03/03/2018 Saturday Kitchen


03/03/2018

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Greg Marchand and Nieves Barragon and special guest Iain Stirling. Olly Smith picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Good morning, and welcome

to the weekend!

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We're live with 90 minutes

of fabulous food and amazing chefs.

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So, let's get cooking.

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I'm Matt Tebbutt, and this

is Saturday Kitchen Live!

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Welcome to the show!

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We've got a great line-up today.

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Making his Saturday Kitchen debut,

we have Greg Marchand,

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better known as Frenchie.

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And making a welcome return

is Michelin-starred Spanish

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chef Nieves Barragan.

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And the ever-jolly Olly Smith

is back on drinks duty.

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Good morning, everyone!

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Good morning, Matt.

How are you all?

Very, very well.

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Greg, welcome to the show.

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You are a very busy man, you split

your time between Paris and London.

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What are you cooking for us today?

Today I'm cooking a turbot from

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Cornwall. It is a Grenobloise

sauce,...

Say that again?!

A

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Grenobloise sauce. I have broccoli

cooked from raw. And wild garlic.

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Because spring is here!

Do you

reckon?! There is snow outside!

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Nieves, in its lovely having you

here. You opened your first

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restaurant

yes, I opened it out

through weeks ago.

That must be

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relaxing!

Not really! Eight this

must be like downtime for you?

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Pretty much!

What are you cooking?

I

am going to make a lardo and

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anchovies salad, and another dish

with black -- with tomatoes. One is

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a bar and one is a restaurant.

Olly,

lots of dishes to date.

I'm site

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you've change out of your cardigan

from rehearsals, you looked like

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Daniel Craig on a day of! -- I'm sad

you have changed.

I caught myself

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drinking tea in a cardigan, that's

never going to happen again! I

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looked like an old man!

I have two

white wines from red wine regions,

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phenomenal dishes and great value

ones as well.

As always, we have

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scoured the archives for some

classic foodie favourites.

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Iain has become known is being the

cheeky boys of Love Island. Please

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welcome, Iain Stirling -- the cheeky

voice of Love Island. You are known

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as one of the best joke writing

comedians on the circuit?

That could

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mean many things, there could be

hundreds ahead of me. People I do

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all right and try my best buy it is

quite funny, seeing to you and

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listening to your voice. You don't

strike me as a Love Island fan!

I

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dip in and out and then I get angry

with myself.

You watch a Love Island

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and where a cardigan, I didn't think

it was possible!

Do they not sit

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together?!

People do recognise my

voice before they recognise me.

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voice before they recognise me.

They

do a double-take.

I have made my

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boys more recognisable than my head,

pretty impressive, I don't do how

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I've done it!

Luck or judgment,

which one?

I can just sit in a booth

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with my voice in a cardigan, is the

Scottish way!

I was looking at your

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stuff on YouTube last night. You

were in Majorca, you rock up to a

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voice-over is, looking super casual

like you are on holiday.

Olly would

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love it!

Is saw you on YouTube doing

something with pancakes, you weren't

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wearing a huge number of clothes, it

has to be said!

I thought it would

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be funny to be naked! It's not until

you see yourself on camera with

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nothing on...

Or in a carded ranking

the!

-- or is a khadi drinking tea.

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There is a real moment of horror.

May that could be a challenge!

It's

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a bit chilli in here!

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a bit chilli in here!

What to idea

of food heaven?

Is so easy, that's

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passed. I'm obsessed with it. Since

I was a kid, I can boil up some

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fresh pasta and that can be me --

passed the.

Is it an easy thing or

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do you just love it?

Italy is fine!

Let me tell you about pasta... I

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didn't even know pasta was Italian

and all right now! I thought pasta

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was from Tesco's! Other supermarkets

are available... No, I've always

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loved pasta. I was quite sporty as a

kid so it was a good way for my mum

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to get energy inside quickly. And

seafood, I love them both.

Nice,

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nation. What about help?

I'm not the

world, taste has never been too much

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of an issue. But textures for me.

So, pork. You get a grisly bit or a

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fatty bit, it's too much hard work,

I don't like it.

What about all of

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that wobbly fat, zero I don't like

it, it sort of sits in its own

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juices, it comes with the nappy

thing underneath it when you buy it

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in the supermarket, it's disgusting!

It's disgusting!

And the other one

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is mushrooms? Again, because of the

texture?

My friend Vicky is with me

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today. She said that when she eats

mushrooms she feels like she's

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covered in very repairs! I've got to

eat that later on!

Well, may be --

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covered in other routers. It depends

how nice to viewers.

I've got faith

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in them, Matt.

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So if the viewers give you heaven,

I'll give you a blissful

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seafood pasta special.

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I'll take your favourite scallops

along with a smorgasbord of other

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shellfish, including langoustine

and prawns, and serve them up

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in a perfect pile of taglioni pasta

with a truly indulgent

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lemon butter sauce.

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But if Iain gets hell,

it's going to be double trouble,

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with both pork and mushrooms

taking centre stage.

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Yes, it's going to be braised

pork belly served up

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with mushroom ketchup,

plus some extra pickled mushrooms

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on the side, for good measure.

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And just to ensure a really good

porky flavour, I'll cover

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it with a sprinkling

of pork-crackling crumbs.

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But you'll have to wait

until the end of the show to find

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out which one the viewers vote for.

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So, everyone, just go

to the Saturday Kitchen website

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before 11am this morning

and get voting.

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We also want your questions.

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You can ask our experts anything,

just dial: 0330 1231410.

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That's 0330 123 1410.

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Get dialling now!

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As always, you can also comment

on what's cooking on social media.

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I love the fact you told us earlier

that your parents are playing along

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to this this morning?

My mum and dad

are big fans. I'm hoping my dad will

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let down and get ingredients

together.

What are they called?

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Roger and Alison will stop well, I

call them mum and dad!

Are they

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going to get the ingredients and

play along?

Get out the house,

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run-up to the school and get the

ingredients!

Maybe they could stay

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in and vote for you -- run-up to the

store. They would vote for hell, I

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know they would!

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Greg, let's head to the hobs.

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What are we making?

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It's a beautiful piece of fish,

quite simple, but I love the

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techniques that you use.

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quite simple, but I love the

techniques that you use.

We can

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start with lemon oil. Take this

grape seed oil. Yes, it is a nice

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oil because it doesn't taste of

anything, really, it is very

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natural. Then we are going to put

some lemon zest, some lime zest,

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some ginger and some lemongrass.

It

is very citrusy.

Yes, but without

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the acid. We are going to use that

to do wild garlic puree. What

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happens if you put acid or lemon

juice onto green puree?

It's going

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to go dark.

Exactly. Beautiful.

You

are keeping me on my toes!

That

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Herbert is but. Bike a generous

portion, Greg. Yes, we are generous!

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You split your time between Paris

and London. You started with a

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restaurant in the middle of Paris,

but that has grown and grown and you

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will most only the street, is that

right?

It is a small street, 72

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metres! As we went, there was

nothing in the street. So, as we

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started to grow, the space just

opened up, and we took them. So, we

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did a little wine bar, Frenchie to

go. It is a New York deli, London we

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see spoon... -- greasy spoon.

You

did some time in New York?

I spent

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two years in New York. I love eating

this food.

You were at a great

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restaurant.

Yes, it is an

institution in New York. The

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restauranteur is a big inspiration

for me when we talk about

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hospitality. So, here we have the

broccoli. Now,, broccoli, we always

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tend to cut it in boiling water,

now, what I like is just getting

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them on a pan with a little weight

on.

You like to wake these things

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down. These are great. What is the

idea?

If you put the fish in a pan

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with no weight on it, it's going to

go like this, right? It's not going

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to give a nice colouration. Because

the protein goes like this. Imagine

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if I throw you on a pan! You would

be doing that!

I'm imagining that

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right now!

You put in a weight and

you have a nice crispy skin.

All of

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your restaurants are called

Frenchie. This... You used to work

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at the Jamie Oliver's 15 and your

nickname was Frenchie.

That's right.

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And then when I moved to New York it

kind of stuck to me.

You must have

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taken it, right?

I took it, I like

it, it's nice, it's a nice nickname.

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And so, afterwards, when I chose the

name of the restaurant, well, it

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just came naturally. And I think it

represents well what we do.

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Frenchie, French -based... It

represents me. I trained in a French

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cooking school for four you and I

worked for the best part of my 20s

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in Britain and in New York. -- for

Quattrone is.

Your restaurants are

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combination of where you have been

around the world.

Exactly. That's

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what we do. French -based. And

inspired by the world.

And I love

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the fact that you have got kind of

what you call the rock and roll

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space, the wine bar.

Yes, the wine

bar is rock and roll.

But you just

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serve British cheese. How does that

affect the sensibilities of the

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Parisians?

When you create a

restaurant, it's very important that

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you represent who you are. And it's

part of who I am. You know, spending

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all this time in this beautiful

country. And the cheeses of Britain

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are great. It's been a little bit

forgotten. I think in France, we are

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very blessed with cheese. But then,

French people know French cheese. I

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thought, I'm going to make them

discover something a little

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different.

Are they pleasantly

surprised?

They are.

What are the

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most popular cheeses that?

We have

the Stilton, everybody knows the

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Stilton. And the Cheddar, of course.

One of my favourite being the Kings

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Cheddar. For the Grenoble a sauce,

we have the croutons, look at that.

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Just in butter. In case of doubt,

add butter! You cook the croutons in

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butter like this, add a bit of

garlic. I'm cooking the broccoli.

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You can see I'm poking them from

raw, the broccoli gets nice and

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crispy. If you want to make your

kids eat broccoli, you should really

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do this. When you bite into it, it

goes very crispy.

You get a nice

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caramelised taste to it.

Yes,

exactly.

Nice texture.

You are doing

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a little segment, a lemon segment,

and capers and herbs. That is part

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of the... The Grenoble soars.

Where

does the history of this sauce come

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from?

It is from the bottom of the

French Alps. It is very far from any

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kind of see or ocean. So, when the

fish used to come in so bring or in

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autumn, sometimes they wouldn't

travel fish because it would be to

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off. But it would be a little bit

funky when it arrived! So, they got

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used to cooking capers in brown

butter and lemon twos. A lemon

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segment. Don't worry, -- lemon

juice. Don't worry, this is a very

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fresh Cornish fish, time has

changed! I have been doing great

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improvements to aid! So, what we are

here, the fish is cooking nicely. We

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have the croutons, we have the

broccoli. We will start to make the

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Grenoble last sauce.

