10/02/2018 Saturday Kitchen


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10/02/2018

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Gennaro Contaldo and Eleonora Galasso, and special guest Stephen Tompkinson. Drinks expert Olly Smith picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Good morning. I hope you are hungry

because we have 90 minutes of

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top-class food to inspire you. I'm

Matt Tebbutt and this is Saturday

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Kitchen live.

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Welcome to the show. We've got two

brilliant Italian chefs joining us

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today, Eleonora Galasso and Gennaro

Contaldo, and on the drinks it is

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Lee Smith. Do you like our new

opening?

I love it! It is welcoming

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and informal.

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and informal.

This is going to set

the theme of the show. Eleonora, you

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are cooking first.

Yes, I am cooking

a beautiful rice dish with soul food

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and beautiful prosecco gravy. It is

a recipe from a 17th century, when

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rice arrived in Naples and so it was

thought of in different ways.

We

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have prosecco gravy as a little

twist, a lodge to Britain and nod to

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Wales... Not to Wales? Mode to

Italy.

It is an hot much to you so

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whoa but it is made with prosecco so

it is a nod to the region of Venice.

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Gennaro, we are doing a celebration

of Antonio.

Yes, two simple pasta

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dishes, one with mushrooms and

pancetta, and another one which

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Antonio used to like, "Cook me

something quick!" I will do it with

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garlic, chilli, olives.

Your best

friend and a great friend of ours.

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Olly, you are on the wine, straight

off the boat from China.

Yes, I was

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in northern China and it was minus

30. This is like a midnight feast

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for me to drop it is marvellous! We

have lashes of fantastic wine and

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depending on which we heaven and

hell swings we may have a British

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beard it up as always we have some

films from Rick Steyn, the Hairy

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Bikers, Wray blog and Nigel Slater.

Our special guest today has been

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keeping audiences are retained for

20 years with shows from Drop The

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Dead Donkey to DCI Banks. Today he

is mainly doing eating so I am

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delighted to welcome Stephen

Tompkinson. Nice to see you. This is

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your third time on the show.

It is,

perhaps trick.

Thank you for taking

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time out of rehearsals for Art.

Yes,

it was the final day of rehearsals

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yesterday and we start in Cambridge

next week for 17 weeks, touring the

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nation.

You are happy with it?

Yes,

fingers crossed.

You know the score,

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heaven and hell. What is your food

heaven?

Venison. It is something I

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have always liked. That is a nice

alternative to stake.

And you love

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wild mushrooms?

I do indeed.

He is

my friend!

What about hell?

It is

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something I have never tried but I

don't like the look of...

You

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haven't tried it?

No, I was going to

throw in at the deep end for tripe.

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It is very brave of you. Tripe is my

hell.

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hell. It is the smell, you know when

you get it into your nose?

Just that

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little bit of mint on top!

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little bit of mint on top!

Put a peg

on your nose and eat it?

As I've

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never tried it, I thought I would

try a new experience and vomiting

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live on television would be one!

If

the viewers give you have and I will

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give you the perfect accommodation

of venison and wild mushrooms so I

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will roast rack of venison and top

with cep crust and I will throw in

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some venison tartare and some

sauteed wild mushrooms. If Stephen

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gets Hell, I will make tripe, tripe

and more tripe. An Asian beef tripe

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and coriander salad and a tripe stew

with some...

I don't like coriander

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either!

Obviously you have to wait

to the end of the show to find out

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which won the viewers vote for. Go

to the Saturday Kitchen website

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before 11am to vote and we also want

your questions. Just dial 0330 123

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14 10.

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14 10. Get dialling now and, as

always, you can join the show on

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social media. You can chip in what

you like. We are going to cook.

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It is the way you walk! Let's start

off. We are making a beautiful rice

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baked so we make making risotto.

They're going to be a lovely source.

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We are making a stock. I am going to

start off with this one. I have

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because it will add to some extra --

cloves.

It is an unusual addition.

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You make vegetable stock and to

start with, Gennaro will agree with

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me, when you go to a market in

Italy, whichever market you go to,

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you always get for free the elements

that will help you make both stock

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and soft free to for your week. You

will leave it in your fridge and add

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to all of your recipes.

Celery,

carrots and onions you are always

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getting free.

And you can have

potatoes and tomatoes in the stock.

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There is no limit to the vegetables

you can put in. I see that you have

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put onion into the pan but there is

whoa whether one should use union or

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garlic. People always discuss about

it. I am for the money and so we

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will chuck the garlic this is going

to have the air we are going to fry

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the objective is to make it lovely

and crunchy for a before we at the

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labels of stock and we are going to

cook it in a lovely way. We are

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going to massage it around for about

two minutes, and then we are going

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to add labels of stock and after

about 15 minutes, when this is going

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to be lovely cooked, we are going to

add up some butter and some lovely

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Parmesan.

I am making the source.

This is a basic rule and we are

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going to use a bit of green. What

other spices?

We are using nutmeg,

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rice paper. If you're feeling more

adventurous you can use black pepper

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or chilli. No recipe is ever

prescriptive in Italy so you do it

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with what you have. You improvise in

the kitchen, as you do in life. Life

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is a celebration, that's for sure.

CHEERING

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In with the green. This B covers of

your cookbook. -- this recipe comes

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from your cookbook.

This is

something you can adapt with

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whatever leftovers you have. If you

made the risotto last night, for

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example, very easily you can

transform it and put it in a mould

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so you are going to grease the mould

with some lovely olive oil. I like

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the extra virgin olive oil, possibly

cold-pressed.

Is this a leftover

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dish, a celebration dish?

It is a

leftover dish that becomes

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tomorrow's dish so it is a never

ending dish with which you can

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always celebrate it is there any day

in which you don't celebrate? I

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don't really see it! We are going to

grease this so it will be important

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for the olive oil to be the best

quality you can get because of the

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smell and also because, when it is

cold-pressed it is actually

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extracted, the juices extracted,

with unheated machines, hence you

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have a lovely olive juice as opposed

to that sort of chemical

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transformation you get with very

heated machines. It is a bit more

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expensive but you get to go less to

the GP, so you have more time for

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the lovely stuff in life, right?

You

have been away filming with Gennaro

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and Jamie recently?

Oh, my God, that

was so much fun! We have been to

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Rome to speak with the world

heritage that we have and they are

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the unknowns, the grandmothers, and

that was some weeks before the pizza

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became world heritage, you know?

# When the moon hits your eyes like

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a big pizza pie

# That's a Mori!

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Well, exactly.

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Well, exactly.

That is all yours!

We

have made it already!

What do you

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need me to do?

Basically, now I will

lead... This rise has been mixed up

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with lovely Parmesan and butter and

with about two thirds of that gravy

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source. What we will need to do very

simply is take this rice, that lets

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say is left over from last night,

and put it in this mould, just chuck

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it in, and then we are going to oven

bake it for 30 minutes and then

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forget about it all.

So you put the

sole in raw and then bake it in the

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other?

Exactly, and we are going to

make it with some citrusy fruits.

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And you want a little julienne of

orange and lemon?

That's what I

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would like, and also some lovely

parsley, flat leaf parsley, slightly

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chopped, always roughly chopped. We

are never very precise! As you can

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see, I do not wear a white hat, I am

not a chef, I am all about home

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food. This dish that dates back from

the 17th century in Naples actually

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arrived in Naples in the same period

in which rice arrived to. Rice was

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somehow refused because maples was

all about macaroni and when rice

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arrived, they said, "What shall we

do with it?" Basically, people would

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use it just when they had stomach

aches as a cure. It was a good way

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to have the kids eat something

nourishing, healthy, and that would

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prevent them from getting sick. Now

it is something delicious. This

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beautiful dish, you can make it with

any leftovers you have sitting down

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board in the fridge. You can have it

with lovely stripes of courgette,

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for example, you can have it with

pancetta, or lovely meatballs,

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either big very small once. Do you

make it with meatballs and tomatoes,

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Gennaro?

Had via a second. If you

would like to ask a question, give

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us a ring now on 0330 123 14 10.

That's 0330 123 14 10. Calls are

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charged at your standard network

rate. And continue!

Yes!

I want to

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know how you make it.

With

meatballs, yes. With garlic, a

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little bit of parsley, a bit of

Parmesan, fried, sauteed, fresh

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tomato. Drop the meatballs inside,

cook the spaghetti or the

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tagliatelle...

I'm fainting!

Please

don't faint! Shall we do this?

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Together, right?

Ready?

OK. The show

must go on, mustn't it!

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must go on, mustn't it! That is a

success.

There is your source, there

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is your garnish.

It is going to be

nice and easy. We are going to put

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our lovely prosecco gravy on top and

around, and then we are going to

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garnish with beautiful orange and

lemon, all around, just the way you

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see fit, and then a little bit of

parsley - why not? Let's not be shy!

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This is a dish you seen before?

Yes,

not this particular one, but kind

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of.

Shall I be mother?

Put it there.

Remind us what that is called.

That

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is rice timbale with the sole and a

lot of love!

