05/11/2017 Saturday Kitchen Best Bites


05/11/2017

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen. Elaine Paige faces her food heaven or food hell.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 05/11/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Good morning. We've got a whole host of chefs

0:00:020:00:03

cooking up delectable dishes on today's show.

0:00:030:00:05

From a traditional Italian dish to a modern take on Japanese food,

0:00:050:00:08

we've got it all.

0:00:080:00:09

So, pull up a chair, make yourself comfy and enjoy another slice of

0:00:090:00:12

Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

0:00:120:00:13

Welcome to the show.

0:00:340:00:35

Now, over the next 90 minutes we'll be bringing you

0:00:350:00:37

some of the best moments from Saturday Kitchen's history.

0:00:370:00:40

Coming up, James Martin gets a helping hand from Nick Frost

0:00:400:00:43

as he makes crab balls with rice noodles and a Thai dressing.

0:00:430:00:47

Theo Randall is serving up a Tuscan sausage pasta.

0:00:470:00:50

He pan-fries sausage meat with pancetta, onions and garlic,

0:00:500:00:53

before adding cream and wilted Swiss chard, served over penne pasta.

0:00:530:00:57

Jason Atherton is here with a Japanese-inspired mackerel dish.

0:00:570:01:01

He marinades the mackerel in lime juice, coriander seeds

0:01:010:01:04

and sugar and then serves alongside barbecued cucumber,

0:01:040:01:07

marinated beetroot, mooli, and a cucumber oil.

0:01:070:01:10

It's another heavyweight battle as Paul Rankin

0:01:100:01:12

takes on Lawrence Keogh in the omelette challenge,

0:01:120:01:14

and then French chef Daniel Galmiche is here

0:01:140:01:17

with a chicken and cucumber en papillote.

0:01:170:01:19

He cooks the chicken on a bed of cucumber

0:01:190:01:21

and serves with a paprika cream sauce and toasted almonds.

0:01:210:01:25

And, finally, West End star Elaine Paige faces her food heaven

0:01:250:01:28

or her food hell.

0:01:280:01:29

Will she get her food heaven,

0:01:290:01:30

grilled salmon with tempura prawns,

0:01:300:01:32

or her food hell, confit duck leg with a flageolet ragout

0:01:320:01:35

and celeriac mash?

0:01:350:01:36

You're going to have to keep watching until the end of the show

0:01:360:01:39

to find out.

0:01:390:01:40

But, first, it's Italian chef Eleonora Galasso

0:01:400:01:42

making her Saturday Kitchen debut.

0:01:420:01:45

-Eleonora!

-Eleonora's cooking next.

0:01:450:01:47

Eleonora, what are you cooking for us?

0:01:470:01:49

-So, now you're in Rome...

-Yes.

-..so you will follow my lead.

-OK.

0:01:490:01:52

Right, so what do you want me to do?

0:01:520:01:54

So, we're starting off with the vignarola,

0:01:540:01:56

-which is this wonderful vegetable stew...

-OK.

0:01:560:01:58

..that we have either in Autumn or in Springtime.

0:01:580:02:02

Now, I'd like you to start off by chopping these spring onions for me.

0:02:020:02:06

Spring onions, OK.

0:02:060:02:07

I'll get on to the sacred grail of all Italian,

0:02:070:02:11

-well, Roman ingredients, really...

-Right, OK.

0:02:110:02:13

..which is the artichoke.

0:02:130:02:15

Now, the first thing I'll do before cleaning it is actually

0:02:150:02:18

sticking my finger into a lemon

0:02:180:02:21

so that I can keep my manicure nice.

0:02:210:02:23

OK, and also...

0:02:230:02:25

It's still nice to be a woman in the kitchen, you know?

0:02:250:02:27

It just turns your fingers brown, doesn't it?

0:02:270:02:29

Yes, that's exactly.... When you don't, actually.

0:02:290:02:32

So, to me, the artichoke is just like a flower.

0:02:320:02:35

I know a few people might be a bit scared of it

0:02:350:02:38

but, to me, it's a flower with petals waiting be played with.

0:02:380:02:43

You know, he loves me, he loves me not.

0:02:430:02:46

Or, you know, just...

0:02:460:02:47

We're deflowering the flower.

0:02:470:02:49

Yes, exactly. Exactly.

0:02:490:02:51

I have no idea what I'm talking about, you know that.

0:02:510:02:54

However, if the people at home can find a fresh artichoke...

0:02:540:02:57

-This is not exactly the Roman-style artichoke.

-OK.

0:02:570:03:00

The Roman-style artichoke has a smaller head but a bigger heart

0:03:000:03:04

and a huge amount of it, actually.

0:03:040:03:07

Well, you can still find canned in water artichokes.

0:03:070:03:11

Tinned ones? Yeah, OK.

0:03:110:03:12

The tinned ones, which are absolutely fine

0:03:120:03:14

because we're going to mix them with butter, the mint, the pecorino,

0:03:140:03:18

so, really, it's quite fantastic.

0:03:180:03:21

It will taste just as good.

0:03:210:03:23

And then we have fava beans, we have peas,

0:03:230:03:26

we have butter, obviously.

0:03:260:03:28

-We've got the pancetta, which you've chucked in already.

-OK.

0:03:280:03:32

And basically with the artichoke you just want to cut the head off.

0:03:320:03:37

Cut the head off, yeah.

0:03:370:03:38

Cut part of the stem off

0:03:380:03:41

and then go to the very core of it.

0:03:410:03:44

Now, this is a bit of a capricious stem, really.

0:03:440:03:47

-Do you want me to have a little bash?

-What do you think?

0:03:470:03:50

-You don't need me.

-Really?!

0:03:500:03:51

So, basically, this is the heart.

0:03:510:03:53

This is exactly what you would want to get.

0:03:530:03:56

-So you peel all that round and then you get that.

-Absolutely.

0:03:560:03:59

And it's nice to make with friends.

0:03:590:04:03

It's a typical Saturday dish you would want to make with friends.

0:04:030:04:06

OK, if you give me this, I'll slice those.

0:04:060:04:08

-You get on with the veal for me.

-Yes, absolutely.

0:04:080:04:10

So, now, the veal - I love this sort of meat because it's very...

0:04:100:04:15

You know, it's very sweet, very thinly layered

0:04:150:04:19

but to make it even more thinly layered...

0:04:190:04:21

Also, we need to use more veal.

0:04:210:04:23

Obviously, it's a by-product from the dairy cows.

0:04:230:04:26

You should definitely use more of it.

0:04:260:04:29

That's rose veal, isn't it? You can see it's quite pink.

0:04:290:04:32

So it's had that extra time.

0:04:320:04:34

And you want to give it a good bash!

0:04:340:04:36

And also, it's an alternative from beef

0:04:360:04:37

-and it's also an alternative from pork.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:04:370:04:40

-And also, if you'd like to get some very nice veal...

-Sorry...

0:04:400:04:44

..my son-in-law works in Smithfield Market,

0:04:440:04:46

I'll give you his number after the show, all right?

0:04:460:04:48

I'll take that straight off you.

0:04:480:04:50

So I'm relieving the stresses of my week away, as you can clearly see.

0:04:500:04:55

You've had a stressful week, then?

0:04:550:04:57

Well, actually, it's Saturday, you know,

0:04:570:04:59

I think we all come to a certain point in the week.

0:04:590:05:01

So what I will do is I will flour it slightly

0:05:010:05:06

and then I will top it up with a little mixture of...

0:05:060:05:11

I just had some pear dices cooking in butter,

0:05:110:05:15

sage and a little bit of sugar and...

0:05:150:05:18

-Are they just peeled, diced and then sauteed down?

-Exactly.

0:05:180:05:22

That's it. It just takes five minutes to make.

0:05:220:05:24

In fact, this dish takes three or four minutes to make.

0:05:240:05:28

I mean, you just get the veal and in the flour

0:05:280:05:32

with the sage, with the pear,

0:05:320:05:33

with the prosciutto on top, and that's it, you cook it

0:05:330:05:36

and you have it.

0:05:360:05:39

I call it a midnight muncher, actually.

0:05:390:05:41

Midnight muncher.

0:05:410:05:42

Because it's something I would want to make after a big night out

0:05:420:05:45

when, you know, maybe I drank a few too many glasses

0:05:450:05:49

and not enough food in my belly.

0:05:490:05:51

OK, let's get that in the pan, then.

0:05:510:05:53

You could use chicken or pork.

0:05:530:05:54

-If you couldn't get veal, for example...

-Absolutely.

0:05:540:05:57

..chicken or pork would be a good one, wouldn't it?

0:05:570:05:59

You could use any other meat alternative,

0:05:590:06:01

-this is just an example.

-So a bit of chicken, a bit of pork...

0:06:010:06:03

I am never prescriptive in the dishes that I make, actually,

0:06:030:06:07

because it's all about home cooking, really.

0:06:070:06:09

And, again, it's about choosing what you like as well.

0:06:090:06:11

-It's, like, trying different things.

-Absolutely.

0:06:110:06:13

A nice chicken breast would go fantastic.

0:06:130:06:15

-Also, it's quite economical. Easy to get hold of.

-It is very.

0:06:150:06:18

And, you know, you can go for prosciutto,

0:06:180:06:19

-you can go for mortadella, you can go for bacon.

-Yeah.

0:06:190:06:22

What I like about the fact that we use pancetta

0:06:220:06:26

is that pancetta is something that is very present

0:06:260:06:28

in the Roman kitchen,

0:06:280:06:30

especially because traditionally people would be waiting

0:06:300:06:35

ravenously outside the Vatican walls

0:06:350:06:38

in order to get the leftovers from the Vatican banquets

0:06:380:06:42

so that they could concoct some sort of, you know, edible dish.

0:06:420:06:46

And pancetta, or guanciale, which is actually the cheek of the pork,

0:06:460:06:51

would be on the list. Yeah.

0:06:510:06:53

-Guanciale's delicious.

-Absolutely.

-I love it.

-Absolutely.

0:06:530:06:57

So this is something we actually chuck in every stew or every dish -

0:06:570:07:02

every pasta dish, every meat dish.

0:07:020:07:04

I'm just putting these on the side.

0:07:040:07:05

You've got some anchovies, you've got some sage.

0:07:050:07:08

-Do you want me to make a little bit of a batter?

-Absolutely.

0:07:080:07:10

So, we're doing the fried sage, yes.

0:07:100:07:12

-So I've got the veal on now.

-Yes.

0:07:120:07:15

-I've got the stew on.

-Absolutely.

0:07:150:07:17

And I'm going to dip these.

0:07:170:07:20

Give that stew a little check for me. I've just put your lettuce in.

0:07:220:07:24

-I've got some chopped lettuce for you here as well.

-Yeah.

0:07:240:07:27

So we...

0:07:270:07:29

We are adding a bit of stock into the vegetable stew

0:07:290:07:33

so that it's all nice and sweet and it's not too thick, basically.

0:07:330:07:39

-Eleonora, it's your first time on Saturday Kitchen.

-Yes, it is.

0:07:390:07:45

Which I'm absolutely thrilled to take you on the first time...

0:07:450:07:47

-Thank you so much.

-..because you've been fantastic fun,

0:07:470:07:50

in rehearsals as well, and I believe all of the viewers at home

0:07:500:07:52

-are absolutely loving you as well.

-Well, well.

-What about that, eh?

0:07:520:07:56

Well, well, well, I just like to bring a little

0:07:560:07:58

bit of Rome into everyone's home, really.

0:07:580:08:01

A bit of improvisation, you know, a bit of making do with what you have.

0:08:010:08:06

And also, the people at home as well...

0:08:060:08:08

-This is in your new book, I believe?

-Yes, it is.

0:08:080:08:10

My new book is called As The Romans Do

0:08:100:08:13

and it's basically...

0:08:130:08:14

It takes you from Rome at breakfast time

0:08:140:08:19

to after-dinner time, what we call the Ammazzacaffe time,

0:08:190:08:23

-the coffee killer's time...

-The coffee killer's time.

0:08:230:08:25

..when you have those beautiful frothy lemon sorbets.

0:08:250:08:27

But that would be a typical...

0:08:270:08:29

That would be a typical family lunch, sort of,

0:08:290:08:34

easy to make recipe.

0:08:340:08:36

-I like easy, actually.

-Everybody likes it, yeah.

0:08:360:08:39

I mean, cooking's great but if it's made easier

0:08:390:08:42

and it turns out absolutely delicious,

0:08:420:08:44

then you're onto a winner, aren't you?

0:08:440:08:46

I mean, how difficult is it to find just Roman lettuce, artichokes,

0:08:460:08:50

fava beans, fresh peas, either bacon or pancetta?

0:08:500:08:54

-It's all there, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:08:540:08:56

-Right, OK, so...

-Spring onions.

-How long have we got for that?

0:08:560:08:59

-Is that nearly ready?

-Everything green goes well in it.

0:08:590:09:02

It's quite light, isn't it, as well? It's not heavy, stodgy...

0:09:020:09:06

It's coming away from pizzas, it's coming away from pasta.

0:09:060:09:10

Well, actually, there is so much more than pizza

0:09:100:09:13

-and pasta to Italian cooking.

-Yeah.

0:09:130:09:15

Of course, pizza and pasta is something

0:09:150:09:17

we have on a regular basis but, you know,

0:09:170:09:19

Glynn, we have 20 regions and 110 provinces.

0:09:190:09:23

Each province resonates with a different style of cooking.

0:09:230:09:27

-Exactly.

-It actually screams it out loud, you know?

-Yeah.

0:09:270:09:29

So, basically, if you were to visit Milan

0:09:290:09:32

and then go straight to Sicily,

0:09:320:09:34

you would think you were visiting two different countries altogether.

0:09:340:09:38

Yeah, two different countries.

0:09:380:09:39

-So, do you want to put a little bit of wine in with that now?

-Yes.

0:09:390:09:41

-Ready?

-Absolutely. This is the time.

0:09:410:09:43

A little bit of wine there.

0:09:430:09:44

-Now, this is my favourite moment when I make this dish.

-Yeah?

0:09:440:09:48

The fragrance is just so intoxicating

0:09:480:09:52

and you can get the wine...

0:09:520:09:54

The wine will make a beautiful sauce that we will actually dip...

0:09:540:09:58

-Yeah, we need to do that.

-We will dip some bread in.

0:09:580:10:01

-You need to show me how to do that.

-Absolutely.

-Right, OK...

0:10:010:10:03

It's important.

0:10:030:10:04

The pleasure you take in making a dish, it's so important.

0:10:040:10:07

OK, right. Let's look at trying to maybe serve up now.

0:10:070:10:11

-So I've got...

-That's a beautiful sauce. Mm.

-Mm.

0:10:110:10:17

That's even better than rehearsal, that is.

0:10:170:10:19

It's better than rehearsal.

0:10:190:10:20

Right, OK. So I've done the little crispy sage, crispy sandwiches.

0:10:200:10:24

We've got our bread there. Our bread there. We need the pecorino cheese.

0:10:240:10:29

Absolutely. Pecorino's a central ingredient in Roman cooking as well.

0:10:290:10:33

-Let me put some sauce...

-Put some of that juice on there.

0:10:330:10:35

That's what my grandmother would be like. "Would you like some more?

0:10:350:10:38

"Would you like some more?" "Yes."

0:10:380:10:40

And then she would just chuck the whole thing on.

0:10:400:10:42

-Do you want to do this or shall I?

-Yes, absolutely.

-You do that.

0:10:420:10:45

I'll grate the cheese then, yeah?

0:10:450:10:47

I already burn a finger this morning, so that's all right,

0:10:470:10:49

there's nothing worse that can happen.

0:10:490:10:51

OK. That would be it.

0:10:510:10:54

We will be quite generous. Then this is the fried sage leaf.

0:10:540:10:57

It is two sandwiched sage leaves with anchovies in the middle.

0:10:570:11:03

-And pecorino over the top.

-Pecorino on top. This is the British way.

0:11:030:11:07

-And this is the Italian way.

-OK.

0:11:070:11:09

So you basically want to have pecorino...