And when you

are looking at your menus across all

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of the restaurants, does the food

death a lot -- differ a lot, is very

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different style in London and Paris?

The DNA is the same. We are very

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ingredient driven in Frenchie.

You

are butter driven, as well!

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What better for butter sauce than

butter.

Absolutely. It is like a

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one-time dish. You can cover the

fish nicely. We will not overcook it

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too much. We will let it rest.

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Remember, if you'd like

to ask us a question,

0:15:320:15:34

then give us a call

now

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on 0330 1231 410.

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That's 0330 1231 410.

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Calls are charged at your

standard network rate.

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Here we go. A bit of drama. A bit of

drama, I bit of capers and lemon

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segment, and some herbs. I will just

take that off now. So, you see? That

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is grenobloise sauce. Classic.

Very

sharp with the capers and the lemon.

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Yes, that represents well what we do

at Frenchie.

This is interesting.

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Why would you take such a big piece

of fish and then cut it which is

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quite a hard thing to do after you

cook it?

Years, unless you need --

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unless you have a good now. You need

a good knife? Yes. A bread knife? At

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home, just leave it whole. Here, I

like it, because you can see.

So it

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will be cannibalised, but it will be

soft? Yes. -- caramelised.

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soft? Yes. -- caramelised.

Garlic

pesto, but not too much.

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pesto, but not too much.

You'll like

to keep the fish paint in the

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middle?

Always. People always tend

to cook their fish a little bit too

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much. Here is the sauce. It smells

fantastic. The cretins. Now that is

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a grenobloise sauce. It was not

before. Before it was just the

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capers sauce.

And the bread is just

the texture thing? Yes. It is

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lovely. It smells fantastic. Now you

have got the beautiful herbs.

Yes,

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this is crispy.

A little bit like

that. Is a lot of the cooking that

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you do like this?

Yes.

0:17:500:17:56

you do like this?

Yes. We do lots of

things in a minute, freshness. Even

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vegetables. Here we have some little

herbs. Basically the idea was you

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would have a little stroll in a

British seashore and you pick up

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some wild herbs. This is Alexander.

It is from the celery family. It

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really taste like radish. Mrs garlic

flowers and salty fingers. It will

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give beautiful saltiness and

texture. What is it called? Visits

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turbot grenobloise with crispy

broccoli, well garlic pesto, and sea

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herbs from a stroll on the British

seashore. And everything else. It is

0:18:460:18:53

a triumph.

Thank you. OK, feeling

hungry?

Yes. There you go.

I will

0:18:530:19:01

move your tea.

Tucked in. Amazing.

That is really interesting, you keep

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the vision and pink. People will see

that in restaurants and it will be

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put off with it, especially in

Britain.

Yes, I think fish, chicken

0:19:140:19:19

as well, she'd be medium rare.

Really?

Yes. I know we talk about

0:19:190:19:27

salmonella and all that, but if the

chicken is... You do not want to

0:19:270:19:30

overcook chicken. It should not be

raw, do not get me wrong.

How is it?

0:19:300:19:38

It is amazing. That is so crispy. I

am a Scottish miner who has just

0:19:380:19:47

eaten a vegetable. Well done. I

loved it. Have you had vegetables

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before? They are great. Mum and dad,

if you're watching, getting some

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vegetables. They are brilliant. It

is highly thick and like me to the

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fishes.

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fishes. -- like meat the fish is.

You have all the range of flavours

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in the dish, you have the nuttiness,

right through to the bright lemon

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and keeper. I have chosen a wine to

imagine that. It is a white Cotes Du

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Rhone. It is one of the underrated

treats of France. It tastes of

0:20:280:20:34

peaches. It is fresh.

It is an

amazing year. Yes, we have a wine

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shop in Paris. We are very serious

about our wine. I like to drink wine

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myself.

Do you? Do you indeed? You

famously love your morning wine?

0:20:460:20:55

Yes, for the last few months. We

will have that later on.

Remind us

0:20:550:20:59

what you are cooking? I will do the

lardo with the anchovy salad, and I

0:20:590:21:07

will have the green squid with

chorizo and matters.

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Don't forget if you want to ask us

a question this morning, just call

0:21:120:21:15

0330 1231 410.

0:21:150:21:16

That's 0330 1231 410.

0:21:160:21:17

Lines close at 11:00am today.

0:21:170:21:19

You haven't got long

so get dialling.

0:21:190:21:20

Or you can tweet us a question using

the hashtag "Saturday Kitchen".

0:21:200:21:23

And don't forget to vote for Iain's

food heaven or hell on our website.

0:21:230:21:27

Now let's catch up with Rick Stein.

0:21:270:21:28

He's taken a day trip from Lisbon

to Sintra, another of

0:21:280:21:31

Lord Byron's favourite spots.

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This is Sintra, one

of Lord Byron's favourite places.

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He even wrote to his mum to say

how beautiful it was.

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Lo!

0:22:280:22:29

Sintra's glorious Eden

0:22:290:22:31

maze of mount and glen.

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Thus wrote Byron, but I'm

blowed if I can see

0:22:320:22:34

what he was writing about.

0:22:340:22:36

And actually, it comes

0:22:360:22:37

And similarly Byron was writing

about a place in Greece that I've

0:22:370:22:41

been to recently called Zitza,

about how it was the best view

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in the world, second only to Sintra.

0:22:430:22:45

But that wasn't very good either.

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So I think that something's

happened, that maybe,

0:22:460:22:48

looking around, it just looks

so wonderfully neglected here.

0:22:480:22:50

There's all these buildings

that are crumbling,

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but it's a sort of must.

0:22:520:22:53

You must come from Lisbon

0:22:530:22:56

It...

0:22:560:22:57

Actually, you can feel how great it

0:22:570:23:00

the heat of the city in the summer,

for all those kings and princes,

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but it's a little, little bit

sort of, erm, you know,

0:23:040:23:06

a bit dilapidated.

0:23:060:23:07

It's good for mooching

about, though.

0:23:070:23:09

Lovely little lanes.

0:23:090:23:11

I've often dreamt about

a quirk in time travel -

0:23:110:23:15

Byron and my paths might cross over

and we can meet up.

0:23:150:23:20

But I think he might say,

"Come along, Shelley, quickly!

0:23:200:23:24

"Here comes that dreadful bore

0:23:240:23:32

about sardines all the time!

0:23:320:23:34

Let's get out of here, quick!"

0:23:340:23:35

I've just been looking

at these tiles.

0:23:350:23:37

You can see how beautiful it

would have been in Byron's time.

0:23:370:23:43

The variegated maze,

the mount and glen.

0:23:430:23:44

Without the trees, you can

see the Moorish castle,

0:23:440:23:47

the mountains, the glens...

0:23:470:23:49

That's the palace

where I was standing.

0:23:490:23:50

It's just much more obvious now.

0:23:500:23:56

The castle was built by the Moors,

who conquered most of Spain

0:23:560:23:59

and Portugal in the eighth century.

0:23:590:24:03

They brought citrus fruits

0:24:070:24:10

cream to the country,

as well as their techniques

0:24:100:24:13

for growing rice.

0:24:130:24:17

And without the invasion of

the Arabs, there wouldn't be paella.

0:24:170:24:20

I know that's not Portuguese,

but there wouldn't be paella!

0:24:200:24:28

So, what to cook?

0:24:300:24:31

Well, it has to be a legacy

from the Moors, something sweet

0:24:310:24:34

and totally delicious.

0:24:340:24:35

Almond tart - crisp, toasted

almonds, butterscotch, in a tart.

0:24:350:24:37

It's dead easy to make.

0:24:370:24:39

You see it everywhere.

0:24:390:24:40

I love it.

0:24:400:24:44

I don't do complicated sweets.

0:24:440:24:45

It's not my forte.

0:24:450:24:48

But the point of actually

sieving flour is not

0:24:480:24:50

to get rid of the lumps -

0:24:500:24:53

of air into your pastry.

0:24:530:24:55

I'm using about 150

0:24:550:25:01

Now butter.

0:25:010:25:03

Crumb it in so it becomes, well,

0:25:030:25:06

and nice and moist.

0:25:060:25:07

Now caster sugar, about 60 grams,

and give it a good stir.

0:25:070:25:15

It needs an egg yolk for that

richness and to bind it.

0:25:150:25:23

And a bit of water to make it

pliable for rolling.

0:25:230:25:26

A bit of flour...

0:25:260:25:28

..and roll it out.

0:25:280:25:36

Well, that's looking

all right on the rolling pin.

0:25:360:25:38

Oh, it's starting to

break up a bit as I...

0:25:380:25:40

As I roll it into the baking tin,

but I expected that.

0:25:400:25:46

I mean, it's sort of no

pain, no gain, really.

0:25:460:25:52

It's so short that it is inevitably

going to break up a little bit,

0:25:520:25:56

so I'm just having to patch it.

0:25:560:25:58

But don't worry - when you bake it,

you will not notice a thing.

0:25:580:26:01

OK, now, I just need

to get some beans and some

0:26:010:26:03

paper to put in there.

0:26:030:26:05

Well, this, as you probably

all know, is called blind baking -

0:26:050:26:08

getting that pastry cooked just

enough so that it makes a perfect

0:26:080:26:10

vessel for your filling.

0:26:100:26:16

Just add all of those

flaked almonds.

0:26:160:26:17

They'll take a while because there

is a lot of volume in there,

0:26:170:26:20

but once they start to toast,

I've got to be quite careful,

0:26:200:26:23

cos they'll go quite quickly.

0:26:230:26:25

Yeah, beginning to go now.

0:26:250:26:28

Just shake the pan a little bit

like that, just to get the ones

0:26:280:26:31

from the bottom of the top.

0:26:310:26:33

Yeah, that's beginning

to come up really nicely.

0:26:330:26:35

I think it's probably time to go.

0:26:350:26:36

All right, into the bowl.

0:26:360:26:41

Now for the butterscotch sauce.

0:26:410:26:42

The pan is still very hot,

so first sugar, about 120 grams.

0:26:420:26:46

Then butter, a big

chunk, 120 grams or so.

0:26:460:26:49

And now milk.

0:26:490:26:54

Now, this is producing lovely

smells of distant times -

0:26:540:26:59

making toffee apples,

I think.

