they took me to the one in Glasgow,

0:28:060:28:08

-where I met a very nice lady called Marie...

-Yeah.

0:28:080:28:10

..and she described all the different way people sign.

0:28:100:28:13

-Gordon Ramsay does the pile method.

-Right.

0:28:130:28:15

He piles books on top of each other, signs them

0:28:150:28:17

and throws them, and they have to have three catchers.

0:28:170:28:19

LAUGHTER

0:28:190:28:20

Typical Ramsay, isn't it? What's that about? You don't need to do that, do you? Er, Alan Wicker...

0:28:200:28:24

-Yeah.

-..has a blotter cos he signs with an ink pen,

0:28:240:28:27

and after every book that's signed...

0:28:270:28:29

-Somebody goes round and..?

-..blots it.

0:28:290:28:31

-That takes a while.

-OK.

-Yeah.

0:28:310:28:33

Yeah.

0:28:330:28:34

Talking about blotting, don't you have a little tip with this tissue?

0:28:340:28:38

-What?

-Go on, then.

-It's not a tip, it's just a waterproof tissue to

0:28:380:28:41

-liven things up.

-Go on, then.

0:28:410:28:42

Do you want me to put the egg...?

0:28:420:28:44

-So this is the truffle scrambled egg.

-OK. Truffle egg.

0:28:440:28:46

Oh, sorry. We did this on the telly last night,

0:28:460:28:48

and a lot of people saw it and said can we do it again this morning.

0:28:480:28:51

-OK?

-Go on, then.

-Basically, this is a waterproof tissue.

0:28:510:28:53

-You ready for this?

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:28:530:28:54

Let me see. Get another one. OK.

0:28:540:28:57

-Don't worry, we're only three minutes over!

-Hang on a second.

0:28:570:28:59

-It's worth it.

-Yeah, go on.

0:28:590:29:01

OK. Is that a genuine tissue?

0:29:010:29:03

-Genuine tissue, yeah.

-OK.

0:29:030:29:04

-Hold it out above that water, above that bowl. Are you ready?

-Yeah.

0:29:040:29:06

LAUGHTER

0:29:080:29:10

Right. That tissue's waterproof but my shoe's not!

0:29:100:29:12

-Look, look!

-It is waterproof.

-OK, let's do, well, what about this?

0:29:120:29:16

Surely it can't come out there dry, can it?

0:29:160:29:19

-Go on, shake it.

-Wow! Ah!

-How good is that?!

0:29:190:29:22

-Very good, very, very good.

-Yeah.

-Right...

0:29:220:29:24

-How good is the breakfast? That's the important thing.

-Come on over here.

0:29:240:29:27

-There you go.

-That's great!

0:29:270:29:28

-By the way, it's like an ice rink back here now!

-It is!

0:29:280:29:31

-Come on over here.

-Just so you know.

-There you go.

0:29:310:29:33

So, the broken one - I broke it on purpose so we'd know which was the truffle egg.

0:29:330:29:36

-Yeah.

-Smells good.

-That was very clever.

0:29:360:29:38

Got a little bit of lemon juice in the mushrooms.

0:29:380:29:40

True test is whether these boys like it.

0:29:400:29:42

-Mmm!

-Approve?

-Yeah. It's good.

-Can you taste the truffle?

0:29:450:29:47

Does it work, the cheap truffle egg?

0:29:470:29:50

Cheap truffle egg works.

0:29:500:29:51

-There you go, he likes it.

-You've got the real one.

0:29:510:29:53

-I think it's quite faint.

-Quite faint?

-Yeah.

-So just,

0:29:550:29:58

just get more truffle oil.

0:29:580:29:59

Danny's got the real one, so we need to put more truffle oil in.

0:29:590:30:02

Who doesn't love a good fry-up, though, eh?

0:30:050:30:08

There's still plenty more to come on today's Best Bites,

0:30:080:30:11

but now it's over to Andrew Turner,

0:30:110:30:13

who's making fried egg on toast like you've never seen before.

0:30:130:30:16

It's the brilliant Andrew Turner.

0:30:170:30:19

I've been wanting to get you on the show for ages.

0:30:190:30:21

-You're here!

-I'm so excited to be here.

-You're here with two trays

0:30:210:30:24

-and not much pans.

-No.

-So what are we cooking or inventing or making?

0:30:240:30:28

We are making a liquid mango egg on a Gypsy bread. We are using brioche.

0:30:280:30:33

-Yes.

-I'll explain the processes but there's no real cooking,

0:30:330:30:36

not really that much cooking involved. So, firstly...

0:30:360:30:38

So it's going to look like an egg?

0:30:380:30:40

-It's going to look exactly like a poached egg.

-Right.

0:30:400:30:42

If you could take this, which is the mango, and just peel it.

0:30:420:30:45

We're going to make the puree and we're going to add

0:30:450:30:48

our calcium to it, which is called gluco,

0:30:480:30:50

which is readily available online.

0:30:500:30:53

The reason we're doing that will be explained

0:30:530:30:55

when it's a reaction against the water bath, which is an alginate.

0:30:550:30:58

-Which is what?

-Which is what I'll explain.

0:30:580:31:00

-The main thing is that you're not adding sugar to this?

-No.

0:31:000:31:03

We want the natural sweetness, really naturally sweet

0:31:030:31:05

cos with the wine, once you start adding too many sugars,

0:31:050:31:08

it interferes with the wine and it doesn't work.

0:31:080:31:10

-OK.

-Just literally pop that in.

-So this is our mango.

0:31:100:31:13

-Just one mango is going to go in?

-One mango, yup.

-Right, there you go.

0:31:130:31:16

-OK, we'll put our gluco in.

-And that, you can get online?

0:31:160:31:19

You can get it online.

0:31:190:31:21

I don't quite know how that works. You're the expert on that.

0:31:210:31:23

-There you go.

-Blend that up.

0:31:230:31:25

Now, the important thing about this is... We'll probably add a bit of water, just to get the puree.

0:31:250:31:29

The important thing about this is we're going to do that

0:31:290:31:32

-the day before and just pop it in the fridge.

-Yeah.

0:31:320:31:34

We need to lose the air out of this.

0:31:340:31:37

-So, you're adding air now?

-Yeah.

0:31:370:31:39

This is the sort of thing that's great for dinner parties

0:31:390:31:41

cos you're doing your preparation in advance, really. So, the gluco's in.

0:31:410:31:45

The puree's done. We're going to pop that into a bowl

0:31:450:31:48

and whack it into the fridge and leave it overnight.

0:31:480:31:50

-Which we have here.

-The finished result.

-There you go.

0:31:500:31:53

I think the next step we're going to explain is the seaweed water bath,

0:31:530:31:57

-the alginate.

-Can I get this on first of all?

-Yeah. OK.

0:31:570:32:00

-This is for the pain perdu, isn't it?

-The pain perdu, yes.

0:32:000:32:03

-Explain to us what we've got in here.

-OK, so, we've got some brown sugar,

0:32:030:32:06

we've got some cream. If we just warm the cream up,

0:32:060:32:09

-put the butter in.

-It can go in that one, it's fine.

0:32:090:32:13

OK, we've got some cinnamon for flavouring.

0:32:130:32:15

-We've got some star anise.

-Yup.

-Some cloves.

0:32:150:32:18

In we go with the butter and you're going to put the sugar in there.

0:32:180:32:21

And just let that all melt and then you take the eggs, whisk those up,

0:32:210:32:25

-take a slice of the brioche, as well...

-And then you soak that?

0:32:250:32:29

..and soak that again. All being soaked overnight.

0:32:290:32:31

So, the whole point is that it's preparation in advance.

0:32:310:32:34

You're making sure that all the aromats go into the brioche

0:32:340:32:37

cos that's the part of the dish.

0:32:370:32:38

The egg that we're going to make is only the vehicle for the sauce.

0:32:380:32:41

-That's all it is.

-Now, although you're doing this and it's scientific,

0:32:410:32:45

-this isn't the majority of your cooking, is it?

-None of it.

0:32:450:32:47

This is one part of a dish that we do for seven courses.

0:32:470:32:50

I know a few tricks. I work very closely with my staff.

0:32:500:32:54

They're all geniuses in their own right

0:32:540:32:56

and we jam together with music, we jam together with food

0:32:560:32:59

and we create stuff, but it has to be realistic.

0:32:590:33:02

You have to understand the flavours.

0:33:020:33:03

You have to understand the reason we're doing it.

0:33:030:33:05

-The reason we're doing it is, the brioche is the dish.

-OK.

0:33:050:33:08

The sauce is the little egg. That's the twist.

0:33:080:33:10

That's what makes you a little bit different.

0:33:100:33:13

So, we've got the brioche here. I'm going to slice this.

0:33:130:33:15

This is then cut through with a little cutter.

0:33:150:33:17

I'm going to stick it in there.

0:33:170:33:19

Over to you for this next bit.

0:33:190:33:21

OK, back to the seaweed.

0:33:210:33:22

So, the alginate, again, it's in a food processor with bottled water.

0:33:220:33:26

The importance of the bottled water is there's not so much calcium

0:33:260:33:29

in it. If you get it from tap water - calcium, too much.

0:33:290:33:32

-Now, alginate is from seaweed?

-It's a seaweed paste.

0:33:320:33:35

Again, available online.

0:33:350:33:37

And literally you puree...

0:33:370:33:39

Sorry, blend the water, you add your alginate, keep blending and blending

0:33:390:33:43

for a good five minutes and then put it into the fridge cold.

0:33:430:33:47

-There's no cooking process in that at all.

-Always bottled water.

0:33:470:33:50

Always bottled water. You get this consistency.

0:33:500:33:52

-It's like thinned down shampoo, basically.

-Right, OK.

0:33:520:33:56

So, it thickens it up a little bit?

0:33:560:33:58

It thickens. It's a little bit gloopy, a bit syrupy.

0:33:580:34:00

Can I say, just so you see this, this is where we take this and then

0:34:000:34:03

pop these in the fridge, and then these want to be overnight you say?

0:34:030:34:06

Overnight. Again, all of this preparation can be done in advance.

0:34:060:34:09

You can actually make the eggs four or five hours before

0:34:090:34:12

you need them, so for a dinner party.

0:34:120:34:14

-And then I'm going to pan-fry this.

-Just pan-fry that.

0:34:140:34:16

Now, masterclass in this. This is where it all happens.

0:34:160:34:19

This is where we get jiggy, so to speak.

0:34:190:34:22

Here's my little measure and here's our mango puree.

0:34:240:34:28

I take a scoop of this,

0:34:280:34:30

drain off any excess

0:34:300:34:33

and literally, as you watch, just tip that in,

0:34:330:34:37

and in she goes.

0:34:370:34:38

Take a slotted spoon cos once it sinks to the bottom,

0:34:380:34:41

if you don't just lift it off the bottom, it will stick to it.

0:34:410:34:44

Now, if I was to leave that in there completely,

0:34:440:34:47

it would actually go thick all the way through.

0:34:470:34:49

The idea is, we want it to remain liquid.

0:34:490:34:51

So what is it doing to the actual...?

0:34:510:34:53

Well, it's reacting...

0:34:530:34:55

The alginate bath is reacting against the calcium

0:34:550:34:58

and just forming a gel. My sister is a scientist

0:34:580:35:00

and her only way of explaining this is it's the way that we form a gel.

0:35:000:35:03

So I asked her more about that and she couldn't explain it to me.

0:35:030:35:06

A little film all the way round it. If we left it in there...