0:11:090:11:11

LAUGHTER DROWNS SPEECH

0:11:110:11:13

I think it was the footwork that made the difference on that dish.

0:11:130:11:16

Maybe I need to learn the Italian footwork. Right.

0:11:160:11:19

-And now...

-Now, what are we going to do now?

0:11:190:11:21

-No, no, no. You know how is this called?

-Yes.

0:11:210:11:23

-The scarpetta.

-Scarpetta.

0:11:230:11:25

Get some scarpetta on there.

0:11:250:11:27

So basically you just roughly want to take this in order to devour the

0:11:270:11:33

dish and really get into it.

0:11:330:11:37

-Do we twist our arms as well?

-Absolutely. Why not?

0:11:370:11:40

LAUGHTER

0:11:420:11:44

-Wow.

-Tell us what that dish is again.

0:11:440:11:47

SHE LAUGHS

0:11:470:11:48

Roman-style saltimbocca with dried sage leaves and the vignarola.

0:11:480:11:53

Brilliant.

0:11:530:11:55

-OK, follow me.

-Absolutely.

0:12:010:12:02

-Suggs, you're in for a treat here, my friend.

-Bravo.

0:12:020:12:05

-Absolutely fantastic.

-Wow!

0:12:050:12:06

And I'll tell you, what you were saying there, because I've spent

0:12:060:12:09

-a lot of time in the south, in Puglia.

-I am originally from there.

0:12:090:12:12

-There we go.

-Very dodgy people, the Pugliese. You've got to count your fingers!

0:12:120:12:17

-Count your fingers!

-You've got to be able to deal with them.

0:12:170:12:20

You were saying about the regional thing about food, how it changes,

0:12:200:12:23

and the further north obviously it's more meat,

0:12:230:12:26

-and the further south, more fish.

-Yes.

-Tuck in.

-Yeah, yeah, go on, mate.

0:12:260:12:28

Because you wouldn't have meat in the coast ever.

0:12:280:12:32

You would only consume it there.

0:12:320:12:35

Whereas the fish, you find near Rome, you find beautiful fish in Ostia.

0:12:350:12:40

But, no, you wouldn't find it in Rome so much. Just on Fridays.

0:12:400:12:44

What do you think?

0:12:440:12:46

Absolutely amazing. I mean, I love the whole dish.

0:12:460:12:48

-The sage, the fried sage is fantastic.

-Lovely?

-Fantastic, yeah.

0:12:480:12:52

A dish fit for the Romans, and Suggs, of course.

0:12:550:12:58

And a top tip from Eleonora there about prepping artichokes.

0:12:580:13:01

Coming up, Nick Frost gets his hands dirty as he helps James

0:13:010:13:04

out in the kitchen, but first Rick Stein is in Cambodia learning

0:13:040:13:07

all about the historical French influences.

0:13:070:13:09

Early the next morning I went to Siem Reap market to see a baguette factory,

0:13:100:13:15

a culinary link with Cambodia's past,

0:13:150:13:17

when the French ruled here.

0:13:170:13:20

I was invited by Joannes Riviere, a young French chef

0:13:200:13:22

who has lived here for some time.

0:13:220:13:25

I think he was rather proud of the fact that French imperialism still lives on.

0:13:250:13:30

I was reminded, watching these incredibly skilful chaps do this,

0:13:300:13:35

Julia Child wrote a book in the '70s

0:13:350:13:37

called Mastering The Art Of French Cooking, in which she described

0:13:370:13:42

how to roll out a baguette.

0:13:420:13:44

I seem to remember it taking about four pages.

0:13:440:13:49

These guys are doing what took four pages in about four seconds.

0:13:490:13:54

I love watching things like that.

0:13:540:13:55

The dough is baked for about 20 minutes in this baker's oven.

0:13:580:14:02

They use lots of steam to develop the crust, just like in France.

0:14:020:14:06

But the difference here is that the bread is rather sweet.

0:14:060:14:09

It's looked upon more as a cake.

0:14:090:14:11

But it did seem particularly scrumptious,

0:14:110:14:14

as a barbecued beef sandwich, back at the temples,

0:14:140:14:17

with lots of sweet chilli sauce and a green papaya salad.

0:14:170:14:21

-Can we get one?

-Help yourself.

0:14:230:14:26

Thank you.

0:14:260:14:27

-A bit hot!

-Yeah!

0:14:270:14:30

So, the French are long gone.

0:14:300:14:32

Why do you think the baguettes remain?

0:14:320:14:36

The baguettes are one of the few things

0:14:360:14:38

that French have really left in Cambodia.

0:14:380:14:41

It's interesting because it's considered as a cake

0:14:430:14:46

but it's something you can find anywhere in the countryside.

0:14:460:14:49

You see a motorbike, really, in the middle of nowhere, coming through

0:14:490:14:53

with just stack of baguettes and people stopping

0:14:530:14:56

and Cambodian eat that, actually, with banana, with ice cream.

0:14:560:15:00

Not really with salty food.

0:15:000:15:01

But the technique is perfect, isn't it?

0:15:030:15:05

Yeah. It's really industrial, almost.

0:15:050:15:07

It's quite interesting to see.

0:15:070:15:09

I don't know half these fruit. That looks like a plum. Is it?

0:15:160:15:20

That's a type of mango. It's truly seasonal.

0:15:200:15:24

So you came at the right time for that.

0:15:240:15:27

-Can we try one?

-Yeah, we'll try one.

0:15:270:15:29

I mean... This is what's so nice about these sort of markets.

0:15:300:15:34

Half the things you see here, to me, I don't know what they are.

0:15:340:15:38

-Have a try.

-Oh, I see. Yeah. That's lovely.

0:15:380:15:41

You nick the skin and once you cut it and half...

0:15:410:15:44

Oh! Look at that! Wow!

0:15:440:15:46

Extremely easy to make a nice decoration on the plate.

0:15:460:15:50

-That's rambutan.

-Rambutan.

-What are those there, then?

0:15:500:15:53

-Those are longan.

-Longan?

0:15:530:15:56

It's a white flesh with a big stone in the middle.

0:15:560:15:58

It tastes almost like chemical.

0:15:580:16:00

-What's that?

-Those are dragon fruit.

0:16:000:16:03

-A dragon fruit?

-Do you want a try?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:16:030:16:06

HE SPEAKS LOCAL LANGUAGE

0:16:060:16:08

That looks very exotic.

0:16:100:16:11

And the flesh. Have a try.

0:16:140:16:16

-Don't eat the skin.

-No. OK.

0:16:160:16:18

It's not very tasty.

0:16:190:16:20

It's just very refreshing.

0:16:200:16:22

Like all cactus fruit.

0:16:220:16:24

Yeah, yeah. That's true.

0:16:240:16:26

-It's...a bit bland, I think.

-Yeah.

0:16:260:16:27

The dragon fruit, a triumph of style over content.

0:16:280:16:33

Well, I'm getting a bit addicted to these.

0:16:330:16:36

They are like mini mangoes.

0:16:360:16:38

You know, in football,

0:16:380:16:39

they send out talent scouts all over the world to find new young players.

0:16:390:16:43

I wonder if supermarkets do the same.

0:16:430:16:45

Whether they've got people coming out to these sort of markets

0:16:450:16:48

and finding things like this

0:16:480:16:50

and going off into the fields and bringing them back.

0:16:500:16:53

Because, I can tell you, if I was one of those people,

0:16:530:16:56

this is what I'd be bringing back to our supermarkets.

0:16:560:16:59

Because I know I've never seen them in England.

0:16:590:17:01

HE SPEAKS LOCAL LANGUAGE

0:17:030:17:06

Samuel Johnson said,

0:17:080:17:10

"When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life."

0:17:100:17:14

I think that could easily be applied to chefs who get bored with markets.

0:17:140:17:19

I know I tend to go on a bit about food in markets but I don't believe

0:17:210:17:26

that, looking at these pictures, you could fail to see why.

0:17:260:17:29

I mean, this is just so exciting.

0:17:290:17:31

Other people may pass a market like this by, but not me.

0:17:310:17:35

As a cook, I just find it so, so inspirational.

0:17:350:17:40

And I've just been talking to this chef

0:17:400:17:42

who used to cook in big hotels in Siem Reap.

0:17:420:17:47

He said he used to come down here, every day,

0:17:470:17:50

not to buy the vegetables,

0:17:500:17:52

but just to get brilliant ideas to compose his menus.

0:17:520:17:55

This is a village that prides itself

0:17:580:18:00

in making one of the prime ingredients of Cambodian food.

0:18:000:18:03

Something which has always been a mystery to me. The rice noodle.

0:18:030:18:06

David, the director, has just, rather unkindly,

0:18:060:18:10

suggested that if you don't want to take as long

0:18:100:18:12

as this to grind the rice, get yourself a machine.

0:18:120:18:15

Which, of course, is saying,

0:18:150:18:17

this is a very, very old-fashioned way

0:18:170:18:19

of doing something.

0:18:190:18:21

Of course, that went through my mind.

0:18:210:18:23

But what's also going through my mind is, here, we've got

0:18:230:18:26

a family doing something very much together,

0:18:260:18:29

obviously getting on with each other,

0:18:290:18:32

and you have to say, who's the happiest?

0:18:320:18:34

Somebody with a machine doing this thing in a tenth of the time,

0:18:340:18:38

or all this group and all the chat that's going on?

0:18:380:18:42

As she's just been pushing this machine,

0:18:420:18:45

she's been making little cooing noises to the baby here.

0:18:450:18:48

It's just very, very attractive.

0:18:480:18:50

They make it look so easy, right?

0:19:000:19:02

It's not.

0:19:020:19:04

You've got to get into the groove.

0:19:050:19:07

It's trying to keep it smooth, really.

0:19:070:19:11

That's the thing.

0:19:110:19:12

Can I stop now, Dave?

0:19:140:19:16

Thank you.

0:19:160:19:17

That's really good fun, actually.

0:19:170:19:21

What happens, then, is that the rice is pounded into a form of dough.

0:19:210:19:25

It reminds me of white latex rubber.

0:19:250:19:28

Then it's put into this cradle and boiled in water for 30 minutes or so.

0:19:280:19:32

Like so many things, this was a Chinese invention

0:19:320:19:36

developed thousands of years ago and it always surprises me

0:19:360:19:40

about the ingenuity of man and how he came up with such an idea.

0:19:400:19:45

But the whole point of this rather laborious process

0:19:450:19:48

is the fact that rice has no gluten content.

0:19:480:19:50

And, therefore, to make it elastic,

0:19:500:19:53

you have to first cook it and then pummel it to turn it into noodles.

0:19:530:19:59

Otherwise, if you think, if you just roll up a rice ball...

0:19:590:20:02

..and drop it into boiling water, it'll just disperse.

0:20:020:20:06

I'm told the Cambodians feel that nobody would be interested

0:20:070:20:10

in watching something like this, like tourists,

0:20:100:20:13

but I think they are wrong.

0:20:130:20:15

I just find it fascinating.

0:20:150:20:16

The fact that this has been going on since the 12th century,

0:20:160:20:19

cooking and producing rice like this

0:20:190:20:22

and still it's happening in this way, I think is incredible.

0:20:220:20:26

The dough is now put into a wooden tube and under enormous pressure

0:20:290:20:33

is forced down through a series of holes, a bit like a mincer, really.

0:20:330:20:37

I couldn't stop myself thinking about the Flintstones

0:20:370:20:41

while watching this.

0:20:410:20:43

The noodles are then cooked for a few seconds only to set them

0:20:430:20:46

and then scooped out and left to dry.

0:20:460:20:49

Before this, I've only eaten them in their dry state

0:20:490:20:52

but fresh from the cauldron, they are brilliant in a soup,

0:20:520:20:55

made with aromatic herbs, chillies and, perhaps, a few prawns.

0:20:550:21:00

The rice noodle is the bread and potatoes of Cambodia, in my book.

0:21:010:21:06

What an incredible process that was.

0:21:120:21:14

Luckily, we're able to buy rice noodles very easily

0:21:140:21:16

here in the UK and they make a great store cupboard ingredient.

0:21:160:21:19

I'm going to show you what to do with them, with a wonderful

0:21:190:21:22

little salad, with palm sugar, we've got some mint and coriander.

0:21:220:21:25

I know that you love coriander as well.

0:21:250:21:26

A lovely dressing to go with these noodles

0:21:260:21:28

that you can serve with chicken, or a variety of fish, whatever.

0:21:280:21:31

Or just serve them as they are.

0:21:310:21:33

But I'm going to serve them with some little crab balls, really.

0:21:330:21:36

Crab cakes, really, for this one.

0:21:360:21:37

So, we've got white and dark crab meat.

0:21:370:21:39

What I'm going to get you to do, Nick.

0:21:390:21:41

I know you are into your food and your cooking.

0:21:410:21:43

So, what we're going to do is to pick off the mint leaves, like that.

0:21:430:21:46

We don't want the stalks. I want you to grind them down

0:21:460:21:48

with a pestle and mortar with some coriander.

0:21:480:21:50

-If you can chop me...

-Yeah.

0:21:500:21:52

..basically, all that. Including the stalks as well.

0:21:520:21:54

-You want just the leaves...

-Just the leaves and the mint. That's it.

0:21:540:21:59

-Is that enough?

-No, we want about a good half a bunch of mint.

0:21:590:22:02

-Something like that.

-All right.

0:22:020:22:04

-A fair amount, really.

-Stop shouting.

-Sorry!

0:22:040:22:06

LAUGHTER

0:22:060:22:08

-Stop shouting at me.

-You should be used to this.

0:22:080:22:11

-You cut your teeth in a restaurant, didn't you?

-I did, yeah.

0:22:110:22:13

I was, like, I started on the big griddle. On the big grill.

0:22:130:22:18

-On a Saturday night.

-He's got the chopping down a fine art.

0:22:180:22:21

-Check that out!

-I just said that!

-Fair play, mate.

0:22:210:22:24

-Yeah, well, what was life like on the grill, then?

-I liked it a lot.

0:22:240:22:28

I like that kind of pressure

0:22:280:22:29

where there are people screaming at you and you've got, kind of,

0:22:290:22:32

50 different bits of meat on and you're having to ascertain,

0:22:320:22:35

by touch alone, at what point, you know, where they are in the cooking.

0:22:350:22:42

It's a good kind of pressure.

0:22:420:22:44

You say in your autobiography your restaurant was kind of like

0:22:440:22:47

a training ground for you, really, when it came to acting.

0:22:470:22:51

-Was that right?

-Yeah. I think, being...

0:22:510:22:53

Uh-huh! That's heavy, isn't it?

0:22:530:22:55

Being a waiter, I think, taught me how to act.

0:22:550:22:58

Slightly. You know,

0:22:580:23:00

because, unless you're what every customer wants, every time,

0:23:000:23:04

you're not going to get good tips.

0:23:040:23:05

So, I, kind of, I learned to ascertain and break down people's characters

0:23:050:23:09

-within a second and then try and be what they wanted me to be.

-Right.

0:23:090:23:13

It sounds horribly divisive.

0:23:130:23:15

-But reading through the biography as well...

-Eh?

0:23:150:23:18

Reading through the biography as well, you say that you never

0:23:180:23:21

-actually wanted to be an actor when you first started.

-No. No.

0:23:210:23:24

I mean, I think, if someone had come down

0:23:240:23:26

and said, "Hey, you're going to be an actor",

0:23:260:23:28

it would have been an awful punishment for me.

0:23:280:23:31

Because, you know, I think, I got really embarrassed about it

0:23:310:23:34

and ashamed and I was quite shy and, you know, having to

0:23:340:23:37

act in front of people was a really weird thing for me to do.

0:23:370:23:40

So, you didn't go through to drama school and went through all that,

0:23:400:23:43

you know, pretending to be a fluffy cloud and all that sort of stuff?

0:23:430:23:46

No, I mean, that came later. But, no, I didn't train to be a cloud.

0:23:460:23:49

That's it. You've got to keep blending that now.

0:23:490:23:51

We're going to take the crab, we're going to put them in flour, egg and breadcrumbs.