0:26:590:27:01

You don't want to cook it too long,

otherwise you get fudge.

0:27:010:27:04

Perfect, now, to tip over

all those toasted almonds.

0:27:040:27:11

That's been in a moderate

oven for ten minutes,

0:27:110:27:13

so the pastry has just

begun to bake.

0:27:130:27:21

I just love almonds and I think it's

very appropriate that...

0:27:210:27:24

Almond tarts, of course,

you're going to see them all over

0:27:240:27:27

Portugal and all over Spain.

0:27:270:27:29

And, you know, almonds, garlic,

olive oil, lemons, tomatoes,

0:27:290:27:33

all fit into that sort of idea

of the Mediterranean diet.

0:27:330:27:39

I love them and I love this tart.

0:27:390:27:42

20 minutes later,

bubbling perfection.

0:27:420:27:46

Wait another hour and voila,

an almond tart with fresh

0:27:460:27:50

raspberries, with a dusting

of icing sugar.

0:27:500:27:55

Now, how cool is that?

0:27:550:27:58

Thanks, Rick.

0:28:030:28:04

Fantastic.

0:28:040:28:05

I don't do fancy puddings

either, so here's

0:28:050:28:07

another one that's

pretty straightforward!

0:28:070:28:08

This one also involves

lots of butterscotch.

0:28:080:28:11

This one also involves

lots of butterscotch.

0:28:110:28:13

Simple puddings do not necessarily

mean they are rubbish. It means

0:28:130:28:17

there are simple to prepare, but

delicious. This little walnut and

0:28:170:28:23

date pudding, self raising flour,

butter sugar, the usual suspects, we

0:28:230:28:27

will make a butterscotch sauce with

brown sugar, butter, cream, and

0:28:270:28:32

whiskey because I like whiskey. That

is pretty much it. I will keep you

0:28:320:28:38

updated as we go on. That is so

true. I do like whiskey. I have got

0:28:380:28:44

into it recently. Enough of my

drinking habits. Love Island, the

0:28:440:28:50

big runaway success.

You cannot talk

about whiskey and then move onto

0:28:500:28:53

that. Shall we talk about whiskey?

I

love whiskey. Have you a favourite?

0:28:530:29:01

With the taste of Pete? I like

Talisker single malt, 12 years old.

0:29:010:29:06

I am a big fan.

Anyway, Love Island.

Yes, the runaway success of the

0:29:060:29:12

summer. Who would have thought that

watching beautiful people frolicking

0:29:120:29:16

in this son trying to couple up

would be watchable.

If they made a

0:29:160:29:23

pudding it would have smashed the

ratings entirely. I do not think

0:29:230:29:26

anyone was expecting it. But you did

not either? I honestly did not think

0:29:260:29:30

anyone did. No one from the head of

the company down expected it to be

0:29:300:29:35

as big as it was. But we are all

very glad it took off.

It is

0:29:350:29:40

something like 2.5 million people

tuned in every week on ITV.

That is

0:29:400:29:45

every day, six days a week for seven

weeks. It built up to 2.5 million,

0:29:450:29:52

which is crazy.

It was not something

you were overly happy about getting

0:29:520:29:57

involved with?

I think I said no

originally when I got offered it.

0:29:570:30:03

You did, it was in my notes. I did.

I am trying to keep my job. I have

0:30:030:30:10

never watched reality television so

I was not sure what it was. It falls

0:30:100:30:15

near to the Edinburgh Festival which

is an important month for stand-up

0:30:150:30:18

comedians. You have to perform your

show so I did not want to give up

0:30:180:30:23

the time before that.

Watching

people frolicking all the time.

For

0:30:230:30:28

eight weeks. In Mallorca in bikinis

and swimwear. It is a tough gig.

0:30:280:30:33

Someone has got to do it.

Ujah

I

fell in love with it and I loved

0:30:330:30:40

everything about it, it was great.

Do you get really into the

0:30:400:30:44

characters?

You get into everything.

Here's the question... You don't

0:30:440:30:50

technically need to be in Majorca,

do you?

No!

You could do it from

0:30:500:30:56

London or anywhere in the world,

they don't need to take you there!

0:30:560:31:01

Why do they do that?!

Because I like

it! I get to sunbathe!

It's quite

0:31:010:31:09

immersive, is that how you do your

role?

When I get back, I'm the

0:31:090:31:13

raised hand man in Scotland and idle

and some Spanish, it's incredible.

0:31:130:31:18

-- I am the most hand man in

Scotland. Series one helps you

0:31:180:31:23

immerse yourself in it because

there's not much out there to do

0:31:230:31:26

apart from watch the show, you get

into it. You are not in the hustle

0:31:260:31:32

and bustle of London, you can't sort

of pop out in the evening and see

0:31:320:31:35

your friends. You're just sat there

watching it, that is useful. Now I'm

0:31:350:31:39

so invested in it anyway, I would be

watching it from home anyway. It's

0:31:390:31:45

bizarre. I'm not complaining, ITV,

if you're watching...

Well, it has

0:31:450:31:53

just rocketed.

It's incredible, I'm

very happy about it, though.

I'm

0:31:530:31:58

sure I would be happy with 6-8 weeks

in Majorca every year.

One-day off a

0:31:580:32:04

week. Apart from that, it's all

right!

Come on! I saw you doing your

0:32:040:32:09

voice-over bit in your shorts and

T-shirt!

It's very hot in there,

0:32:090:32:15

though! It is Spain in the summer,

you do get quite sweaty.

Nice! OK...

0:32:150:32:21

You are off on tour soon.

I just got

back from Shrewsbury last night. I

0:32:210:32:28

braved the snow.

It was a lot of

snow.

I came back, I was going to

0:32:280:32:35

get wine at 10am! I got in the car,

drove home!

Tell us what the tool is

0:32:350:32:42

called?

It's called U OK Hon? .

Why?

When I go on shows like this I like

0:32:420:32:52

watching people have to say U OK

Hon?, I think it's great!

I didn't

0:32:520:32:56

realise it was a thing, I was on

Instagram this morning. There was a

0:32:560:33:01

hashtag with it.

It's a thing people

text each other. It's one of those

0:33:010:33:07

relatively insincere things you

might ask someone, when you ask

0:33:070:33:10

someone how they've been and you

don't really want to know the

0:33:100:33:13

answer! You know those situations...

When you pick up the phone and you

0:33:130:33:17

say, hi, how are you doing, you

don't really care! And they don't

0:33:170:33:22

want to know, do they?!

I just find

it quite a funny thing to say, it's

0:33:220:33:27

quite representative of my

generation, and

0:33:270:33:34

generation, and -- and internet

based, fairly egocentric, that's the

0:33:340:33:36

kind of thing I talk about on the

show.

That really is very similar to

0:33:360:33:40

the characters that we see an Love

Island, isn't it, it's that

0:33:400:33:44

generation?

They are all the same

sort of generation. Like any

0:33:440:33:47

generation, there's this is a quite

different aspects and different

0:33:470:33:52

people within each one. -- there's

different aspects. I find it

0:33:520:33:57

interesting that I am from this

generation that have grown up on the

0:33:570:34:00

internet, sort of filtering their

life to everyone else to tell

0:34:000:34:04

everyone how great they are and how

well they are doing. I think

0:34:040:34:07

sometimes it can get quite

isolating. One if you're watching

0:34:070:34:11

all of that, wondering why you don't

think everything is going so well

0:34:110:34:14

but everybody seems to be doing so

brilliant.

It's a funny thing,

0:34:140:34:18

because it is this weird thing where

you kind of, if your life is not

0:34:180:34:22

amazing and yet you are on social

media and everyone is having a

0:34:220:34:26

fantastic time at my new dress or

whatever, it can be hugely

0:34:260:34:32

depressing.

Yes. But I think it's

important to note that all of those

0:34:320:34:38

people aren't having an amazing time

and a great life, and it's quite

0:34:380:34:41

important to get that balance. I

think that's what I talk about the

0:34:410:34:45

show as well. I'm here, it's really

great, and also I have to go and

0:34:450:34:51

clean my toilet at some point, you

know!

It is a balance...

I don't

0:34:510:34:57

mean because of the cooking!

A lot

of comments on Twitter about putting

0:34:570:35:03

fish or chicken. The advice is to

always cook your wish all the way

0:35:030:35:08

through, even though some chefs do

like to serve their dishes pink, the

0:35:080:35:13

FSA say, always cook it thoroughly.

Always cook it through. That's from

0:35:130:35:19

the FSA. I don't know who she is,

but she sounds like a very wise

0:35:190:35:22

woman! Always cook your chicken!

Don't have a chicken sushi or

0:35:220:35:30

anything! That's a terrible idea!

Right, good, OK, let's recap this

0:35:300:35:35

because we lost it somewhere along

the line... Here is my finished

0:35:350:35:39

pudding. That went in for about sort

of 25 minutes here at 180. This is

0:35:390:35:45

the butterscotch sauce. Brown sugar,

butter, double cream, bring it

0:35:450:35:49

together. A slash of whisky.

A

genuine question, I love

0:35:490:35:54

butterscotch. Is it literally just

butter and sugar?

Generally,

0:35:540:35:59

whatever you like. A bit of cream.

That's incredible. It's the stuff of

0:35:590:36:05

dreams!

Witchcraft.

It's amazing!

The touch of whisky takes the edge

0:36:050:36:12

off... Life!

LAUGHTER

0:36:120:36:15

That it, pretty much. OK, let's take

that, you don't want to be eating

0:36:150:36:21

that. Let's be generous with this.

What other subjects do you cover on

0:36:210:36:26

your tour?

A bit of personal

experience. Real life, the sort of

0:36:260:36:33

bizarre move that I made from the

face of CBBC... I used to do Hacker

0:36:330:36:43

the dog, great guy!

Do you stay in

touch?

We used a live together for

0:36:430:36:49

years and years, he's a great guy!

Don't give it away! He's a dog!

Grow

0:36:490:36:54

up, man!

I'm playing along!

But I

talk about the move from the brink

0:36:540:37:03

of that or the office, which is what

the BBC was, -- the broom cupboard.

0:37:030:37:12

No real gap from anyone to adjust --

the broom cupboard of the CBBC

0:37:120:37:16

offers to the voice of Love Island.

It is quite a difficult thing, to

0:37:160:37:22

jump from children's television.