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OK, let's go over here. Right, grab

a knife and some plates.

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a knife and some plates.

It looks so

good. We must tasted.

How do you do

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this?

Slice it like so? Yes, this is

one of those cases where you can

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have your cake and eat it too.

Did

you follow that recipe, Stephen?

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Yes, spectacular.

Because, if you

didn't, they are on the website.

If

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ever there are some leftovers and

you make it for your family, the

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following day you can do the

so-called the meal where you put the

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rice in a pan and put it down with

the lid pretty much as you would

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with an omelette, and then you would

eat it as if it was a cake, a rice

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cake. In that case, you can fry it

with olive oil whereas here we have

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used mostly but because rice, the

marriage of rice is usually with

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butter.

Have a seat.

Can I try some?

It is beautiful.

So, with this we

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are going to go with prosecute. An

absolute bargain, 799. It's very

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good. Extra dry. A little more

fruity than the

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fruity than the brut, and it is

slightly drier. I love this with

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this kind of dish. It's great for a

party. Valentine's Day coming up,

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it's a great option. And organic

prosecute from northern Italy,

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lovely part of the world.

Oh my God,

what a marriage of food. Look at

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that. It's so good.

It's real

Italian comfort food.

You find it in

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homes but never in restaurants. You

have to divide this between a horde

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of ravenous hungry people.

And it's

going to go a long way, isn't it? So

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tomorrow you could do something

else.

Absolutely, I will fry it in a

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pan. If you misbehave, I will just

throw it at you.

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LAUGHTER

Cheers.

In Dublin last week, I heard

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one fellow say, I'm going to Rome

for Easter, and he said, no, I am

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going to roam around Baggot Street!

LAUGHTER

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I love it.

Also the wine. It's so

perfect, so good, because each bite

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you have, it is clean and fresh.

The

extra dry bid works well if

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specially with a citrus in the dish.

It lightens it. This is kind of your

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British...

It makes it feel quite

light and summary.

Now, Gennaro,

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what's the next course?

It is going

to be tagliatelle with pancetta

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mushrooms and thyme, linguine with

capers.

You will love it. We look

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forward to that and if you want to

ask questions this morning, call

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0330 123 1410 and lines close at

11am so get dialling the orange you

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can tweet as. Don't forget to vote

for food had a or Food Hell on the

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website. Now let's catch up with

Rick stein on another long weekend

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in Lisbon, which is fast becoming

the biggest foodie hotspot. Take a

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look at this.

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Well, it's some time

since I've been to Lisbon,

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but what I remember most

of all was the seafood.

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But not just the wonderfully fresh

seafood, but the little

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restaurants that sold it,

with, all the time,

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a view over the water -

not the open sea but the River

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Tagus.

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And the other thing was the tiles -

everywhere the buildings seemed

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to be clad in these beautifully

faded blue and green tiles.

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I remember those particularly.

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Just lovely.

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And the other thing were the narrow

streets, often going up

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and down some really,

really steep hills.

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ALL:

Really?

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Yes, really.

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Not so good if you're carrying heavy

filming equipment, but fine for me.

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I don't have to.

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Now, this is a nice, practical,

ordinary sort of hotel.

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It's not going to break the bank

and it has all the accoutrements

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for my long weekend,

namely a bar.

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How often does this happen to me?

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Please work.

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Don't make me have

to go back downstairs.

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Oh, brilliant.

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This is nice and modern.

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A Japanese bathroom

with its little panes.

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The bed looks nice.

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Nice double bed.

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Sofa.

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That'll be good.

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And the view.

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A road and another hotel.

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Well, you can't have everything.

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No, you can't.

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I'd much rather overlook this square

with a view of the River Tagus

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or a view of the castle or this

square, but if, like me,

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you happen to plan your weekend

around mid-June, you may find that

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all the hotels are

booked in the centre

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because of this man -

St Anthony.

0:20:230:20:25

Today is his day.

0:20:250:20:28

St Anthony's patronage is bountiful.

0:20:280:20:31

He is the patron saint

of fishermen, the poor,

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amputees, travellers,

horses, pregnant women and swine

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herds, to name but a few.

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BAND PLAYS

0:20:420:20:45

Summer here

means warmer waters

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and the coming of the sardines.

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They're at their very best, full of

oil and extremely sweet and tasty.

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Now when I have the luxury

of eating a grilled sardine,

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no matter where I am in the world,

I think of Portugal.

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They should be on the national flag.

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SHE SPEAKS PORTUGUESE

0:21:050:21:08

I'm really

looking forward to this.

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I just asked them how to eat this

on bread because, obviously,

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there's loads of bones in a sardine.

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I couldn't totally understand

what she was saying but I got

0:21:160:21:18

the general gist of it.

0:21:180:21:20

I think, basically,

you just take the skin off

0:21:200:21:22

and then you pull it apart.

0:21:220:21:23

It's very hot, but very fresh...

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and very tasty.

0:21:270:21:30

And I noticed that she said,

now you pull out the backbone...

0:21:300:21:35

but you have to eat these bits here.

0:21:350:21:39

There is just something incredibly

wonderful about getting messy

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eating food like this,

which is so good.

0:21:430:21:45

It is sort of part of the whole...

0:21:450:21:47

enjoyment of it.

0:21:470:21:51

You'd love this.

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I promise that.

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UPBEAT MUSIC PLAYS

0:21:550:22:02

'My very first breakfast

here in Lisbon has to be this -

0:22:230:22:26

'the famous pasteis de Belem,

'the most brilliant custard tart

0:22:260:22:29

you've ever tasted.' I'd go further

and say that these sweet,

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mellow, warm, very gooey

and exceedingly tasty little tarts

0:22:310:22:34

were a real eye-opener for me.

0:22:340:22:38

And this cafe-cum-bakery

with its rabbit warren

0:22:380:22:39

of tile-encrusted rooms

is a sheer delight.

0:22:390:22:44

Naturally, the recipe

is a closely guarded secret,

0:22:440:22:48

and so from eight in the morning

until 11 at night,

0:22:480:22:51

the queues are always there.

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Well, I'm extremely partial

to a custard tart, but they don't

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get any better than these.

0:23:000:23:02

What makes them so special

is the extraordinary softness

0:23:020:23:06

of the custard and the crispness

and the lightness of the pastry.

0:23:060:23:13

Seriously, when you bite

into them, it's bliss.

0:23:130:23:17

But the other thing

is when you just put

0:23:170:23:20

a little bit of cinnamon -

not too much - and a little bit

0:23:200:23:22

of icing sugar on the top,

it just completes it.

0:23:220:23:27

Interestingly, these tarts

are a part of history,

0:23:270:23:30

because next door to here

is a monastery, and in

0:23:300:23:33

the 15th and 16th century,

monasteries were like hotels.

0:23:330:23:38

They were the only places that

you could actually get

0:23:380:23:40

a bed for the night,

and these custard tarts came out

0:23:400:23:43

of that and became so popular that

in about the 18th century,

0:23:430:23:47

this shop opened, and the rest,

of course, is history.

0:23:470:23:51

But what is so good, I think,

is food and history.

0:23:510:23:54

It's not just about the recipes

but it's also about the ingredients

0:23:540:23:59

because, as you know,

the Portuguese went everywhere

0:23:590:24:02

in the world and they brought sugar

cane back from the Americas,

0:24:020:24:06

and they brought cinnamon back

from the East Indies.

0:24:060:24:09

So there is a real food chain there,

and I think that's what makes

0:24:090:24:13

them so special as well.

0:24:130:24:19

Thanks for that, Rick. That custard

tart had a closely guarded secret

0:24:250:24:29

recipe.

This one hasn't so this is a

very British custard tart I'm

0:24:290:24:34

making, very simple recipe. Sugar,

double cream, a lot of eggs, vanilla

0:24:340:24:38

and nutmeg and that's it.

0:24:380:24:41

Very easy to make. I'm going to put

that with poached rhubarb and poach

0:24:420:24:47

it in stem ginger and blood oranges

which are knocking around at the

0:24:470:24:50

moment so what we need to do is

bring the cream up to simmer. With

0:24:500:24:57

some vanilla. I have two vanilla

pods going in there. One litre of

0:24:570:25:01

cream. Mix eggs and sugar and bake

it. It gets baked for about one hour

0:25:010:25:07

at 110, a low temperature because

you don't want it to bubble and

0:25:070:25:10

blister. And then B will pair it

with a rhubarb. Right, let's talk

0:25:100:25:15

about Art. It has been kicking

around since the early 90s?

Yes, it

0:25:150:25:24

was huge in London's West End. I

made my West End debut with it 18

0:25:240:25:30

years ago, so I am revisiting it.

It's fascinating you are back in it

0:25:300:25:34

taking it on.

The same part. Ivan.

Are you bring a different dimension

0:25:340:25:42

to it?

It centres around a

friendship of three guys, and so

0:25:420:25:53

revisiting it, it's a 25 year

friendship we are talking about. And

0:25:530:25:59

Serge buys a painting which looks on

first glance looks like a white

0:25:590:26:05

canvas.