0:23:510:23:55

Going to roll them around in these as well.

0:23:550:23:57

They get all mixed together.

0:23:570:23:59

Now, your life, as well, in your autobiography.

0:23:590:24:01

It's quite a fascinating life. Highs and lows, like I said.

0:24:010:24:04

You know, some great stories in there as well.

0:24:040:24:07

The Istanbul thing, I thought was fantastic.

0:24:070:24:09

-In Tel Aviv. In Israel?

-Tell everybody. What sent you over there?

0:24:090:24:14

Well, I mean, I had a good friend and he, kind of, said, I was

0:24:140:24:19

17, 18 at this point, and he said, "I think you should leave London."

0:24:190:24:23

I won't go any further with that story.

0:24:230:24:26

And he said, "I lived in Israel for a while and I think you should...

0:24:260:24:28

"Maybe there's a place for you there."

0:24:280:24:30

-Right.

-And he was talking about the kibbutz,

0:24:300:24:32

which is, essentially, a farm, where you go and you work

0:24:320:24:35

and they don't pay you anything but they clothe you and feed you and...

0:24:350:24:39

And I loved it.

0:24:390:24:40

I ended up staying there for almost two years, on and off.

0:24:400:24:43

-This was working as a volunteer?

-Yeah.

0:24:430:24:46

And some great stories when you were over there as well.

0:24:460:24:49

So many that I can pinpoint as well.

0:24:490:24:51

What about these ketchup sandwiches?

0:24:510:24:54

Toast and ketchup. Yeah.

0:24:540:24:55

The food was very bad.

0:24:550:24:57

I mean, at that point, I didn't eat a vegetable until I was 30....

0:24:570:25:00

So, living on a farm, where it's just, essentially, vegetables,

0:25:000:25:04

-was a tough ask for me.

-Yeah.

0:25:040:25:06

-I'm aware...

-Keep going, Nick.

0:25:060:25:08

OK, I'm aware tomatoes, and, in turn, ketchup is a vegetable.

0:25:080:25:13

Just having toast and ketchup was the thing that kept me alive.

0:25:130:25:18

I mean, a fascinating story, what brought you back to the UK as well.

0:25:180:25:22

-A girl. It's always a girl, you know?

-Yeah.

0:25:220:25:25

I just, kind of, fell in love and followed her back

0:25:250:25:28

and that didn't work out and I ended up being at Chiquitos, you know?

0:25:280:25:31

This was working in the restaurant as well.

0:25:310:25:34

So, when would you say was your big break? How did that come about?

0:25:340:25:36

Well, meeting Simon. Knowing Simon.

0:25:360:25:39

You know, he was going out with a waitress at the time,

0:25:390:25:42

who worked at Chiquitos and I met him through her

0:25:420:25:45

and we just, kind of, got on, you know, and hung out.

0:25:450:25:49

Just made each other laugh for years.

0:25:490:25:52

And that was, kind of, it, you know.

0:25:520:25:53

Right. Look. We've got the rice noodles here.

0:25:530:25:55

They are just going to go into the boiling water just for a second.

0:25:550:25:59

Only about for a minute or so.

0:25:590:26:00

Meanwhile, we'll take our crab cakes.

0:26:000:26:02

-You're basically grinding down...

-This is like pesto.

-It's kind of like that.

0:26:020:26:05

We've got some palm sugar

0:26:050:26:07

and into there now we add a bit of sesame oil.

0:26:070:26:10

And then we're going to add a combination of soy sauce.

0:26:100:26:13

This is a wonderful dressing, by the way. And then a bit of sesame oil.

0:26:130:26:17

-I love sesame oil.

-And this is fish sauce in this one as well.

0:26:170:26:20

-Ah, nam pla.

-Yeah. And, then, a tiny bit of a chilli.

0:26:200:26:24

This is so great having somebody else who can cook. There you go.

0:26:240:26:28

What else?

0:26:280:26:29

-Chilli.

-You want that ground down too.

-Yeah. That's it. Keep going.

0:26:290:26:33

I think it's a mistake, but that's fine. So...

0:26:330:26:35

Then what we're going to do is deep-fry this as well.

0:26:350:26:38

Now, you said at the top of the show, you didn't want to

0:26:380:26:40

write a book that was just all about what you'd been doing.

0:26:400:26:43

But the huge inspiration for you for the book was about your son

0:26:430:26:46

-because...

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:26:460:26:48

Because he's, like, four and a half now and he's a little monkey.

0:26:480:26:51

And, you know, I just wanted him to know,

0:26:510:26:53

because, sadly, I don't have folks any more,

0:26:530:26:55

so there are big gaps in my history of them

0:26:550:26:58

and just stuff like what they liked

0:26:580:27:00

and what they were afraid of and how they courted one another

0:27:000:27:03

and what was their favourite restaurant.

0:27:030:27:05

So, you know, I think I didn't want him

0:27:050:27:07

to get a point where he thought, "Well, what was my dad like?"

0:27:070:27:10

Now he's only four and he's probably not going to be allowed to read the book until he's 50 so, you know...

0:27:100:27:16

THEY LAUGH

0:27:160:27:17

But what was that like writing a book?

0:27:170:27:19

Because you've written so many different things but what's that like writing about your life?

0:27:190:27:23

-Because, you know...

-It was very indulgent. Can I use this spoon?

0:27:230:27:26

-You can use the spoon, yeah.

-Thanks. Yeah, I mean, it was...

0:27:260:27:28

You know, I knew what I wanted to do and I wrote it all down.

0:27:300:27:33

I've got a selection of notebooks that I use

0:27:330:27:37

and I tried to write down everything I could remember throughout my whole life

0:27:370:27:40

and then just saw if I could make stories around it.

0:27:400:27:43

And you did that all while doing this film as well.

0:27:430:27:46

Well, tell us about the film.

0:27:470:27:49

It's the second in our kind of Snow White, you know,

0:27:490:27:52

we did Snow White & The Huntsman and now we've just done The Huntsman with me,

0:27:520:27:56

Chris Hemsworth and lovely little Rob Brydon, Sheridan Smith.

0:27:560:28:01

I don't think I'll ever write a book and do a film at the same time.

0:28:010:28:05

-That's quite a lot of hard work.

-Yeah. It was just stupid.

0:28:050:28:09

Now, we've talked about the book

0:28:090:28:10

but we forgot to mention what it's called.

0:28:100:28:12

Oh, Truths, Half Truths And Little White Lies.

0:28:120:28:15

-Out now!

-Out now, there you go.

0:28:150:28:17

-What camera am I on?

-You do that while I'm pouring this in here.

0:28:170:28:20

-So, look... There's your dressing.

-Yeah.

0:28:200:28:24

Do you want me to stir that?

0:28:240:28:27

You can... We'll take the...

0:28:270:28:29

These little rice noodles.

0:28:310:28:33

There you go, we're going to pop those in as well.

0:28:330:28:35

And this will basically just warm everything up.

0:28:350:28:37

-Now, if you stir that together. You might need...use a bit of those.

-Yeah.

0:28:370:28:40

It might need some lime juice, fresh lime juice in there.

0:28:400:28:43

-I just binned a lot of rice noodles.

-You just binned a lot?

0:28:430:28:46

Yeah, I moved house on Monday and I found some

0:28:460:28:48

and I wasn't sure how long they'd been in that box.

0:28:480:28:50

-Well, this is it, you've got a new kitchen.

-I can't get rid of them.

0:28:500:28:52

-You're cooking in your new kitchen tonight?

-Yeah.

0:28:520:28:55

I've got like a plancha grill.

0:28:550:28:59

-Oh.

-Don't judge me!

0:28:590:29:01

LAUGHTER

0:29:010:29:02

-So, yeah, I'm going to be cooking on that tonight.

-All right.

0:29:020:29:05

-Are you induction or gas?

-I'm induction. I've gone full induction.

0:29:050:29:09

-He's on it.

-That's a section where I go induction

0:29:100:29:13

is not covered in my book, which is out now.

0:29:130:29:17

Look at that.

0:29:170:29:19

-Dive into that one.

-Can I?

-Yes, absolutely. That's all for you.

0:29:200:29:24

So that's your crab.

0:29:240:29:26

I usually have a thing where I don't like eating on telly

0:29:260:29:28

because people look and say, "Yeah, that's why he's so big."

0:29:280:29:31

-But it's like... Thank you!

-LAUGHTER

0:29:310:29:34

Mmm.

0:29:340:29:36

Oh, my God.

0:29:360:29:38

LAUGHTER

0:29:390:29:41

Now, try as he might, Nick couldn't hide his delight for that Asian-inspired dish.

0:29:470:29:51

And there's still plenty more to come on today's Saturday Kitchen Best Bites.

0:29:510:29:54

But up next, Theo Randall serves up a spicy sausage supper.

0:29:540:29:58

-Do you like Italian food?

-I do. I love Italian food.

-This boy's...

0:29:580:30:01

Well, actually, he's the best this side of Kennington Road.

0:30:010:30:04

Pizza Express is at the other side.

0:30:040:30:06

Right, what are you cooking then?

0:30:060:30:08

-This lovely spicy sausage, which is Italian style but actually come from England.

-Right, OK.

0:30:090:30:13

-So it's using...

-What's the Italian style in it?

0:30:130:30:16

Well, it's using things like pancetta and Prosciutto fat.

0:30:160:30:19

-Don't they have a lot of fennel seed in it?

-Fennel seed and a bit of chilli.

0:30:190:30:22

-Right.

-First of all, we're going to put our pasta in.

0:30:220:30:25

So in goes the penne.

0:30:260:30:28

But I'm mixing that with some Swiss chard, so if you chop an onion up for me

0:30:280:30:31

and we'll start off with a bit of olive oil as usual.

0:30:310:30:34

-In the pan. I'm going to take the skins off the sausage.

-Right.

0:30:350:30:40

And you've got this lovely seasoned sausage meat inside, like a mince.

0:30:400:30:44

Now, where would this be from in Italy?

0:30:440:30:46

Well, you get these type of sausages in Tuscany.

0:30:460:30:48

You know, every kind of butcher has all these trimmings of lovely bits of pork.

0:30:480:30:52

They eat huge amounts of pork in Tuscany.

0:30:520:30:54

But look at that skin, it just comes off really easily

0:30:540:30:57

and it's a beautiful mince inside.

0:30:570:30:59

So do they put more fat in Italian sausages?

0:30:590:31:02

Yeah, there's lots of fat. They kind of use spices, chilli, bay leaves,

0:31:020:31:07

fennel seeds, that kind of thing.

0:31:070:31:09

And then they mix it up with all the nice bits of pork belly fat

0:31:090:31:13

and then they use things like shoulder.

0:31:130:31:16

They will mince it up quite roughly, it's got a lovely sort of texture.

0:31:160:31:20

And then if you just take out the skin, it makes a brilliant pasta sauce.

0:31:200:31:24

-Onions straight in.

-And a little bit of pancetta.

0:31:280:31:31

Theo, could you use a British sausage?

0:31:310:31:34

You could use a British sausage

0:31:340:31:35

but you need something with quite a lot of fat.

0:31:350:31:38

-Like a Cumberland sausage?

-Yeah. Cumberland to a fine mince, I'd say.

-OK.

0:31:390:31:43

-Let's get a better knife for that.

-So the garlic has gone in as well.

0:31:440:31:48

The garlic's gone in, onion's gone in.

0:31:480:31:50

-Now, we're using some of this chard.

-Swiss chard.

0:31:500:31:52

So if you take the leaves off and cut the storks really, really fine,

0:31:520:31:56

like matchsticks.

0:31:560:31:57

This is fantastic stuff but it does grow a different colour.

0:31:570:32:00

You get the orange chard, the red chard.

0:32:000:32:01

-They call it rainbow chard, don't they?

-Yeah.

-And that is lovely.

0:32:010:32:05

The thing is, I always find the red chard can be slightly tough, though. Have you ever found that?

0:32:050:32:09

If you cook it it's got very stringy stalks.

0:32:090:32:11

-But you've going to use the entire lot?

-So a little bit of pancetta.

0:32:110:32:14

-You put plenty of onion in there, didn't you?

-I did put half in.

0:32:150:32:18

Let's put a bit more sausage in there to even it up.

0:32:200:32:22

-Is that chopped enough?

-A little bit finer, please.

0:32:220:32:25

Your knife skills aren't what they used to be.

0:32:290:32:30

It was fine in rehearsal and now you've just changed it.

0:32:300:32:33

-That's because I did it!

-Exactly!

0:32:330:32:35

We won't use that bit.

0:32:350:32:37

-So your restaurant is celebrating, what, your fifth year?

-Five years.

0:32:370:32:40

-I know, it's amazing, isn't it?

-Yeah. Five years.

0:32:400:32:43

Five years and going strong.

0:32:430:32:45

And it feels like five minutes ago but it also feels like 10 years.

0:32:450:32:49

OK, so those sausages are starting to break down, all that fat's coming out of them.

0:32:500:32:53

And that smoky pancetta is going to season this sausage

0:32:530:32:59

and the onion is there for the sweetness.

0:32:590:33:01

So if we get that chard in quickly.

0:33:020:33:04

-So what do you call this in Italian?

-Bietola.

0:33:040:33:07

-Bietola.

-Bietola.

0:33:070:33:10

-The French call it bette.

-They do call it bette, yeah.

-And we call it Swiss chard.

0:33:100:33:13

I used to cook it a lot when I was in France working over there, with liver.

0:33:150:33:19

Yeah, that's very nice.

0:33:200:33:21

And the stalks are lovely because you can blanch the stalks

0:33:210:33:23

and you can make a lovely gratin with eggs and cream

0:33:230:33:27

and cheese, like a...or something.

0:33:270:33:29

So quite sort of chunky. I'll just break that down.

0:33:310:33:34

Now, as well as celebrating your fifth year, you have started writing a new book, have you?

0:33:360:33:40

I've started writing.

0:33:400:33:41

I mean, I've got a lot of recipes which I've been collecting

0:33:410:33:44

over the years. The ones that I like to cook at home.

0:33:440:33:48

So, yeah, the new book is going to be quite a big one, I think.

0:33:480:33:51

Is that Spanish food or...?

0:33:520:33:55

-It's Japanese.

-Japanese.

0:33:550:33:57

Right, I'm going to put the stalks in.

0:33:570:33:59

-The stalks are in already, just put the tops of these ones in.

-OK.

0:33:590:34:02

So we just want to cook that sausage down.

0:34:020:34:04

So you've got all that sort of fennel and the garlic.

0:34:040:34:08

A little bit of chilli, bits of dried chilli.

0:34:080:34:09

Now, it's important to use the right pasta for the right dish.

0:34:090:34:12

Why are you using penne for this one?

0:34:120:34:14

Penne because it's penne regatta, which means it has got

0:34:140:34:17

the little lines on it, so it will hold the sauce.

0:34:170:34:19

I mean, you could use anything like a rigatoni or something

0:34:190:34:23

or even maybe a pappardelle, a flat egg pasta.

0:34:230:34:27

But this one, you know, it's quite an easy one

0:34:270:34:30

-and everyone likes penne, don't they?

-So just recap what we've got in there.

0:34:300:34:33

OK, so you fry the onion, a bit of garlic.

0:34:330:34:35

We've got the pancetta, we've got the sausages

0:34:350:34:37

and we're just breaking them down so they become a bit more manageable.

0:34:370:34:42

And you par-cooked this beforehand, so this is not real time.

0:34:420:34:45

Yeah, that's going to be out in a second.

0:34:450:34:47

OK, so I need a little bit of Parmesan. Shall I do that?

0:34:470:34:50

-I'll do that.

-What's that?

-Parmesan.

-Oh, I'll do that. Sorry.

0:34:500:34:53

I'll do that. There's a sink in the back if you want to wash your hands.

0:34:550:34:58

You are also doing the old food shows a lot this month.

0:34:580:35:02

Yeah, so I'm with you in Birmingham

0:35:020:35:06

and I'm actually doing a pop-up restaurant on the London Olympia

0:35:060:35:10

for the MasterChef weekend.