0:35:060:35:09

-It would go solid.

-Solid? OK.

0:35:090:35:10

So the important thing, with the slotted spoon,

0:35:100:35:12

drain off the alginate. You don't want that cos that will react

0:35:120:35:15

into the water and form little lumps of jelly.

0:35:150:35:18

-You don't want to that, really.

-So that's the egg yolk?

0:35:180:35:21

That's the egg yolk. Into the water like so.

0:35:210:35:24

Again, you don't leave that for long.

0:35:250:35:27

-You don't need to leave it for long.

-Are you following this, Phil?

0:35:270:35:30

-No.

-THEY LAUGH

0:35:300:35:32

-It's ever so easy.

-There's a questionnaire afterwards.

-Oh, yeah!

0:35:320:35:35

I'll be knocking half a dozen up when I get home.

0:35:350:35:37

I've got a really good English yoghurt and literally...

0:35:370:35:42

just mix it together. OK?

0:35:420:35:44

-So, we've got the yolk in there.

-Yep.

-Now for the white.

-Yep.

0:35:440:35:47

I'll just move that forward.

0:35:470:35:48

All I've done is just pan-fry a little bit of this pain perdu,

0:35:480:35:52

literally just some butter, something like that, on both sides.

0:35:520:35:55

Right, next.

0:35:550:35:56

So out comes the yolk and it's going to go into the yoghurt.

0:35:560:36:01

-Pop it in.

-It looks like an egg.

0:36:010:36:03

You can have a little bit of excess. Just cover over the egg.

0:36:030:36:06

Now of course yoghurt has calcium in it.

0:36:060:36:07

Yeah, so you don't need to add any gluco.

0:36:070:36:10

-That's why it's a natural process.

-Yep.

0:36:100:36:12

OK. Take off any extra

0:36:120:36:15

and then in...exactly the same way.

0:36:150:36:18

Make sure that that doesn't...

0:36:190:36:21

If you've got a dinner party tonight and you've got 150 coming,

0:36:210:36:24

you might be here a long time.

0:36:240:36:25

-Once you've got it all set up, it's quite quick.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:36:250:36:28

So, they're nearly ready.

0:36:280:36:30

And the secret is - you need to put it in the water afterwards, yeah?

0:36:320:36:35

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:36:350:36:36

So out we come. Out it comes.

0:36:360:36:39

-THEY LAUGH

-Look at it!

-Look at that!

0:36:390:36:41

Drain off the alginate.

0:36:410:36:43

You're definitely coming back on this show. That is wicked. Look at that.

0:36:430:36:46

And then into the water, just to get rid of that alginate.

0:36:460:36:50

It genuinely looks like a poached egg. Look at it!

0:36:500:36:52

This is the spooky thing.

0:36:520:36:54

I've actually had this sent back by a customer.

0:36:540:36:56

A new waiter, didn't know really what the dish was,

0:36:560:36:58

put it down and the guy goes,

0:36:580:37:00

"Excuse me, I don't eat poached eggs."

0:37:000:37:02

I had to go back out and explain to the guest what it actually was

0:37:020:37:05

-cos he actually thought it was a poached egg.

-Fantastic.

0:37:050:37:07

But you were saying you do a thing with olive, as well?

0:37:070:37:10

Yeah, you can do it with olive fat.

0:37:100:37:12

Again, it's a friend of mine, Jimmy, who worked with elBulli.

0:37:120:37:15

When we jam, he brought some stuff to the table, how they do stuff

0:37:150:37:18

and then we started to take that

0:37:180:37:20

and use it for ourselves to make your own style of cuisine.

0:37:200:37:24

He's a genius, I'm not, and for that reason...

0:37:240:37:26

You're looking pretty good so far, but go on then.

0:37:260:37:28

This is the little bit of pain perdu in here.

0:37:280:37:30

-Right, so there's our pain perdu.

-On a plate that you helped make.

0:37:300:37:33

I did, yeah. We've got some designers in North London,

0:37:330:37:36

English designers, and they will create a plate

0:37:360:37:38

for you around a dish.

0:37:380:37:40

-Go on, then.

-And this is probably number four or five.

0:37:400:37:42

So, literally across the plate...

0:37:420:37:45

nice and simple.

0:37:450:37:46

-A little bit of that.

-A little bit of that. I've lost my spoon.

0:37:460:37:49

-There's my slotted spoon.

-There you go.

-Out it comes.

0:37:490:37:52

But you could leave that and you could make these in advance?

0:37:520:37:55

You could take this out now, put it on a tray,

0:37:550:37:57

-put it in the fridge and it's all done.

-Brilliant.

0:37:570:38:00

Now this is great. I love this bit.

0:38:000:38:02

So we put it on our little toast...

0:38:020:38:05

..and it gets even more spooky because, as you see it now...

0:38:070:38:10

This is the best bit.

0:38:100:38:11

..I can actually scrape the top of it to reveal the yolk.

0:38:110:38:14

-And then, just to be a little bit different...

-This is brilliant.

0:38:160:38:19

We've got some crackling popping candy, like you'd have at home.

0:38:190:38:23

I don't have it at home but if you're at school.

0:38:230:38:25

This is the stuff you used to put in your mouth

0:38:250:38:27

and it used to crackle. This is the stuff.

0:38:270:38:29

Pop it on top and there you have a liquid mango egg with pain perdu.

0:38:290:38:34

How brilliant is that? APPLAUSE

0:38:340:38:37

-Thank you.

-Fantastic.

0:38:370:38:38

Absolutely brilliant. Now, you get to taste this.

0:38:420:38:46

We have got some more over here. Have a seat over here.

0:38:460:38:49

We've got one each over here because it's quite small,

0:38:490:38:52

but I want you to experience this.

0:38:520:38:54

So take your egg and dive in,

0:38:540:38:55

and tell us what you think.

0:38:550:38:57

Do it with a spoon. It's just as though you were eating an egg.

0:38:570:38:59

That's the weird thing.

0:38:590:39:01

-It just oozes out.

-It's egg on toast, so use a knife and fork.

0:39:010:39:03

-Dive into that.

-Can you make some bacon out of a pear?

0:39:030:39:06

THEY LAUGH

0:39:060:39:08

-Crack that yolk.

-Right, yeah.

0:39:080:39:11

Shut up!

0:39:110:39:13

HE LAUGHS LOUDLY

0:39:130:39:15

-But amazing. It tricks with your mind, as well.

-Absolutely.

0:39:150:39:18

-It's all poppy.

-PHIL GIGGLES

0:39:180:39:21

-Isn't that incredible?

-But the brioche is the dish,

0:39:210:39:24

-that's the food.

-That is the most amazing thing.

0:39:240:39:27

-It's delicious.

-Oh, wow.

-Fabulous.

0:39:270:39:29

A brilliant dish from Andrew that certainly brought out

0:39:330:39:36

Phil's inner child, I reckon.

0:39:360:39:38

Next up, Keith Floyd's exploring the UK, starting in Northumbria.

0:39:380:39:43

# The fells are alive

0:39:430:39:46

# With the sound of curlews. #

0:39:460:39:51

This is absurd, isn't it?

0:39:510:39:53

Just so you can get what the director called

0:39:530:39:56

"a sense of place", I have to stand here on this blasted heath

0:39:560:40:00

on these Northumberland fells so you can see the beautiful view,

0:40:000:40:03

when all I've got to do is, "Quite simply, love," he says,

0:40:030:40:06

cook up a little something with a Roman influence,

0:40:060:40:08

you know, to impress the visiting professor of Roman archaeology,

0:40:080:40:11

Hadrian's Wall, gastronomy, and Northumberland history.

0:40:110:40:14

Very simple, isn't it? And that lot, you,

0:40:140:40:17

are all standing there on your little tripods under umbrellas.

0:40:170:40:20

Just dismantle the whole lot. Dismantle the whole lot.

0:40:200:40:22

Come here and pay some attention to me!

0:40:220:40:25

Thank you very much indeed.

0:40:250:40:26

Now then, the real purpose of this little culinary exercise is to,

0:40:260:40:31

as I say, interpret what the Romans might have eaten, what, 2,000...?

0:40:310:40:35

I don't know, how many thousand years ago?

0:40:350:40:36

..several thousand years ago,

0:40:360:40:38

when they were building this wonderful wall.

0:40:380:40:40

I reckon they'd have eaten quite a lot of pig,

0:40:400:40:43

so I've got a piece of pig here,

0:40:430:40:44

which I'm going to cut up into little cubes.

0:40:440:40:47

Now, I want you to really believe and understand.

0:40:470:40:50

I don't complain as a rule,

0:40:500:40:51

but it is very cold, it is raining, I have got a temperature.

0:40:510:40:54

Richard might have to wipe his lens often, empty his mind

0:40:540:40:57

from time to time, cos the rain is coming down.

0:40:570:40:59

So, I've got pieces of pork, I've got bits of carrot,

0:40:590:41:04

I reckon the Romans had...sorry about all this, but this is, you know,

0:41:040:41:07

this is real-life stuff.

0:41:070:41:08

Richard, I'm...I'm actually trying... This is my programme, please.

0:41:080:41:11

I mean, they all know what a carrot looks like. OK?

0:41:110:41:14

I am chopping carrots and onions.

0:41:140:41:16

You don't need to look, they know what an onion is.

0:41:160:41:18

In this appalling weather, trying to make this sort of Roman-type meal,

0:41:180:41:22

so I won't do all those together.

0:41:220:41:24

I've got to chop up some garlic

0:41:240:41:25

because it was the Romans, after all, who brought...oh, dear...

0:41:250:41:29

who brought garlic to this place.

0:41:290:41:30

I've got all those things together.

0:41:300:41:32

I need some parsley because they were great green herb users,

0:41:320:41:36

the Romans.

0:41:360:41:38

And also, of course,

0:41:380:41:40

what all history and all wars have always been about have been spices

0:41:400:41:43

and things. Even in Grecian, Roman times, they were squabbling over it.

0:41:430:41:46

Well, they squabbled over these, cumin seeds, ginger,

0:41:460:41:49

marjoram, thyme, dill and stuff like that

0:41:490:41:52

is a typical selection of Roman herbs.

0:41:520:41:54

I mean, they had more herbs than Sainsbury's, I can tell you.

0:41:540:41:56

Anyway, that goes into my pot like that

0:41:560:41:59

because you've got to remember, like me,

0:41:590:42:01

these guys were stuck out here, you know,

0:42:010:42:03

nothing on the clock but the maker's name.

0:42:030:42:05

And if they didn't pickle, preserve or spice their meat,

0:42:050:42:08

it was...like this could be...it could be pretty terrible.

0:42:080:42:10

Anyway, they also had wine, so they whacked a load of wine into

0:42:100:42:13

their pot with these herbs, OK, and spices?

0:42:130:42:17

That's what they did and, being Roman soldiers,

0:42:170:42:20

before those little signs that are now along the Hadrian's Wall

0:42:200:42:23

and the Appian Way and all that saying, "Please keep Britain tidy,"

0:42:230:42:26

they probably tossed the bottles into the hedge.

0:42:260:42:28

In we put our meat, carrots, onions and stuff like that

0:42:280:42:33

and we let that marinate now for about 24 hours -

0:42:330:42:37

for about as long as it will take you to do

0:42:370:42:40

the first 700km on a decathlon.

0:42:400:42:43

But let me tell you about something else.

0:42:430:42:46

In fact, I won't tell you about this.

0:42:460:42:48

This was the centurion's Worcester sauce.