Had you seen it?

Yes, in

Paris.

That is when it was first on

0:26:050:26:16

and Sean Connery was the producer,

his wife saw it, and then they got

0:26:160:26:20

in touch with David Pugh, who is

producing it to this day, so that

0:26:200:26:24

painting becomes a catalyst for this

25 year friendship, possibly

0:26:240:26:29

dissolving because one of the guys

thinks that his friend has gone

0:26:290:26:32

completely mad spending a small

fortune on a painting. He just does

0:26:320:26:37

not get it. My character, they are

like fire and ice, those two

0:26:370:26:40

characters. I'm like the bassist in

spinal tap, like lukewarm water.

0:26:400:26:48

It's a particular relationship,

isn't it? You have a relationship

0:26:480:26:53

outside of them. It's quite fragile.

Yes, his professional life has

0:26:530:26:59

always been a failure. He's about to

get married for the first time in

0:26:590:27:03

two weeks when you join the play,

and he's very henpecked by his

0:27:030:27:08

mother and it looks like he's about

to be henpecked by his new wife.

0:27:080:27:12

These other two guys are his

bedrock. When they seem to be

0:27:120:27:18

falling apart at the seams, then it

makes it all the more poignant. 18

0:27:180:27:24

years later, where would you start a

new 25 year friendship from?

Is

0:27:240:27:30

there anything new? Has it changed

since the early 90s?

I don't know it

0:27:300:27:34

has because modern art still

polarises people. You either love it

0:27:340:27:42

or hated, and if you don't like it

you can't understand why people do,

0:27:420:27:46

and vice versa.

This is kind of the

extreme of what a lot of young

0:27:460:27:51

British artists would do?

Yes.

There

was a lot of artwork coming out that

0:27:510:27:56

people would just amused by.

Yes,

exactly. It is a bit like the

0:27:560:28:04

emperors new clothes sometime. It

has an amazing effect on the

0:28:040:28:07

audience. Some people really like

the painting, some people don't get

0:28:070:28:10

it at all. There's a lot of people

who are in the middle but what

0:28:100:28:14

happens is the audience really,

really fall for these characters and

0:28:140:28:18

want this friendship to stay

together.

Right, so they are three

0:28:180:28:23

distinct characters?

With Denis

Lawson and Nigel Haver 's.

Great

0:28:230:28:28

cast. Do you know them?

Yes, I have

known them similar to the play for

0:28:280:28:35

over 20 odd years. It's lovely. Life

imitating art. You see how neatly it

0:28:350:28:42

fits together?

Back to the recipe,

my cream is simmering with the

0:28:420:28:49

vanilla. Going to turn that off. In

here put the sugar and the egg

0:28:490:28:53

yolks, and keep it moving because we

don't want scrambled eggs. Mix it

0:28:530:28:57

together and overhear I have got the

rhubarb, a little bit of sugar, some

0:28:570:29:03

blood orange zest, juice, and the

stem ginger.

Is this the season for

0:29:030:29:08

blood orange?

Yes, they are not

around for long, delicious, sweet,

0:29:080:29:13

but they are quite tricky to get

hold of. It's not a regular thing a

0:29:130:29:21

lot of greengrocers will have.

Right.

In Sicily.

Yeah, well, that's

0:29:210:29:30

handy! Thank you.

0:29:300:29:35

You love stage? Yes, especially with

the comedy because you get the

0:29:360:29:45

immediate reaction from the

audience.

Do you like that

0:29:450:29:47

immediacy? We know you from so much

big TV.

It is a while since I have

0:29:470:29:55

toured and it is a gorgeous way to

visit places.

It was interesting

0:29:550:30:00

what you were saying about

everything being shot out of order

0:30:000:30:02

when you are doing film and TV.

With

a play you have a bit more control

0:30:020:30:09

over the beginning, middle and end

and the audience are very much a

0:30:090:30:13

part of it and keep it fresh.

You

are on our screens at the moment, in

0:30:130:30:20

Trolleys. It is very funny.

It is

lovely and it is our supermarket

And

0:30:200:30:32

it is there all the time?

Yes, it

has been there for the last seven

0:30:320:30:40

years so we don't do any filming

outside of the supermarket and there

0:30:400:30:43

are known night shoots so it is the

nearest thing to a nine to five.

A

0:30:430:30:50

little tip, that is a blind baked

tart, put it in the oven at 110,

0:30:500:30:54

pour the mix of the middle and then

you won't slot it all over. So then

0:30:540:31:01

the rhubarb, you could leave it a

couple of hours or overnight and put

0:31:010:31:05

it into a warm pan, a bit of dessert

wine going in. Bring it up to heat,

0:31:050:31:12

put a lid on and turn it off.

This

is the season of beetroots now?

Of

0:31:120:31:22

beetroot?

I beg your pardon,

beetroot! It is the colours!

0:31:220:31:30

beetroot! It is the colours!

Root,

blood oranges, both lovely.

A 17

0:31:300:31:36

week run is a long time to be

focused on doing one thing every

0:31:360:31:39

single night. Is there something you

do every night to maintain that?

The

0:31:390:31:46

play is about an hour and 25 minutes

so it seems like it should be a

0:31:460:31:49

breeze but when it is just three of

your concentration levels are

0:31:490:31:52

fantastic. Doing a tour is

fantastic, especially with the

0:31:520:31:57

comedy, to see how it varies from

place to place. When the play is

0:31:570:32:01

performed in Paris, it is taken a

lot more seriously and the author

0:32:010:32:06

was quite perturbed that at won the

Olivier award for best comedy over

0:32:060:32:11

here, when it is treated very

different there and she sees it

0:32:110:32:16

different. It will be different

every night in whichever town and

0:32:160:32:19

city we play.

When you take it on

the road is there a marked

0:32:190:32:23

difference between the jokes people

laugh at?

Yes, and some audiences

0:32:230:32:29

are more reserved. Newcastle, for

example, is one of the best theatres

0:32:290:32:33

and audiences and I'm really looking

forward to going there.

0:32:330:32:42

forward to going there.

Wires that?

I don't know, they just love going

0:32:420:32:44

to the theatres and our game for

anything.

Do you get people who will

0:32:440:32:53

sit and ponder?

Yes and you think

you've lost them but they show it

0:32:530:32:56

with their applause at the end. Some

are a bit reserved with getting

0:32:560:33:01

their laughter out.

A big difference

between North and South?

There can

0:33:010:33:05

be, yes, indeed.

Here is the tart,

with a little bit of rhubarb.

Sums

0:33:050:33:16

up this show, a little bit of

rhubarb!

That is Matt Tebbutt's new

0:33:160:33:23

motto!

That is beautiful, with the

ginger as well.

A bit of a departure

0:33:230:33:33

now. Perfect timing to make a tart

because today is the 70th birthday

0:33:330:33:39

of somebody very special, our

cameraman on camera one, Lofty or

0:33:390:33:45

Phil The Fork, as he is often

called, because he is first in to

0:33:450:33:49

taste the food and has cutlery in

his back pocket. So, Lofty, downed

0:33:490:33:55

tools for just a second.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

0:33:550:34:00

You knew this was coming! Happy

birthday!

0:34:050:34:19

birthday! Can I just say, when we

looked at this Campbell, we wondered

0:34:200:34:24

how long it would burn for so we

looked at the instructions

0:34:240:34:27

instructions said," light touch

paper and retire immediately," which

0:34:270:34:32

I thought was quite presumptuous of

the makers to know how old you were,

0:34:320:34:37

so we don't need you to retire

immediately! Have you got your

0:34:370:34:42

cutlery in your back pocket?

I have!

It is posh Gold cutlery, all this,

0:34:420:34:51

you could use. This is more you!

What is going on?

Just a bit of live

0:34:510:35:01

TV!

Who is on camera one?

Don't get

used to it, he is coming back. Take

0:35:010:35:12

that back. That is for you.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

0:35:120:35:20

Watch the heart! I know that was a

surprise. What will I be making for

0:35:230:35:27

Stephen at the end of the show? Will

it be food heaven, a combination of

0:35:270:35:31

venison and wild mushrooms? I will

go all out with a roast rack of

0:35:310:35:40

venison and a brothel and tartare

and I will spoil him by adding wild

0:35:400:35:46

mushrooms and a crunchy cep grass.

If Stephen gets help, I will be

0:35:460:35:51

making tripe two ways. I will make

an Asian tripe salad with coriander,

0:35:510:36:00

served with fennel. Don't forget,

what you get is down to you, you

0:36:000:36:06

have 45 minutes -- 25 minutes left

to vote, and every vote matters. Go

0:36:060:36:14

to the website and have your say.

Enough excitement, it is time for

0:36:140:36:19

the Hairy Bikers, who are on the

hunt for something quintessentially

0:36:190:36:21

British.

0:36:210:36:22

It's quite good being

out here, isn't it?

0:36:360:36:38

Cos they don't it knock it our way.

0:36:380:36:40

It's brill.

0:36:400:36:41

Oh, crikey, it's like

watching paint dry.

0:36:410:36:43

It is, aye.