0:35:100:35:14

And I'm doing a demonstration Taste of London, Taste of Christmas.

0:35:140:35:19

So, yeah, I'm busy. Very busy.

0:35:190:35:20

OK.

0:35:220:35:23

Let's get this chard out now. I'm just going to drain the chard out.

0:35:230:35:27

The stalks are nice and soft.

0:35:270:35:30

How much Parmesan do you want, anyway?

0:35:300:35:33

That's tons.

0:35:330:35:35

I'm enjoying this, you see?

0:35:360:35:38

I'll keep going.

0:35:380:35:40

These are the best Christmas presents ever.

0:35:420:35:44

-Are they your own range?

-No.

0:35:450:35:46

LAUGHTER

0:35:460:35:49

-They will be soon.

-No, these are brilliant.

0:35:490:35:52

So, I'm putting the cream in, James.

0:35:520:35:53

They're good for the corns on your feet.

0:35:530:35:55

-A little bit of cream. You'll like this bit.

-What's that?

-The cream.

0:35:550:35:58

-It's cream.

-It's cream?

-Yeah.

-Double cream?

-Yeah.

0:35:580:36:01

-Your favourite.

-Double cream. I reckon it needs a bit more.

0:36:010:36:04

Oh, come on! We'll use that pasta water. All right, there you go.

0:36:040:36:07

-So, the chard has gone in.

-The chard's gone in.

0:36:090:36:11

So, a real classic one would probably have tomato in, but

0:36:110:36:14

I just thought Swiss chard adds a little, different dimension.

0:36:140:36:19

I want to show you this

0:36:190:36:20

because I know you are a fan of Italian produce.

0:36:200:36:22

-In fact, I was at Mr Tom Kerridge's restaurant last night...

-Yeah.

0:36:220:36:25

-Have I got to close my eyes?

-No.

0:36:270:36:29

-OK.

-This is from the UK.

0:36:290:36:32

Check that out. That is a UK-grown black truffle.

0:36:330:36:36

I don't believe it. That's amazing.

0:36:360:36:39

-Oh, my God, it smells good as well.

-Yeah!

0:36:400:36:43

-God, it...

-Get your hands off it.

0:36:430:36:45

That's a UK-grown black truffle. Look at that.

0:36:450:36:47

That'll be on tonight's menu, if I get my hands on that.

0:36:470:36:50

-It's lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's very nice.

0:36:500:36:52

Grown in the UK.

0:36:520:36:53

I did promise the guy not to tell you where it was

0:36:530:36:56

cos he's literally got it.

0:36:560:36:58

It's near Oxford. LAUGHTER

0:36:580:37:01

OK, so the pasta is in,

0:37:010:37:02

add a bit of the pasta cooking water to sort of help it along.

0:37:020:37:05

Now, you use a lot of this water in there, don't you?

0:37:050:37:08

Yeah, because it's starchy, so it gives it a sort of nice... It emulsifies...

0:37:080:37:11

Do you think this is the difference between a lot of people

0:37:110:37:14

adding a bit more sauce or oil, you'd use the water?

0:37:140:37:16

I always use water because then you don't...

0:37:160:37:18

You're not enriching the sauce too much.

0:37:180:37:20

You don't make the sauce too heavy.

0:37:200:37:21

Perhaps some people would add lots and lots more cream, but...

0:37:210:37:24

So, you've got chilli flakes in there as well.

0:37:240:37:26

Chilli flakes in there, Swiss chard, sausages, pancetta,

0:37:260:37:29

a bit of Parmesan.

0:37:290:37:31

Look at that. Nicely emulsified.

0:37:310:37:34

And then, I think we can probably plate that up.

0:37:340:37:36

Make sure it's all kind of creamy.

0:37:360:37:38

So all the sauce sticks to the actual pasta.

0:37:380:37:40

That's kind of what you want. And let's put that on a plate.

0:37:420:37:46

That's a lovely penne.

0:37:460:37:47

And if you can't find these Italian sausages...?

0:37:470:37:49

If you can't find Italian sausages...

0:37:490:37:51

-You can't really make the dish.

-You can't really make the dish.

0:37:510:37:54

-Yeah, exactly.

-Just get some alphabet spaghetti.

0:37:540:37:56

-That kind of stuff.

-Well, you could if you really want, but...

0:37:560:37:59

-Do you want a sprinkle of cheese?

-A little sprinkle of cheese.

0:37:590:38:02

-A little bit of pepper.

-While you explain what it is.

0:38:020:38:04

And that's my penne with spicy Italian sausages, pancetta,

0:38:040:38:07

Swiss chard, cream and Parmesan.

0:38:070:38:09

It's pretty good.

0:38:090:38:10

There you go.

0:38:150:38:16

All done.

0:38:180:38:19

Easy as that. Have a seat over there. Dive into that one.

0:38:190:38:22

-It looks hot.

-It is very hot, yeah.

0:38:220:38:25

-Tell us what you think of that.

-OK.

0:38:250:38:26

I'm a bit worried. It's embarrassing eating on the telly, innit?

0:38:260:38:30

-Particularly when it's hot.

-Mm! It is good.

0:38:300:38:32

Like you say, you've got to get the right type of pasta for that one.

0:38:330:38:36

It really is important cos a lot of pastas, you get the wrong pasta

0:38:360:38:39

and the sauce just falls away from the pasta, it doesn't hold to it.

0:38:390:38:42

-It's very important you get a ridge pasta.

-What do you think of gluten-free pastas?

0:38:420:38:45

-I think they're getting really good now.

-Yeah?

0:38:450:38:48

Some of the corn ones are really fantastic.

0:38:480:38:50

Just using corn. They are kind of yellow. The quality is really good.

0:38:500:38:53

Yeah, I'd go for rice myself, but you think corn is better?

0:38:530:38:56

I think the corn one has got more flavour. It tastes of something.

0:38:560:38:59

That's his own range. But anyway. LAUGHTER

0:38:590:39:01

-What do you reckon to that one?

-It's lovely.

-Happy?

-Isn't it lovely?

0:39:010:39:04

-Nice and simple.

-The sausage is really good.

0:39:040:39:07

The flavour, the meatiness of the sausage.

0:39:070:39:09

It's got fennel in there.

0:39:090:39:10

Just a fresh bit of English black truffle on the top.

0:39:100:39:13

-That would have been nice.

-You're not getting that one.

0:39:130:39:15

You're right, Mel, it is embarrassing eating live on TV.

0:39:190:39:22

And that's why you'll never catch me doing it.

0:39:220:39:24

A great dish there from Theo.

0:39:240:39:26

Now, it's over to Keith Floyd who is continuing his trip

0:39:260:39:28

around the UK and this week he is in Northern Ireland.

0:39:280:39:31

You now, after years,

0:39:320:39:34

I mean, literally decades on the road

0:39:340:39:36

making these cookery programmes,

0:39:360:39:38

I can sort of play a gastronomic blind man's buff.

0:39:380:39:41

I can put a mask on, I can taste a dish

0:39:410:39:44

and I can tell you where we are.

0:39:440:39:45

In fact, I'm so good at that kind of thing that

0:39:450:39:47

if I wanted to make another fortune, I could invent another board game.

0:39:470:39:50

I'd probably call it... I don't know, Gastropoly?

0:39:500:39:52

No, that doesn't ring right. I'd probably call it Culinary Pursuits.

0:39:520:39:55

You know, the kind of thing you would throw a six

0:39:550:39:58

and if it landed in Yorkshire, you'd get a pudding.

0:39:580:40:00

You throw another six in Lancashire and it gets a hotpot.

0:40:000:40:03

For example, where are we now?

0:40:030:40:05

Richard, spin the camera around. Give them a clue.

0:40:050:40:07

Look, cranes, hoists, jigs and stuff like that.

0:40:070:40:11

I'll give you another idea. This is also where they built the Titanic.

0:40:110:40:14

And if you were to eat this dish now, which I'm going to have

0:40:140:40:18

served to me, you would know exactly where we are.

0:40:180:40:21

Even if I might trip over this step, one look at this dish

0:40:210:40:23

will say one word to you, two syllables and it's delicious.

0:40:230:40:28

You've got it. It's Belfast.

0:40:290:40:30

And the famous Ulster Fry, the backbone of Northern Ireland,

0:40:300:40:34

the meal that launched a thousand ships. Look at it.

0:40:340:40:37

It is soda bread, it's potato cakes, it sausages,

0:40:370:40:40

wonderful Irish bacon, the best bacon in the world, in my view.

0:40:400:40:42

Eggs, tomatoes and stuff like that.

0:40:420:40:44

And they eat this at any time of day.

0:40:440:40:46

In fact, I wouldn't dream of starting a show without it.

0:40:460:40:48

Good breakfast even though it is 5.15.

0:40:480:40:51

Brilliant!

0:40:510:40:52

Before I started making these scrumptious little programmes,

0:40:590:41:02

all I had seen of Belfast was pictures on the news.

0:41:020:41:05

Pictures that for some strange reason didn't dwell on

0:41:050:41:07

the culinary heritage of this proud city.

0:41:070:41:10

I must confess, though, I didn't actually come here with a song in my heart,

0:41:100:41:13

but after a blinding breakfast at Benny's Cafe

0:41:130:41:16

and a few pints of the Imperial Stout,

0:41:160:41:18

not to mention an ear bashing by the most loquacious people on earth,

0:41:180:41:22

I thought I was in Florence.

0:41:220:41:23

This is the kind of thing that gets you arrested in these programmes, you know?

0:41:260:41:29

Walking around the streets of Belfast, gazing at the buildings

0:41:290:41:32

and the things behind you and talking to yourself.

0:41:320:41:34

Whereas, really, of course, I am thinking about the deep and profound

0:41:340:41:38

culinary meaning of this splendid city here in Northern Ireland.

0:41:380:41:41

I'm meant to cross the road here, but I forgot to do that.

0:41:410:41:44

Because La Direction, as our producer is affectionately known,

0:41:500:41:53

insists on giving a sense of place, here's one of me yet again

0:41:530:41:57

struggling through another anonymous city centre of these fair islands.

0:41:570:42:01

It's a great pity.

0:42:010:42:02

You wouldn't even know you were in Belfast, a city that exudes

0:42:020:42:06

joie de vivre like buckets of Guinness sloshing around your toes.

0:42:060:42:10

We went to celebrate the architecture of this city

0:42:100:42:12

by going to probably the most famous pub in the world,

0:42:120:42:16

but the BBC, through painstaking research, turned up when, of course,

0:42:160:42:19

this architectural jewel was clad in tarpaulins, camiknickers and...

0:42:190:42:25

HE LAUGHS

0:42:250:42:27

According to Oscar O'Flahertie Wills Wilde,

0:42:290:42:32

there are three great arts -

0:42:320:42:34

painting, music and ornamental cake decoration,

0:42:340:42:38

of which architecture is but a subdivision.

0:42:380:42:40

This is a brilliant pub, you know?

0:42:400:42:42

John Betjeman said it was the best in the universe, the best in the entire world.

0:42:420:42:46

Artists through the generations have adored it.

0:42:460:42:48

In fact, James Mason used it for his great film The Odd Man Out.

0:42:480:42:51

The advantage, of course, he had over me was that

0:42:510:42:54

he had a real director, Carol Reed. But, you know, look at it.

0:42:540:42:57

It's a cathedral to drink. Isn't it?

0:42:570:42:58

And that is not just a quick pun.

0:42:580:43:00

This was actually made and decorated by Italian craftsmen,

0:43:000:43:04

plasterers, sculptors and painters

0:43:040:43:06

who were moonlighting whilst building cathedrals and stuff.

0:43:060:43:09

What a wonderful way to earn a living,

0:43:090:43:11

much better than making spaghetti.

0:43:110:43:12

BELLS TOLL

0:43:120:43:14

Come in, my son, I'll hear your confession now.

0:43:140:43:17

Richard, don't look so serious. I know you've been a naughty boy,

0:43:190:43:21

but that was only a little joke, you see?

0:43:210:43:23

What we're really going to do here is

0:43:230:43:25

because I'm a kind of a sleuth, detective,

0:43:250:43:27

champing around the lanes, the byways, the pubs,

0:43:270:43:29

the bars, the bistros of these great British Isles of ours -

0:43:290:43:32

Ireland included - looking for things, I need help.

0:43:320:43:35

So, I read the Belfast Cookery Book

0:43:370:43:40

and it says pizza napoletana, fritto misto, quiche Lorraine,

0:43:400:43:43

tarte aux oignons, all that sort of stuff,

0:43:430:43:45

I thought that's not Irish food.

0:43:450:43:47

Somebody who knows about Irish food is my great mate,

0:43:470:43:49

and we are friends, unusually,

0:43:490:43:51

because often I say we've been friends for, like, minutes,

0:43:510:43:53

-but we've been friends for years.

-Yes, this is true.

0:43:530:43:55

-This is true, is not?

-Yes.

0:43:550:43:56

This is Niki Hill, she's the leading writer on the world's

0:43:560:43:59

oldest English-speaking, or English-written, newspaper

0:43:590:44:03

-which is called the Belfast...

-Newsletter.

0:44:030:44:05

-The Belfast Newsletter.

-250 years.

0:44:050:44:07

-Man and boy.

-Yes.

-It's a brilliant paper.

0:44:080:44:11

She wrote very nice things about me in that one,

0:44:110:44:13

that's why I've invited her on to my programme today

0:44:130:44:15

to pretend to be an expert because you are an expert, aren't you?

0:44:150:44:17

-Oh, of course, yes.

-On everything.

-Yes.

0:44:170:44:19

-On food in particular.

-Yes, very much so.

0:44:190:44:21

-I mean...

-A great eater.

-And a great eater.

0:44:210:44:23

I mean, is this stuff, this champ, this Irish stew, this hot whiskey,

0:44:230:44:27

this Murphy's, this brown bread and butter, these oysters,

0:44:270:44:30

-is this Irish food?

-The stew's not quite right.

0:44:300:44:32

Well, it's, you know, a stew is a stew is a stew.

0:44:320:44:35

The champ's not quite right but it's almost right

0:44:350:44:38

because champ is a big mound, it's like making cement.

0:44:380:44:40

It's a big mound of mashed potato with scallions in it.

0:44:400:44:42

What are scallions, for our English-speaking viewers?

0:44:420:44:45

Scallions are spring onions

0:44:450:44:46

and the spring onions must be stewed in milk beforehand

0:44:460:44:50

so they're are all nice and soft.

0:44:500:44:51

And then you make a big hole in the middle, as I say,

0:44:510:44:53

like making cement, and you put the butter in

0:44:530:44:55

and you make cement.

0:44:550:44:57

And it's high in whatever you like to think, but it tastes gorgeous.

0:44:570:45:01

Mrs Currie, if she's still in power, I don't know,

0:45:010:45:04

I don't follow politics,

0:45:040:45:05

says that the Northern Irish people are even worse

0:45:050:45:08

than the naughty people up in the north

0:45:080:45:10

for eating high cholesterol, fatty foods.

0:45:100:45:13

Well, you know it's eating and drinking.

0:45:130:45:15

We talk about having a feed of drink and we have a feed of food too.

0:45:150:45:17

I don't care about it, it's lovely.

0:45:170:45:19

I mean, without the Ulster fry after a night's drinking,

0:45:190:45:22

-you know, you'd be done for.

-How much has food changed?

0:45:220:45:24

I mean, trotting up and down the streets here, the Golden Mile

0:45:240:45:27

which I think once was a street of sort of brothels

0:45:270:45:30

-and women of the night.

-No, not quite.

-Not quite?

0:45:300:45:32

No, it was all insurance companies but it's now all restaurants because

0:45:320:45:35

everyone decided when the Troubles hit Northern Ireland in 1969,

0:45:350:45:39

they said, "Where am I going to go for my holidays?

0:45:390:45:41

"I'm going to get the hell out of here."

0:45:410:45:42

So they went to France and they went to Spain and they came back saying,

0:45:420:45:46

"I want paella and I want all these goodies,"

0:45:460:45:48

so hence the Golden Mile and hence all these restaurants.