0:42:480:42:51

This was the centurion's soy sauce, walk along the wall

0:42:510:42:54

and I'll tell you what it is and why I've got it.

0:42:540:42:57

Emperor Hadrian was a Spanish chap who got the idea to build the

0:43:000:43:04

wall from...the Chinese, of course.

0:43:040:43:06

It's a desolate spot,

0:43:060:43:08

but you can easily imagine the legionnaires wrapped in their Armani

0:43:080:43:11

togas under the menacing Northumbrian sky,

0:43:110:43:13

munching on roasted dormice stuffed with minced pork and pine cones.

0:43:130:43:18

Yum, yum...I think.

0:43:180:43:19

But Northumbria, and here we go for complaints from the other regions,

0:43:190:43:23

must be the most unspoilt and beautiful part of Britain.

0:43:230:43:26

And this is the home of St Cuthbert and a fine glass of mead.

0:43:270:43:31

Here endeth the first travelogue.

0:43:310:43:33

That took me seconds to research, fascinating, interesting, isn't it?

0:43:390:43:42

But back to the liquid.

0:43:420:43:44

This is the centurion's Daddy's ketchup, tomato sauce,

0:43:440:43:47

call it what you will.

0:43:470:43:48

He wouldn't have eaten anything without it

0:43:480:43:50

because basically his food wasn't too good but, do you know?

0:43:500:43:53

I made this. I knew I was coming up here

0:43:530:43:55

and I make this about three weeks ago. I've had it marinating,

0:43:550:43:58

I've had it...macerating is the word ever since.

0:43:580:44:00

It is anchovies, it's sprats, it's marjoram, it's red wine

0:44:000:44:04

and it's salt. It's all boiled up,

0:44:040:44:07

left to ferment for three or four weeks and strained,

0:44:070:44:10

and there you have it. The Centurion sauce.

0:44:100:44:12

In fact, we ought to brand it, Floyd's Centurion Sauce,

0:44:120:44:16

it could be a big hit.

0:44:160:44:17

Anyway, you do tend to drop a bit of that into your pork marinade. OK?

0:44:170:44:23

And also because they didn't have sugar in those days,

0:44:230:44:26

and this was a bit tangy and a bit pongy,

0:44:260:44:28

they used to put in a teaspoonful or two of honey.

0:44:280:44:31

That's why honey people are called apiarists.

0:44:310:44:34

I think, if I've got my words right, it's a Latin word too, isn't it?

0:44:340:44:38

Anyway, there it all is. Richard, close-up on that.

0:44:380:44:40

You can feel it, you can smell it.

0:44:400:44:42

There's the marinade, there's the pork, the onions, the herbs,

0:44:420:44:44

the spices and stuff, it's been in there for about 24 hours.

0:44:440:44:48

Now it has to go, wander round here, however you do it.

0:44:480:44:51

It has to go into my typical...on wood mark four,

0:44:510:44:55

or at home gas mark six,

0:44:550:44:56

but wood mark four it goes into there...

0:44:560:44:59

SIZZLING

0:44:590:45:02

Four.

0:45:020:45:04

Put the lid on - Richard, I'm talking to you -

0:45:040:45:08

for about 45 minutes.

0:45:080:45:10

Richard, you wipe your lens,

0:45:110:45:12

I'll blow my nose and that was a bit too hot.

0:45:120:45:14

I know I said gas mark four, I can barely see through the smoke

0:45:140:45:17

and the heat here but I have got this guy coming to do it.

0:45:170:45:19

I can't do that again, so we've got to live with it. OK?

0:45:190:45:22

Now, listen...

0:45:220:45:24

HE COUGHS

0:45:240:45:25

Oh, dear, it is ridiculous.

0:45:250:45:27

I made a little joke about the Roman soldiers throwing their bottles

0:45:270:45:30

away, but don't be a prat, don't listen to me.

0:45:300:45:32

Please don't throw your bottles into the hedges.

0:45:320:45:34

OK? OK, Richard, back on the pot.

0:45:340:45:37

We're not proud on this programme...

0:45:370:45:38

if we need an expert on, say, the Romans, then the director, sparing

0:45:380:45:42

no thought for himself, goes straight to the nearest pub and finds one.

0:45:420:45:45

Hence, Donald McFarlane.

0:45:450:45:46

Donald, what did the Romans, I mean, you know, I feel

0:45:460:45:49

a bit like John Cleese here, what did the Romans do for us?

0:45:490:45:52

I mean, what did they do when they were here?

0:45:520:45:54

OK. I think the first thing is...

0:45:540:45:56

Can you imagine the culture shock to the locals? I mean, look around you.

0:45:560:46:01

The locals, the Briganti, the Votadini, the Selgovae,

0:46:010:46:05

would live on the tops of these hills.

0:46:050:46:08

-These are people or birds?

-People in this instance, yes, that's right.

0:46:080:46:13

And, um, their quite primitive lifestyle would probably...they'd

0:46:130:46:18

roast an ox and everyone would partake of that.

0:46:180:46:21

What you had when the Romans arrived is a very highly civilised nation,

0:46:210:46:26

even by our standards.

0:46:260:46:28

They introduced a disciplined system of society

0:46:280:46:31

and, along with that, which is the reason why we're here,

0:46:310:46:35

is they introduced foods, commodities which the locals didn't

0:46:350:46:39

have at all, like turnip, like cabbage, like lettuce, like herbs.

0:46:390:46:43

Name a herb, the Romans will have brought it here as spice.

0:46:430:46:46

You're telling me the British cabbage was invented by some centurions?

0:46:460:46:49

-It was brought by the Romans, yes.

-That's outrageous.

0:46:490:46:51

But I tell you what, Donald, if I don't serve this, you know,

0:46:510:46:54

using of course the standard issue imperial Roman utensils,

0:46:540:46:57

it's going to be cooked to a frazzle. There you go. Listen...

0:46:570:47:00

We had all the Romans, we had all them,

0:47:000:47:02

-but what other influences have sort of stormed onto Northumberland?

-Yes.

0:47:020:47:06

Well, following the Roman withdrawal from Britain, the Anglo-Saxons

0:47:060:47:11

came into the ascendancy for again about another 400 years.

0:47:110:47:15

So, as a Roman historian, you are clearly second to none

0:47:150:47:19

-but what do you think of my dish?

-I think it's interesting.

0:47:190:47:23

I think you probably recaptured... the flavour...

0:47:230:47:27

HE LAUGHS

0:47:270:47:28

..of yesteryear quite well.

0:47:280:47:31

If I saw one of those posters in Rome that said

0:47:310:47:34

"Caesar needs you" and this was the kind of food

0:47:340:47:36

you got when you joined up, there's no way I'd go!

0:47:360:47:38

Well, I think we've got to ask the question, "Why did they withdraw?"

0:47:380:47:42

LAUGHTER

0:47:420:47:46

If my director had his way, this shot would last half an hour.

0:47:520:47:55

He loves Newcastle and thinks it the finest city in the world.

0:47:550:47:58

Joking apart though, we are very lucky chaps.

0:47:580:48:01

We asked the Newcastle College Of Science And Technology

0:48:010:48:03

to present us with a taste, just a taste,

0:48:030:48:06

of the northeast and, with typical generosity, this lot gave up

0:48:060:48:09

a day to create an edible tableau.

0:48:090:48:11

Fresh salmon from Berwick-upon-Tweed.

0:48:110:48:13

An unusual dish, loppy dog, which has cheviot lamb

0:48:130:48:16

and vegetables cooked in Newcastle Brown Ale,

0:48:160:48:19

affectionately known as Journey Into Space or Electric Soup.

0:48:190:48:22

A soup even more nutritious than Popeye's spinach, the director says.

0:48:220:48:26

Craster kippers, probably the finest kippers in the universe,

0:48:260:48:30

ho-ho, were baked with some cranberries and rosemary.

0:48:300:48:33

A fillet of pork in flaky pastry.

0:48:330:48:35

My eyes were opened and my mouth watered but I'll let the boss,

0:48:350:48:39

James Walling, talk you through the rest.

0:48:390:48:41

Well, what we've got here... A traditional jugged hare.

0:48:410:48:46

Potted celery. We've got leek and onion stuffing.

0:48:460:48:50

We've got parsnips here.

0:48:500:48:52

We've got roast pheasant with an oatmeal crust, which is cracked

0:48:520:48:56

in front of the customer to release the wonderful odours and flavours.

0:48:560:49:00

-What is this? What is this?

-This is a traditional northeastern dish...

0:49:000:49:03

A leek pudding... Suet pastry, leeks inside,

0:49:030:49:07

a little bit of ham running through the centre of it as well to

0:49:070:49:10

give an extra bit of flavour to it.

0:49:100:49:12

I been up here in the northeast, which I love,

0:49:120:49:15

now for five days to make this programme.

0:49:150:49:18

I've been into 128 pubs, 94 discotheques, 18 restaurants,

0:49:180:49:22

47 hotels and I haven't seen one of those on anybody's menu anywhere.

0:49:220:49:28

Well, I'm amazed.

0:49:280:49:30

It should be on every menu in the northeast really

0:49:300:49:32

because it is a very traditional northeastern dish.

0:49:320:49:36

But I mean, truly it is very old, it's very solid, very robust

0:49:360:49:41

and the type of thing that I think chefs in this

0:49:410:49:44

part of the country at any rate are trying to get back to.

0:49:440:49:46

And so they should, it's absolutely superb.

0:49:460:49:48

Now, this looks rather splendid.

0:49:480:49:51

-This is what?

-That's a wonderful north-eastern dish, a pan haggerty.

0:49:510:49:55

Sliced potatoes, sliced onions,

0:49:550:49:58

a little bit of grated cheese and just baked in

0:49:580:50:01

the bottom of the oven. A very sort of, uh, staple dish

0:50:010:50:04

of any north-eastern menu. And wonderful flavour!

0:50:040:50:08

# Dum...dum...dum...

0:50:170:50:21

# Dumble dumble dum...dum... #

0:50:210:50:27

This music is incredible! Rock on, Robert! But, you know, duty calls and it's back to the commentary.

0:50:270:50:32

So here we are, then, on the good ship Radiant Way,

0:50:320:50:35

putting out to sea from Seahouses.

0:50:350:50:37

A bit like The Owl And The Pussycat, except we ain't got a five-pound note.

0:50:370:50:40

Now, all cooking of the REAL kind depends on first-class shopping!

0:51:030:51:10

Anybody can go to the supermarket and buy a packet of frozen fish.

0:51:100:51:15

But if you've got real "B dot-dot-dot with an S on the end",

0:51:150:51:18

you go to where it's really happening!

0:51:180:51:22

Which is, you know, waves with teeth like bananas,

0:51:220:51:25

head of white water, all that business!

0:51:250:51:27

In case, because you know what fishermen are like, don't you?

0:51:290:51:33

They say it was that big,

0:51:330:51:35

but when you actually go fishing they haven't caught anything!

0:51:350:51:38

I brought a few mussels

0:51:380:51:41

from Seahorses - or Seahouses or whatever it's called -

0:51:410:51:44

just to cook for the crew.

0:51:440:51:45

But, in fact, they have been quite the boys,

0:51:450:51:48

they've caught a few things, so I'm going to prepare a dish

0:51:480:51:52

which is going to be called Light Of The Radiant Way.

0:51:520:51:55

Which is, you know,

0:51:550:51:57

this is our nautical dish of the day!

0:51:570:51:58

Panache of fish, The Radiant Way. Name of the boat, get it?