0:36:430:36:44

But there's nothing

so quintessentially British

0:36:440:36:45

as the thwack of leather on willow.

0:36:450:36:47

Freshly brewed tea in china cups.

0:36:470:36:48

A tranche of Victoria sponge.

0:36:480:36:49

Cucumber sandwiches.

0:36:490:36:50

Give over!

0:36:500:36:51

When was the last time that you ever

ate a cucumber sandwich?

0:36:510:36:54

Blargh!

0:36:540:36:56

We've gotta come up with something

better than a cucumber sandwich,

0:36:560:36:58

dude, at half-time or whatever

the flippin' heck they call it.

0:36:580:37:01

We better get a move on...

0:37:010:37:02

PLAYERS:

Oh!

0:37:020:37:03

..because the way this

lot are playing, it's

0:37:030:37:05

not going to be long.

0:37:050:37:09

Dude, it's gotta be something

quintessentially British.

0:37:090:37:11

Aye, I've got it.

0:37:110:37:12

A curry!

0:37:120:37:16

But with a particularly

British spice.

0:37:160:37:17

Howzat?!

0:37:170:37:18

Come here and I'll show you.

0:37:180:37:22

HE WHISTLES

0:37:220:37:25

CHEERING

0:37:250:37:26

Curry!

0:37:260:37:27

Yes!

0:37:270:37:28

Not half.

0:37:280:37:30

Right.

0:37:300:37:31

And this is a peculiar curry that

we've never cooked before.

0:37:310:37:33

No.

0:37:330:37:37

It's a new one in our repertoire-y.

0:37:370:37:39

It is and what a repertoire-y...

0:37:390:37:41

Shorshe...shorshe...

0:37:410:37:42

It's really hard to pronounce.

0:37:420:37:44

Shorshe Murgi.

0:37:440:37:45

Shorshe Murgi.

0:37:450:37:46

It means, translated,

"mustard chicken."

0:37:460:37:47

Oh, does it?

0:37:470:37:48

Yes.

0:37:480:37:49

Oh.

0:37:490:37:50

And this is what's

special about our curry.

0:37:500:37:52

This is what it's all

about - mustard seeds.

0:37:520:37:54

Yellow mustard seeds

and brown mustard seeds.

0:37:540:37:56

And that is the British ingredient.

0:37:560:37:57

Cos that's what you have

with your roast beef.

0:37:570:37:59

And now, of course, you've got

mustard with one of the best chicken

0:37:590:38:02

curries you're ever going to taste.

0:38:020:38:04

You know what you need

for a chicken curry?

0:38:040:38:06

A chicken.

0:38:060:38:08

First off, I take an onion,

peel it and chop it.

0:38:080:38:11

Everything starts with a peeled

and chopped onion, doesn't it?

0:38:110:38:13

Well, apart from

evolution, of course.

0:38:130:38:14

We started with the egg.

0:38:140:38:16

It didn't.

0:38:160:38:17

It started with the chicken.

0:38:170:38:18

I keep telling you, you cannot

have an egg without a chicken.

0:38:180:38:22

I want about a 5cm piece of ginger.

0:38:220:38:26

Do you know the little takeaway that

I use at home, the Tandoori Oven?

0:38:260:38:29

Yeah, yeah.

0:38:290:38:30

Poor old chef, he died.

0:38:300:38:32

Really?

0:38:320:38:33

Mm.

0:38:330:38:34

It was tragic.

0:38:340:38:35

He slipped in the kitchen

and fell into a "korma."

0:38:350:38:39

A-ha-hey!

0:38:390:38:40

Take four cloves of garlic.

0:38:400:38:44

My garlic and ginger.

0:38:440:38:45

This now needs to be

pureed into a paste.

0:38:450:38:48

Due to the fact that I'm

on the edge of a cricket field

0:38:480:38:51

and I've got no leccy,

I've got to improvise.

0:38:510:38:54

But I had an idea - bing!

0:38:540:38:56

Light bulb moment.

0:38:560:38:57

In Thailand they use a blending

method called pounding, you know.

0:38:570:39:04

Well, it's not a Thai pestle

and mortar but this little belter,

0:39:040:39:07

this'll sort this out.

0:39:070:39:12

DISHES CLATTER LOUDLY

0:39:120:39:20

So, the marinade.

0:39:240:39:25

Half a lemon, half

a teaspoon of turmeric.

0:39:250:39:30

If you can get it, use

Kashmiri chilli powder

0:39:300:39:32

because it's great for colour.

0:39:320:39:35

Look at how vibrant that colour is.

0:39:350:39:38

Every Bengali housewife's

favourite - the mustard oil.

0:39:380:39:42

Take the skin off the chicken

so the flavours can get

0:39:420:39:45

right into the meat.

0:39:450:39:48

Is it working, dude?

0:39:480:39:49

Yeah.

0:39:490:39:50

Works well, this.

0:39:500:39:51

Forget your processor -

buy a cricket bat.

0:39:510:39:55

Right, dude, marinade's in.

0:39:550:39:58

I need to make another paste

now, which is a mustard

0:39:580:40:00

seed and chilli paste.

0:40:000:40:04

You can use the dark

or the brown mustard seeds.

0:40:040:40:06

I want a spoon of each.

0:40:060:40:07

Right, go on.

0:40:070:40:13

Into that, I want some chillies.

0:40:130:40:18

Two of these little fiery devils.

0:40:180:40:21

And just give it a quick bash.

0:40:210:40:26

HE LAUGHS

0:40:260:40:27

Paste number two.

0:40:270:40:28

Maestro, the pan is yours.

0:40:280:40:30

Right, so you want about

a tablespoon of mustard oil.

0:40:300:40:37

Cinnamon.

0:40:370:40:38

Cloves go in.

0:40:380:40:39

Two black cardamoms.

0:40:390:40:40

Break those down a little bit just

so the oils can come out.

0:40:400:40:44

So half a teaspoon of nigella seed.

0:40:440:40:47

Two more little green chillies.

0:40:470:40:49

Just slash them like that.

0:40:490:40:50

I want the flavour

rather than the heat.

0:40:500:40:53

But when you want the dish you can

just pick the chillies out.

0:40:530:40:56

There will always be some burke

who'll go, "I can eat it."

0:40:560:40:59

Well, good luck to them.

0:40:590:41:00

When the cardamoms are popping,

the onions come a-rocking.

0:41:000:41:06

It really has worked rather well

with me cricket bat.

0:41:060:41:09

Oh, the mustard oil

with the cardamoms,

0:41:090:41:14

the chillies, the ginger -

it's everything I love about food.

0:41:140:41:16

Put the chicken in?

0:41:160:41:17

Mm-hm.

0:41:170:41:18

And this has been skinned,

which is what we want.

0:41:180:41:22

The reason that we want to make sure

this is on the bone is cos

0:41:220:41:25

it just adds flavour.

0:41:250:41:26

And in 15 minutes' time we pop

in the mustard paste and some water.

0:41:260:41:30

See you later.

0:41:300:41:37

# I don't like cricket

0:41:370:41:38

# Oh,

no

Oh, no

# I love it #

0:41:380:41:42

# I love it

0:41:420:41:43

# I don't like cricket...

0:41:430:41:47

Oof!

0:41:470:41:52

# I love it

0:41:520:41:53

# I don't

like cricket...

0:41:530:41:55

It'll go wrong.

0:41:550:41:57

Come here, you, ya lummox.

0:41:570:42:04

Oh!

0:42:040:42:05

Massive flavour.

0:42:050:42:06

That is a good curry

from Bengal to Birmingham.

0:42:060:42:09

Those that want a leg can

have a leg, those that want

0:42:090:42:12

a breast can have a breast,

but everybody is going

0:42:120:42:15

to want the sauce.

0:42:150:42:16

Garnish with coriander

and fresh chilli.

0:42:160:42:21

Right, that is like no other

cucumber sandwich I've ever seen.

0:42:210:42:27

Ooh!

0:42:270:42:28

Hey-hey!

0:42:280:42:29

Our shmoozy...sherti...shusheshe...

0:42:290:42:31

Shorshe Mur-Kingi - a Bengali curry

with a British twist.

0:42:310:42:39

Thanks, lads, that definitely beats

a cucumber sandwich. Still to come,

0:42:460:42:51

Nigel Slater has more simple

suppers, pork chops with Apple cider

0:42:510:42:57

plus metallic chowder. And as it is

through 20 suite we replace the

0:42:570:43:02

omelette child with a pancake

challenge so time for me to crack

0:43:020:43:08

out some great jokes. Let's have

Gennaro and Lenora and hope they

0:43:080:43:14

don't flip out and argue the toss

and there will be some batter even

0:43:140:43:20

if the pants fall flat it up will

Stephen get food heaven, venison

0:43:200:43:25

with wild mushrooms, or hell, tripe

with fennel and chilli? We will find

0:43:250:43:32

out later underdog but your pounds

down, guys.

0:43:320:43:42

We are doing two different pasta

dishes in honour of the great

0:43:420:43:45

Antonio Carluccio.