0:45:480:45:51

But, listen, I mean, I'm not an interviewer.

0:45:510:45:54

I mean, I'm getting fed up with this journalistic bit.

0:45:540:45:57

At the end of the day, this is a cookery programme

0:45:570:45:59

so if you'll excuse me from trying to interview you,

0:45:590:46:01

which I do very badly, I want to go off and do some real cooking. OK?

0:46:010:46:06

-So, look, let's drink to ourselves...

-Yes.

0:46:060:46:07

..let's forget the camera because we're fed up with them.

0:46:070:46:10

-We can talk about the Golden Mile as it used to be 50 years ago...

-Oh!

0:46:100:46:13

..when they're not listening and stuff like that.

0:46:130:46:16

-In this booth?

-Well, what about this booth?

0:46:160:46:19

I must go down to the seas again, to the vagrant gypsy life,

0:46:190:46:23

to the gull's way and the whale's way

0:46:230:46:25

where the wind's like a whetted knife

0:46:250:46:27

and all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow rover

0:46:270:46:30

and a quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trek's over.

0:46:300:46:34

Good, hey? But it's really interesting, isn't it, in Portrush,

0:46:340:46:37

it's great to find a little restaurant

0:46:370:46:39

that celebrates the area?

0:46:390:46:40

George McAlpin is one of a growing breed of young chefs

0:46:400:46:43

who are not content to pay lip service to the French

0:46:430:46:46

but develop and exploit local produce

0:46:460:46:48

to create dishes that are second to none.

0:46:480:46:50

Here he's cooking salmon, halibut and lobster

0:46:500:46:53

in a light, creamy champagne and butter sauce.

0:46:530:46:57

Although it looks extravagant, this dish is quite simple

0:46:570:47:00

but what makes it superb is the freshness of the fish,

0:47:000:47:02

and lobster isn't essential, by the way,

0:47:020:47:04

and the immediacy of the cooking and serving.

0:47:040:47:07

You have to admit that was a virtuoso performance

0:47:070:47:10

of my new chum, George here.

0:47:100:47:11

George, bring that in a minute because I must taste it.

0:47:110:47:14

But, look, this is a town, like Clevedon in Somerset,

0:47:140:47:16

you would hardly find this sort of dazzling selection of stuff

0:47:160:47:19

around there and yet here we are on a blustery Northern Irish coast.

0:47:190:47:22

George, I must just taste this a sec, excuse me.

0:47:220:47:25

Mm. Divine.

0:47:280:47:30

What's this got to do with Ireland?

0:47:320:47:33

I mean, where's all this stuff come from?

0:47:330:47:35

Well, this is all locally caught, as I say, we're on the harbour

0:47:350:47:37

in Portrush and it's all caught by local fishermen.

0:47:370:47:40

It's absolutely supreme. Now, look. Look at this.

0:47:400:47:43

This I've never seen before.

0:47:430:47:45

Richard, come really close into that, please.

0:47:450:47:47

It's got caul on the outside, like a faggot.

0:47:470:47:49

Where did this dish come from?

0:47:490:47:51

Well, it's actually, brunoise of vegetables

0:47:510:47:53

and fillet of lobster roasted in the oven,

0:47:530:47:55

-served with a lobster sauce.

-And who...? It is your own...?

0:47:550:47:58

-Yes, yes.

-Where do you get your...?

0:47:580:48:01

Do you wake up in the middle of the night like a musician

0:48:010:48:03

and run for the Yamaha and say, "I must get that tune down,"

0:48:030:48:06

or is it a carefully thought out kind of thing?

0:48:060:48:08

Er, sometimes, some days, things come to you easier than others

0:48:080:48:11

-and...

-Well, this is...

0:48:110:48:13

Obviously you have to work at it and try different ideas

0:48:130:48:16

and sort of try and blend them,

0:48:160:48:18

get them all to work nicely together.

0:48:180:48:19

This has really come to me in a major way.

0:48:190:48:21

Richard, look at this, I'm going to cut

0:48:210:48:23

right through the middle of this.

0:48:230:48:25

See these very finely diced vegetables on the top,

0:48:250:48:27

inside the caul and the wonderful fillet of turbot

0:48:270:48:30

at the bottom there. I must just taste that

0:48:300:48:32

and this fabulous rich fish sauce.

0:48:320:48:35

You should feel very jealous, you lot.

0:48:350:48:37

Now this also fascinates me. What are those?

0:48:370:48:40

Richard, over here.

0:48:400:48:41

They're little port fillet chimneys wrapped in puff pastry.

0:48:410:48:43

Going to hack right down to there. What's that stuff on the top?

0:48:430:48:46

It's mushroom duxelles.

0:48:460:48:47

That sort of minced mushroom and onion and stuff like that.

0:48:470:48:50

Yes, and it's served with a rosemary jus.

0:48:500:48:52

Oh, wonderful, a jus. Richard, come back here.

0:48:520:48:54

A lovely rich, meat glazey sauce, flavoured with rosemary.

0:48:540:48:59

And this. Over here, quick!

0:49:000:49:02

We just haven't got the time to do

0:49:020:49:04

this brilliant young chef the justice. What is this here?

0:49:040:49:07

It's a fresh orange terrine filled with fresh summer fruits.

0:49:070:49:11

Ah...

0:49:110:49:12

A masterpiece. I have to say, George,

0:49:140:49:17

-that I award you the imperial stout for being brilliant.

-Cheers, Keith.

0:49:170:49:20

For being young, you make me feel like a passe 40-year-old

0:49:200:49:24

but it is my programme, so shoot off, if you don't mind.

0:49:240:49:26

I'm going to do some cooking now.

0:49:260:49:28

So, Richard, stay with me.

0:49:280:49:30

Off with the coat and on to a cooking a sketch right away.

0:49:300:49:34

So this, then, is the beef simmering gently in beef stock

0:49:350:49:40

and stout, absolutely perfect.

0:49:400:49:42

Richard, I hear you cry, what beef, what Guinness,

0:49:420:49:45

what stout, what stock?

0:49:450:49:47

Actually, this is the classic modern way of cooking beef

0:49:470:49:49

with oysters and Guinness.

0:49:490:49:51

You could say the perfect TV meal.

0:49:510:49:53

No, not that one, my dear. This one, actually.

0:49:530:49:55

This is the perfect TV dinner, look, wonderful local oysters,

0:49:550:49:59

fabulous fillet, little shallots, bit of brown sugar,

0:49:590:50:03

a wonderful meat glaze,

0:50:030:50:04

the reduction of beef bones and stock and stuff like that,

0:50:040:50:07

a little butter and some stout.

0:50:070:50:08

And as I always say...

0:50:080:50:09

Back to me, Richard, please. ..if it isn't good enough to drink,

0:50:090:50:12

it's not good enough to cook with, so I'll just check.

0:50:120:50:15

Absolutely perfect. Right,

0:50:150:50:16

we haven't got very much time, so I have already...

0:50:160:50:20

poached my fillet of beef...

0:50:200:50:22

in some meat stock and some stout. OK?

0:50:220:50:25

I've got it reduced down to that with a few shallots and a bay leaf.

0:50:250:50:29

Now for the important part of making the sauce.

0:50:290:50:31

Come in very close, you may walk, you...

0:50:310:50:34

You have actually got legs.

0:50:340:50:36

We put... Because of the bitter sauce you get from the stout

0:50:360:50:39

and beef stock, a little of the brown sugar, like that,

0:50:390:50:42

dissolve it in and then,

0:50:420:50:43

whisk in a few little knobs of butter.

0:50:430:50:47

A huge whisk.

0:50:470:50:49

And we whisk that until it gets creamy, shiny and unctuous,

0:50:490:50:54

which will take a second or two.

0:50:540:50:56

While that's just finishing off there,

0:50:560:50:58

I must now...

0:50:580:50:59

..concentrate, because I'm going to offer this to George in a moment,

0:51:010:51:04

you've seen what a brilliant chef he is. Just taste.

0:51:040:51:07

That brown sugar is essential into that,

0:51:080:51:10

it takes the bitterness away and gives it a superbly unctuous flavour.

0:51:100:51:14

Back a bit, please, Richard.

0:51:140:51:15

Right, sauce onto the plate, first of all,

0:51:150:51:18

strain through so we don't get the shallots and things.

0:51:180:51:20

OK? Like that.

0:51:200:51:21

Which is perfect.

0:51:230:51:25

Save a bit of that. Over there.

0:51:250:51:27

Now, while I cut up the meat,

0:51:270:51:29

I'm going to pop my little oysters in for a second or two.

0:51:290:51:32

OK, have a little close-up into there, Richard, if you can get it.

0:51:350:51:38

Just warm the oysters through. They are naturally raw.

0:51:390:51:43

You just want them glazed with the sauce,

0:51:430:51:45

only there for a second. OK, you've seen those. Right, back.

0:51:450:51:49

Oh, for the difficult bit.

0:51:490:51:51

We just carve that down.

0:51:510:51:53

Oh, cooked, if I may say, to perfection.

0:51:530:51:56

Pink in the middle.

0:51:560:51:57

Thin slivers of fillet of... fillet of beef.

0:51:570:52:01

Like that, one, two, three.

0:52:010:52:04

Maybe, cos this is for George, maybe I should make a bit of

0:52:040:52:07

a better effort there and overlap them, like that.

0:52:070:52:10

A little bit of my julienne of vegetables.

0:52:110:52:14

Trembling hands.

0:52:170:52:18

Do you know, I've made hundreds of these programmes,

0:52:180:52:20

I still get very nervous cooking for really talented people.

0:52:200:52:23

It's genuinely true, you know. I haven't...

0:52:230:52:26

cleaned that as well as I might. Right...

0:52:260:52:29

Oysters.

0:52:290:52:30

My oysters can go...

0:52:300:52:32

around here.

0:52:320:52:34

Like that, and I'll get a bit more of this...

0:52:370:52:40

sauce.

0:52:400:52:42

Now, OK, under the pressure, I don't suppose I presented that

0:52:430:52:46

as beautifully as George... But George, come and have a taste.

0:52:460:52:49

Tell me what you think.

0:52:490:52:51

I know you might criticise the presentation,

0:52:510:52:53

but see if the flavours are there.

0:52:530:52:55

Well, it looks very good.

0:52:550:52:57

Certainly tastes very good.

0:53:030:53:04

Do you want to tell several million people what you really think?

0:53:040:53:06

I think it's absolutely fabulous, I think that's one for our new menu.

0:53:060:53:10

-Really, truly?

-Yes, I do.

0:53:100:53:12

Righto, see how I feel about that.

0:53:120:53:14

Beautiful oysters. Beautiful beef.

0:53:140:53:18

Well, I told you George was a man of integrity.

0:53:200:53:22

Everything he said is true.

0:53:220:53:24

Those oysters are perfect, the beef was brilliant,

0:53:240:53:27

the sauce is fantastic.

0:53:270:53:29

I'm a bit proud.

0:53:290:53:30

No cooking programme of mine would be complete without a dollop

0:53:400:53:43

of mythology, and I'm standing here on the Giant's Causeway,

0:53:430:53:46

which, it says here on my tea towel, issued by the National Trust, was...

0:53:460:53:50

It's the Giant's Causeway, made by Finn McCool,

0:53:500:53:53

you remember Finn McCool in The Heartbreakers?

0:53:530:53:56

Great man in the early 17th century.

0:53:560:53:58

Anyway, he was fighting forever with this Scottish giant

0:53:580:54:01

over the water there, and they built this causeway

0:54:010:54:04

so they could do battle in the middle.

0:54:040:54:06

But Finn McCool was a pretty smart kind of guy,

0:54:060:54:09

and he'd heard that the Scottish giant was so big that he borrowed

0:54:090:54:13

his son's school uniform, you know, Just William's short trousers,

0:54:130:54:15

a blazer and a peaked cap,

0:54:150:54:17

walked across the causeway, so petrified of the Scottish giant,

0:54:170:54:20

he thought, blimey, if that's his son, what's his dad like?

0:54:200:54:23

He threw a little fit of pique and ripped up the causeway,

0:54:230:54:26

and this is all that remains.

0:54:260:54:28

HE LAUGHS

0:54:280:54:29

SLOW DRUMBEAT

0:54:290:54:32

MUSIC

0:54:330:54:35

Ah, the Bushmill's distillery. Yes, I remember.

0:54:350:54:38

Of course, taking me there is a bit like giving a strawberry donkeys,

0:54:380:54:41

but simply, to make the mash, the first stage,

0:54:410:54:44

you add water from the River Bush to Irish barley.

0:54:440:54:47

And the next thing I recall is the heady fumes of the wash,

0:54:470:54:50

this is where the yeast is added,

0:54:500:54:52

which feeds off the sugar to make the alcohol.

0:54:520:54:55

Then it's but a few wibbly, wobbly steps to the distillation plant,

0:54:550:54:58

where the raw spirit is circulated through the system three times.

0:54:580:55:02

I was surprised to learn that this is the oldest distillery

0:55:030:55:07

in the world, and was first granted a licence in 1608.

0:55:070:55:09

AD, of course.

0:55:090:55:11

So this then is the end of the process,

0:55:110:55:14

this is the end of the line.

0:55:140:55:15

This is where this wonderful spirit is stored in oak barrels

0:55:150:55:18

for up to 10 years, you know that? Before it's bottled.

0:55:180:55:22

But in the meantime, there's some other people getting

0:55:220:55:25

a real kick out of it, the angels,

0:55:250:55:27

because 20% of the liquor in these barrels evaporates up -

0:55:270:55:32

and they call this the angel's share.

0:55:320:55:35

MUSIC FADES OUT

0:55:390:55:41

Thanks, Keith. Now, as ever on Saturday Kitchen Best Bites, we're taking a look back

0:55:450:55:49

at some of the best moments from the Saturday Kitchen archives.

0:55:490:55:52

Still to come on today's show, it's Lawrence Keogh versus

0:55:520:55:55

Paul Rankin in a battle for the top spot in the Omelette Challenge.

0:55:550:55:59

French chef Daniel Galmiche is here

0:55:590:56:01

with a chicken and cucumber en papillote.

0:56:010:56:03

He cooks the chicken on a bed of cucumber, before topping

0:56:030:56:06

with toasted almonds and a paprika cream sauce.

0:56:060:56:08

And Elaine Paige faces her Food Heaven or Food Hell.

0:56:080:56:11

Did she get her Food Heaven - grilled salmon with tempura prawns?

0:56:110:56:14

Or her Food Hell - confit duck leg with a flageolet ragout

0:56:140:56:18

and celeriac mash? You're going to have to keep watching to find out.

0:56:180:56:21

But now, it's time for Jason Atherton,

0:56:210:56:23

who's serving up a Japanese-inspired mackerel dish.

0:56:230:56:26

Great to have you on the show.

0:56:260:56:28

Now, your little restaurant empire has suddenly grown

0:56:280:56:30

-since the last time you were on.

-Yeah.

0:56:300:56:32

We've got different flavours from different parts of the world,

0:56:320:56:35

where your restaurants are from, so what's the name of the dish?

0:56:350:56:37

Just barbecued mackerel with marinated beetroot and mooli,

0:56:370:56:40

-and matcha green tea.

-Sounds good to me.

0:56:400:56:42

So, you want me to fire off with this mooli, first of all?

0:56:420:56:45

If you can just peel it in nice, long strips.

0:56:450:56:47

-And make a giant tagliatelle, please.

-Peeler. Right.

0:56:470:56:49

-Somebody will get a peeler from somewhere.

-I'm going to fillet the mackerel.

-Yeah.

0:56:490:56:54

Take it straight down, take it straight off

0:56:540:56:55

-and we're going to cure this in a lime cure.

-Yeah.

0:56:550:56:58

With just sugar, salt, coriander seeds...

0:56:580:57:02

take it straight off...

0:57:020:57:03

You can tell when the mackerel is as fresh as possible,

0:57:030:57:05

because it's literally nice and firm, that's the key to it.

0:57:050:57:08

Yeah, making sure...