0:51:580:52:03

We've got a few whiting, we've got a few haddock,

0:52:030:52:06

we've got some little lemon soles, we've got some cod,

0:52:060:52:10

we've got some prawns and we've got some codlings.

0:52:100:52:13

So take your shopping basket.

0:52:130:52:15

A couple of whitings,

0:52:150:52:17

a couple of haddocks.

0:52:170:52:19

I'm not joking, my old gastronauts, this is unbelievably bad!

0:52:190:52:22

It really is.

0:52:220:52:23

A bit of... A bit of one of these little things here.

0:52:230:52:27

Very slippery. In you go.

0:52:270:52:29

This is your shopping basket.

0:52:290:52:32

This is shopping on the ninth parallel, OK?

0:52:320:52:35

A little codling and something, Richard, if it's OK to you.

0:52:350:52:40

I mean, don't, actually, seriously, don't laugh!

0:52:420:52:45

Every time you have a fish meal,

0:52:450:52:47

what I'm doing now is what they do every day of the week

0:52:470:52:53

to bring you the fish, so don't joke about it. It's fun, I know, for us.

0:52:530:52:58

But this is how they really work.

0:52:580:53:01

OK? So, out of this lot, I'm going to dedicate a dish to this ship,

0:53:010:53:07

The Radiant Way.

0:53:070:53:09

Richard, come into the kitchen...if we can get back.

0:53:090:53:12

To recap on the whole thing, Richard, and stay with me. I know you're not used to being on boats.

0:53:230:53:28

We have my little fresh codling, OK, down here,

0:53:280:53:31

my little whiting, my little haddock,

0:53:310:53:33

my little langoustines, my little prawns,

0:53:330:53:36

the mussels I brought with me, a bit of parsley

0:53:360:53:38

and some cream and not really very much else!

0:53:380:53:42

But while I fried those fillets of the freshest fish you can imagine in a little butter on the pan,

0:53:420:53:46

at the same time I made,

0:53:460:53:48

as every good little cookette in the world knows,

0:53:480:53:52

a simple white sauce -

0:53:520:53:53

butter and flour, filled up with milk, a few onions, bay leaves

0:53:530:53:57

a bit of parsley and stuff to make a basic white sauce. OK?

0:53:570:54:00

So I did it while I was fiddling about

0:54:000:54:03

cos this is the magic of...magic.

0:54:030:54:06

At the same time...from Seahouses I got these brilliant mussels

0:54:060:54:11

and merely poached them, sorry about this,

0:54:110:54:13

merely poached them in about a quarter of a pint of water

0:54:130:54:16

so that they opened. I didn't overcook them because they're succulent and nice.

0:54:160:54:20

And to make, because I want a really fishy flavour

0:54:200:54:22

to the ultimate sauce of this dish. Now, Richard, this is the tricky bit.

0:54:220:54:25

OK, we've got to get some of this juice from the mussels into the white sauce,

0:54:250:54:32

just to give it a fishy flavour,

0:54:320:54:35

and stir that in. So we've now got a fundamental white sauce, OK?

0:54:350:54:40

With a fishy flavour, which is quite nice...

0:54:400:54:44

If I may now... You know, I have to tell you I am REALLY tired.

0:54:440:54:50

We do take these things, in a way, pretty serious.

0:54:500:54:53

I know you love me rolling about in a ship

0:54:530:54:56

and trying... And just simply cooking things,

0:54:560:54:59

but there AREN'T, I can promise you,

0:54:590:55:01

17 home economists behind me doing all this.

0:55:010:55:04

Right. I've got a few tasks to do.

0:55:040:55:06

For my parsley sauce,

0:55:060:55:08

very freshly chopped parsley, OK, we all know what that is.

0:55:080:55:12

Excuse all this muddle up of the pots.

0:55:120:55:14

Stay with it, Richard, you're doing very, very well.

0:55:140:55:16

I'll buy you a large one when and if ever we get ashore.

0:55:160:55:20

Strain... Stay with it, dear boy. I can see you wobbling.

0:55:200:55:24

Strain the white sauce of all the lumps into the parsley there.

0:55:240:55:29

Which is quite good, discarding then,

0:55:310:55:33

as you can now see, the little flavourings I put in -

0:55:330:55:36

the carrot, the onion, the mushroom and stuff I added to make that brilliant.

0:55:360:55:39

Put that into the sink. Stir that in. That is really real.

0:55:390:55:44

And it's very, very good.

0:55:470:55:49

I want, because this is for the captain and for one of my very good friends, Mr Swallow,

0:55:490:55:56

here on the Radiant Way, I want to make this really rich and luxurious,

0:55:560:55:59

so I'm going to add a little cream to the sauce. OK.

0:55:590:56:02

And put that gently on the gas over there to cook away,

0:56:020:56:06

while...and here we come to the tricky bit.

0:56:060:56:10

I put my couple of little fillets on this lovely white plate,

0:56:140:56:17

simplicity itself,

0:56:170:56:19

the little langoustines,

0:56:190:56:21

which I've just tailed and headed and split down the middle...

0:56:210:56:24

Like that.

0:56:240:56:26

OK.

0:56:260:56:27

A few fillets of fish, then some of my little mussels.

0:56:270:56:33

I think that, one way or another, this has got to be

0:56:350:56:40

a sort of fishy version of Northumbria on a plate.

0:56:400:56:43

You know, we are working in those absurd conditions,

0:56:430:56:46

nothing on the clock but the maker's name and all that kind of stuff.

0:56:460:56:49

I think now...

0:56:490:56:51

My sauce is warm, the flavour has gone through...

0:56:510:56:55

to the thing.

0:56:550:56:57

And watch closely...

0:56:570:57:00

Well, don't watch closely, but just admire the steadiness of my hand

0:57:000:57:04

under these absurd conditions.

0:57:040:57:06

And I can't put that down, that's very difficult.

0:57:080:57:11

I think, you know...fresh fish... Floyd... Northumberland...

0:57:120:57:18

There it is, on a plate. I think it's brilliant.

0:57:180:57:20

Wonderful stuff from Keith there.

0:57:240:57:26

Now, as always, we're looking back through the Saturday Kitchen

0:57:260:57:29

archives to bring you the best moments from over the years.

0:57:290:57:31

Still to come on today's show,

0:57:310:57:33

Paul Rankin takes on Michael Caines

0:57:330:57:35

in another Saturday Kitchen omelette challenge.

0:57:350:57:37

Mark Hix is here with a superb steak salad.

0:57:370:57:40

He pan-fries steak before serving alongside crispy shallots,

0:57:400:57:43

wild mushrooms and a watercress salad.

0:57:430:57:46

And Helen Glover faces her food heaven or her food hell.

0:57:460:57:49

Did she get her food heaven, chocolate lava cake with banana ice cream?

0:57:490:57:52

Or her food hell, chilli lemon grass pork?

0:57:520:57:55

Find out what she got at the end of the show.

0:57:550:57:57

Next up, Claire Thomson is cooking up

0:57:570:58:00

a comforting savoury bread pudding.

0:58:000:58:02

What have we got on the menu, then, Claire?

0:58:020:58:04

-What are we going to be doing?

-Um, so I'm going to cook

0:58:040:58:06

a sourdough bread pudding, so savoury pudding,

0:58:060:58:08

with sausages and cauliflower and radicchio.

0:58:080:58:10

Sounds pretty good to me.

0:58:100:58:12

So this is with sourdough. It's like a, what is it, a bake?

0:58:120:58:15

Is that what we're going to call it?

0:58:150:58:16

It's like a bread and butter pudding, yeah, it's a bake, a good dish to cook for all the family.

0:58:160:58:21

What I really like is to cook vegetables and make them sort of core to my family's cooking,

0:58:210:58:25

not sort of this thing that's on the side of the plate that kids eat.

0:58:250:58:27

-OK.

-That they have to eat to get their pudding, or worse still, so I really like making vegetables

0:58:270:58:31

intrinsic to the dish

0:58:310:58:33

and sort of mixing it up,

0:58:330:58:34

and not always just boiling them and serving them.

0:58:340:58:36

So this is a great way to use cauliflower up

0:58:360:58:38

-that isn't just your usual cauliflower cheese.

-Yeah. Exactly.

0:58:380:58:42

-Going to take the sausage meat out of these sausages.

-Yeah.

0:58:420:58:45

I really like using sausage meat rather than just mince

0:58:450:58:47

because half the work is done for you, it's all flavoured,

0:58:470:58:50

they're cheap, you know, a good sausage.

0:58:500:58:52

High meat content, not too much rusk

0:58:520:58:55

And, uh, brown that off a bit.

0:58:550:58:58

OK.

0:58:580:58:59

OK.

0:59:010:59:02

But it is a savoury pudding.

0:59:020:59:04

So, the cauliflower, you just want them in decent sort of chunks, these florets?

0:59:040:59:07

Yes, please, so, small, and we're going to boil that in some sort of herby, fennel-seedy water.

0:59:070:59:12

Um, and use that stock, that cauliflower herb stock,

0:59:120:59:18

to make the veloute, which is a sort of same preparation as a bechamel.

0:59:180:59:23

-OK.

-But not using milk, using a roux to stick in the water and then...

0:59:230:59:27

-I'll do that.

-You're going which way?

0:59:270:59:29

-Now, I mentioned at the top of the show about the restaurant, but you sold it last week!

-Yes.

-Right.

0:59:290:59:34

That's why she's smiling, you see.

0:59:340:59:35

That's why she's here!

0:59:350:59:37

So we're doing, we're concentrating on a theatre show that we've got coming up for kids,

0:59:370:59:41

which has played for the last two years in Bristol.

0:59:410:59:44

-Right.

-And this November it's coming to London

0:59:440:59:47

and it's at the egg theatre in Bath next week

0:59:470:59:50

and one performance at Yeo Valley in the countryside,

0:59:500:59:53

-in the hills.

-So what are you doing?

0:59:530:59:55

Are you actually cooking on it? What are you doing?

0:59:550:59:58

Yes, so it's a ten-metre table and there's 60 children sat round it,

0:59:581:00:01

and they eat the food that they watch, so...

1:00:011:00:04

-It's together with a theatre company called Theatre Damfino.

-Right.

1:00:041:00:08

We're all parents to six kids between us

1:00:081:00:10

and...my kids would go to their house

1:00:101:00:13

and sort of have full-scale Matilda productions

1:00:131:00:15

and smoke machines and Miss Trunchbull,

1:00:151:00:17

-and their kids would come to ours...

-Smoke machines and what?

1:00:171:00:20

-Miss Trunchbull!

-Miss Trunchbull, from Matilda, James! Come on!

1:00:201:00:24

Only girls would know.

1:00:241:00:25

So, um, then their kids would come to us and we'd have

1:00:251:00:28

sort of different foods than what they're used to,

1:00:281:00:30

so we got talking about that

1:00:301:00:32

and agreed we'd try and do something for our kids together,

1:00:321:00:35

a sort of food theatre...spectacle.

1:00:351:00:37

-Right.

-And uh, and so it was born two years ago

1:00:371:00:40

and it's had five stars the last two years running.

1:00:401:00:43

And so it's coming to London and, um,

1:00:431:00:46

-yeah, we want everyone to come.

-Do they keep you busy then?

1:00:461:00:48

Yeah! So, it's five courses, five acts,

1:00:481:00:50

starts off with bread and then we go through to,

1:00:501:00:53

right the way through to ice cream.

1:00:531:00:54

-Right.