0:43:450:43:50

Antonio Carluccio.

In this

spaghetti, everything I am I02

0:43:500:43:53

spaghetti, especially handmade!

It

is like a kitchen takeover. What is

0:43:530:44:00

going on?

Cut about three sizes.

Just three?

Three and a half.

Why

0:44:000:44:18

these dishes?

This is in, is to

Antonio, you wanted to cook

0:44:180:44:30

something very quick and Antonio

used to be angry and used to say,

0:44:300:44:35

make something quick! Put them

inside there.

This was his go to

0:44:350:44:42

quick dish?

You can see, I am doing

two dishes instead of one.

I'm going

0:44:420:44:49

to speed up.

Put some salt inside. I

need some chilli for one. That is

0:44:490:45:01

garlic. I am going to do the other

one.

Have you got chilly in both?

I

0:45:010:45:08

have chilli and garlic in both.

0:45:080:45:13

Both these recipes come from your

last book?

Yes, from my last book of

0:45:130:45:18

pasta. OK, the garlic, give it a

little bit of a cake. As soon as it

0:45:180:45:26

starts to sweat, look at this one.

-- a bit of a cake. Some capers.

0:45:260:45:38

These sticks behind us, tell us

about this.

Antonio used to love

0:45:380:45:45

those sticks and we always used to

compete, I would carve my stick. We

0:45:450:45:57

used to go in the forest, in the

woods, to find mushrooms and we

0:45:570:46:03

needed something to look around. The

walking sticks were really, really

0:46:030:46:07

nice.

They are beautiful. How long

did it take?

About one week to make

0:46:070:46:14

one of them.

Really? Your friendship

is a very genuine one, wasn't it? A

0:46:140:46:22

lot of pairings on television is not

necessarily what you would expect

0:46:220:46:25

off-screen but yours was very

different.

Original. This is what we

0:46:250:46:30

used to be and this is what we are

now. I miss him, yes, I have to say,

0:46:300:46:35

I really miss him, quite a lot,

because I used to phone him up on

0:46:350:46:44

Sunday, and now I can't do that any

more. I used to insult him.

Who do

0:46:440:46:50

you insult now?

LAUGHTER

0:46:500:46:54

You can see how quick it is.

Garlic

and capers inside there. Pancetta

0:46:540:47:02

and wild mushrooms with chilli at

the last minute, I will put in some

0:47:020:47:06

wild mushrooms, porcini, in a little

bit of water. The Pasteur goes

0:47:060:47:13

straight in. I need you to chop some

parsley.

OK, just a little bit.

0:47:130:47:21

Jamie to you out recently for a

special birthday. Can we say how old

0:47:210:47:25

you are? 69?

You got it.

You are

nearly the same age as Lofty.

He is

0:47:250:47:40

younger than me.

He is 70.

Jesus!

I

saw on Instagram, there were the two

0:47:400:47:51

review in his restaurant.

He took me

to the shops. He bought me a suit.

0:47:510:47:58

Assured. A pair of shoes. Attire.

Pair of socks. And append.

0:47:580:48:10

Pair of socks. And append. -- a pen.

What does that say about your

0:48:100:48:16

sartorial elegance?

He said, "You

always look smart." They opened

0:48:160:48:22

especially for me.

And then he went

out for a lovely lunch?

We had lunch

0:48:220:48:29

and we really enjoyed it. Quality

time.

Nice to be able to do that.

0:48:290:48:39

What do you want me to do?

Saute

this one. Go. A squeeze of lemon.

0:48:390:48:48

Lemon zest, as well?

No.

0:48:480:48:56

Lemon zest, as well?

No. Look at

that.

Do you want some liquor, as

0:48:570:49:03

well?

A little bit.

Why are you

using linguine in one dish and

0:49:030:49:11

tagliatelle in the other?

It goes

well with seafood, linguine. This

0:49:110:49:20

one has capers, so it's a better

when you eat it. You get a lovely

0:49:200:49:26

sensation. With the other one, wild

mushrooms, there's a little bit of

0:49:260:49:31

juice and sauce inside and it stays

on top and you can enjoy it.

You are

0:49:310:49:37

still very busy every day in the

kitchen. Jamie's Italian.

Have you

0:49:370:49:43

been?

Yes, I love it, I took my

kids. The Pasteur, it does so much

0:49:430:49:51

to bring really, really good pasta

to such a wide audience.

We make

0:49:510:49:54

fresh pasta. Every single day.

Unless you go to a high-end

0:49:540:50:02

restaurant, that's very often

something you missed.

Yes, it is. We

0:50:020:50:06

have a passion for pasta. We have

special machines all the way from

0:50:060:50:13

Italy. Squeeze a bit of lemon. We

love what we are doing. A little bit

0:50:130:50:19

of oil.

I want to talk to buy the

capers. You are using salted as

0:50:190:50:25

opposed to the ones in brine. Why?

In brine, it has a touch of vinegar.

0:50:250:50:34

Sometimes it becomes very difficult

to remove it. When you use the salty

0:50:340:50:42

one, you leave it for a few minutes

inside the water, and then the salt

0:50:420:50:46

will disappear. But you still get a

lovely taste.

Is that clear?

0:50:460:50:55

LAUGHTER

Excellent. The breadcrumbs.

This is

0:50:550:51:01

just breadcrumbs, sauteed little

bit, because when you put inside

0:51:010:51:08

your mouth, crunch. It starts to

dissolve, it's so nice. And then you

0:51:080:51:15

get biting on it.

I do know what's

happening next. Quite frankly.

0:51:150:51:28

happening next. Quite frankly.

Some

nice Parmesan cheese. On top. This

0:51:280:51:34

is Peggy Arena. It's a lovely dish.

-- pecorino. I got this beautiful

0:51:340:51:45

olive oil, a drizzle on it. Don't be

afraid to use olive oil. Olive oil

0:51:450:51:52

is very, very good for you.

Put it

on the side. Beautiful. Two dishes

0:51:520:51:59

in six and a half minutes, something

like that, it's very good.

0:51:590:52:07

like that, it's very good. 69, you

can't be doing that any more. Watch

0:52:070:52:10

yourself.

Tagliatelle with pancetta

mushrooms and thyme. And linguine

0:52:100:52:19

with capers and olives.

Beautiful. A

drizzle of olive oil. That's it.

0:52:190:52:28

Come on. Come and have a lie down.

LAUGHTER

0:52:280:52:34

Right, here. Dies in wherever you

want to go first. -- dies in. --

0:52:340:52:45

shall we have a drink?

I found a

wine from Sicily. It is Nicosia Etna

0:52:470:52:57

Rosso. 11 quid from Marks & Spencer

is the quality of the wine I have to

0:52:570:53:02

say is absolutely stunning. Why is

so good from there? It's on the

0:53:020:53:09

volcano. It gives a real intensity

to lift the flavour of wine but

0:53:090:53:13

because its 700 metres above sea

level, you get freshness, so it's a

0:53:130:53:17

perfect pairing. A local grape. It's

a risky business. On a volcano. Mick

0:53:170:53:29

Hucknall from simply red had a

vineyard in there. Be used to grow

0:53:290:53:33

his own rape finds there. It's

increasingly fashionable. It is

0:53:330:53:37

southern Italy's answer.

Oh my God!

Amazing. Amazing. I love it.

0:53:370:53:52

Amazing. Amazing. I love it. Olly,

how do you manage to find the

0:53:520:53:55

perfect marriage of whatever we

cook?

Inspired by your cooking,

0:53:550:53:59

Gennaro, the only way.

What a lovely

man. Lifted up. Don't worry.

Good?

0:53:590:54:15

Beautiful.

Excellent. Cheers to you.

And cheers to Antonio. Bless him.

0:54:150:54:25

Right, that was delicious. As it's

Valentine's Day on Wednesday, who

0:54:250:54:28

better to give as a desert recipe in

his romantic French annex van

0:54:280:54:33

Raymond Blanc and it's his ultimate

chocolate tart.

0:54:330:54:46

There are hundreds

0:54:520:54:54

of varieties of chocolate

on the market and for Raymond,

0:54:540:54:56

100% dark chocolate is irresistible.

0:54:560:54:57

That is seriously bitter.

0:54:570:54:58

That's what I love the most.

0:54:580:55:00

It's got so many lovely qualities.

0:55:000:55:01

It melts in the mouth,

wonderful flavours.

0:55:010:55:03

When you feel melancholic, "Oh,

let's have a bit of chocolate."

0:55:030:55:05

You feel a bit under pressure, "Oh,

let's have a bit of chocolate."

0:55:050:55:08

You feel happy, you want chocolate,

so you must always, at all times,

0:55:080:55:12

have chocolate in your cupboards.

0:55:120:55:13

That's always de rigueur.

0:55:130:55:15

To test his office staff's taste

buds, he's taking them a selection,

0:55:150:55:18

ranging from a sweet milk chocolate

to the darkest chocolate available.

0:55:180:55:26

OK, Adam, let's see the girls.

0:55:260:55:28

See if they love their

chocolate, OK Hello!