0:57:080:57:09

Any oily fish, you need to be as fresh... Any fish will be

0:57:090:57:12

fresh as possible, but you know, with the mackerel, even more so.

0:57:120:57:17

-So we take it straight off.

-So, tell me about your restaurants, then.

0:57:170:57:20

Because literally, you started off...

0:57:200:57:22

-Well, you've got the Pollen Street Social.

-Yeah.

0:57:220:57:24

-Which is in Mayfair.

-Yeah. And then, you've got...

0:57:240:57:27

they've expanded globally, really, these ones.

0:57:270:57:30

Yeah. Well, we, erm...

0:57:300:57:32

My business partner's from Singapore,

0:57:320:57:34

so the next obvious step was to open something in Singapore,

0:57:340:57:38

which we did about a year ago now, and then we...

0:57:380:57:41

It was really successful, so we opened another one,

0:57:410:57:44

which was really successful,

0:57:440:57:45

-so we opened another one...

-Another one!

0:57:450:57:47

No, no, it was just...

0:57:470:57:49

I don't know, I just enjoy running restaurants, you know?

0:57:490:57:52

And I've got a super bunch of talented guys work for me,

0:57:520:57:54

-so we make more partners and, yeah...

-Yeah?

0:57:540:57:57

-So we just launched in Hong Kong, a couple of weeks ago.

-Right.

0:57:570:57:59

Which has gone really, really well.

0:57:590:58:01

We've been a big success with 22 Ships.

0:58:010:58:03

-Which is on 22 Ship Street in Wan Chai.

-Right.

0:58:030:58:06

And it serves modern European tapas, so nice little dishes like this,

0:58:060:58:10

but in smaller portions where you can share it with your friends,

0:58:100:58:13

it's a 35-cover tapas bar,

0:58:130:58:14

it's really cool, playing funky music and, yeah...

0:58:140:58:17

Sounds pretty good. Sounds pretty good. This is...

0:58:170:58:20

-This dish is a mix of, not raw, because it's marinated...

-Yeah.

0:58:200:58:24

It's cured, but...

0:58:240:58:26

It was inspired by a trip to Japan,

0:58:260:58:28

which I went to in March with the family,

0:58:280:58:30

and we went to a famous sushi restaurant called Jiro.

0:58:300:58:34

And I wanted to emulate how he does sushi there,

0:58:340:58:38

so I won't serve sushi in my restaurant,

0:58:380:58:40

because I'm not a sushi chef, but this is near as damn to sushi.

0:58:400:58:43

But you have to train for so long

0:58:430:58:45

-to be able to do it properly, don't you?

-Yeah.

0:58:450:58:47

THEY TALK OVER EACH OTHER

0:58:470:58:49

You have to be able to understand the whole process,

0:58:490:58:52

a lot of people think it's just raw fish. It's much more than that.

0:58:520:58:55

Yeah, absolutely, so it's...

0:58:550:58:57

-I've got a knife there for you.

-You've got one. Thank you, Chef.

0:58:570:59:00

You need to get a new knife block, cos it keeps sticking.

0:59:020:59:04

All right, so I'll replace that, yeah.

0:59:040:59:06

GENTLE LAUGHTER

0:59:060:59:07

We're just going to squeeze the lime juice.

0:59:070:59:09

So, in here, we've got sugar, salt, lime zest, coriander seeds

0:59:090:59:13

and pepper, and then we're just going to put all the lime juice in,

0:59:130:59:16

make a little cure, put it over the top,

0:59:160:59:19

-we'll leave these in the fridge for a couple of hours...

-Yeah.

0:59:190:59:22

..until they're nice and marinated.

0:59:220:59:24

Is that where you love your Asian flavours from,

0:59:240:59:26

from your travels, as well?

0:59:260:59:27

Absolutely, my mother actually lived in Indonesia for many years.

0:59:270:59:31

She was from Holland originally, so I grew up with Asian food,

0:59:310:59:34

and in World War II, she was a prisoner of the Japanese,

0:59:340:59:38

so we weren't introduced to Japanese food until I left home,

0:59:380:59:41

and then I fell madly in love with Japanese food.

0:59:410:59:44

-My mother could never take the raw thing...

-Yeah.

0:59:440:59:47

She just wouldn't do that, but I love it...

0:59:470:59:50

Anything Asian, I love.

0:59:500:59:51

-Yeah, yeah. Me, too.

-You've got a big mix and match here, really.

0:59:510:59:54

Like you said, you use a lot of British ingredients,

0:59:540:59:56

-we've got some beetroot...

-Beetroot over there.

0:59:560:59:59

So this is the cure. Explain to us what's going on here...

0:59:591:00:01

Just salt, sugar, lime juice,

1:00:011:00:04

pepper and, erm, coriander seeds, which have just been crushed.

1:00:041:00:08

-Yeah?

-We're just going to stick at over the top.

1:00:081:00:10

And then, with those, we're just going to peel them,

1:00:101:00:14

we keep the skins and then we blend the skins with oil

1:00:141:00:17

to make this little cucumber oil,

1:00:171:00:18

which we're going to dress the plate with.

1:00:181:00:20

-Right, so you're not wasting any of it, really?

-No.

1:00:201:00:23

-JAMES COUGHS

-With the spoon there.

1:00:231:00:24

-And with the beetroots, we just thinly slice them.

-Yeah?

1:00:241:00:27

Thinly slice the beetroot and then marinate it in honey,

1:00:271:00:31

sugar, garlic and just a little bit of vinegar and some thyme.

1:00:311:00:34

And then that's the... And then...

1:00:361:00:38

Now, although you've got the Pollen Street Social, like we said,

1:00:381:00:41

which is in central London,

1:00:411:00:42

you travel a lot, particularly you spend, you know,

1:00:421:00:45

a lot of time when you're over in that neck of the woods in Asia.

1:00:451:00:48

Yeah. Not too much.

1:00:481:00:49

I mean, I've got one restaurant in London and... Not only one,

1:00:491:00:52

you know, a very important one, we've got one restaurant in London

1:00:521:00:56

and I spend nine months a year in London and three months a year in...

1:00:561:01:00

over in Asia, you know.

1:01:001:01:01

-My wife's from that part of the world, so it works.

-Yeah.

1:01:011:01:04

So we spend...we take the kids over there and we...

1:01:041:01:06

And what about getting British ingredients over there?

1:01:061:01:09

Do you have to...?

1:01:091:01:10

You can fly them in, you know, so we fly British ingredients in,

1:01:101:01:14

but we try to use local ingredients,

1:01:141:01:16

I think that's really important, rather than trying to keep

1:01:161:01:18

flying in ingredients all round the world...

1:01:181:01:20

In Britain, we use ingredients here

1:01:201:01:22

and in Asia, we use Asian food over there...

1:01:221:01:23

-So that's your fish. You're basically...

-Yeah.

1:01:231:01:26

Put the marinade over the top.

1:01:261:01:27

-And leave that to one side.

-In goes that.

1:01:271:01:30

And then you want me to...

1:01:301:01:31

This is this Japanese radish, this mooli. You want me

1:01:311:01:34

-to use some of this beetroot juice...?

-Yes, please. Yes.

1:01:341:01:36

Basically, we've just juiced a whole beetroot

1:01:361:01:39

and then we've stained the mooli with it.

1:01:391:01:41

You can actually buy this, I believe, as well...

1:01:411:01:44

You can buy it from health food stores, this beetroot juice.

1:01:441:01:47

You shouldn't be buying things, James, if you're a chef...

1:01:471:01:50

Well, it actually saves you a lot of mess.

1:01:501:01:52

-It's not about saving time...

-It's mess more than anything else.

1:01:521:01:55

Beetroot juice everywhere.

1:01:551:01:57

-Just got a bit of that.

-We're just going to wash off the cure.

1:01:571:02:01

How long would you marinate that for...?

1:02:011:02:03

Just a couple of hours, that's all, just till it starts to take the cure on.

1:02:031:02:06

-OK.

-And then...

1:02:061:02:08

I'll move the limes out of the way.

1:02:081:02:10

We'll just take two...

1:02:111:02:12

This, you can actually eat like this as well, now.

1:02:121:02:15

Yeah, absolutely, yeah. Just take the two nice big fillets off.

1:02:151:02:18

And it alters the texture massively, as well.

1:02:181:02:20

Yeah, absolutely, it makes it a little bit firmer.

1:02:201:02:23

So if you can just barbecue those for me, James, that would be great.

1:02:231:02:26

-You want me to do this?

-Yes, please, yeah.

1:02:261:02:28

I'm just going to trim them up.

1:02:281:02:29

-Barbecue or blowtorch it, you want me to use?

-Yeah.

1:02:291:02:32

This is a technique they do with sushi.

1:02:321:02:34

So with sushi fish, they'll, erm...

1:02:361:02:37

Halfway through your sushi tasting menu,

1:02:391:02:41

-you'll have a piece of fish that's been barbecued in this way.

-Right.

1:02:411:02:45

And is it...? This would be done on a grill...?

1:02:461:02:49

-I mean, we're using a blowtorch...

-No, they use blowtorches.

1:02:491:02:52

-Do they?

-That's where I got the technique from, yeah.

1:02:521:02:55

So...

1:02:551:02:56

Basically, in here now with the,

1:02:561:02:57

what you've blowtorched, we've...

1:02:571:03:00

just put lemon juice, a little bit...

1:03:001:03:02

Which I've got there...

1:03:021:03:03

-That's your cucumber.

-So we put it in.

1:03:031:03:05

-So that's your cucumber and everything.

-OK. Fresh knife.

1:03:051:03:09

So the idea is it just alters the texture of it...

1:03:101:03:12

Well, the flavour as well, but you can actually,

1:03:121:03:15

because it's cured, you don't need to cook it all the way through...

1:03:151:03:18

Exactly.

1:03:181:03:19

Just cut those down like so, put them in there, leave them

1:03:191:03:21

in the fridge for a couple of hours.

1:03:211:03:23

here's some we've done earlier. That's ready to go. We've got our...

1:03:231:03:27

-Right, I think I'm there with this one.

-That's fine, that's fine.

1:03:271:03:30

It's mostly on the skin, James.

1:03:301:03:32

Yeah. On the skin.

1:03:321:03:34

Where's the beetroot?

1:03:341:03:36

It's a great way to actually cook these,

1:03:391:03:41

cos I know you can actually cook this, as well, so...

1:03:411:03:44

Yeah.

1:03:441:03:45

-That's it. Have you got it?

-There you go.

-Well done.

-Right...

1:03:451:03:48

We're ready to go.

1:03:481:03:50

-Thank you.

-There you go. A quick clean.

-Right, so...

1:03:511:03:55

Then I'll get the...

1:03:551:03:56

I'll drain off those for you.

1:03:561:03:58

On goes the...mackerel.

1:03:581:04:00

Like so.

1:04:021:04:03

Thank you.

1:04:031:04:05

-And we'll build this up.

-Yeah.

1:04:051:04:07

Really pretty, we'll just drain off the cucumber...

1:04:071:04:10

-Right.

-Get rid of that, if you can just drain off that...

-Yeah...

1:04:101:04:13

These are the beetroot that you've also cured, have you, as well?

1:04:131:04:16

-Yeah...

-These ones.

1:04:161:04:17

So this is...a little bit of thyme gone in there...

1:04:191:04:22

-Thyme, honey...

-Yeah?

-Garlic.

1:04:221:04:24

-Little bit of oil...

-Yeah.

1:04:241:04:26

And we just build these up so we get a really nice

1:04:261:04:29

pretty little, almost like tagliatelle, but it's raw salad,

1:04:291:04:32

because you try to emulate... The whole thing about Japanese cuisine,

1:04:321:04:35

-the majority of it is raw, you know?

-Right.

1:04:351:04:38

So I just want to emulate that with the salad

1:04:381:04:41

and the leaves and stuff...

1:04:411:04:42

Do you want to pick through those flowers for me?

1:04:421:04:44

-Pick the flowers?

-Yes, please.

1:04:441:04:46

-Right.

-Yeah.

1:04:461:04:48

On top, like so.

1:04:481:04:50

Then we put the marinade beetroot around.

1:04:521:04:54

So these are just a mix and match of different edible flowers, then.

1:04:541:04:58

And normally with this, James,

1:04:581:04:59

we'd serve a nice quenelle of horseradish cream,

1:04:591:05:01

to emulate the wasabi, but I know you hate horseradish,

1:05:011:05:04

-so I got banned from using it.

-Yeah.

1:05:041:05:06

-It's dreadful stuff. It's the food of the devil.

-Can you believe that?

1:05:061:05:09

JAMES STIFLES LAUGHTER

1:05:091:05:10

-Right.

-That's that.

-Yeah.

1:05:101:05:12

-What's next?

-That's it, we're just going to put the flowers around,

1:05:121:05:15

a little bit of the cucumber oil.

1:05:151:05:17

There's that cucumber. You make that out of the skins...

1:05:171:05:20

-Just from the skins.

-Right.

1:05:201:05:23

Yeah. We're going to sprinkle a little...

1:05:231:05:25

Now this is matcha, this is the green tea, isn't it?

1:05:251:05:27

Yeah, this is green tea...

1:05:271:05:28

-It's wonderful stuff.

-And the cucumber skins.

-All right.

-OK?

1:05:281:05:31

-So that goes on like so.

-You've got some of that dressing

1:05:311:05:34

-that you want in there.

-Bit of the dressing on there, like so.

1:05:341:05:37

Remind us what that is again?

1:05:381:05:39

This is barbecue mackerel with barbecued cucumber,

1:05:391:05:43

fresh mooli dressed in beetroot

1:05:431:05:45

and cucumber skin oil.

1:05:451:05:48

-How good does that look?

-There we go.

1:05:481:05:51

You made that look easy, that one.

1:05:551:05:57

-It is easy.

-It looks...

-That is a piece of art.

1:05:571:05:59

-How does that look?

-It looks too good to be eaten.

-There you go.

1:05:591:06:03

-My goodness.

-Dive in.

1:06:031:06:04

-I get to dive in...

-Yeah, tell us what you think.

1:06:041:06:06

Like you said, the mackerel has got that unique texture

1:06:061:06:09

when you use the blowtorch, really.

1:06:091:06:11

Tom Kerridge did it actually like that, he did it with beetroot

1:06:111:06:14

but he didn't cure it beforehand, but it's really...

1:06:141:06:16

He cooks it all the way through with the blowtorch, it's...

1:06:161:06:19

-Mm.

-With a whole team of chefs, on the blowtorch...

1:06:191:06:21

With blowtorches. Good?

1:06:211:06:23

-It's so simple, but...

-It is fantastic.

-There you go.

1:06:231:06:26

-And I would never, ever have tried mackerel.

-No, it's really nice.

1:06:261:06:30

-It's really, really fresh, that's the key to mackerel, isn't it, really?

-Yeah.

1:06:301:06:33

What a work of art there from Jason, although I'm not so sure

1:06:381:06:40

about all those orange shirts, never a good look.

1:06:401:06:43

Anyway, now it's Omelette Challenge time,

1:06:431:06:45

as Lawrence Keogh takes on Paul Rankin in a battle

1:06:451:06:48

to make it to the top of the board.

1:06:481:06:50

It's not rocket science. Now, Paul...

1:06:501:06:52

You're not far off...

1:06:531:06:55

You know, I used to be in that sort of top five...

1:06:551:06:57

I did say it's not rocket science, but it probably is for these two.

1:06:571:07:00

But a respectable time, 38 seconds.

1:07:001:07:02

I did do 28 the last time, you disqualified me.

1:07:021:07:05

Yeah, well, it wasn't cooked.

1:07:051:07:06

And literally, 38 seconds, tried to get further up on the board,

1:07:061:07:09

however, the other fella, Lawrence, is trying to get ON the board.

1:07:091:07:12

-Nice.

-Because disqualification

1:07:121:07:15

cost him the green bit in there, it wasn't even cooked.

1:07:151:07:19

All right, are you ready, boys?

1:07:191:07:21

I know they've been practising, cos I did actually

1:07:211:07:24

speak to his sous chef and you've been practising in the kitchen.