-And the children, you know, we've got an egg cannon

1:00:541:00:57

that launches an egg from one end of the table,

1:00:571:01:00

fires along the ten-metre table, through a hoop, lands in a bowl,

1:01:001:01:03

we make a custard, and then we make ice cream on stage with dry ice.

1:01:031:01:06

Uh, we've got two beetroots that get murdered

1:01:061:01:09

-and then, um...

-LAUGHTER

1:01:091:01:11

..the children all have to eat the beetroot.

1:01:111:01:13

And there's all these cries of "Eugh, we don't like beetroot!"

1:01:131:01:16

But, actually, they all love it and that's a part of the show.

1:01:161:01:18

All right. Have you got Evel Knievel in it?

1:01:181:01:20

-No.

-All right.

1:01:201:01:22

Food and theatre together?

1:01:221:01:24

-Yeah, and kids!

-Food and theatre.

1:01:241:01:26

-Never work with food, children...

-What's not to like?

-Yeah, it's great.

1:01:261:01:29

So, um, yeah, I think everyone would love it, so...

1:01:291:01:32

Now, you've just got a new book out as well, like Dawn,

1:01:321:01:35

-so this is your first book, though.

-Yes. So, baby thing, I get that, you know.

1:01:351:01:38

So how exciting is that?

1:01:381:01:41

It's really exciting and I feel really, like,

1:01:411:01:43

I'm on a road that I want to be on.

1:01:431:01:45

-Have been a chef for the last sort of 12 years and, um...

-Yeah.

1:01:451:01:48

I love writing.

1:01:481:01:49

And the theatre thing has taken its own...

1:01:491:01:52

Now, it's got a particular name to it, the Five O'clock Apron,

1:01:521:01:54

so what does this mean, then?

1:01:541:01:56

So, uh, well, I was having babies at home, as you do,

1:01:561:01:59

and, uh,

1:01:591:02:00

so I wanted to have a bit of authenticity to my cooking

1:02:001:02:03

and show the world that, actually,

1:02:031:02:05

-I did practise what I was preaching.

-Right.

-So, every night at five o'clock, thereabouts,

1:02:051:02:09

I Instagram or tweet what I feed the kids and, from that,

1:02:091:02:14

you know, people can check up on me that I'm actually the real deal.

1:02:141:02:17

And so I... You know, we cook

1:02:171:02:19

spaghetti bolognese sometimes, or, you know,

1:02:191:02:22

soup and stuff,

1:02:221:02:24

but ordinarily I like things like this that are a bit more sort of...

1:02:241:02:27

So what's on the menu for tonight then?

1:02:271:02:29

-What are we going to see on Instagram?

-My husband's at home, so...

1:02:291:02:31

-Oh, right, OK. All right!

-He's a chef, too, so it's good, you know.

1:02:311:02:35

At five o'clock, I'm going to tweet my dinner.

1:02:361:02:38

You'll be at the rugby, though.

1:02:381:02:40

I know, it's going to be a Twix, a beer and a Cornish pasty -

1:02:401:02:44

-something like that.

-Correct!

-Yes, exactly!

1:02:441:02:46

So, I browned off this bread a bit and the sausage meat,

1:02:461:02:49

you don't need to cook it all the way through

1:02:491:02:51

-cos it's going to cook in the oven.

-Yeah.

1:02:511:02:53

So that goes in there.

1:02:531:02:54

Right, you're on about this veloute.

1:02:551:02:57

So we take the liquid from the cauliflower...

1:02:571:02:59

-Yeah.

-..with the fennel seeds and everything else...

-Yeah.

1:02:591:03:02

-..in order to make a nice little simple sauce, really.

-Yeah.

1:03:021:03:05

Uh, it's the same preparation as a bechamel,

1:03:051:03:07

-it's just thickened with the roux.

-Yeah.

1:03:071:03:09

Then that's going to get poured over this.

1:03:091:03:11

So what was the restaurant that you had, then, what was that based on?

1:03:111:03:15

Was it still a family-oriented restaurant?

1:03:151:03:17

Cos you ran pubs as well.

1:03:171:03:19

-Yeah.

-You have a pub down in Cornwall as well?

1:03:191:03:21

We didn't own it, we worked in it, The Gurnard's Head.

1:03:211:03:24

I love it down there, it's such a beautiful part of the world.

1:03:241:03:26

-It is, isn't it? Fantastic.

-I love it. We go back every year still.

1:03:261:03:29

Um, yeah, my cooking's just rooted... I travelled a lot,

1:03:291:03:32

my husband's a Kiwi, I grew up in Africa,

1:03:321:03:36

my step-mum's from the Sichuan province,

1:03:361:03:38

so, um, I've travelled extensively and cook...

1:03:381:03:41

-Is she happy or angry, according to Ching?

-She's happy, man!

1:03:411:03:44

-Yeah, she's cool.

-Passionate!

1:03:441:03:46

Passionate!

1:03:461:03:48

You're, like, going to have your Visa denied when you go back.

1:03:481:03:51

-I've got the sauce here. You want some salt and pepper in here.

-Yes, please.

-Explain to me...

1:03:521:03:55

As well as mustard and the red wine vinegar, so you're making a kind of piquant, creamy sauce.

1:03:551:03:59

Explain to me what you've over there then.

1:03:591:04:01

So this is just the cauliflower, the bread cooked off with the sausage

1:04:011:04:05

and the radicchio, and the radicchio is a really nice thing to use

1:04:051:04:08

in this sort of cooking cos that sort of bitterness compliments

1:04:081:04:11

the sort of fattiness of the sausages

1:04:111:04:12

and the fried bread and the creamy sauce.

1:04:121:04:14

So it all works really well together.

1:04:141:04:16

-Pop a few bay leaves in amongst it.

-OK.

1:04:161:04:19

-And you want me to pour this over the top?

-Yes, please.

1:04:191:04:22

-And I'm going to chuck some Parmesan on.

-OK.

1:04:221:04:25

-That's over there.

-Yes, brilliant.

1:04:271:04:29

And then...

1:04:291:04:30

-Everything tastes better...

-So your whole thing is not to hide the veg from kids...

1:04:311:04:35

No, and to cook, really, sort of, like, get them to like vegetables and to like being in the kitchen.

1:04:351:04:39

And to like food, really. I'm not about demonising certain ingredients

1:04:391:04:43

or making them not eat this or not eat that.

1:04:431:04:45

I want them to enjoy food,

1:04:451:04:46

and I want them to sort of be immersed in normal cooking

1:04:461:04:49

and being at home being in the kitchen.

1:04:491:04:52

I think it's really important.

1:04:521:04:53

-I'm going to put this in the oven, about 180 for 40 minutes.

-Right, OK.

1:04:531:04:57

Right, the salad's ready.

1:05:001:05:02

So that's just going to be dressed simply with some red wine vinegar, a bit of mustard.

1:05:021:05:06

-Hang on, 40 minutes?

-We can't wait that long!

-What? HURRY UP!

1:05:071:05:12

Hurry up!

1:05:121:05:14

No, no, there's the "here's one I made earlier" bit.

1:05:151:05:17

Ah, OK, good.

1:05:171:05:19

I'll stop panicking now.

1:05:191:05:21

It was made earlier, actually,

1:05:211:05:22

about five o'clock this morning. Right. Goes in there.

1:05:221:05:25

So you've got the salad. I'll let you serve it.

1:05:251:05:27

So some of the bread is all crispy and toasted

1:05:301:05:33

on top and some is all chewy.

1:05:331:05:35

Good old bread. I like recipes that use bread and, sort of...

1:05:351:05:39

Go... Change as they determine through the week that you're using...

1:05:391:05:42

You need sourdough, don't you, for this one, would you say?

1:05:421:05:45

Yeah, the pappy white stuff will just go to mush, but old bread,

1:05:451:05:47

big, rustic sort of country style bread.

1:05:471:05:49

-Perfect. Thanks.

-OK, give us the name of this dish, then.

-So this is a sourdough and cauliflower

1:05:491:05:53

-bread pudding with Parmesan and radicchio.

-That's what it is.

1:05:531:05:57

-Great.

-She's off. Leave it there.

1:05:571:05:59

-Come on, bring it back!

-Oh!

1:06:001:06:03

We've got to do this!

1:06:031:06:05

There, you see?

1:06:051:06:07

LAUGHTER

1:06:071:06:08

We've got a guy stood up in the loft there who was just frightened to death then, but anyway.

1:06:131:06:16

Food's got to have its own jingle and its own shot.

1:06:161:06:19

-Yeah. Oh, my goodness!

-Beautiful.

-Yes.

1:06:191:06:22

Oh, yes.

1:06:221:06:24

-Smells so good!

-Lovely.

1:06:241:06:25

Dig in, dig in.

1:06:251:06:27

Tell us what you think. And like you say, you can pick the best bits off it, can't you?

1:06:271:06:31

-Yeah.

-Bread, bread in cooking is excellent.

-My five-year-old loves the cauliflower in this,

1:06:311:06:35

but my eight-year-old really likes the bread and, you know, they can...

1:06:351:06:38

I think that's just giving everyone a little bit of what they like.

1:06:381:06:40

-Lovely.

-Like you say, the top goes nice and chewy.

-Yes, definitely.

-Oh, this is delicious again!

-Stunning.

1:06:401:06:45

A dish so good that Dawn couldn't wait for it to be cooked.

1:06:501:06:52

Now it's time for the omelette challenge and top of the table is

1:06:521:06:55

Paul Rankin, with Michael Caines not far behind.

1:06:551:06:58

But who will come out on top?

1:06:581:07:00

Right, let's get on to business. All the chefs that come on the

1:07:001:07:02

show battle it out to make a three-egg omelette.

1:07:021:07:05

We've got Michael with pretty respectable time here on the

1:07:051:07:07

blue board - 18.8 seconds.

1:07:071:07:09

However, the top of our board here, 15 seconds, Mr Rankin.

1:07:091:07:13

Can you go any quicker? Usual rules apply.

1:07:131:07:15

Let's put the clocks on screens, please.

1:07:151:07:17

-I really don't think I can because...

-Three, two, one, go!

1:07:171:07:20

-Crikey.

-That stopped him.

1:07:201:07:23

You'll see the speed of what he does.

1:07:231:07:25

Neck and neck at this point.

1:07:291:07:31

The concentration on their faces.

1:07:331:07:35

-Ah!

-LAUGHTER

1:07:361:07:39

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

1:07:411:07:44

That's terrible!

1:07:441:07:46

Right, first of all...

1:07:471:07:49

I wasn't really ready to turn mine...

1:07:491:07:51

-I know!

-Because you put yours out, I put mine out.

1:07:511:07:54

-I couldn't believe he said go. I was...

-Yeah.

-Crikey!

1:07:551:07:58

Yeah, that's...that's cooked.

1:07:581:08:01

-What bit is cooked?

-All of it!

1:08:011:08:04

Yeah, that's cooked, isn't it? Perfect.

1:08:041:08:07

-Oh!

-I tell you, that's delicious. That's beautiful.

1:08:071:08:11

-That's proper...

-Paul Rankin.

-Worry about your own.

1:08:111:08:14

It's nice, it's just not a very good shape! LAUGHTER

1:08:141:08:17

-It is nice, mind.

-Did you beat your time?

-No, I did not.

1:08:171:08:19

Nowhere near. 22 seconds.

1:08:191:08:21

-It proves how quickly you did it the first time.

-That's incredible.

1:08:211:08:24

I doubt I've beat mine, to be honest.

1:08:241:08:27

And that's if it's an omelette.

1:08:271:08:29

You didn't?