0:55:280:55:34

I have decided...

0:55:340:55:39

Can I have your attention one

minute I have decided

0:55:390:55:41

to change the bonus system.

0:55:410:55:42

We pay by chocolate now.

0:55:420:55:43

OK, so you can do a bit

of testing of chocolate.

0:55:430:55:46

Who doesn't like chocolate?

0:55:460:55:48

Number nine is the cheapest,

containing just 20% cocoa solids.

0:55:480:55:54

So which one you prefer?

0:55:540:55:56

Number nine is beautiful.

0:55:560:55:57

Number nine, yes.

0:55:570:55:59

Number nine is brilliant.

0:55:590:56:00

It's like...

0:56:000:56:01

Yes, most of you have

loved the number nine.

0:56:010:56:04

Actually that's the worst chocolate.

0:56:040:56:06

It's very highly sweet,

very addictive, the sweetness.

0:56:060:56:13

It's got only 20% cocoa content.

0:56:130:56:17

I really feel so, so disappointed,

so from tomorrow we are going to hav

0:56:170:56:25

we are going to have

0:56:250:56:27

a chocolate tasting every day

at four o'clock exactly.

0:56:270:56:29

Hooray!

0:56:290:56:32

Adam!

0:56:360:56:37

I asked you bran flakes this morning

I was very clear about it.

0:56:370:56:41

Raymond's next recipe

is a chocolate delice,

0:56:410:56:44

a rich, dark chocolate tart

with a nutty, crunchy base.

0:56:440:56:50

The delice au chocolat is a bit

like a tarte au chocolat.

0:56:500:56:54

For the base, I've used bran flakes.

0:56:540:56:58

And you just...

0:56:580:57:03

crunch them up nicely,

and you have praline.

0:57:030:57:05

Praline you can buy in any shops.

0:57:050:57:07

You can also make it yourself.

0:57:070:57:10

Praline paste is easy to make.

0:57:100:57:13

All you need to do is blitz equal

quantities of roasted hazelnuts

0:57:130:57:16

and caramelised sugar in a blender.

0:57:160:57:21

Then you mix the flakes

to your hazelnut paste.

0:57:210:57:24

So simple.

0:57:240:57:32

And that's my base for my tart.

0:57:380:57:40

Taste it.

0:57:400:57:41

Really, really lovely.

0:57:410:57:42

Yummy.

0:57:420:57:43

Place the mixture between two sheets

of greaseproof paper

0:57:430:57:45

and get ready to roll.

0:57:450:57:46

Adam, can I have my

rolling pin, please?

0:57:460:57:48

I want a big one, a serious one.

0:57:480:57:50

That one, I find it a bit too thin.

0:57:500:57:52

Tres bien.

0:57:520:57:53

That's fine.

0:57:530:57:54

Tres bien.

0:57:540:57:55

It is wonderful, very nutty.

0:57:550:57:59

There's a nut texture here and, Adam

a better palette knife, mon petit.

0:57:590:58:04

Thank you very much, Adam.

0:58:040:58:07

And that, I'm going to

keep it in the fridge.

0:58:120:58:14

Ah, now, le chocolat.

0:58:160:58:20

Let's go.

0:58:200:58:21

Tres bien.

0:58:210:58:22

Next, the filling for

the chocolate tart.

0:58:220:58:25

I'm going to boil my milk

and my cream together.

0:58:250:58:28

The eggs...

0:58:280:58:31

Tres bien.

0:58:350:58:36

So our milk now is rising,

is rising, is rising up.

0:58:360:58:40

I'm going to pour it over my eggs.

0:58:400:58:44

The eggs are magical.

0:58:440:58:46

The eggs are bonding that cream,

and now all that I've got to do

0:58:460:58:49

is to add my chocolate.

0:58:490:58:52

Oh, la!

0:58:520:58:53

Beautiful chocolate.

0:58:530:58:55

Look at it.

0:58:550:58:57

Voila.

0:58:570:58:58

For this, Raymond's

using a dark chocolate

0:58:580:59:00

containing 70% cocoa solids.

0:59:000:59:07

You see?

0:59:070:59:08

Beautiful.

0:59:080:59:11

Yes.

0:59:110:59:12

When the mixture is smooth,

pour it into a pastry frame.

0:59:120:59:16

Voila.

0:59:160:59:21

Then put it in the fridge to set

for at least six hours.

0:59:210:59:25

Voila.

0:59:250:59:31

While the tart sets,

prepare the decorations that

0:59:310:59:33

will transform this simple dish

into a work of art.

0:59:330:59:38

First, make a caramel.

0:59:380:59:41

Melt sugar in a heavy

base pan until it's rich

0:59:410:59:44

and golden in colour.

0:59:440:59:46

What I want is a bit of darker

colour so I can give a bit

0:59:460:59:51

of flavour to my caramel.

0:59:510:59:52

Put a roasted hazelnut

on a cocktail stick,

0:59:520:59:55

dip it in the caramel and pin

in some Blu-tac to

0:59:550:59:57

produce a long tail.

0:59:571:00:03

Look at that - beautiful!

1:00:031:00:05

Next, a light coffee foam.

1:00:051:00:06

Add melted gelatine to some strong

coffee and a little sugar,

1:00:061:00:09

then whisk until frothy.

1:00:091:00:16

So you've got the richness

in the hazelnut, the praline,

1:00:161:00:18

and then the richness again

in the chocolate.

1:00:181:00:20

So I want a sauce which is like air,

you know, something so light.

1:00:201:00:24

OK?

1:00:241:00:25

Once the tart is set,

it's time to decorate.

1:00:251:00:28

Dust with some grated 70% chocolate.

1:00:281:00:31

Nice textures, no?

1:00:311:00:33

Icing sugar, please!

1:00:331:00:38

Tres bien.

1:00:381:00:39

Just very lightly...

1:00:391:00:40

It's so simple.

1:00:401:00:41

No sweat, no?

1:00:411:00:49

Here's just a tiny little garnish -

very pretty, very dainty.

1:00:551:01:01

Voila, tout simplement.

1:01:011:01:09

Thanks, Raymond. Simple as that. The

heaven and hell boat is now closed

1:01:171:01:22

and Stephen's fate is sealed.

1:01:221:01:26

Let's take some calls. First is

Richard.

I picked up a lobster from

1:01:261:01:35

the fishmonger this morning and I

would like some advice on what to do

1:01:351:01:38

with it.

1:01:381:01:44

with it.

Lobster can be an

untameable thing but you can tame it

1:01:441:01:46

by putting it in a pan with some

lovely tomatoes, some lovely

1:01:461:01:51

parsley, fresh sage, fresh basil and

you make a lovely source to

1:01:511:01:55

accompany your spaghetti, black and

white, and the day after, you

1:01:551:02:02

scramble a few eggs and you can have

your breakfast on a Sunday. Why not?

1:02:021:02:08

Taming lobsters. What do you drink

with? Lobster is a real treat.

1:02:081:02:13

Traditionally, French champagne has

been the dish of the day but any

1:02:131:02:17

sparkling wine.

Or a light white?

You could have an oak Chardonnay or

1:02:171:02:22

Burgundy would be delicious. I would

go for fizz!

Stephen, you have a

1:02:221:02:29

couple of tweaks?

Yes, the

appropriately named for this show

1:02:291:02:35

Janet garlic once Tono from Olly,

screw-top or Cork wine, is there any

1:02:351:02:39

difference on quality?

Hi, Janet.

Nothing to fear from the screw-top.

1:02:391:02:45

Gone are the days when they were

inferior. The screw-top is very

1:02:451:02:51

convenient, you can put it in the

fridge and it will keep well but

1:02:511:02:57

courts have their place, for fine

wine.

I have an inkling who might

1:02:571:03:03

answer this question. Do you have an

idea for an Italian winter salad?

1:03:031:03:11

Salads really grows in the winter,

lots different salads grow in the

1:03:111:03:16

winter. You have a rid Duccio and an

endive. Escarole... Extra virgin

1:03:161:03:24

olive oil and a squeeze of lemon

inside, salt and pepper.

And you can

1:03:241:03:31

get some fennel and you can pan fry

them and put them on top with some

1:03:311:03:36

lovely blue cheese.

Oh, my salad!

Our next call is Sue from

1:03:361:03:46

Worcestershire. What is your

question?

Good morning. I have a

1:03:461:03:50

hazelnut liqueur and I would like to

mail how to use it?

We have exactly

1:03:501:03:58

the same liqueur. It is incredible.

That his hazelnuts. Make a lovely

1:03:581:04:05

tiramisu. So simple. You need some

finger biscuits, some double

1:04:051:04:10

espresso, some mascarpone cream. You

make the coffee, you put the liqueur

1:04:101:04:16

inside with the coffee and the

sugar, you mix together at biscuits,

1:04:161:04:21

finger biscuits, sponge it, then you

can but some mascarpone on top,

1:04:211:04:30

great to shop over chocolate and

just enjoy it. It is Valentine! You

1:04:301:04:38

really love it.

1:04:381:04:43

really love it.