Kids TV is very difficult, you have

0:37:220:37:26

got to be happy all the time, and

that can be tricky.

Yeah, I know!

0:37:260:37:31

When you talking to some public dog

after, like, your roof's fallen in,

0:37:310:37:36

you got to go, like a high, kids!

The insurance isn't paying out,

0:37:360:37:41

here's Tracy Beaker!

0:37:410:37:46

here's Tracy Beaker!

Right, tucked

into that.

This is amazing!

It's

0:37:470:37:50

very simple and very light. It's

made from self raising flour.

This

0:37:500:37:55

is the butterscotch on top.

Do you

want some more?

Oh, my God!

You need

0:37:550:38:03

plenty of that.

Oh, my!

0:38:030:38:05

So, what will I be making for Iain

at the end of the show?

0:38:050:38:09

Will it be his food heaven - his two

favourite foods rolled into one:

0:38:090:38:12

A sumptuous shellfish pasta.

0:38:120:38:13

I'll saute scallops,

langoustine tails and prawns

0:38:130:38:15

and serve them all in a delicious

lemon butter sauce with a bowlful

0:38:150:38:18

of his dessert island

ingredient - pasta.

0:38:180:38:20

Yum!

0:38:200:38:21

But if Iain gets hell,

I'm marrying two of his worst foods:

0:38:210:38:24

I'll serve up braised pork belly,

with a mushroom double whammy -

0:38:240:38:26

pickled mushrooms as well as my

mushroom "ketchup" puree.

0:38:260:38:29

And just in case it's

not quite porky enough,

0:38:290:38:33

I'll sprinkle the whole lot

with some fine crackling crumbs.

0:38:330:38:36

Don't forget, what he

gets is down to you!

0:38:360:38:38

You've only got around 25 minutes

left to vote for Iain's food

0:38:380:38:41

heaven or food hell.

0:38:410:38:42

The power is in your hands.

0:38:420:38:43

So, go to the Saturday Kitchen

website and have your say now!

0:38:430:38:46

We'll find out the result

at the end of the show.

0:38:460:38:49

It so good! ??MIDDLE it's the nicest

thing I've ever tasted!

Wrap it up

0:38:490:38:55

and take it home!

0:38:550:38:57

Now, time for some more

Kitchen Secrets from Raymond Blanc.

0:38:570:39:00

He's celebrating celeriac,

and serving it with roast duck

0:39:000:39:02

and a blackberry sauce.

0:39:020:39:03

Mouth-watering.

0:39:030:39:09

Raymond's next dish is roast

duck with celeriac puree

0:39:290:39:31

and a blackberry sauce.

0:39:310:39:32

The dish I'm going to cook today

is of course wild duck

0:39:320:39:40

The kitchen is already smelling of

that beautiful flavour, yummy.

0:39:540:40:02

that beautiful flavour, yummy. I'm

Karaman rising the breast.

0:40:020:40:12

Karaman rising the breast. -- I'm

Karaman rising the breast. For well

0:40:120:40:17

done, voila.

0:40:170:40:20

I'm going to show you now how to

cook eight celeriac puree which will

0:40:240:40:31

accompany it.

Grown for its route

rather than stalks and leaves,

0:40:310:40:36

celeriac is a variety of celery, a

perfect alternative to potatoes.

0:40:360:40:39

Wonderful.

0:40:390:40:49

Everything is going up again. Oh! I

love it! Simmer, gently. Never any

0:41:010:41:20

fast cooking. Fast cooking

overcooked the outside.

0:41:200:41:32

It's crazy!

0:41:530:41:54

Simmer gently.

0:41:540:41:55

Never any fast cooking because fast

cooking overcooks the outside

0:41:550:41:58

and doesn't cook the middle.

0:41:580:41:59

So slowly, let the heat permeate.

0:41:590:42:00

So now we have 20 minutes

for ourselves where we can

0:42:000:42:03

have a nice glass of water or maybe

a little espresso.

0:42:030:42:06

After the steam has gone,

puree the cubes in a liquidiser.

0:42:060:42:08

Having added a squeeze

of lemon juice...

0:42:080:42:10

There's 40 grams here.

0:42:100:42:11

..Raymond makes a beurre noisette -

a browned nutty tasting butter

0:42:110:42:12

..Raymond makes a beurre noisette -

a browned nutty tasting butter

0:42:120:42:14

to enrich the pureed celeriac.

0:42:140:42:15

to enrich the pureed celeriac.

0:42:150:42:20

We'll bring the butter

to a temperature which gives

0:42:200:42:22

a lovely colouration and I want that

butter to go a slightly hazel look.

0:42:220:42:25

Tres bien.

0:42:250:42:26

And now it's about to happen.

0:42:260:42:28

Ooh, delicious.

0:42:280:42:29

Look at that, that's perfect.

0:42:290:42:30

Now voila, we've got a nice colour

here, you can see it here, you see?

0:42:300:42:34

That is lovely, just

very simple and lovely.

0:42:340:42:41

Alongside the roast duck

and celeriac, Raymond's

0:42:410:42:43

serving a blackberry sauce.

0:42:430:42:44

It's a lovely sauce,

which you can easily make

0:42:440:42:46

in your own home very simply.

0:42:460:42:49

A little bit of clove,

a bit of juniper berry.

0:42:490:42:52

Spice up blackberries

with a simple marinade.

0:42:520:42:56

So with my clove, one single clove,

two juniper berries,

0:42:560:42:58

tiny bit of bay leaf

and a sprig of thyme.

0:42:580:43:01

A dash of sugar and it

takes on all of those

0:43:010:43:05

flavours and believe me,

that process will make

0:43:050:43:07

that blackberry taste

at least three times better.

0:43:070:43:12

Maybe four times, I've never been

a good mathematician.

0:43:120:43:15

Fry sliced shallot and field

mushrooms in butter.

0:43:150:43:17

Blend them a little bit,

just for one minute.

0:43:170:43:20

Add 100 mls of ruby port...

0:43:200:43:21

..and the same amount of red wine.

0:43:210:43:29

Now I can add the blackberries.

0:43:340:43:35

A pinch of salt only.

0:43:350:43:38

Remember, there's quite

a lot of spice here,

0:43:380:43:40

you don't need very much salt.

0:43:400:43:42

That process takes

about ten minutes.

0:43:420:43:46

When the sauce has simmered

gently for ten minutes,

0:43:460:43:48

puree in a liquidiser...

0:43:480:43:50

It's like a richer mulled wine.

0:43:500:43:52

Voila.

0:43:520:43:55

..and press through a sieve.

0:43:550:43:58

I think that's going

to be rather lovely.

0:43:580:44:02

After 12 minutes in the oven,

the duck is ready.

0:44:020:44:08

Tres bien.

0:44:080:44:11

Raymond props up the ducks

to rest for ten minutes.

0:44:110:44:19

This relaxes the meat,

so it releases its juices,

0:44:210:44:23

becoming succulent.

0:44:230:44:26

So now we are really ready to carve.

0:44:260:44:28

Open it up.

0:44:280:44:29

Voila.

0:44:290:44:30

Guy is joining me.

0:44:300:44:31

We have worked together for a long,

long time now and I'm

0:44:310:44:34

going to make him taste the dish.

0:44:340:44:36

Raymond serves slices of duck

with the blackberry sauce.

0:44:360:44:38

Voila, the sauce, go ahead.

0:44:380:44:44

Adam, have you got

a few crisps, please?

0:44:440:44:46

A garnish of deep fried parsnip

ribbons and a helping

0:44:460:44:48

of the celeriac puree.

0:44:480:44:51

Voila.

0:44:510:44:52

Bon appetite.

0:44:520:45:00

The cooking is nice,

it's not too pink.

0:45:120:45:14

It's lovely.

0:45:140:45:15

It works well.

0:45:150:45:16

I like that.

0:45:160:45:24

Thank you, Raymond!

0:45:240:45:25

A perfect alternative

to mashed potato there.

0:45:250:45:27

Right, still to come Nigel Slater

has two winter warmers today.

0:45:270:45:31

For mains he's got a simple Moroccan

style chicken casserole and for

0:45:310:45:36

pudding, as a cold-weather treat,

he's serving up roasted figs with

0:45:360:45:38

honey and Marsala.

0:45:380:45:40

It's almost omelette challenge time!

0:45:400:45:41

That means it's time for some puns.

0:45:410:45:49

Iain, we thought we would leave it

to you.

You're the professional.

0:45:500:45:55

Here we go, so I can read the

article you.

0:45:550:46:07

Right guys, let's crack on. This is

not a York. If you mess up, Matt

0:46:070:46:17

will not pick up your Caroline

Flack. Good luck and make a sterling

0:46:170:46:21

effort.

That is Bafta winning stuff.

You have got one already. I have got

0:46:210:46:27

one, it is on my fridge.

0:46:270:46:28

Will Iain get his food heaven,

a delicious shellfish pasta with a

0:46:280:46:31

lemon butter sauce?

0:46:310:46:32

Or his food hell, piggy

pork belly and moist

0:46:320:46:34

mushrooms?

0:46:340:46:35

There's still a chance

for you to vote on the website and

0:46:350:46:38

we'll find out the results later on!

0:46:380:46:40

Baftas are heavy, and they? Really

heavy. You should win one, I

0:46:400:46:47

recommend it. Did you pick one up

for someone else?

0:46:470:46:49

Right, on with the cooking.

0:46:490:46:51

Nieves, what are we making?

0:46:510:46:53

Nieves, what are we making?

0:46:530:46:54

We're going to make two dishes?

We're going to make two. One is

0:46:540:47:00

going to be lardo with anchovy, surf

and turf. The other one is going to

0:47:000:47:06

be squid with pan-fried chorizo and

Spanish Black tomato salad.

These

0:47:060:47:10

are two Micro dishes you are doing

at your new restaurant.

Yes, this is

0:47:100:47:16

more like the bar and this is more

like the restaurant.

You're serving

0:47:160:47:19

them with this -- with these little

beauties. I came across them in

0:47:190:47:24

Spain recently.

Yes, they have been

made by hand.

They are crispy and

0:47:240:47:30

tasty. Would you not find these and

other regions of Spain?

You do, but

0:47:300:47:34

they are different. Some of them,

they make them flat but these ones,

0:47:340:47:38

I like the shape and the Crispin is.

Is this a classic combination?