1:08:291:08:31

-Not quicker. 19.5.

-Awww!

1:08:311:08:34

But it's hardly an omelette when you can eat it with a straw, is it, really?

1:08:341:08:37

LAUGHTER

1:08:371:08:40

Another close call,

1:08:431:08:44

but no movement on the leaderboard there for Paul or Michael.

1:08:441:08:48

Now it's ever to Mark Hix, who's serving up a sizzling steak salad.

1:08:481:08:52

Making his welcome return to the Saturday Kitchen,

1:08:521:08:54

-of course, it's Mark Hix. Great to have you on the show.

-How are you doing?

1:08:541:08:57

-And congratulations on your new restaurant.

-Thank you.

1:08:571:08:59

Going well. One in London and one in Devon, is that right?

1:08:591:09:02

Yeah, just on the Devon, Dorset borders.

1:09:021:09:04

OK, we'll talk about that in a minute because I know the first thing you want to do is get this...

1:09:041:09:08

Yeah. So I've got this hanger steak. I mean, English...

1:09:081:09:10

Well, the old English butchers would know it as butcher's steak

1:09:101:09:12

because it's the piece of meat that they used to keep for themselves,

1:09:121:09:15

-cos it had the most flavour.

-Now this is for a beef salad, isn't it, this one?

-Yeah.

-OK.

1:09:151:09:19

So, great flavour.

1:09:191:09:21

You can bash it out a little bit.

1:09:211:09:22

If you can't get this, you could use a bit of flank.

1:09:221:09:24

-We're going to put that...

-Straight on...

1:09:241:09:27

We've got a sink in the back there, if you want to wash your hands.

1:09:271:09:29

Now, the hanger steak in particular, where is it...? I mean, where...?

1:09:291:09:32

-OK, on the carcass you've got the flank and then, just under the kidneys...

-Yeah.

1:09:321:09:35

..you've got the hanger.

1:09:351:09:37

-So it takes on a bit of that flavour from the kidneys.

-I mention the French...

1:09:371:09:40

The French use this quite a lot, don't they?

1:09:401:09:42

Yeah, so quite often when you get a steak frites in France,

1:09:421:09:45

-you'll get the anglais.

-OK. The anglais.

1:09:451:09:47

-That's a very special bit of meat.

-And what else have we got going on in our salad?

1:09:471:09:50

-OK, so we've got some shallots, which you're going to do for me, nice and crispy.

-OK.

1:09:501:09:54

-I like to delegate...

-I thought you liked to delegate, yeah.

1:09:541:09:56

-So you want a bit of seasoning in here.

-Yeah.

1:09:561:09:59

Flour, milk and then flour.

1:09:591:10:01

-So through the flour twice, just to give them a nice crispy...

-Yeah.

1:10:011:10:04

-Flour, milk, and then back in the flour.

-Yeah.

-OK, no problem.

1:10:041:10:07

Now, tell us about your restaurant because, I mean, literally people have heard about the Ivy, Caprice

1:10:071:10:11

and stuff like that. It must have been a huge change for you.

1:10:111:10:14

-Yeah, I mean, it's...

-You've been there 17 years?

1:10:141:10:17

-Yeah, 17... Well, 18, actually.

-Yeah.

-So it's quite interesting.

1:10:171:10:21

I've, you know, I've sort of seen all of the restaurant opening

1:10:211:10:24

and I just thought, you know, it was time for me to do it myself, really.

1:10:241:10:27

-Yeah.

-And this site came up in Smithfield,

1:10:271:10:30

and I kind of had this idea to do a chop house, like an

1:10:301:10:33

old-fashioned chop house,

1:10:331:10:35

-where all the meat is served on the bone.

-Yeah.

1:10:351:10:38

-And this was the old Rudland & Stubbs site...

-Yeah.

1:10:381:10:40

..which had that sort of look about it,

1:10:401:10:42

wooden floorboards, tiles on the walls.

1:10:421:10:44

So I kind of stuck my neck out and did a menu with, you know,

1:10:441:10:47

all the meat totally on the bone, whereas a few years ago,

1:10:471:10:50

you know, it would have been a bit tricky doing an all meaty menu.

1:10:501:10:54

And of course, oysters as well, you know,

1:10:541:10:57

oysters are an old-fashioned London thing.

1:10:571:10:59

My friend over there, Mr Corrigan, has got an oyster bar.

1:10:591:11:02

Exactly, in Bentley's. And you're in the sort of tradition where you're

1:11:021:11:04

-going to try and bring oysters back to the...

-Yeah, yeah.

1:11:041:11:07

-Particularly in London because we used to eat loads of them, didn't we?

-Yeah.

1:11:071:11:10

You know, London was the sort of capital of, you know,

1:11:101:11:12

oyster-eating, and then it dropped off quite a bit,

1:11:121:11:15

but I think, you know, the likes of Corrigan and myself, we can...

1:11:151:11:18

revive oyster-eating in London, yeah?

1:11:181:11:21

Revive it, the oyster-eating, you're into it.

1:11:211:11:23

Is that right? He's into French ones and you're into English ones?

1:11:231:11:25

Mark has seemingly changed his mind on this

1:11:251:11:28

-since the last time we talked, yeah?

-Mr Corrigan...

-LAUGHTER

1:11:281:11:31

-Mine are strictly British.

-Yeah.

1:11:311:11:33

-Mine are strictly British.

-Is that because you started publishing the

1:11:331:11:36

-Great British cookbook series, is it?

-There you go.

-Yeah. You've got it.

1:11:361:11:39

You're going to get this endlessly throughout the show,

1:11:391:11:41

I can just see this happening. OK, what are we cooking here?

1:11:411:11:44

Also, if you notice, all my ingredients are British.

1:11:441:11:46

-Yes, exactly. Yeah.

-Including the oil.

1:11:461:11:48

LAUGHTER Including the oil.

1:11:481:11:50

Now, tell us about the dressing, because it is...

1:11:501:11:52

OK, so...so I've got a little bit of Suffolk Mustard...

1:11:521:11:55

Yes, for the mustard, yeah.

1:11:551:11:57

..cider vinegar,

1:11:571:11:59

and extra virgin rapeseed oil.

1:11:591:12:02

Really popular now, rapeseed oil.

1:12:021:12:04

I found a rapeseed oil up in Suffolk

1:12:041:12:06

when I did the British Regional book.

1:12:061:12:08

-Rapeseed oil has become sort of trendy now, has it?

-Yeah.

1:12:081:12:11

Kind of...a bit difficult to find five years ago,

1:12:111:12:13

-but now it's all over the place.

-Yeah, it's a good alternative to olive oil, really.

1:12:131:12:16

It's got that quite unique flavour and, you know, really great colour.

1:12:161:12:19

-Look at that really vibrant yellow colour, like the rapeseed flowers.

-Yeah.

1:12:191:12:23

I think it's a good alternative to virgin olive oil, I mean, really...

1:12:231:12:26

-It is. Very good. Very good for your omega-3 as well, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-There you go.

1:12:261:12:31

-OK.

-Going to use some chanterelles,

1:12:311:12:33

-which are bang in season at the moment...

-Yeah.

1:12:331:12:36

..if you're a keen forager.

1:12:361:12:37

-Yeah.

-Just going to whip the bottom bits off there.

1:12:371:12:41

So these just want flour...

1:12:411:12:43

-Yeah, flour, milk and then back through the flour.

-Flour, milk and back to the flour.

1:12:431:12:46

-Just to give them a nice...

-There you go.

-crisp...

-The milk...

1:12:461:12:49

So this is kind of a sort of, you know,

1:12:491:12:51

the only thing that's missing here is the chips, really, isn't it?

1:12:511:12:53

You know, you've got your steak, you've got your salad...

1:12:531:12:56

So, I mean, the menu itself, when you're, I mean...

1:12:561:12:58

Have you kept the same sort of ethos with the menu, particularly?

1:12:581:13:01

Well, I've kind a purposefully gone a bit the other way, to be

1:13:011:13:03

honest. I mean, I think, when I first opened,

1:13:031:13:06

-I think people expected me to do the best of Caprice, Ivy...

-Yeah.

1:13:061:13:13

And what I've done is kind of, you know,

1:13:131:13:15

I suppose my restaurant verges on being a steakhouse, really.

1:13:151:13:17

You know, there's about five or six different steaks on the menu.

1:13:171:13:20

Yeah.

1:13:201:13:22

-Mutton, lots of different chops, including English veal etc.

-Yeah.

1:13:221:13:27

So, yeah, it is, it is...

1:13:271:13:29

it's a very different menu than what we're used to doing.

1:13:291:13:32

-Seasonal, I mean, because...in the UK, the seasons change so quick, so...

-Yeah, I mean...

1:13:321:13:36

Actually, now I tend to keep to the seasons

1:13:361:13:39

and the menu we change twice a day.

1:13:391:13:42

-Yeah.

-So I'm always madly on my Blackberry, you know,

1:13:421:13:45

sort of changing the menu, amending it.

1:13:451:13:47

Now we mentioned the one in...obviously this is the one in London as well,

1:13:471:13:50

but the one in Devon, slightly different, slightly...

1:13:501:13:53

Yeah, it's a fish restaurant,

1:13:531:13:54

-so I've called that one Hix Oyster and Fish House.

-Right.

1:13:541:13:56

Because we're overlooking the harbour,

1:13:561:13:58

and all you can see is the sea,

1:13:581:13:59

so it kind of made sense to go back to my home town almost and...

1:13:591:14:03

Cos you've always been a fan of British food,

1:14:031:14:05

hence the, dare I say, the book.

1:14:051:14:07

Go on, then. LAUGHTER

1:14:071:14:09

Where's it gone?

1:14:091:14:11

-Corrigan's hiding it over there.

-Go on.

1:14:111:14:14

Corrigan's going to eBay it later on this afternoon. LAUGHTER

1:14:141:14:17

Yeah, I think it's just, it's important to get, you know, our...

1:14:171:14:21

you know, housewives and cooks just to, you know, cook, you know,

1:14:211:14:24

British seasonal food because, you know, we've been

1:14:241:14:27

so used over the years to relying on imported stuff that comes from...

1:14:271:14:30

-Yeah.

-..you know, Rungis Market, Holland,

1:14:301:14:32

but we actually don't need it, you know.

1:14:321:14:34

-We've got great stuff on our doorsteps.

-Exactly, and great stuff on the doorstep,

1:14:341:14:37

bang in season as well, and these mushrooms... What are you using here?

1:14:371:14:40

-What have you got...

-So, chanterelles, which...

-Yeah.

1:14:401:14:42

..anyone that's foraging, you can go into the woods and,

1:14:421:14:45

you know, if you find the right spot,

1:14:451:14:46

-you'll get carpets and carpets of these things.

-Yeah.

1:14:461:14:49

-And basically you never wash these, just literally just pick them...

-Yeah.

1:14:491:14:52

The minute you put these anywhere near water, they're just go to get soggy and...

1:14:521:14:55

-Go like a sponge.

-So... I'm going to take this off now.

-OK.

1:14:551:14:58

Give it a little rest.

1:14:581:14:59

Now you did mention the French use this quite a lot,

1:14:591:15:02

-don't they, for steak and chips?

-Yeah.

1:15:021:15:04

And, you know, it's just got that lovely flavour. I mean, it's not

1:15:041:15:06

the most tender cut of meat, you know, it's quite, quite fibrous.

1:15:061:15:09

-Yeah.