I was wondering what

was coming next! Thanks to everyone

1:04:431:04:46

who called and treated. This week,

Glyn Pernell is getting the chance

1:04:461:04:51

to prove his theory that Birmingham

is the centre of the culinary

1:04:511:04:55

universe. Let's see if he can

persuade us.

1:04:551:05:02

I've lived in Birmingham most of my

life and I think it is the centre of

1:05:051:05:09

the universe. Used to be the

culinary desert of Britain but now

1:05:091:05:11

is one of the most exciting cities

in Britain. I am going to show you

1:05:111:05:16

exactly why it is the best place to

eat. Markets are the heartbeat of

1:05:161:05:24

any city. This is one of my

favourite places in Birmingham. I've

1:05:241:05:28

been coming here since I was a kid

and I come down here to get food for

1:05:281:05:32

home and the restaurant. Nice to see

you. There is the head.

You have

1:05:321:05:41

head, belly, feet.

Pigs' Trotters

are one of my favourite things. When

1:05:411:05:47

I was a kid we got them as a treat

on a Saturday to drop my mum would

1:05:471:05:52

boil them, I would be in my pyjamas

watching Blind date.

We do about 25

1:05:521:05:59

pigs are weak.

Why would you say it

has become more popular?

The

1:05:591:06:03

diversity of our customers, from all

over the world. Chinese, Vietnamese.

1:06:031:06:09

The only thing we don't sell is the

squeal!

You can't sell the squeal!

1:06:091:06:15

These are one of my favourite little

treats at the market. Cockles, a

1:06:151:06:22

splash of vinegar and eight dash of

white pepper. Brilliant! Takes me

1:06:221:06:27

back to being a little kid coming

round here, a pot of cockles. Can't

1:06:271:06:32

beat it! How are we? Tracy, morning.

I'm here to showcase what fantastic

1:06:321:06:40

fish we've got in the Birmingham

market. Traditionally... Is at the

1:06:401:06:46

West Indians on the Chinese that

Brian?

The Caribbean, you got your

1:06:461:06:51

Chinese. There are 201 different

nations in Birmingham and we are

1:06:511:06:55

trying to get as much from around

the world.

Birmingham has an array

1:06:551:07:00

of fantastic produce but is also

famous for one dish, the balti.

1:07:001:07:06

This may be a bit of a cliche but if

you are in Birmingham you've got to

1:07:191:07:23

have a curry. This was created here

in the early 1960s for the western

1:07:231:07:28

Pallett and there are now hundreds

of balti houses serving 20,000

1:07:281:07:34

people a week. That is a lot of

curry! I don't need these. I am

1:07:341:07:38

going to eat it with these. You may

have yellow stained fingers for a

1:07:381:07:43

week afterwards but it is definitely

worth it. Birmingham isn't just

1:07:431:07:48

about balti is. Over the last 15

years we have seen a fantastic

1:07:481:07:52

change in the restaurant and food

seem to cocktail bars Michelins

1:07:521:07:55

stars and sushi. This is one of my

favourite places where we buy sushi.

1:07:551:08:06

We have been spoilt, boys!

1:08:061:08:13

We have been spoilt, boys! If you

would have told me you would have

1:08:131:08:15

cocktail bars and sushi restaurants

in Birmingham 15 years ago. Of

1:08:151:08:20

cocktail 15 years ago in Birmingham

was a cube of ice and a slice of

1:08:201:08:24

lemon! I told you that Birmingham

was the food capital of the world

1:08:241:08:28

and we have only scratched the

surface of what the city has to

1:08:281:08:36

Thanks for that. If you good tips.

You are performing in Birmingham.

1:08:361:08:40

Yes, a good few tips. There is a

restaurant outside Glasgow called a

1:08:401:08:47

balti Towers.

1:08:471:08:52

... Shrove Tuesday has crept up on

us so we are going to do a pancake

1:08:521:08:57

challenge.

Can our chefs toss their

way to glory. The aim is to flip the

1:08:571:09:01

pancake as many times as you can.

You both have the same batter, oil,

1:09:011:09:09

pounds, a level playing field.

1:09:091:09:15

I am ready for a challenge now I

don't have my scarf!

Are you ready?

1:09:171:09:22

Shall we start making pancakes?

Three, two, one, go. Not quite the

1:09:221:09:28

explosive start!

1:09:281:09:34

explosive start! Both of you need to

make a pancake. As soon as you have

1:09:341:09:37

made a pancake, we will start

flipping.

What is the secret? A warm

1:09:371:09:44

plan to start?

You need a nice

nonstick pan, a hot pan, and good

1:09:441:09:50

batter. Usually the first one messes

up and I throw it away. The tension

1:09:501:09:55

is palpable.

Do they do Shrove

Tuesday in Italy?

We make them like

1:09:551:10:01

a cannelloni, we make them with

better melted rock

Do you have a day

1:10:011:10:07

that celebrates them?

No, we don't.

We make things that only contain

1:10:071:10:15

flour, eggs and a bit of sorts.

There we go. That's cooking.

Are you

1:10:151:10:27

ready, Eleonora?

Yes, it is cooking!

That is an improvisation for you,

1:10:271:10:38

Matt.

1:10:381:10:43

Matt.

We are going to miss Shrove

Tuesday by the time...

Gennaro, you

1:10:431:10:48

are cooking so well!

Go! Flip!

Gennaro, help! Help!

1:10:481:11:01

Gennaro, help! Help! One. Two.

Three. Four.

I think I'm being

1:11:051:11:12

hypnotised by Gennaro's pancake!

1:11:121:11:20

hypnotised by Gennaro's pancake!

You

are a perfect gent, Gennaro.

1:11:201:11:26

Gennaro,

1:11:261:11:26

Gennaro, how many do you think you

got? 33. Four! That is for you,

1:11:261:11:36

fellow. Of all the achievements of

your life, that is going to be up

1:11:361:11:41

there. That is why we do the

omelette talent and nothing else!

1:11:411:11:48

Will Stephen get his food heaven,

venison, or food hell, try? We will

1:11:481:11:54

find out after Nigel Slater shows us

two more hearty simple suppers.

1:11:541:12:07

I'm going to be cooking pork chops

1:12:081:12:10

with apples and cider.

1:12:101:12:11

I'm very fussy about pork chops.

1:12:111:12:12

I like good, thick ones,

with plenty of fat,

1:12:121:12:14

so that as the chop cooks,

that fat makes the meat

1:12:141:12:17

really succulent.

1:12:171:12:18

Pork and apple works

on so many levels, you know.

1:12:181:12:20

It works because of the richness,

and the sharpness of the fruit.

1:12:201:12:23

But it also works on another

level altogether -

1:12:231:12:25

that idea of pigs, in an orchard,

crunching their way through windfall

1:12:251:12:28

apples in the grass.

1:12:281:12:32

And it just brings...

1:12:321:12:37

I don't know, a bit

of poetry to supper.

1:12:371:12:45

I don't think that's a bad thing.

1:12:481:12:49

I don't think we always have

to be quite so practical.

1:12:491:12:52

I like to give the rind a good

headstart to getting a bit crispy,

1:12:521:12:55

by just searing it in the oil.

1:12:551:12:57

Then, lightly fry each side -

about a minute or so should do it.

1:12:571:13:05

I'm going to put a little bit

of cider with these.

1:13:111:13:19

Once lightly browned on the sides,

pull out the chops, then bung

1:13:211:13:24

the onions into the hot pan.

1:13:241:13:25

Whilst they're browning,

chop up some dessert apples.

1:13:251:13:27

I'm using the Discovery

ones from my garden.

1:13:271:13:35

I'm going to carefully

add some sage.

1:13:361:13:38

Use it sparingly,

1:13:381:13:39

because it can overpower the dish.

1:13:391:13:40

Then squash some juniper

berries to add a fresh,

1:13:401:13:43

lemony quality to the dish.

1:13:431:13:50

I'm gonna pop the chops back.

1:13:591:14:01

These are such sweet little apples.

1:14:011:14:02

They're so cute.

1:14:021:14:03

I'm gonna pop a couple

of whole ones in as well.

1:14:031:14:09

Season to taste with salt and pepper

and add a good glass of cider.

1:14:091:14:12

Slide into a hot oven

for about half-an-hour.

1:14:121:14:16

What's great about this dish

is you can either cook it

1:14:161:14:22

quickly on high heat,

or leave it in the oven

1:14:221:14:24

for hours on low.

1:14:241:14:26

What's happened is that

all of the succulence from the meat,

1:14:261:14:29

and all of the juices,

all the flavourings,

1:14:291:14:32

just come together.

1:14:321:14:36

That, for me, is both

supper and a big treat.

1:14:361:14:39

Of course, the perfect drink for thi

dish is a glass of ice-cold cider.

1:14:441:14:52

We all have our favourite combos -

ingredients that work

1:15:021:15:05

perfectly together.

1:15:051:15:08

They're always on our shopping list.

1:15:081:15:11

The danger is that these favourites

can become a bit predictable.