Which

0:47:380:47:44

one? This one here. Normally we have

these with ham. But today, I choose

0:47:440:47:54

to do it with the lardo, because it

is a little more fatty and it works

0:47:540:47:59

very well with the anchovies.

I am

just going to fry this. You are

0:47:590:48:06

fresh from opening your new

restaurant. You have three different

0:48:060:48:09

areas, one of which only opened two

days ago something?

It opened four

0:48:090:48:14

weeks ago, but some of it opened on

Thursday. The new one is more like a

0:48:140:48:22

brasserie. I'm going to need to use

that. The brasserie is more like

0:48:220:48:29

sharing tables. We just bought

another in from Spain. We are

0:48:290:48:37

cooking suckling pigs.

This is a

circular stone of in that you can

0:48:370:48:41

move around?

0:48:410:48:48

move around? Well, they then

rotates.

Is that traditional? Well,

0:48:480:48:52

I bought it from Spain. It has two

platforms where the suckling pigs

0:48:520:48:59

can rotate.

0:48:590:49:04

can rotate. It is like an

old-fashioned than? We brought it

0:49:040:49:07

from Spain, three generations. It is

a traditional than in one region. A

0:49:070:49:15

traditional oven where you cook

suckling pigs. We are also going to

0:49:150:49:19

cook lamb as well.

The whole nature

of the restaurant, it is a journey

0:49:190:49:26

through Spain. It is not just one

region? Exactly. When you go to the

0:49:260:49:34

bar, it is more like the south of

Spain. We have beautiful home-made

0:49:340:49:41

tapas. But in the restaurant, it is

more the north of Spain, Catalunya.

0:49:410:49:47

Do you have a favourite region

yourself?

No. I love Spain. It is

0:49:470:49:58

difficult for me to say I love

Catalunya, Mallorca, Galletier is

0:49:580:50:04

amazing.

This is it, super simple.

-- Galicia is amazing.

0:50:040:50:17

-- Galicia is amazing.

All you need

is a cold beer or sherry.

Nothing

0:50:170:50:21

else.

Or your famous morning wine. I

have not had that for a few months,

0:50:210:50:27

actually. You have been very busy.

Exactly.

We have got the squid,

0:50:270:50:34

getting a decent colour on it. Yes.

I am getting there. What is that

0:50:340:50:40

sausage?

This is from the north of

Spain. It is less fatty, and it has

0:50:400:50:48

less paprika. Has it got bad spice?

A little bit. It is very mild. It is

0:50:480:50:56

very mild.

Hopefully Iain will love

this dish. The popularity of Spanish

0:50:560:51:04

food and drink at the moment seems

to be skyrocketing. Do you have an

0:51:040:51:08

opinion as to why that might be? Why

the popularity of Spanish food and

0:51:080:51:13

drink is rising so high?

I think it

is because we love to have fun.

0:51:130:51:22

There is an informality to the

style.

Yes, but it is all about the

0:51:220:51:26

fantastic ingredients. For a long

time, this country embraced the

0:51:260:51:32

worst elements of battered squid and

things like that, and now suddenly

0:51:320:51:36

people like Jose Pizarro and Nieves

are opening Britain to a much more

0:51:360:51:43

beautiful taste.

I think in the open

kitchen it makes everything more fun

0:51:430:51:48

for the guests and the staff. The

interaction of the customers, seeing

0:51:480:51:54

what you are cooking, I think that

is what makes a more relaxed

0:51:540:52:00

ambience.

You're a big fan of the

open kitchen for that reason?

0:52:000:52:04

Exactly. To have the opportunity to

cook in front of the customers. To

0:52:040:52:09

listen to their opinion. I think

that is the best feeling you can

0:52:090:52:13

get.

You like the feedback and the

immediacy of seeing the customer in

0:52:130:52:18

front of you?

Yes, if you're doing

something wrong, it is very easy for

0:52:180:52:24

you to fix it. You also have a

fishmonger? Yes, we have a beautiful

0:52:240:52:34

seafood display where you can choose

your little prawns. As soon as you

0:52:340:52:42

come in, you can see everything.

There is nothing to hide.

We love

0:52:420:52:45

the open kitchen.

What is going in

here? I do not like to marinate that

0:52:450:52:52

the makers. If I put them in the,

they will release the juice. -- I do

0:52:520:52:59

not like to marinate that matters.

This is going to be the dressing for

0:52:590:53:05

that matters.

0:53:050:53:11

that matters.

That is sweet,

delicious.

Is that easily available?

0:53:110:53:16

Yes, today you can get any Spanish

products. It is very easy.

A little

0:53:160:53:23

bit of the pork fat.

Yes, I know we

are going to do this. This is good

0:53:230:53:28

pork fat. It is kind of like a warm

salad? It is a warm salad. With the

0:53:280:53:36

beautiful chorizo.

A little bit of

that.

I am just going to put it on

0:53:360:53:45

top of this beautiful squid.

That is

just a little bit of garlic and oil,

0:53:450:53:52

parsley.

Always. These are my three

amazing ingredients. I cannot live

0:53:520:53:58

without them.

0:53:580:54:03

without them. It is very simple,

very clean, very fresh.

What would

0:54:040:54:11

you call this in Spanish? SHE SPEAKS

IN SPANISH. People are doing this a

0:54:110:54:20

lot, in the Basque country as well.

We have the lardo with anchovies,

0:54:200:54:27

then we have the green squid, with

the chorizo.

Fantastic. Right, let's

0:54:270:54:34

go and eat. Are you a big fan of

squid?

Guess, I love it. That looks

0:54:340:54:42

so good.

0:54:420:54:47

so good. There is some pork fat for

you. No, I am all right.

Why are we

0:54:470:54:52

using these? We are using these at

the moment in the bar, the

0:54:520:55:00

traditional napkins to clean.

And

also to throw to the floor.

Why do

0:55:000:55:06

you do that? In Spain, we say that

you always go to the bar with more

0:55:060:55:13

napkins on the floor. That means it

is good.

We try to do that in

0:55:130:55:17

London. How the people coping?

Some

of them are, some of them are not,

0:55:170:55:23

but we will get there.

Would that

upset your sensibilities? I do not

0:55:230:55:29

think I could do it. I am too

polite.

I would tuck it in. No, you

0:55:290:55:34

will do it.

It feels so wrong to me.

I have got to apologise, however, I

0:55:340:55:41

have picked a wine to reflect the

theme of surf and turf. There is one

0:55:410:55:46

wine region in Spain.

0:55:460:55:52

wine region in Spain. It is wide

Rioja Blanco Muga. It has the

0:55:520:55:55

influence of the Atlantic and the

Mediterranean and the land itself.

0:55:550:55:58

We are spoilt for choice in Spain

for a great wines. This Rioja Blanco

0:55:580:56:04

Muga is blended. A little bit of

texture from fermentation, but

0:56:040:56:10

freshness. That is what you need

with seafood.

It looks red, how is

0:56:100:56:19

this a white wine?

They also do

Redwing. I think they are white wine

0:56:190:56:27

belongs on our table. They should be

far more appreciated. You can get

0:56:270:56:32

ones that taste like all, very

modern ones, and this is somewhere

0:56:320:56:36

in between. They are doing a

fantastic job.

Your fine? For me,

0:56:360:56:42

this is one of the best. This is

good wine, man. I will pour myself a

0:56:420:56:47

glass.

Get a Gladstone. Can they use

that as part of their marketing?

0:56:470:56:53

This is good wine, man.

Our US ban

of Spanish food? Allows Spanish

0:56:530:56:59

food. I remember the first time I

went to Spain, just going to barring

0:56:590:57:04

getting some beers. You get little

snacks, side dishes. It would be

0:57:040:57:09

like chorizo and fish. You think, I

am not even paying for this, it is

0:57:090:57:14

brilliant.

I love the Spanish.

That

was delicious. So lovely.

0:57:140:57:20

Now let's catch up with Si

and Dave, the Hairy Bikers.

0:57:200:57:23

They're on an Asian Adventure.

0:57:230:57:24

They're off to the Chinese

mainland where they've

0:57:240:57:26

been invited in to a typical

family home for dinner.

0:57:260:57:34

Now we've got to grips

with Cantonese fast food,

0:57:370:57:39

I reckon we need to find out

what people eat at home and how food

0:57:390:57:43

fits into family life.

0:57:430:57:44

Well, you're in luck,

because we're going to gate-crash

0:57:440:57:46

a local family's weekday dinner.

0:57:460:57:51

So, it's bye-bye to the big banks

of Hong Kong Island and hello

0:57:510:57:54

to the New Territories

on the Chinese mainland, where three

0:57:540:57:56

and a half million people live.

0:57:560:58:02

Speaking of the banks, Kingy,

Hong Kong has more billionaires

0:58:020:58:05

per capita than anywhere else

in the world.

0:58:050:58:09

Yes, and you need to be loaded

to buy your own gaff here.

0:58:090:58:14

House prices in Hong Kong have

doubled over the past four years,

0:58:140:58:17

so nearly half the population lives

in council owned skyscrapers

0:58:170:58:22

with subsidised rents, like the one

we're going to eat our tea in.

0:58:220:58:30

This is a government housing estate

on the Hong Kong/Chinese border,

0:58:310:58:34

and it consists of hundreds

of high-rise apartments.

0:58:340:58:41

Now, each high-rise consists of 456

flats spread over 38 floors

0:58:410:58:43

with approximately 12

flats per floor.

0:58:430:58:45

With four to five people

living in each apartment,

0:58:450:58:50

that makes a total of 2,200 people

in each high-rise.

0:58:500:58:57

Our destination is floor 35,

home to the Feungs -

0:58:590:59:01

a typical Hong Kong working family.

0:59:010:59:03

Jackie and Lulu's.

0:59:030:59:08

Hello, Jackie?

0:59:080:59:09

I'm Dave.

0:59:090:59:11

Pleased to meet you.

0:59:110:59:14

Jackie, hello.

0:59:140:59:15

I'm Si, very nice to meet you.

0:59:150:59:17

Yeah.

0:59:170:59:18

Nice to meet you.

0:59:180:59:19

Thank you for...

0:59:190:59:20

This is Si.

0:59:200:59:21

Hello.

0:59:210:59:22

Hello.

0:59:220:59:24

University student Jackie lives

here with his Grandma Lulu,

0:59:240:59:25

two brothers, and Dad and Mum.

0:59:250:59:27

And my mother.