-But it's got, you know, I think these days people don't mind

1:15:091:15:13

so much, you know, chewing their eat a little bit...

1:15:131:15:16

-Yeah.

-..cos it's got flavour, you know. Gone are the days of you know, serving fillet and that

1:15:161:15:20

sort of stuff, you know. This is great value and also it's just...

1:15:201:15:23

Well, people are always looking for alternatives to try as well,

1:15:231:15:26

so this is a good one. All right, so...

1:15:261:15:27

How much is a portion of that steak?

1:15:271:15:29

Well, if you bought that in a butcher's shop,

1:15:291:15:31

-you'd probably pay about three or four quid, I'd imagine.

-So fantastic value again, eh?

1:15:311:15:35

-Yeah.

-There you go. So straight in.

1:15:351:15:37

So, mushrooms in, I'm just going to...

1:15:371:15:39

-So these things, we don't want... Season these up?

-No.

1:15:391:15:41

-Chanterelles cook really, really quickly, so...

-Yeah.

1:15:411:15:44

..literally sort of 10 or 15 seconds in the pan.

1:15:441:15:47

I'm going to dress the watercress.

1:15:471:15:50

Straight on there.

1:15:501:15:52

And this is a sort of fun salad that you can have for lunch.

1:15:521:15:55

-There's a knife there, if you want.

-Great.

1:15:551:15:58

Now I'm just going to slice this really thinly.

1:15:581:16:01

Yeah.

1:16:011:16:03

Have a little taste of that, James.

1:16:031:16:05

I'll taste it, cos it does, it tastes... You mention it's...

1:16:051:16:07

-it's like a sort of offaly sort of...

-Yeah, it's sort of offaly, gamey taste, yeah.

1:16:071:16:11

-Really strong.

-Yeah.

-Cut nice and thin, but it is...

1:16:111:16:14

-you need to chew it.

-Yeah.

1:16:141:16:16

It does remind you of those sort of, you know, French restaurants,

1:16:181:16:21

-steak frites, that sort of stuff.

-Yeah, anglais bavettes.

-Yeah.

1:16:211:16:25

The beef goes on.

1:16:251:16:27

-Looking good. You want the onions over the top?

-Yeah.

1:16:291:16:32

Let me just scatter the onions and the chanterelles over.

1:16:321:16:35

And that's it, really.

1:16:351:16:37

Simple, tasty...

1:16:371:16:39

So remind us what that is again.

1:16:391:16:41

So we've got hanger steak

1:16:411:16:43

and watercress salad with crispy shallots.

1:16:431:16:46

-And if you missed that, it's in his book.

-Exactly.

1:16:461:16:48

Right, come and have a seat over here.

1:16:531:16:55

The easiest way you get to dive into this, Craig.

1:16:551:16:58

There you go. Have a seat.

1:16:581:17:00

Tell us what you think of that one.

1:17:001:17:02

-OK.

-You've probably never had this sort of anglais,

1:17:021:17:05

but the flavour is fantastic, isn't it?

1:17:051:17:07

-Bit chewy.

-THEY LAUGH

1:17:101:17:11

Bit chewy? That's what it's supposed to be!

1:17:111:17:13

Bit fibrous.

1:17:131:17:16

By the way, your jowls are supposed to work.

1:17:161:17:18

-I don't know that I even want this.

-Yeah, you're supposed to chew it.

1:17:181:17:21

-Cheap cuts of meat never work, John.

-THEY LAUGH

1:17:211:17:25

Oh!

1:17:251:17:26

-He's obviously a fillet steak man.

-It is tasty. It's tasty.

1:17:261:17:29

-Tasty but chewy.

-It just requires a lot of energy to eat.

1:17:291:17:32

-Well, what would you...

-Get a small but then, so that we

1:17:321:17:34

-don't have too chew too much!

-..score out of ten?

1:17:341:17:36

I would say that's probably about a six.

1:17:361:17:39

-Oh, my God.

-That's not...

-No, it's...

-Trust me, Mark,

1:17:391:17:42

it's more than he gave me in 14 weeks.

1:17:421:17:45

-So, trust me.

-If I only had three quid, then that's what I'd do.

1:17:451:17:49

I can't even cut it.

1:17:491:17:51

Well, you're supposed to eat it whole!

1:17:511:17:53

It tastes quite fatty, though.

1:17:531:17:54

Oi, Craig, is this in your book?

1:17:541:17:56

He's not dealing with Gary Rhodes now, tell him.

1:17:561:17:58

We'll take you outside and we'll give you a good hiding.

1:17:581:18:00

-Corrigan...

-Promises, promises, promises.

1:18:001:18:03

-OK.

-Professional opinion.

1:18:041:18:06

First of all, I love Mark's style of food, deconstructed, no ego.

1:18:061:18:09

-That's as good as you're going to eat.

-It's proper.

-Really.

1:18:121:18:15

Even when it comes to food, Craig just can't be nice, can he?

1:18:201:18:23

I personally thought it looked great, Mark.

1:18:231:18:25

Now, when Olympic rower Helen Glover came to Saturday Kitchen

1:18:251:18:29

to face her food heaven or food hell, she told as she was full

1:18:291:18:32

steam ahead for chocolate but would rather capsize than face chilli.

1:18:321:18:36

What did she get? Let's find out.

1:18:361:18:38

Now, it's time to find out

1:18:381:18:39

whether Helen is getting her food heaven or her food hell.

1:18:391:18:42

We do know that they voted for the food heaven,

1:18:421:18:45

but we are going to check with our guys as well.

1:18:451:18:46

I'm going to talk you through what we're going to

1:18:461:18:48

make for your food heaven, a chocolate lava cake,

1:18:481:18:50

something that can be served straight to the table.

1:18:501:18:53

We're going to melt down some butter and some chocolate,

1:18:531:18:55

whisk up some eggs with some caster sugar,

1:18:551:18:57

fold through a little bit of flour and we're going to fold

1:18:571:18:59

it all through to make the most beautiful melting chocolate moment.

1:18:591:19:03

And then we're going to serve it up with an attempt at ice cream

1:19:031:19:06

to match your dad's, but we'll see how we go.

1:19:061:19:08

And, of course, we do need to talk about your hell,

1:19:081:19:10

cos the guys can still vote. So, for your food hell,

1:19:101:19:13

we're going to do a chilli and lemon grass pork, finely sliced

1:19:131:19:16

pork fillet, a lovely bit of chilli and lemon grass, nicely sliced.

1:19:161:19:20

A little bit of curry powder in there as well

1:19:201:19:22

and then softened down, just cooked out, and served with egg-fried rice.

1:19:221:19:25

But, of course, we do know that it was heaven

1:19:251:19:27

because we have three votes for it.

1:19:271:19:29

Guys, would you have gone heaven or hell?

1:19:291:19:31

-Yeah, heaven, I think.

-Heaven all the way.

-Aw, thanks.

1:19:311:19:33

You're doing well this morning, Helen.

1:19:331:19:35

-Clean sweep, Helen.

-Clean sweep. Right, well, let's get cooking.

1:19:351:19:38

We're going to get rid of our hell ingredients

1:19:381:19:40

and we're going to talk about our hell.

1:19:401:19:42

So we do need to get going with our lovely dish, which is

1:19:421:19:46

very simple to make and it's one of those recipes that I find is a very

1:19:461:19:49

handy one to have for a dinner party because, only using

1:19:491:19:52

a few ingredients, you can make up a fantastically quick dessert.

1:19:521:19:55

I'm going to chop up some tomatoes... Not tomatoes, chocolate.

1:19:551:19:58

I don't know where tomatoes came from.

1:19:581:19:59

THEY LAUGH Guys...

1:19:591:20:02

It's the end of the show, we're nearly getting to the end.

1:20:021:20:04

We're going to do... You guys are going to work on the ice cream.

1:20:041:20:07

I'm not going to work on the tomatoes, I'll work on the chocolate,

1:20:071:20:09

-and you're going to fry up some breadcrumbs...

-Sure.

-..to fold

1:20:091:20:12

through this chocolate banana ice cream, and it's got some peanut

1:20:121:20:16

butter in there and it's very, very simple to make.

1:20:161:20:18

-So just nice crumbs...

-Crumbs.

-..and we have a little blitzer down

1:20:181:20:21

the end. Yeah, and some frozen banana. So this is frozen banana

1:20:211:20:24

-ice cream.

-That sounds amazing.

-OK, good, good, good. Yeah.

1:20:241:20:26

I thought your dad might not be completely approving.

1:20:261:20:29

Oh, yeah, Jimmy Glover might not approve. We'll see. We'll see.

1:20:291:20:31

OK, OK. It's actually a really good method, so maybe you can make some

1:20:311:20:36

-for him at home.

-Definitely, yeah.

1:20:361:20:38

We'll save him some to bring with you in the car.

1:20:381:20:40

-I don't know if it'll last all the way to...

-Penzance.

1:20:401:20:42

Yeah, to Penzance.

1:20:421:20:44

Which I only just found was a real place just about two minutes ago.

1:20:441:20:47

-It's true. It exists.

-Who knew?!

1:20:471:20:49

My English geography needs a lot of work, so...

1:20:491:20:52

But tell me about your plans now,

1:20:521:20:53

cos you're obviously taking some downtime

1:20:531:20:56

but are you taking some time off?

1:20:561:20:57

-I'm really busy, actually.

-Yup.

1:20:571:21:00

I've said yes to a Strictly Come Dancing Children in Need special.

1:21:001:21:05

Oh! Fantastic. OK, OK.

1:21:051:21:07

Which sounds good until you see a rower trying to dance elegantly.

1:21:071:21:11

I'm sure that takes place, does it not?

1:21:111:21:13

I'm working on being elegant at the moment. It's just difficult for me.

1:21:131:21:16

-Yeah.

-OK. And do you get a lot of preparation that goes into

1:21:161:21:19

-that or...?

-No, not really. I mean, I think it'll be really fun

1:21:191:21:22

cos there are lots of different athletes doing it and we're totally

1:21:221:21:24

out of our comfort zone and it's all for a really good cause,

1:21:241:21:27

-for Children in Need.

-Excellent.

-So it'll be fun.

-OK, OK.

1:21:271:21:29

And Steve has a bit experience, your husband has a bit of experience in

1:21:291:21:33

Strictly Come Dancing, so he should be able to give you some good tips.

1:21:331:21:36

Yeah, but that's the kind of thing we're just going to argue about.

1:21:361:21:39

When we did our first dance, we were even arguing about the way

1:21:391:21:42

-to do it, so...

-Right.

1:21:421:21:43

Maybe we'll just... I'll leave that to Pasha. Pasha's my dance partner.

1:21:431:21:47

-Oh, really?

-He's so good.

-He's a bit of a star, isn't he?

1:21:471:21:49

-He's patient with me, which is what I need.

-OK, OK.

-Yeah.

1:21:491:21:52

And what has been the hardest part of the process so far?

1:21:521:21:55

I think learning steps, like, learning to move my feet

1:21:551:21:58

and my hands, like, for eight years I've just moved in one way,

1:21:581:22:01

-one stroke on repeat for eight years.

-OK.

1:22:011:22:03

Nothing changes and now I'm having to remember, you know,

1:22:031:22:06

how to coordinate things and remember what steps

1:22:061:22:09

I'm supposed to be doing, so that's kind of challenging me

1:22:091:22:11

-mentally more than physically, really.

-So a little bit more

1:22:111:22:14

-complicated than rowing and rowing and rowing?

-Yeah, yeah, definitely.