1:07:241:07:26

Oh, yeah! Bring it on.

1:07:261:07:27

You can choose what you like from the ingredients put in front of you,

1:07:271:07:30

it must be an omelette and not a scrambled egg,

1:07:301:07:32

-three-egg omelette, three-egg...

-Three, well, it does say...

1:07:321:07:35

Butter, cream, cheese, milk, you can use whatever you want,

1:07:351:07:38

but it must be a three-egg, folded, seasoned preferably,

1:07:381:07:41

and cooked as quick as you can.

1:07:411:07:43

Are you ready? Three...

1:07:431:07:44

Put the hands back. LAUGHTER

1:07:441:07:45

Three, two, one, go. MUSIC STARTS

1:07:451:07:48

Whoo-hoo!

1:07:481:07:50

Oh, no.

1:07:501:07:51

JAMES LAUGHS

1:07:511:07:53

-Oh, Mr Rankin.

-Mr Rankin.

1:07:531:07:55

-Look at the concentration.

-Oh, look at the concentration!

1:07:581:08:00

JAMES LAUGHS

1:08:001:08:02

I think he's just ahead of you, Lawrence.

1:08:021:08:05

-I think...

-It's not far off, it's not far off, it's not far off.

1:08:051:08:09

SYMBOLS CLASH

1:08:091:08:10

It's not bad, not bad.

1:08:101:08:12

-Is it in the green bit?

-Wow!

1:08:121:08:15

-Come on, Lawrence.

-Come on, Lawrence.

-It's stuck to it.

1:08:151:08:19

SYMBOLS CLASH Yeah, lovely...

1:08:191:08:21

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE Not bad, respectable time.

1:08:211:08:23

But... LAUGHTER

1:08:251:08:27

-It was the pan.

-I'll let you off that one.

1:08:271:08:30

I shall try it, though.

1:08:301:08:31

Lawrence, I have to say, Lawrence, yours looks

1:08:311:08:34

probably the best of the two.

1:08:341:08:35

-It's folded.

-Well...

-It's folded, Chef, and seasoned.

1:08:351:08:38

Is the green bit not cooked? On the boards?

1:08:381:08:40

-Yeah.

-It's great.

1:08:421:08:43

-That's a quality omelette.

-No, I like that, it's very nice.

1:08:431:08:45

What is that? How many eggs are in that pan, you reckon?

1:08:451:08:48

This, however, is not...really...

1:08:481:08:50

I'll let you win.

1:08:541:08:56

-Lawrence.

-Thank you.

1:08:571:08:58

Well...

1:08:581:09:00

-We can lose your face off there.

-Oh...

1:09:011:09:04

You did it...

1:09:041:09:05

He beat all this...

1:09:081:09:09

You beat his time.

1:09:111:09:12

But was it enough to get on here?

1:09:121:09:14

Not quite, but 32 seconds...

1:09:141:09:16

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE ..is pretty respectable.

1:09:161:09:18

LAUGHTER

1:09:181:09:20

-Put his little mug on there, there we go.

-Thank you.

-Pretty good.

1:09:201:09:23

However, Mr Rankin...

1:09:231:09:25

LAUGHTER

1:09:251:09:26

It's not my best omelette, but I suspect it's my quickest one.

1:09:261:09:29

LAUGHTER

1:09:291:09:31

That can go, 38 seconds.

1:09:311:09:34

-You can go straight on to here.

-Oh, good man.

1:09:361:09:38

You can go straight up to here. GASPS IN BACKGROUND

1:09:381:09:41

You could even go straight up to here...

1:09:411:09:44

Oh, yes!

1:09:441:09:45

-Look at him!

-LAUGHTER

1:09:471:09:49

22 seconds...

1:09:491:09:51

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

1:09:511:09:53

Bring it on!

1:09:531:09:54

Who said it's not competitive?

1:09:561:09:58

A closely fought battle there, with both climbing the leaderboard,

1:10:021:10:05

although not quite reaching the top.

1:10:051:10:07

Now it's over to Daniel Galmiche, who's serving up a chicken dish

1:10:071:10:10

using a classic French method.

1:10:101:10:13

-Hi.

-Welcome back, Daniel.

1:10:131:10:14

-Hello, James.

-And chicken en papillote.

-Yes.

1:10:141:10:16

We've done different things en papillote over the years.

1:10:161:10:19

-Which is generally fish.

-Fish normally. But never this one.

-But just with a difference,

1:10:191:10:22

-because we're using cucumber as a vegetable this time.

-OK.

1:10:221:10:25

And it keeps its crunch, and it's very moist.

1:10:251:10:28

-It's an interesting dish. It's very different.

-Right. So, fire away.

1:10:281:10:31

What do we need first of all?

1:10:311:10:32

So we need some kind of large julienne of cucumber.

1:10:321:10:36

-I'm going to pan fry it.

-Large julienne.

1:10:361:10:38

It's not really...kind of baton things, isn't it, really?

1:10:381:10:42

-Yeah, baton, yeah.

-OK.

1:10:421:10:43

And I'm going to just start to roast some chicken.

1:10:431:10:49

Now, I've said this before.

1:10:501:10:51

-The French cook with cucumber quite a lot.

-Yes, we do.

1:10:511:10:54

-Also lettuces and stuff like that.

-Correct.

1:10:541:10:55

-We tend not to do it so much.

-Yeah. It's nice as a vegetable,

1:10:551:10:58

and it's crunchy, it's fresh,

1:10:581:11:00

and it's not heavy as a dish. So I really like it.

1:11:001:11:03

And I take it you want the seeds taken out of here, then?

1:11:031:11:05

Yes, please, yeah. OK.

1:11:051:11:06

I'm going to put as well a touch of paprika within it,

1:11:061:11:10

-and a touch of cream.

-Yes.

1:11:101:11:12

Right, so about that length, that's all right?

1:11:131:11:16

Yeah, that's perfect, yeah. OK, there you go.

1:11:161:11:18

Now, I'm going to take the seeds out, because they contain

1:11:201:11:23

quite a bit of water, these ones.

1:11:231:11:25

-Yeah.

-Just going to start to reduce a little bit of cream.

1:11:251:11:29

So how's life at the vineyard, then?

1:11:291:11:32

Because for anybody who doesn't know, wine is the big...

1:11:321:11:35

-Big thing, yeah.

-Big thing.

-Absolutely.

1:11:351:11:37

Obviously, your food, of course,

1:11:371:11:38

but the wine is of huge importance to the place?

1:11:381:11:41

Yeah, I would say it's 50-50, completely.

1:11:411:11:43

Because, officially, as you know, James,

1:11:431:11:45

we've got so much wine and we serve so many wines by the glass,

1:11:451:11:49

which is actually the way people dine much more with it now.

1:11:491:11:53

They want to discover different wines from different regions,

1:11:531:11:56

different countries, and we are specialised too much.

1:11:561:12:00

-Glass of wine to every dish we're doing.

-OK.

1:12:011:12:04

And it's a very elegant way of dining, very popular.

1:12:041:12:08

People like that, to discover, they're like,

1:12:081:12:10

five course, six course, seven course.

1:12:101:12:13

Of course, the menu's changed a bit from what it used to be like,

1:12:131:12:18

-really.

-Yes.

-Much more...

1:12:181:12:19

You have changed that and made it a little bit lighter and

1:12:191:12:22

-a little bit...

-Yes, there is quite a big difference now than we...

1:12:221:12:28

Well, the food is obviously very French, as you know.

1:12:281:12:31

It's much lighter and I think it's... Wine is what we do.

1:12:311:12:36

We base really more on that than before.

1:12:361:12:40

Right, so what are you doing?

1:12:401:12:41

Just getting a bit of colour on the chicken, then?

1:12:411:12:43

Yes, a bit of colour on the chicken.

1:12:431:12:45

-OK.

-A little bit goes in here.

-Roasted the almond.

1:12:451:12:48

Particularly, Dan, I mean, cooking with cucumber,

1:12:481:12:51

you don't often get that, really, particularly like this,

1:12:511:12:53

cooking it down so it ends up...

1:12:531:12:55

-No.

-Serving it as a veg, I mean.

1:12:551:12:57

Yeah, I quite like to barbecue it as well. Chargrilled, it's quite nice.

1:12:571:13:00

Right, so we've got this. You want me to cook this?

1:13:021:13:04

-Yes, please, yeah.

-OK.

-Touch in here.

-Hot pan.

1:13:041:13:06

-Touch in here.

-OK. So what have we got here, then?

1:13:061:13:09

You're making a little sauce for it?

1:13:091:13:11

Yes, a little bit of sauce on the side.

1:13:111:13:13

I need to whip some cream, if you could take one second to do that.

1:13:131:13:15

-Yeah.

-And add that at the end of it, and despite its cream,

1:13:151:13:18

when it's whipped like this, it's much lighter,

1:13:181:13:22

because we put a lot of air in it.

1:13:221:13:24

-Now, this is a recipe from what?

-From the new book.

-Your second book?

1:13:261:13:30

-Oh, yes.

-Yes, the second book. It's not new any more, but yeah.

1:13:301:13:32

It's called Revolutionary French Cooking.

1:13:321:13:35

The reason I call it that way is because I reviewed all the dishes,

1:13:351:13:38

and made them much lighter. Used a technique we use

1:13:381:13:41

in a vineyard which you can't necessarily have at home,

1:13:411:13:45

and just adapt, whether it is cooking parcel,

1:13:451:13:48

cooking in clingfilm,

1:13:481:13:50

in some water, this kind of thing.

1:13:501:13:54

-So it's great.

-OK.

-There you go.

1:13:541:13:56

Here we go with the cucumber.

1:13:581:14:00

-I'm going to use that pan. Can I use that pan?

-Yes, you can, yeah.

1:14:001:14:03

-Nice and hot. There you go.

-It will give a nice colour.

1:14:031:14:06

-So you want colour on the cucumber first.

-Yes.

1:14:061:14:09

I'm assuming no salt in there, then, first?

1:14:091:14:11

Because that's going to dry up the moisture even more.

1:14:111:14:13

Yeah, no, just a little bit I use. Just a bit of colour in here.

1:14:131:14:16

-That is all, just a bit of a whisk in here.

-I'll get a plate there.

1:14:161:14:18

So where do you get your inspiration from, then?

1:14:181:14:21

Well, obviously I've been training with Michel Roux,

1:14:211:14:24

at the Gavroche. So, very classical training, but...

1:14:241:14:28

-But French food's changed over the years.

-Yes.

1:14:281:14:30

And I do not like heavy food.

1:14:301:14:32

So therefore, I always use the best of the season,

1:14:321:14:35

the best of the ingredients, and make them a simple way, but not heavy.

1:14:351:14:39

I cannot do with heavy food.

1:14:391:14:41

And so I try a different way of things, and look at...

1:14:411:14:45

kind of, the way Mum used to cook, perhaps, and just redo

1:14:451:14:51

some of the dishes much more modern, I would say.

1:14:511:14:55

-OK.

-So could you do this with fish?

1:14:551:14:57

I mean, I'm assuming you could do it with cucumber.

1:14:571:15:00

-Something like sea bass would work.

-Oh, you could do, yeah. Yes.

1:15:001:15:03

One other fish comes to mind with that.

1:15:031:15:05

For example, plaice, which is in season at the moment.

1:15:051:15:08

That would be really, really nice.

1:15:081:15:10

And in there, you've got this paprika.

1:15:101:15:12

-Yes, a little bit of paprika.

-Yes.

1:15:121:15:15

-So that's just cream and paprika? Nothing else?

-For the moment, yeah.

1:15:151:15:19

-Any particular paprika? The smoked one or not?

-I like the smoked one.

1:15:191:15:22

This one, we make it a little bit more spicy.

1:15:221:15:24

And cucumber will release a bit of juice, so will do the chicken.

1:15:241:15:28

So therefore, you won't lose any moisture.

1:15:281:15:30

-Ideas for Christmas, Sam, you see!

-I know!

1:15:301:15:33

-Would you serve that parcel at the table?

-You can do that, actually.

1:15:331:15:36

Probably it would be fun.

1:15:361:15:40

And the thing with parcels,

1:15:401:15:42

people always want to open and discover what's in it as well.

1:15:421:15:44

-And the aroma when you open it.

-And the aroma is amazing.

1:15:441:15:47

Absolutely. Yeah.

1:15:471:15:48

Right. There's the almonds as well.

1:15:481:15:50

-Kids will go straight for the cucumber.

-Toasted.

1:15:501:15:53

OK.

1:15:531:15:54

-And move that over there.

-There we are.

-This one in here?

-Yeah, ready.

1:15:581:16:03

How long for?

1:16:031:16:05

-How long for?

-Oven 180-200 Celsius, or 350 Fahrenheit for 12 minutes.

1:16:051:16:12

Two minutes rest plus the roasting time,

1:16:121:16:14

so it's about altogether 16, 16 minutes.

1:16:141:16:17

Are you going to make a sauce out of this?

1:16:171:16:19

-I'll tidy up for you.

-Yeah, yeah.

1:16:191:16:21

-Yeah, it's this one, yeah.

-There you go.

1:16:211:16:24

There you go.

1:16:241:16:25

So the sauce, we then take the liquor from the...?

1:16:251:16:27

-Yes.

-This as well.

-Correct, yeah.

1:16:271:16:29

I'll get you a plate to put that on.

1:16:321:16:34

So you see, it did release a little bit more juice in here,

1:16:351:16:37

which is good.

1:16:371:16:39

-Are you getting a spoon?

-Yes. I'm sorry, yeah!

1:16:411:16:45

Because I'm going to put that straightaway.

1:16:451:16:47

So these soften right up?

1:16:471:16:48

Yes, completely, but what I mean by that is stay crunchy.

1:16:481:16:51

Or the colour is lost a little bit.

1:16:511:16:53

-How are they not stressed right now?

-And then you put it back in there?

1:17:001:17:02

How are you not stressed right now?

1:17:021:17:04

-I'd be like...

-SHE PANTS

1:17:041:17:06

-Stressed?

-Yeah. I'm a manic cooker!

1:17:061:17:09

-Is there stuff everywhere?

-Yeah!

1:17:091:17:11

-A little bit of the whipped cream there.

-Right.

1:17:121:17:15

And the whipped cream keeps this nice and light, you were saying?

1:17:151:17:18

Yes. I would stop the gas, eh?

1:17:181:17:20

-OK, there you go.

-Yeah.

1:17:231:17:25

-So you're ready... And almost, it's just finished as easy as that?

-Yeah.

1:17:251:17:29

OK. I'll slice the chicken for you as well.

1:17:291:17:31

I'll have the whisk from you in a second.

1:17:331:17:35

Now, we mentioned that, but I mean...

1:17:351:17:37

it's nice and cooked, this, and it keeps it lovely and moist.

1:17:371:17:41

Yes, it does, and that's what we say

1:17:411:17:43

when we cook like this in a parcel.

1:17:431:17:46

Little more of that.

1:17:491:17:50

Now, this is the spicy one?

1:17:511:17:53

-This one is a little bit spicy, yes.

-So that is the piquant.

1:17:531:17:56

-Yeah, piquant.

-Yeah. Paprika one.

-Yeah.

1:17:561:17:59

So just a little bit like that.

1:17:591:18:01

A little bit fancy, that. It's a really relaxing dish.

1:18:011:18:06

Just some chopped parsley and flaked almonds on it.

1:18:061:18:08

Some flaked almond, gives a bit of crunch to the dish.

1:18:081:18:10

-And that's it.

-Yeah, and that's it.

1:18:101:18:13

How simple is that? So give us the name of this dish, then?

1:18:131:18:15

So roasted breast in parcel with cucumber,

1:18:151:18:18

a little bit of paprika, roasted almond, touch of cream.

1:18:181:18:22

-As easy as that.

-Voila.

1:18:221:18:23

Et voila. It's as simple as that. No stress. Done.

1:18:281:18:33

-And it just tastes... The flavours are subtle.

-I can smell it.

-Yeah.