0:59:270:59:29

All six of them live

in this two-bedroom flat.

0:59:290:59:32

Here's my bedroom, and I share

the bedroom with my younger brother

0:59:320:59:34

and also my grandma.

0:59:340:59:41

So there's three

of you sleep in here?

0:59:410:59:43

Yeah.

0:59:430:59:44

My younger brother is sleeping here.

0:59:440:59:46

OK.

0:59:460:59:47

And me, I will sleep in here.

0:59:470:59:49

Yes.

0:59:490:59:50

And my Grandma Lulu

is sleeping here.

0:59:500:59:51

Ah, she's got a little

bed under there?

0:59:510:59:53

Yes.

0:59:530:59:54

Ah!

0:59:540:59:55

A little pull-out.

0:59:550:59:56

Yes.

0:59:561:00:01

'Like the majority of families

here, 'Jackie's parents

1:00:011:00:03

both work full-time.

1:00:031:00:04

'Mum is an accountant's clerk

an hour away in Kowloon.'

'And Dad

1:00:041:00:07

is one of the half a million

Hong Kong residents 'who work over

1:00:071:00:10

the border in China.' So there's

two woks and a wok ring

1:00:101:00:13

and a rice steamer.

1:00:131:00:14

'So Granny's in charge of feeding

the family.'

Lulu cooks for six,

1:00:141:00:17

in a kitchen the size of a broom

cupboard, and tonight,

1:00:171:00:19

we're squeezing in.

1:00:191:00:22

'First, a bitter melon,

pork and black bean stir-fry.

1:00:221:00:24

'Bitter melon is a bit

like courgette, er,

1:00:241:00:27

but bitter.' So this is...?

1:00:271:00:28

Palm sugar!

1:00:281:00:29

Palm sugar, yes.

1:00:291:00:30

I think this is why it tastes good.

1:00:301:00:32

That's a lot of palm sugar!

1:00:321:00:34

LULU SPEAKS OWN

LANGUAGE

I'm doing...

1:00:341:00:36

SHE CONTINUES Some water.

1:00:361:00:37

Some water?

1:00:371:00:39

I don't think I've cooked over

a very small Chinese grandma before.

1:00:391:00:42

It's brilliant.

1:00:421:00:44

Yeah.

1:00:441:00:45

She must feel like it's like having

the Gruffalo in the kitchen.

1:00:451:00:49

She's fantastic.

1:00:491:00:52

Oh, look, now.

1:00:521:00:53

Jackie, now I know

why you live at home.

1:00:531:00:55

Yeah.

1:00:551:00:56

And there's a chicken

dish coming now.

1:00:561:00:59

Is there?!

1:00:591:01:00

Yeah.

1:01:001:01:01

Where from?!

1:01:011:01:02

'This 70-year-old doesn't

stop for a second.

1:01:021:01:05

'Every night she cooks five or six

different stir-fries,

1:01:051:01:10

plus rice.'

1:01:101:01:14

DAVE LAUGHS.

1:01:141:01:16

LULU LAUGHS.

1:01:161:01:17

So what dish is this one?

1:01:171:01:18

Sweet-and-sour pork, Kingy.

1:01:181:01:19

It's sweet-and-sour pork...

1:01:191:01:20

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

1:01:201:01:21

With sweet-and-sour sauce.

1:01:211:01:22

Ah, yeah!

1:01:221:01:23

'Ah, love it!

1:01:231:01:24

Lulu knows just how to make these

Englishmen 'feel right

1:01:241:01:27

at home.'

Like magic.

1:01:271:01:28

She's got stuff hidden everywhere!

1:01:281:01:31

It's brilliant.

1:01:311:01:33

Right, this is the

sweet-and-sour sauce.

1:01:331:01:36

This is it.

1:01:361:01:37

Juliennes of carrot, right?

1:01:371:01:38

I've always wanted to know how

to make proper sweet-and-sour sauce.

1:01:381:01:40

Everybody loves it.

1:01:401:01:43

Yes, pineapple now.

1:01:431:01:44

Ohhh, look!

1:01:441:01:48

And the peppers.

1:01:481:01:49

Yeah, peppers.

1:01:491:01:50

Ooh, you can smell...

1:01:501:01:51

Lovely.

1:01:511:01:52

I like it.

1:01:521:01:53

Hurray!

1:01:531:01:54

Wow, very big.

1:01:541:01:55

BIKERS AND JACKIE: Ohhh!

1:01:551:01:59

Tomato ketchup.

1:01:591:02:00

Yeah, ketchup!

1:02:001:02:01

Oh!

1:02:011:02:02

Crumbs.

1:02:021:02:05

That's three quarters

of a bottle of tomato ketchup.

1:02:051:02:08

I think it's a whole

bottle of ketchup, Kingy.

1:02:081:02:10

'Crumbs.

1:02:101:02:11

Dude, that's 700 calories

in the tomato sauce alone.' 'Do

1:02:111:02:13

you know, sweet-and-sour pork's been

on Chinese menus in

1:02:131:02:15

Britain 'since 1908?

1:02:151:02:18

'I'm telling you, this

one's definitely sweet.'

1:02:181:02:21

Ah, look at those.

1:02:211:02:22

Fantastic, Kingy.

1:02:221:02:25

Beautiful.

1:02:251:02:27

'This family feast 'has only taken

Granny Lulu 45 minutes to rustle

1:02:271:02:30

up.'

Now I feel as though I've

arrived in Hong Kong.

1:02:301:02:33

Yes, it doesn't get more

traditional than a family meal.

1:02:331:02:36

So let's start.

1:02:361:02:40

That's fantastic, that sauce.

1:02:401:02:44

So nice and crispy.

1:02:441:02:45

Mm.

1:02:451:02:46

You are a good cook,

aren't you, Lulu?

1:02:461:02:49

JACKIE TRANSLATES SHE REPLIES IN OWN

LANGUAGE

You must love her, man.

1:02:491:02:52

THEY LAUGH

The food is just so good.

1:02:521:03:00

And produced in next to no time,

in the smallest, smallest space.

1:03:011:03:04

Yep.

1:03:041:03:07

But bundles and spoonfuls

of love and care, and that

1:03:071:03:09

was beautiful to see.

1:03:091:03:13

Thank you very, very much.

1:03:131:03:14

Yeah, you're welcome.

1:03:141:03:16

JACKIE SPEAKS IN OWN

LANGUAGE ..you're welcome.

1:03:161:03:20

SHE TRIES TO REPEAT SIMON CHEERS,

THEY LAUGH AND CLAP Try again.

1:03:201:03:23

(SLOWLY) You are welcome.

1:03:231:03:25

You are welcome.

1:03:251:03:31

THEY ALL CHEER.

1:03:311:03:36

Thanks, boys!

That is it - the heaven

1:03:361:03:38

and hell vote is now closed.

1:03:381:03:40

Iain's fate is sealed!

1:03:401:03:41

And we will reveal the results

at the end of the show.

1:03:411:03:44

Now, let's take some

calls from our viewers.

1:03:441:03:47

First up is

1:03:471:03:48

First up is Brenda from Scotland.

What's your question, Brendan?

Hi,

1:03:481:03:53

guys. The other week I was given

three heys, I'd love to know how to

1:03:531:04:02

cook a lovely meal with them --

three hakes.

I like to dust flour

1:04:021:04:10

and eggs, we call it Romano in

Spain. It is sea bass, I like it to

1:04:101:04:15

get very crispy. A quick sauce which

always on make and it works very

1:04:151:04:22

well, tomatoes, a little garlic, a

shallot, a splash of wine or white

1:04:221:04:29

wine, and that will be your bed

either for the crispy skin of the

1:04:291:04:32

sea bass or the Rom a la Romana.

I

have it weak from David. What would

1:04:321:04:45

be a good wine to go with a

home-made steak and mushroom pie?

1:04:451:04:49

He's told us he is slept at home

watching with a cup of tea and

1:04:491:04:54

wearing a cardigan!

Good for you!

I'm loving the sound of the Katty! I

1:04:541:05:01

would say, for a state and kidney

pie at this time of year, southern

1:05:011:05:05

French reds are so delicious, the

grapes down there or amazing. Gently

1:05:051:05:10

spicy, mellow and perfect for your

steak and kidney pie.

I had a

1:05:101:05:18

perfect one the other day. Our next

call is marked from London.

Good

1:05:181:05:22

morning. I have a half shoulder of

lamb and I'm looking for an

1:05:221:05:26

interesting way of cooking get.

Greg?

For a shoulder. Take the

1:05:261:05:32

shoulder, rub it for olive oil, put

it in a tray. In a tray you add a

1:05:321:05:37

couple of glasses of red wine. But

the tinfoil on top and put it in the

1:05:371:05:41

oven at about 150, 140, depending...

For about seven hours. Getting it

1:05:411:05:48

out, it's going to be beautifully

tender. You can just shred it off

1:05:481:05:55

and serve it with lemon and leaves.

Most importantly, you reuse the

1:05:551:06:02

sauce, you are cooking reduces with

the red wine, you get a glaze. And

1:06:021:06:06

you finish with a touch of lemon

juice, delicious!

It's like therapy,

1:06:061:06:14

listening to you! It's quite coming.

It's a very sort of busy show and

1:06:141:06:18

it's like, R, downtime! Thanks for

everyone who phoned and we did. --

1:06:181:06:26

and tweeted.

1:06:261:06:30

It's Real Bread Week,

1:06:301:06:32

so we sent Bake Off star

1:06:321:06:33

Chetna Mackan to a working watermill

in Peterborough, which dates back

1:06:331:06:36

to the 18th century,

to try her hand at making bread

1:06:361:06:38

the old-fashioned way.

1:06:381:06:39

This is a campaign to encourage

people to support the local bakeries

1:06:391:06:42

and inspire them to make more at

home. I am in a Watermill in a very

1:06:421:06:47

snowy pita bread to find out more

about it.

This was attached to our

1:06:471:06:55

mail and was built in the early 18th

century. Everybody would have been

1:06:551:06:59

eating bread in Victorian times, the

poor, the middle classes, and the

1:06:591:07:04

rich. It would have been eating at

every meal. If you were poor, you

1:07:041:07:07

might have just had bread for

breakfast.

Apparently, a family of

1:07:071:07:13

six would consume up to 31 loaves

per week.

It's incredible.