1:22:141:22:17

OK. So to talk you back through our process here,

1:22:171:22:20

-the guys are making up the breadcrumbs and the ice cream.

-OK.

1:22:201:22:23

It's OK, you can make noise.

1:22:231:22:24

-Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah.

-THEY LAUGH

1:22:241:22:27

We're also going to add some caster sugar to three large free-range

1:22:271:22:31

eggs and the idea here is to whisk these up

1:22:311:22:33

until they're really light and fluffy,

1:22:331:22:35

and again, like, we're talking about very simple ingredients.

1:22:351:22:38

Tiny touch of flour, some chocolate, some butter, some eggs

1:22:381:22:40

and some sugar. This is ultimate in easy desserts.

1:22:401:22:42

And does it matter sort of what chocolate you use, does it vary?

1:22:421:22:46

Actually, it's a good question and really I would say,

1:22:461:22:48

for this dessert, because you're really tasting the chocolate,

1:22:481:22:51

-it's good to use something over 70% and dark chocolate.

-Right.

1:22:511:22:53

It actually benefits, and I'm going to add some in now,

1:22:531:22:56

a tiny touch of salt, just to balance out the sweetness

1:22:561:22:58

cos we've got a bit of caster sugar in there.

1:22:581:23:02

Our butter is nice and melted, I'm just going to take that off the heat.

1:23:021:23:04

-And actually, I'm going to give you a little job.

-Great.

1:23:041:23:07

This is a bit of a cheat's dessert,

1:23:071:23:09

-so we're going to pour the butter straight over the chocolate.

-OK.

1:23:091:23:12

And then I'm going to get you to melt that through.

1:23:121:23:14

And this is, like, a great little cheat's dessert for Halloween

1:23:141:23:17

celebrations around the country. So if you pour that straight in and

1:23:171:23:20

-then just start melting that down.

-All of it?

-All of it in. Fantastic.

1:23:201:23:23

It's a great pudding to share as well

1:23:231:23:25

-because you have it straight served to the table.

-Mm.

1:23:251:23:28

Everyone can tuck in and the one thing I find is that when I make

1:23:281:23:30

it I want to eat the whole thing, so it is one of those desserts that

1:23:301:23:34

you do want to dive into.

1:23:341:23:36

You're just going to melt that down until we have a nice smooth

1:23:361:23:39

finish on it.

1:23:391:23:41

Guys, tell me about the banana ice cream

1:23:411:23:43

cos it's quite an interesting technique, isn't it?

1:23:431:23:45

-It's just chopped up frozen bananas, peanut butter...

-Yeah?

-Whizzed up.

1:23:451:23:49

-And that's it.

-Wow!

-And that's it.

1:23:491:23:51

It's instant. And I've got some breadcrumbs that I'm toasting for

1:23:511:23:54

-you with a bit of butter.

-OK.

-I'll take it all the way to brown,

1:23:541:23:57

as brown as you like it,

1:23:571:23:59

and then we'll fold some of that into the ice cream.

1:23:591:24:01

And that's going to give you this lovely kind of nutty crunch

1:24:011:24:04

in there without having any peanuts or anything else.

1:24:041:24:06

But we do have the peanut butter, so, you know, it's a good mixture.

1:24:061:24:10

Now, I mean, I have to say I'm obsessed with that ice cream

1:24:101:24:12

recipe because it's so simple - it's frozen bananas

1:24:121:24:15

and peanut butter and nothing much else.

1:24:151:24:17

You can add chocolate chips in there and look at that velvety

1:24:171:24:20

texture you get from it, because it really does come out gorgeous.

1:24:201:24:23

-That looks amazing.

-You could also add in some frozen mango in there

1:24:231:24:26

-as well...

-Mm.

-..if you kind of wanted a sort of mango sorbet.

1:24:261:24:30

So our chocolate is melted, our eggs are nicely whisked up.

1:24:301:24:32

If you want to keep going with that and you have a really

1:24:321:24:35

frothy mixture, that's kind of what you're looking for.

1:24:351:24:37

But this is looking pretty good.

1:24:371:24:38

We added that tiny touch of salt in there.

1:24:381:24:40

I'm going to pour our chocolate in but first things first,

1:24:401:24:44

when you're adding a little bit of flour into a mixture like this,

1:24:441:24:46

and it's only about three tablespoons, you're going

1:24:461:24:48

to sieve it in so that you make sure that you stir it through quite

1:24:481:24:51

evenly and firmly. So just sieve that in,

1:24:511:24:53

get a little bit of air in there and remember all that whisking work

1:24:531:24:56

you've done, you want to make sure that you incorporate as much air

1:24:561:24:58

in there as possible.

1:24:581:24:59

And then we're going to stir through this chocolate and butter mixture.

1:24:591:25:02

-I have to say, some of the best melting skills...

-Thank you.

1:25:021:25:05

..I've seen from an Olympic rower in the kitchen ever.

1:25:051:25:07

And I thought I couldn't cook!

1:25:071:25:09

Now, we have had a tweet in asking about how to use pumpkin seeds

1:25:101:25:14

cos I suppose, at this time of the year, a lot of people are left

1:25:141:25:17

over with them and it's one thing I do, I always roast them.

1:25:171:25:20

You have to clean them out and clean them up in some water and then just

1:25:201:25:23

dry them up, and then I roast them with a bit of butter and sea salt.

1:25:231:25:26

Any tips from you guys?

1:25:261:25:28

Well, pumpkin seeds, probably that and just add them to a salad.

1:25:281:25:31

But I have this recipe for a fantastic hot, sweet pumpkin

1:25:311:25:36

-chutney that keeps in the fridge for weeks.

-Oh, lovely.

1:25:361:25:39

I remember my mum used to make this when we were little children.

1:25:391:25:42

It would also feature in Diwali.

1:25:421:25:43

I think it's great for this time of the year, with game and things.

1:25:431:25:46

I often put them on the restaurant menu.

1:25:461:25:48

It's dried fenugreek seeds, which are quite medicinal on their own...

1:25:481:25:52

-Yeah.

-..dried red chilies just burnt in hot oil and then diced pumpkin

1:25:521:25:56

flesh, all the leftover pumpkin that you've got

1:25:561:25:58

from your Halloween leftovers.

1:25:581:26:00

-Beautiful. So no poison in these...

-No, none of that!

1:26:001:26:03

You've had me thrown at the start of the show.

1:26:031:26:05

Did I? Yeah, and then more red chilies, lots of salt,

1:26:051:26:09

-a little bit of salt, and lots of sugar.

-OK.

1:26:091:26:11

-And it's that sugar, it's the hot and sweet jam...

-Beautiful.

1:26:111:26:14

..pickled meat chutney.

1:26:141:26:16

That sounds fantastic. I think that's a good thing to add in.

1:26:161:26:20

And Stephen has just tweeted in and asked how to cook bulgur wheat,

1:26:201:26:25

so any tips on bulgur wheat? Is it used in either...?

1:26:251:26:28

In Thai cookery, it's not really used at all.

1:26:281:26:30

-Certainly not in Thai cookery.

-Yeah.

1:26:301:26:31

To be honest, I've forgotten how to cook most of the recipes.

1:26:311:26:35

Boil it in salted water until it's, like, al dente

1:26:351:26:37

and then loads of different nice salads, like Mediterranean

1:26:371:26:40

-and Middle Eastern salads.

-Yeah, roast tomatoes chucked through it.

1:26:401:26:43

Lots of chopped herbs, preserved lemon and things like that.

1:26:431:26:45

The challenge of bulgur and also cracked wheat is,

1:26:451:26:48

you know, because it of tastes of cracked wheat.

1:26:481:26:50

-This is true!

-Right?

1:26:501:26:52

And there is not much else.

1:26:521:26:54

-Yeah.

-But I find, you know, if you've got something very salty,

1:26:541:26:57

like a feta something, or even sort of compressed watermelons

1:26:571:27:01

-I find it works well. Anything sharp and acidic...

-Yeah.

1:27:011:27:04

-..to kind of balance that sort of rather plainness.

-Yeah.

1:27:041:27:08

But the one thing I will say about it is it's such a good store

1:27:081:27:11

cupboard ingredient cos you can have it sitting in the store

1:27:111:27:13

cupboard ready for use and it can be used in so many different ways.

1:27:131:27:16

I actually love using it in a Mediterranean salad like that

1:27:161:27:19

and you roast off your vegetables,

1:27:191:27:21

roast them for about 45 minutes, some courgettes,

1:27:211:27:24

some red onions, things like that that will soften down

1:27:241:27:26

and caramelise, and then toss through that, it's just gorgeous.

1:27:261:27:30

Really good. Really good.

1:27:301:27:31

So we're looking good with our breadcrumbs.

1:27:311:27:33

-Yeah.

-We've got our pudding out of the oven

1:27:331:27:35

and we're going to serve up our ice cream.

1:27:351:27:38

I think we have a little bowl over there, beautiful.

1:27:381:27:41

-OK.

-And again, you know, when you're adding the breadcrumbs

1:27:411:27:45

into the ice cream, you don't want to be adding them hot

1:27:451:27:47

-because it'll just melt everything.

-Probably cool them down.

1:27:471:27:50

-So you want to cool them down, yeah.

-So you've added some already,

1:27:501:27:52

-have you?

-There's some mixed through.

1:27:521:27:54

I mean, look at the texture of this ice cream.

1:27:541:27:56

If you put this into the freezer, it is absolutely gorgeous

1:27:561:27:59

because it's very smooth when you put an ice cream scoop through it,

1:27:591:28:03

but just like this, straight out of the food processor,

1:28:031:28:05

it's just as good. And if you sprinkle through at this point,

1:28:051:28:08

you could go nuts, you could go seeds,

1:28:081:28:10

you could go fruit, it's totally up to you.

1:28:101:28:11

We're going to serve it just with some of the breadcrumbs over the top

1:28:111:28:14

and it's absolutely gorgeous. You could add a little bit of

1:28:141:28:17

butter, some sugar, it's up to you.

1:28:171:28:18

But I do think you, having grown up with an ice cream maker,

1:28:181:28:22

will have to be the judge of this, so let us know what you think.

1:28:221:28:25

Tuck in there.

1:28:251:28:26

I think the only way to go at this chocolate dessert is to dig in

1:28:261:28:29

straight in with a whole load of...

1:28:291:28:30

-I thought you'd say face first.

-Face first, exactly! Exactly.

1:28:301:28:33

Is that what you do after winning a gold medal?

1:28:331:28:35

Just face-plant into chocolate.

1:28:351:28:37

Pretty much actually, yeah.

1:28:371:28:38

-Thank you.

-OK, so tuck in. Try it. Jump in there and give it a go.

1:28:381:28:42

-Looks pretty good. OK, let me...

-Mm!

-So, Helen,

1:28:421:28:46

how does the ice cream fair?

1:28:461:28:48

-Really good, actually.

-Yeah?

-Really different. I like it. Yeah.

1:28:481:28:50

A unanimous decision for heaven there.

1:28:551:28:57

What a simple but indulgent pudding. Chocolate, I reckon,

1:28:571:29:00

is probably the ultimate food heaven.

1:29:001:29:02

Now, unfortunately, that's all we've got time for today.

1:29:021:29:04

I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back through the Saturday

1:29:041:29:07

Kitchen archives. I certainly have.

1:29:071:29:08

Thanks for watching. See you next week.

1:29:081:29:11

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen. Including recipes from Nic Watt, Andrew Turner, Clare Thompson and Mark Hicks, and Helen Glover faces her food heaven or food hell.