1:18:331:18:37

-But everything works together.

-Yeah, it does.

1:18:371:18:40

-Dive in.

-And the crunch of the cucumber, it's refreshing.

1:18:401:18:44

-You see, there's no heaviness.

-Can I try the chicken here?

1:18:441:18:47

Though, like we said, it's cream.

1:18:471:18:48

As soon as you put the whipped cream, it just kind of disappears,

1:18:481:18:51

the heaviness.

1:18:511:18:53

Remember to take the seeds out of the cucumber,

1:18:531:18:55

otherwise you'll end up with a lot of water.

1:18:551:18:56

-Mmm!

-Happy with that?

-Mmm!

1:18:561:18:58

-So moist.

-Lovely and moist, isn't it?

-It's unbelievable.

1:18:581:19:01

I reckon he'll have that one for the late-night...

1:19:011:19:03

-Well, it's OK!

-Very good. Exactly, yeah.

1:19:031:19:05

A simple but elegant dish there from Daniel.

1:19:101:19:12

Perfect for your next dinner party, I reckon.

1:19:121:19:14

Now, when Elaine Paige came to the studio to face her Food Heaven

1:19:141:19:17

or Food Hell, she was singing at the thought of salmon,

1:19:171:19:20

but downbeat when it came to duck.

1:19:201:19:22

So, did she get heaven or hell? Let's find out.

1:19:221:19:25

Right, it's time to find out what Elaine will be facing for lunch.

1:19:251:19:28

Food heaven could be lovely piece of salmon,

1:19:281:19:30

-because I know you like your prawns as well.

-That would do for me!

1:19:301:19:33

Oriental ingredients over here.

1:19:331:19:35

We've got kaffir lime leaves, chilli, coriander.

1:19:351:19:37

Alternatively,

1:19:371:19:39

a big pile of duck here and a big pile of duck fat to go with it.

1:19:391:19:42

-Duck's just duck.

-Duck is just duck.

1:19:421:19:44

-What do you think these guys have decided?

-I don't know.

1:19:441:19:48

-I was hoping they might be kind, be nice to me.

-It's a close one today.

1:19:481:19:52

-4-3.

-4-3? Well, that's just the one, yeah.

-Nat was with you.

1:19:521:19:56

That pushed it to 3-1.

1:19:561:19:58

The girls are looking after the girls, thank heavens.

1:19:581:20:00

Unfortunately the boys are looking after themselves

1:20:001:20:02

because everybody in the studio chose duck.

1:20:021:20:04

-Isn't that typical? I mean, men...

-It's not me!

-..are so typical.

1:20:041:20:08

-Don't look at...

-Aw!

-There you go.

1:20:081:20:10

-It's a blokes' dish, so we'll lose that.

-Yeah.

-Out of the way.

1:20:101:20:13

-And you've got duck, I'm afraid.

-Right, OK.

-Right, duck confit.

1:20:131:20:16

-Go on, then.

-Classic duck confit. If you could make a mash.

1:20:161:20:18

We've got celeriac, potatoes - peeled, chopped up, boiled

1:20:181:20:21

and then blended in here with some butter and some cream.

1:20:211:20:24

Right, duck confit, the way we make these -

1:20:241:20:26

-you use duck legs for duck confit.

-Right.

1:20:261:20:27

-The word duck confit means to cook in fat.

-A-ha.

1:20:271:20:31

Or it can be slow-cooked in fat, and it's a way of preserving.

1:20:311:20:33

What you do with the duck confit and what makes them different is

1:20:331:20:37

you salt them in 15g of salt per kilo of meat.

1:20:371:20:40

I don't know why I'm telling you this

1:20:401:20:41

cos you're never going to do this.

1:20:411:20:43

-15g of salt per kilo. So you just put the salt in here.

-Right.

1:20:431:20:47

Now, the salt does two things - it breaks down the meat, but also,

1:20:471:20:50

it adds tons of flavour to this. A little bit of thyme in here.

1:20:501:20:54

It's very, very traditionally French, and what you do now

1:20:541:20:56

is you take this and pop it in the fridge - ideally overnight.

1:20:561:20:59

But for at least 24 hours if you can do.

1:20:591:21:03

And we've got one in here.

1:21:031:21:04

Now, you wash off the salt in here. So you wash this off.

1:21:041:21:09

The colour changes just a little bit, goes slightly pink,

1:21:091:21:11

-and firms up a little bit, but just wash off this salt.

-Mm.

1:21:111:21:14

And then you get the dreaded bit...

1:21:141:21:16

which there'll be masses of this stuff at Christmas...

1:21:161:21:19

SHE GASPS Nigella made this stuff famous.

1:21:191:21:22

-Oh...

-Duck fat.

-Look at that.

-There you go.

1:21:221:21:26

-Good for your arteries.

-It is very, very good for your arteries.

1:21:261:21:29

But the idea is we take the duck and we cook it in the fat.

1:21:291:21:33

Now, this is the way of preserving.

1:21:331:21:34

What they do in France is they cook it in the fat,

1:21:341:21:37

but then they leave it in the fat,

1:21:371:21:39

-and it can last for between four and five months in the fat.

-Really?!

1:21:391:21:42

Then you lift out... SHE CHUCKLES

1:21:421:21:44

You gently, gently cook it.

1:21:441:21:45

It cooks for about three hours, just really slow cooking,

1:21:451:21:48

-about 80 degrees. You don't boil it.

-What, on the top?

-Yeah.

1:21:481:21:50

-If you can trim that off, please, that'll be great.

-Yeah, sure.

1:21:501:21:53

You just gently, gently cook it - that's the whole idea of this.

1:21:531:21:56

You don't boil it, it's not fried - it needs to cook slowly, slowly,

1:21:561:22:00

-slowly in duck fat.

-Right.

-Gently cooked. There you go.

1:22:001:22:03

And you cook it on the hob with a bit of garlic in there,

1:22:031:22:06

and I'm going to cook our stew for this one. A bit of shallot.

1:22:061:22:08

There we go. Move behind you. We're just going to trim up

1:22:081:22:12

a little bit of the duck over there to go with this.

1:22:121:22:15

So we take some of our shallot here and we can turn this duck into

1:22:151:22:20

duck confit, which is then roasted off in the oven.

1:22:201:22:22

Alternatively we can do duck rillette where you take the duck

1:22:221:22:25

and mix together with duck fat and you've got a pate.

1:22:251:22:27

But this one, I'm going to do a little cassoulet with it.

1:22:271:22:29

Cassoulet uses duck as well.

1:22:291:22:32

So you take some butter, that goes straight in our pan there.

1:22:321:22:35

We're then going to grab... We've got the duck leg here.

1:22:351:22:39

Lift this duck leg carefully into the pan. Grab some honey.

1:22:391:22:43

-Take the entire lot there.

-That looks good.

1:22:441:22:47

-Is that going to crisp it up a little bit?

-It'll crisp it up.

1:22:471:22:50

But above all else, add tons of flavour to this.

1:22:501:22:53

You can actually just serve this roasted as well.

1:22:531:22:56

You can buy this in a jar, this duck leg

1:22:561:22:58

already done and salted and cooked in duck fat.

1:22:581:23:00

Then you can roast it like that.

1:23:001:23:01

It takes about, sort of, three or four minutes

1:23:011:23:03

when they're still warm.

1:23:031:23:05

If they're cold, they're going to take about 10 minutes.

1:23:051:23:07

-Onions and garlic.

-Yeah. That looks good.

-Tomatoes.

-Mm-hm.

1:23:071:23:11

-Tinned tomatoes, these.

-OK, yeah.

-Flageolet beans. There you go.

1:23:111:23:17

-Can you chop a bit of rosemary up for me, please, guys?

-Yeah.

1:23:171:23:19

-A bit of flageolet beans.

-A bit of parsley as well?

1:23:191:23:21

-Yeah. Some rosemary as well.

-This is the sauce, is it?

1:23:211:23:24

This is the little sauce to go with it.

1:23:241:23:26

-Stock - this is chicken stock.

-Right.

1:23:261:23:28

You can't really get duck stock cos it's quite fatty.

1:23:291:23:32

So a bit of that.

1:23:321:23:34

However, you can see the way that we cooked this duck...

1:23:341:23:37

A little bit of rosemary I'll chop up...that we've got there.

1:23:371:23:40

I'll get that in and start to infuse that.

1:23:401:23:43

So this is the basis for a cassoulet.

1:23:441:23:46

You must've cooked cassoulet quite a lot...

1:23:461:23:47

-Definitely, it's one of my favourites.

-..in France.

1:23:471:23:50

You've got the sausage in there and everything else,

1:23:501:23:52

a bit of pork in there as well.

1:23:521:23:53

Oh, everything. You can put anything in there.

1:23:531:23:55

-It's like sort of a French stew, which is very nice.

-Yes, very nice.

1:23:551:23:58

And then this one, now, you can see the way you cook this.

1:23:581:24:01

The idea is, you know when...

1:24:011:24:02

Well, you wouldn't order it in the restaurant, Chinese - crispy duck.

1:24:021:24:05

-Yeah.

-You're not impressed with this, are you, so far?

1:24:051:24:08

-Oh...

-But then you take the entire lot, the fat...

-Everything?

1:24:081:24:12

-Everything.

-Skin, everything.

-Skin, the lot.

1:24:121:24:15

OK, well, the fact that you've taken it off the bone helps a bit.

1:24:151:24:19

-Does it?

-Yeah.

-All right.

1:24:191:24:20

-Look how brown it is.

-Yeah. THEY CHUCKLE

1:24:221:24:25

Because it's a duck.

1:24:251:24:26

-Can you do it with chicken?

-You can do, you can do it with chicken...

1:24:271:24:32

not. You can't do it with chicken.

1:24:321:24:34

You could do the chicken with this sauce, couldn't you?

1:24:341:24:37

-Yeah, but then it wouldn't be...

-Duck.

-It wouldn't be cassoulet.

1:24:371:24:39

It would be chicken and tomato soup. And then we take all the chicken...

1:24:391:24:44

The duck, I mean! The duck.

1:24:441:24:45

And the fat, and we put that all in here.

1:24:451:24:48

Now this is where you can take the rillette,

1:24:481:24:51

you can take this mixture here and blend this in a food processor

1:24:511:24:54

or just flake it all up, mix it with duck fat,

1:24:541:24:57

then they have a thing called a duck rillette.

1:24:571:24:59

When you have that on toast, all the fat melts into the toast

1:24:591:25:02

and you're just left with the confit duck on it.

1:25:021:25:05

So it's like a... You know... Ooh!

1:25:051:25:07

-Don't worry, it won't go everywhere.

-She steps back!

1:25:071:25:10

-A bit of parsley, you've got.

-It's in there.

1:25:101:25:13

-Salt.

-That does look good, I must say.

-Some salt, black pepper.

1:25:131:25:17

So it's a stew, really, then, isn't it?

1:25:171:25:18

Yeah, it's casserole-y sort of thing, but it's

1:25:181:25:21

a little thing to go with the duck that's roasting off in the oven.

1:25:211:25:24

And then of course we've got a little bit of butter there.

1:25:241:25:27

You don't actually have to put the butter in.

1:25:271:25:30

A little bit more butter. There you go.

1:25:301:25:32

-It's a real winter warmer, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's nice and simple.

1:25:321:25:36

Can you season that for me, guys, and give it a quick stir?

1:25:361:25:38

-Let's have a wee taste.

-Meanwhile I'll go back to our duck over here.

1:25:381:25:41

Now, I've put this in a really hot oven.

1:25:411:25:43

That way it's going to cook the honey, which is what we want,

1:25:431:25:46

-quite quickly, and if we lift this out...

-Oh, smells divine.

1:25:461:25:50

..you can see that browns the honey really quick.

1:25:501:25:52

If I take this honey now, lift it off,

1:25:521:25:53

and just quickly glaze it while it's still warm...

1:25:531:25:56

it'll coat the duck leg. All right?

1:25:561:25:58

You can only do this when it's still warm.

1:25:581:26:00

-Much better than that Thai cooking.

-Oh, stop it!

1:26:001:26:04

You're ganging up on me now.

1:26:041:26:05

It's not... Look, I'm impartial -

1:26:051:26:07

-I just have to cook whatever's put in front of me.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah...

1:26:071:26:10

Trust me! I'm not allowed to vote on anything.

1:26:101:26:13

-Watch that doesn't set on fire.

-Thanks very much, Tom.

1:26:131:26:17

Right, a little bit on that.

1:26:171:26:19

It's got lumps in it, but I'll ignore the lumps.

1:26:211:26:23

-What's that, mash, potato?

-Yes, with lumps in it. Look at that.

1:26:231:26:26

There you go. A bit of that.

1:26:301:26:32

And then we've got our spoon, bring it over.

1:26:321:26:34

We've got a nice little cassoulet, so you can just serve this as it is.

1:26:341:26:37

-But this is just...

-Well, that, I could eat that just like that.

1:26:371:26:41

-Well, it's got duck in it, Elaine.

-I know, but you can't see it.

1:26:411:26:43

-All right...

-You know, cos it's mixed in with the beans

1:26:431:26:47

and everything else.

1:26:471:26:48

And then we take the duck...

1:26:481:26:51

-This is going to ruin it for you.

-It looks lovely.

-Like that on the top.

1:26:511:26:54

-It does look great.

-Yeah, very nice.

-That...

-That's quality.

-Beautiful.

1:26:541:26:59

-..is proper chef's grub.

-That is.

1:26:591:27:01

But above all else, it's bloke-y grub - that's why these lot,

1:27:011:27:05

-I'm afraid, chose it.

-I wonder why that is...

1:27:051:27:07

-Dive into that, tell us what you think.

-Oh, must I?

1:27:071:27:10

-OK...

-Tell us what you reckon.

1:27:101:27:13

What do you reckon?

1:27:131:27:15

Which particular part are you going to try first?

1:27:151:27:17

-The mash, probably!

-I'll just taste it all. It does look quite yummy.

1:27:171:27:21

-The duck, it'll crisp up with a little bit of honey.

-Whoops.

1:27:211:27:24

-Do you want to bring over the glasses, guys?

-Crikey.

1:27:241:27:26

It'll be very hot, very hot.

1:27:261:27:28

-Yeah.

-LAUGHTER

1:27:331:27:34

-There you go.

-It's gorgeous.

-Dive into that.

-Wait...

1:27:361:27:40

-Let me try...

-Dive in.

-Thanks.

-Very nice.

-Guys, you dive into that.

1:27:401:27:44

-Don't mind if I do.

-Knives and forks.

-Thanks.

1:27:441:27:46

-No, that is good. I've changed my mind.

-It's kind of all right.

1:27:461:27:49

-I think I have.

-Don't pick it up, otherwise the caterers on the tour

1:27:491:27:52

-will be cooking for you all the time.

-I'm converted.

1:27:521:27:54

Well, best of luck on the album, best of luck on your tour.

1:27:541:27:57

-Pumpkin soup and this - I'm converted.

-Exactly.

1:27:571:27:59

Best of luck on your album and your tour.

1:27:591:28:01

-Best of luck on your new restaurant as well.

-Thank you.

1:28:011:28:03

-And best of luck on your calendar.

-Thank you.

-Cheers.

1:28:031:28:06

See Elaine, eating duck wasn't that Cats-astrophic.

1:28:111:28:14

One for all you musical fans out there, but it's always nice

1:28:141:28:17

to convert people from their food hell, I reckon.

1:28:171:28:20

Well, that's all we've got time for today, I'm afraid,

1:28:201:28:22

but I hope you've enjoyed taking a look back at

1:28:221:28:24

some of the best bits from Saturday Kitchen.

1:28:241:28:26

And don't forget, all the studio recipes are available on

1:28:261:28:28

the BBC website. Thanks for watching and I'll see you next time.

1:28:281:28:31

Matt Tebbutt takes a look back at some of his favourite recipes and best moments from Saturday Kitchen. Featuring recipes from Eleonora Galasso, Theo Randall, Jason Atherton and Daniel Galmiche, and Elaine Paige faces her food heaven or food hell.