It is a

1:07:131:07:18

lot of bread and it was really

expensive and difficult to make at

1:07:181:07:23

home, so the bakeries played an

important part. Nowadays, it's easy

1:07:231:07:27

and cheap to make at home. We have a

fantastic recipes.

We have flour

1:07:271:07:34

from next door that we are going to

be using.

I'm going to add my own

1:07:341:07:40

twist

1:07:401:07:40

be using.

I'm going to add my own

twist to this. I'm going to add a

1:07:401:07:44

teaspoon of powder and some fresh

leaves. The combination of these two

1:07:441:07:52

is a lovely flavour, and of course

the colour as well. This is a really

1:07:521:07:55

simple, easy recipe. Just basically

four ingredient. It is incredible

1:07:551:08:00

you can make a hole of the bread

from just those four things. -- a

1:08:001:08:05

whole loaf of bread. We have just

been making some lovely bread with

1:08:051:08:09

the flour from this mill. Can you

tell me more about the mill itself?

1:08:091:08:14

It was built in about 1755. We have

evidence that there was Milling here

1:08:141:08:20

long before that. So, back in Roman

times. Much more recently, we've

1:08:201:08:25

been conserving and restoring this

wonderful building and the machinery

1:08:251:08:28

in it.

Wow, these look amazing!

Yes,

they have been shaped into roles and

1:08:281:08:37

left to prove for another 30

minutes, now they are ready to go

1:08:371:08:40

into the oven.

Here you go, ladies.

Warm buns, straight out of the oven.

1:08:401:08:49

You really can taste of fresh

coriander, it gives it a lovely

1:08:491:08:52

cake.

There you have it. With a bit

of time and effort you can make a

1:08:521:08:58

wonderful home-made clothes that you

can be proud of. If everything goes

1:08:581:09:02

wrong, you can support your local

bakery! -- home-made loaf.

1:09:021:09:07

There are plenty of easy bread

recipes on the BBC website.

1:09:071:09:14

For next week's foodie film,

we're sending Radio 1's Chris Stark

1:09:141:09:17

on a mission to find out more

about one of the nation's

1:09:171:09:20

favourite foods - the kebab.

1:09:201:09:21

But we need your help.

1:09:211:09:22

If you find yourself

tucking into a doner

1:09:221:09:24

or a shish this weekend,

please send us a selfie and use

1:09:241:09:27

the hashtag #SaturdayKitchen,

and we might include it in our film.

1:09:271:09:30

Right!

1:09:301:09:31

It's omelette challenge time.

1:09:311:09:32

And this way, guys. -- come this

way.

1:09:321:09:37

And this way, guys. -- come this

way.

1:09:371:09:38

Nieves and Greg, neither

of you are on our new board,

1:09:381:09:41

so there's nothing to lose

and everything to gain!

1:09:411:09:43

The aim is to make fast,

edible three-egg omelettes that

1:09:431:09:45

are good enough to feed

to our hungry crew.

1:09:451:09:47

CHEERING.

1:09:471:09:49

That was a bit lame, to be honest!

1:09:491:09:50

But if they're not, they'll

go in the compost bin.

1:09:501:09:53

BOOING.

1:09:531:09:54

Better!

1:09:541:09:54

So, will it be crrew or compost?

1:09:541:09:55

Your time will stop when your

omelettes hit the plates.

1:09:551:09:58

Let's put the clocks on the screen.

1:09:581:10:00

Are you both ready?

1:10:001:10:01

Come on, Perth, are you ready,

Lexmark --?!

1:10:011:10:05

Three, two, one...

1:10:051:10:06

Go!

1:10:061:10:06

Go!

1:10:061:10:13

Oh, where cooking!

Yes, Buccleuch

was in the go! Come on, come on! --

1:10:131:10:18

the clue was in.

1:10:181:10:20

MUSIC

1:10:241:10:29

Oh! Was that at the same time?

Right, let's turn those off. What's

1:10:311:10:39

that for?! Just in case I want to

season it with a knob of butter?

1:10:391:10:44

Identify what happened in there, its

decoration!

Oh, I'll just avoid that

1:10:441:10:49

little bit of shell!

Oh, there's no

shell!

1:10:491:10:57

Some of your finest work, that!

1:10:571:11:05

Nice and diverse. OK, they are both

delicious. Right, let's move.

1:11:051:11:13

Nieves, what do you think you got?

I

don't know!

Nor do why! That is

1:11:131:11:21

Adams, bang on by deserters. Great

-- 30 seconds, bang on by deserters.

1:11:211:11:28

Greg, 29.84, they you go. Very good,

well done.

1:11:281:11:36

So, will Iain get his food heaven -

a delightful duo of shellfish

1:11:361:11:39

and pasta with a bonus

lemon butter sauce?

1:11:391:11:41

Or will it be hellish double

trouble, with braised pork belly

1:11:411:11:43

and pickled mushrooms?

1:11:431:11:44

We'll find out after Nigel Slater

shows us some more of his

1:11:441:11:47

warming simple suppers.

1:11:471:11:53

With the right food, a rainy night

at home can feel like an absolute

1:11:561:12:00

treat. When the weather gets cooler,

my cooking gets a little bit spicy.

1:12:001:12:06

I don't mean really hot, I mean just

a lovely, earthy warmth. For that, I

1:12:061:12:10

use the mild spices. And I could add

them straight into the pot.

1:12:101:12:18

Sometimes, if I've got a little bit

more time, I like to get the spices

1:12:181:12:22

a chance to get to know the

ingredients that there with. So I

1:12:221:12:28

make a little spice rub. You can use

this spice rub in many dishes. But

1:12:281:12:34

tonight, it's the basis of a

Moroccan style chicken casserole. To

1:12:341:12:39

start off, crush a few cloves of

garlic with a mortar and personal

1:12:391:12:42

and add some salt to help get a grip

on the garlic. -- with a personal

1:12:421:12:49

and mortar. A nice squidgy mess of

garlic and salt. And then I can put

1:12:491:12:54

in a fuse buys us. Like a little bit

of paprika. It's got quite a smoky

1:12:541:13:00

flavour to it. The most earthy of

them all, turmeric. These are not

1:13:001:13:04

hot flavourings at all. What they

add is just a warm back note. And a

1:13:041:13:10

little bit of cumin seed.

1:13:101:13:17

So that I can rob my paste into the

chicken, I'm going to add a little

1:13:181:13:23

bit of oil. It could be live, it

could be grounds not, it could be

1:13:231:13:28

whatever's around. -- it could be

all of oil. It could be groundnut.

1:13:281:13:34

You can experiment with different

spices to sue jaw on taste. Just

1:13:341:13:37

make sure that the mixture is runny

enough to poor, but they can after,

1:13:371:13:41

the chicken. The mixture all gets

mixed together. I love this bit! For

1:13:411:13:49

a deep flavour, leave your chicken

in the fridge overnight. But if

1:13:491:13:53

you're in a rush, just let it sit

for as long as you can. This is

1:13:531:13:59

quite cool weather food, it needs a

bit of depth to it. There's no

1:13:591:14:04

better way to introduce sweet depth

to your cooking than with some

1:14:041:14:07

onions. Throw the onions into the

pan, and add your marinated chicken.

1:14:071:14:12

To bring some freshness into this

dish, add some Min Lee sliced lemon

1:14:121:14:17

halves. Keep them then, and the

lemon will take on a sweetness --

1:14:171:14:22

thinly sliced lemon halves. You

could add stock, but I'm just adding

1:14:221:14:27

water to create an uncomplicated

sauce. And that will be fine as it

1:14:271:14:31

is. But I feel like just being a bit

extravagant and putting in one of my

1:14:311:14:37

favourite spices, which is a little

bit of saffron. Saffron adds warmth.

1:14:371:14:46

A little bit of salt. A little bit

more black pepper. Leave it all to

1:14:461:14:54

simmer for about 15 minutes.

1:14:541:15:01

That's got a kind of North Africans

sent to it, with the lemons and the

1:15:011:15:06

spices. So, to contrast with that,

I'm going to add some salty olives

1:15:061:15:10

and some fresh coriander. That's

what I want to come home to. And

1:15:101:15:16

quite a cool day. Something earthy

and sweet and a little bit spicy.

1:15:161:15:30

Use chicken on the bone as the meat

will stay moist and succulent.

1:15:301:15:38

will stay moist and succulent. When

the weather cools, I like a proper

1:15:411:15:44

pudding. But I still like fruity

puddings, and there are still some

1:15:441:15:48

wonderful figs about. I like to bake

these in something very sweet and

1:15:481:15:54

slightly alcoholic. My Tuesday night

treat is roast figs with honey and

1:15:541:15:58

Marsala. Score the figs into

quarters, and push decides to expose

1:15:581:16:04

the juicy flesh. You need a little

bit of sweetness and there. I'm

1:16:041:16:12

going to use some honey. You can use

any honey for this, whatever you

1:16:121:16:19

have around. Then I am going to add

a little bit of quite sweet alcohol.

1:16:191:16:26

You could use port, you could use

media, but I'm going to use Marsala.

1:16:261:16:36

-- Madeira. I am going to put the

lid on, put it in the oven and leave

1:16:361:16:43

it alone. As simple as that. Leave

them in the hot oven for about 20

1:16:431:16:50

minutes to roast.

1:16:501:16:55

minutes to roast. There is something

about hot, sweet fruit, with its

1:16:551:16:58

juices. And freezing cold ice cream.

That is just irresistible. This is

1:16:581:17:06

so tender it is on the verge of

collapse.

1:17:061:17:18

Very tender fruit. With quite a busy

little syrup.

1:17:201:17:29

-- boozey little syrup. And the ice

cream. It tastes like Christmas and

1:17:361:17:43

birthdays all rolled into one. That

is really very good.

1:17:431:17:50

is really very good. For this

pudding, I have used ice cream, but

1:17:511:17:54

you could use cream, Custer doormats

go pony.

1:17:541:18:02

go pony. -- Creamer custard.

1:18:021:18:05

Thanks, Nigel.

1:18:051:18:06

Two great winter warmers there,

just what we need with

1:18:061:18:09

this Beast From The East!

1:18:091:18:10

Time to find out

whether Iain is getting

1:18:101:18:12

his food heaven or food hell.

1:18:121:18:15

Scarlets is your most favourite

shellfish ingredient.

Scottish

1:18:151:18:22

langoustines. Are you a fan of

those? Scottish salmon, all of them.

1:18:221:18:29

We have got monks fish, prawns, and

Dobbie system pasta. This is your

1:18:291:18:38

food hell.

1:18:381:18:44

food hell. Pork and mushrooms.

What

do you think you have got?

I am

1:18:441:18:49

hoping it is heaven because you

cannot go wrong with pasta. No one

1:18:491:18:53

likes mushrooms.

I guarantee you no

one actually likes mushrooms. My

1:18:531:19:01

wife does not like mushrooms.

1:19:011:19:07

wife does not like mushrooms.

There

are quite a lot of other people.

1:19:071:19:09

You're all wrong.

No likes

mushrooms. So, you will be pleased

1:19:091:19:15

to hear that 55% of viewers went for

then on Mac.

1:19:151:19:23

then on Mac.

-- for food heaven.

55%

is close. That is along the lines of

1:19:241:19:33

most things to be honest. It is kind

of split.

I love the 55-45.

1:19:331:19:44

of split.

I love the 55-45. Are you

getting political? I did not mean

1:19:441:19:47

that at all. I have never read a

newspaper in my life.

Do you want to

1:19:471:19:53

open the scallops for me?

I thought

they were a joke ones.

Plastic

1:19:531:19:56

things. There is no pretend food on

the show. We have got these

1:19:561:20:03

beautiful langoustines. The amount

of waste in Britain in shellfish,

1:20:031:20:07

langoustines and things like that,

it is ridiculous.

In a restaurant

1:20:071:20:12

you get given things like that. It

is difficult to feel like you're not

1:20:121:20:16

going have to dinner away.

What,

when you do this? If you smash their

1:20:161:20:21

heads and suck out the juices you

can go through here.

It is quite an

1:20:211:20:27

interactive dinner. I wish I got the

mushrooms now.

What food do you go

1:20:271:20:34

for an tour?

To be honours with you,

I am annoyed that you picked Chris

1:20:341:20:39

start over me for the Caban section.

Do you like them? I love them. I

1:20:391:20:45

need to get healthier. My girlfriend

says that I need to eat more

1:20:451:20:49

healthy. It is hard on the road, you

cannot cook anything. You need

1:20:491:20:54

something fans due to need, normally

in a car. It is difficult. Lots of

1:20:541:21:00

cashew nuts and dried fruit.

It does

not son did your embracing that?

1:21:001:21:06

Yes, it is just to stop you getting

the hunger pangs that result in fast

1:21:061:21:10

food. I do not eat great when I am

away but I enjoy kicking when I get

1:21:101:21:16

the chance. My mum and dad are big

cooks as well.

Do you know how they

1:21:161:21:20

are getting on at home?

They are

making the pudding as we speak.

They

1:21:201:21:26

are not doing this, cooking along?

Hopefully, they might be doing the

1:21:261:21:33

pasta.

But they are very interested

in the butterscotch sauce. Tell us

1:21:331:21:35

about the last time you visited

them?

Well, my mum and dad like

1:21:351:21:41

interactive television experiences.

Last Easter I went home on a

1:21:411:21:46

Saturday night to surprise my

parents, they did not know I was

1:21:461:21:50

coming. I got in on Saturday night,

my mum and dad were watching

1:21:501:21:54

television, but they were both sat

in office chairs facing away from

1:21:541:21:59

the telly. Is that how they sit

normally? Never. I asked them what

1:21:591:22:04

they were doing, and it turned out

that my mum and dad were watching

1:22:041:22:09

The Voice, and playing along at

home. That is great. My mum was

1:22:091:22:15

really is because my dad had not

turned around once, she thought they

1:22:151:22:19

were all terrible.

Do they watch

Love Island?

Yes, which as you can

1:22:191:22:26

imagine, is a bit awkward. Do you

know when you're a kid and you're

1:22:261:22:28

watching a movie and it is a kissing

scene coming on, and you just want

1:22:281:22:35

the sofa Tuohy Diop, I have that

with my mum and dad but I am talking

1:22:351:22:39

them through it.

Do you remember the

first live show that they came to?

I

1:22:391:22:42

do. It was the final of the Scottish

comedian of the year. It was my

1:22:421:22:52

savings ever show at the old fruit

market in Glasgow. They came along,

1:22:521:22:57

very supportive. My dad came up to

me afterwards. He has totally

1:22:571:23:01

thought it went. He said, you were

very nervous.

It is a change, doing

1:23:011:23:08

voice-over to live.

How do you cope

with the nerves? I love it. We were

1:23:081:23:13

saying error about the open kitchen,

that Spanish-style open kitchen.

1:23:131:23:18

That is very similar to stand up. I

love the immediacy of it. You tell a

1:23:181:23:25

laugh -- you tell a joke and get a

laugh. Stand-up has always been my

1:23:251:23:30

main passion. I am doing presenting

and writing but I love dealing with

1:23:301:23:35

the audience. Not all the time.

Sometimes on a Saturday after too

1:23:351:23:39

much of your wine it can be hard. I

do not get as nervous as I used any

1:23:391:23:43

more. It is what I do know, if you

know what I mean.

Thoroughly

1:23:431:23:49

enjoyable, actually. Let's just

recap. The scallops are nearly done.

1:23:491:23:55

I bet that colour and the

langoustines. This is a root

1:23:551:24:01

vegetable that you have stripped

down. If you would put those in

1:24:011:24:06

boiling water, that would be great.

In here, we will add a little bit of

1:24:061:24:12

butter at.

Three amazing shouts

making the pasta. Making it look so

1:24:121:24:18

easy. It is so fun. It is a simple

dish, it does not generally require

1:24:181:24:23

three chefs. Dinner parties

featuring your stand-up? If I am

1:24:231:24:28

honest with you, they annoy me.

Dinner parties? I used to go to

1:24:281:24:32

nightclubs. You are 30 now. I am 30,

I go to dinner parties. There is

1:24:321:24:39

never enough wine.

I will give you

my number.

Do you know that horrible

1:24:391:24:45

thing if there are four of you and

your sharing a bottle of wine, there

1:24:451:24:49

seems to be this weird sort of

contract that you lock yourself into

1:24:491:24:53

with everyone where no one is

allowed to top up the glass until

1:24:531:24:56

everyone else has finished. What

contract is that? Have you never

1:24:561:25:00

been in this situation when you're

just watching everyone, shut up,

1:25:001:25:05

drink your wine. I want to top up my

glass. People that drink wine too

1:25:051:25:13

slowly, it is the worst thing in the

world.

I give you full permission to

1:25:131:25:17

grab the bottle. It is bad for

others and yourself.

Sometimes I

1:25:171:25:21

give them a top up and then I will

fill my glass. You can justify it in

1:25:211:25:25

your head. I am taller than you, I

weigh more than you, I am Scottish,

1:25:251:25:30

I need this. I used to be fun, and

now I go to dinner parties. I have

1:25:301:25:38

got friends know that do things

before work.

Like what? Go to the

1:25:381:25:42

gym.

I do not get that. It is like

more work.

After sleep, before work.

1:25:421:25:51

But your work starts quite late, to

be fair.

If I am doing nothing

1:25:511:25:55

before work, that is bad. I start

work at 8pm and I am still

1:25:551:26:00

struggling.

Is it an endurance,

being on the road? Do you have to

1:26:001:26:05

maintain a healthy resume?

I really

do not. I really wish I did. Again,

1:26:051:26:10

it is that thing we are talking

about. This idea of social media,

1:26:101:26:14

and everyone saying they are doing

so well. That affects your mental

1:26:141:26:19

health. Things like mental health as

well as physical, I get really

1:26:191:26:24

affected by it. Not drinking enough

water or eating healthily and. It is

1:26:241:26:29

something I genuinely want to work

on.

But it is so hard.

Your

1:26:291:26:35

girlfriend is on that?

She is all

over that. Let's stop for a minute

1:26:351:26:39

and talk about your glamorous

girlfriend. She is very glamorous.

1:26:391:26:44

She has given you something of a

makeover. When I was watching video

1:26:441:26:48

clips of you there is quite a

progression in style and the general

1:26:481:26:51

look. It is almost like an angle

going up.

If you watch my video is

1:26:511:26:58

for the year it looks like the

evolution of man. I did not know

1:26:581:27:04

about things like that, you can add

any shirt.

Have you ever done that?

1:27:041:27:09

Not personally. You can shave. --

iron a shirt. It is dead good, it is

1:27:091:27:21

fun.

It makes you feel nicer.

If you

do the shirt? Yes, you make an

1:27:211:27:25

effort and feel good about yourself.

Nothing too drastic.

What?

Right,

1:27:251:27:33

where can we see a?

What has just

happened? It was just like the

1:27:331:27:39

evolution of man. It makes you feel

better if you tidy up your shirts.

1:27:391:27:45

It does.

You mocking me on BBC One?

I want to know how your parents are

1:27:451:27:52

getting on, cooking along cool --

cooking along.

Mum and dad, message

1:27:521:27:59

how they cook along is going.

Some

of that on top, some sauce.

Where

1:27:591:28:05

can we see you next? I am all over

the country. I am doing a big one,

1:28:051:28:11

the 22nd of March. Thank you. I am

at the Apollo in Hammersmith. That

1:28:111:28:18

is a big venue? Last year I went to

Exeter and the people came. So the

1:28:181:28:25

fact I am doing the Apollo, it is

crazy and such an honour.

Live at

1:28:251:28:29

the Apollo.

They have all come to

your voice? And hopefully see my

1:28:291:28:36

face. I will not have drug wine in

the morning before the show.

Tucked

1:28:361:28:41

into that. I will run around

1:28:411:28:44

and say that is all from us today.

1:28:441:28:47

Thanks to all our studio guests,

Greg, Nieves, Olly and Iain.

1:28:471:28:49

All the recipes from the show

are on the website,

1:28:491:28:52

bbc.co.uk/saturdaykitchen.

1:28:521:28:53

Don't forget I've got more

Best Bites for you tomorrow

1:28:531:28:55

at 9.30am on BBC Two.

1:28:551:28:56

Have a great weekend.

1:28:561:28:57

Bye!

1:28:571:29:01

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Greg Marchand and Nieves Barragon and special guest Iain Stirling. There are great moments from the BBC food archive, including clips from Rick Stein, Raymond Blanc, the Hairy Bikers and Nigel Slater. Drinks expert Olly Smith picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.


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