1:15:111:15:14

Which is why I like to bring

something new to these

1:15:141:15:16

existing relationships.

1:15:161:15:18

Some of our favourite culinary

marriages are with the most

1:15:181:15:22

basic of ingredients.

1:15:221:15:27

Potatoes and leeks is one

that works very well.

1:15:271:15:30

So I want to bring them together

as the base of a sumptuous chowder.

1:15:301:15:37

Start by placing the chopped leeks

into a warm pan of butter,

1:15:371:15:43

and adding some thyme.

1:15:431:15:44

I want the leeks to cook very

gently in the butter.

1:15:441:15:47

I don't want them to brown.

1:15:471:15:50

And the best way to do that is to pu

a little bit of paper on top,

1:15:501:15:54

so that they actually steam as much

as they fry.

1:15:541:15:57

And I put the lid on as well,

so that none of the steam can escape

1:15:571:16:02

To give a little body,

add some potatoes.

1:16:021:16:10

Put my potatoes in.

1:16:101:16:12

Into this soup, or stew,

whatever you want to call it,

1:16:121:16:17

I'm going to put some smoked haddock

And I want the haddock to go quite

1:16:171:16:21

a long way, because it's not

the cheapest of fish.

1:16:211:16:24

So I'm going to use sweetcorn.

1:16:241:16:24

And the reason for that is

because the liquid in this soup

1:16:241:16:28

is actually going to be milk.

1:16:281:16:31

And sweetcorn loves dairy produce.

1:16:311:16:38

I've always cooked my

smoked haddock in milk.

1:16:421:16:44

I'm sure there's some very

technical reasons for it.

1:16:441:16:47

But I do it cos my mum did it.

1:16:471:16:53

Milk softens the smokiness

of the haddock.

1:16:551:16:57

It's also wonderful

with the sweetcorn.

1:16:571:17:00

Drop in a few bay leaves

and a sprinkling of peppercorns.

1:17:001:17:04

Your fish should be ready

in under ten minutes.

1:17:041:17:08

This is more than a single

marriage of ingredients.

1:17:081:17:10

It's actually a marriage

of the leeks and potatoes,

1:17:101:17:14

and the milk and the sweetcorn.

1:17:141:17:20

It all comes together.

1:17:201:17:23

Break the haddock into chunks,

drain some of the milk,

1:17:231:17:26

and resettle to the chowder.

1:17:261:17:30

Dishes like this, which are calming,

they've got a quality to them that

1:17:301:17:35

brings a sense of peace

into your supper.

1:17:351:17:40

There's something very gentle

and old-fashioned about these

1:17:401:17:42

flavours and these smells.

1:17:421:17:45

And especially these ingredients.

1:17:451:17:50

Everything in this dish has

a classic connection.

1:17:501:17:53

Leeks to potatoes, milk

to sweetcorn, and fish to some

1:17:531:17:56

freshly chopped parsley.

1:17:561:18:04

There are some recipes

I like to put on a plate,

1:18:051:18:09

and pop them in front of everybody.

1:18:091:18:12

And there's other recipes that

I like to put in the middle

1:18:121:18:15

of the table, with a big ladle,

and get people to help themselves.

1:18:151:18:20

And this is one of those.

1:18:201:18:24

It's bowl food.

1:18:241:18:26

As well as soul food.

1:18:261:18:32

It has to be the bond

between so many of the ingredients

1:18:391:18:42

in this supper that makes

it absolutely mouth-watering.

1:18:421:18:49

Thanks for that, Nigel. Time to find

out what Steve is going to get, Food

1:18:531:18:57

Heaven or food health. This is what

I'd deal of Heaven. Venison, all the

1:18:571:19:03

nice stuff. Your idea of how, tripe,

coriander. So nice.

What is that?

I

1:19:031:19:17

suspect there's a lot of tripe

eaters out there. Right, what do you

1:19:171:19:20

think they went for?

I'm hoping they

went for the venison.

65% of the

1:19:201:19:28

people... Went for venison.

APPLAUSE

1:19:281:19:32

We won't need to look at the tripe

again.

1:19:321:19:36

I will eat this tripe. I love it.

1:19:361:19:39

OK, Gennaro, sort out some wild

mushrooms, venison tartare as well.

1:19:441:19:53

Eleonora, dice up the Apple and

shall not. That is not for you,

1:19:531:19:56

Gennaro. -- shallot. I've got some

roasted bones. That's right, throw

1:19:561:20:08

that in there. Garlic. Juniper

berry. Just to give it a back taste.

1:20:081:20:16

Then some chicken stock over the

top. Summer it for about one hour.

1:20:161:20:21

It reduces. -- simmer it.

Do you do

a lot of cooking?

Not a great deal.

1:20:211:20:32

What sort of thing do you need on

the road?

Fortunately, the show

1:20:321:20:38

comes down about 9pm so there's

still time to go out and eat, so we

1:20:381:20:42

would get the local guidebooks out

and any recommendations would be

1:20:421:20:45

very gratefully received.

Right, I'm

going to make, flour, egg, and this

1:20:451:20:53

is dried cep. Put it in a coffee

grinder, and put in a little crust

1:20:531:20:59

on this venison.

Is it a relatively

cheap meat, venison?

Generally not.

1:20:591:21:10

Some people say it is dead deer!

Think about it!

1:21:101:21:18

LAUGHTER

Right, OK, let's have some

1:21:181:21:24

seasoning, actually. Flour, egg.

Finally, the cep crumbs, put it in a

1:21:241:21:34

pan and stick it in the oven for

about six minutes or so. You want it

1:21:341:21:38

nice and rare.

And the cep will form

the crust?

Yes, exactly.

1:21:381:21:49

the crust?

Yes, exactly. Now, going

from deer to Drop The Dead Donkey. I

1:21:501:21:53

enjoyed watching that. You won the

comedy award for that.

I did,

1:21:531:21:57

indeed.

Was it of its time or ahead

of its time?

I think ahead of its

1:21:571:22:04

time. The only other thing on there

that was as close to it was spitting

1:22:041:22:09

image. We were absolutely dependent

on what was happening in the news.

1:22:091:22:16

It was risky because a quarter of

the show was given to you in front

1:22:161:22:21

of a live audience.

We would record

it on a Wednesday night with a live

1:22:211:22:26

audience. Two of us would go in on

the Thursday to do Thursday's news

1:22:261:22:31

over the end credits. The latest

they got it to the channel before it

1:22:311:22:36

went on air was 40 minutes. A huge

amount of pressure. It was Andy

1:22:361:22:42

Hamilton and Guy Jenkins coping well

with it. They would leave gaps for

1:22:421:22:47

the topical humour and frame it

around whichever characters were on

1:22:471:22:50

screen at the time, so they shaped

it to those characters and I have no

1:22:501:22:54

idea how they did it.

I would say

it's ripe for bringing it back.

1:22:541:23:01

Especially in these times as well.

Yes, it's calling out for it.

You

1:23:011:23:08

could come back as gas. I loved him.

He was a great character.

You've

1:23:081:23:14

done so me different things,

voice-overs, radio, TV, all the

1:23:141:23:19

roles he played, is there one

particular one that makes you more

1:23:191:23:22

nervous than the other? What's the

most nervous you've been a

1:23:221:23:26

performance?

I'm doing a charity

show next Sunday in Newcastle, at

1:23:261:23:32

the Metro Arena, two shows in front

of two batches of 11,000 people.

1:23:321:23:40

That could be nerve-racking. Yeah. I

think the live radio play I did last

1:23:401:23:48

year for Valentine's Day, just

knowing that one slip-up was going

1:23:481:23:53

to be heard, that was terribly

nerve-racking.

I was going to talk

1:23:531:24:04

about Wild At Heart, but you crashed

a balloon in Australia?

Yes, we hit

1:24:041:24:08

the ground at 35 mph and got dragged

through a field full of rocks. Yes,

1:24:081:24:15

I broke two teeth. The cameraman

injured his back. That we are still

1:24:151:24:19

here.

All in the name of television.

The producers were thrilled! They

1:24:191:24:26

didn't show it. They hired a

helicopter that day to follow us, so

1:24:261:24:33

we went when we shouldn't have,

really, but they got some fantastic

1:24:331:24:37

footage.

They were very happy.

That's the main thing. Which teeth?

1:24:371:24:45

Two at the back.

This is venison

tartare. Dijon mustard, shallot,

1:24:451:24:55

capers.

1:24:551:25:00

capers. Sauteed mushrooms. Here we

have got the stock.

Stephen, you do

1:25:011:25:04

the voice-over where you are the

character of Bob the builder?

I was

1:25:041:25:09

his twin brother. Tom, the

zoologist, which does not scan as

1:25:091:25:15

well. I haven't got a single out of

it. It was a Christmas special. The

1:25:151:25:22

best Christmas ever, it was called.

I got to sing crocodile Rock with

1:25:221:25:29

noddy Holder. So that was a treat.

And also Pingu.

I was head right on

1:25:291:25:41

many theories and I have much

affection for the Penguin.

Great

1:25:411:25:46

dialogue.

It was all emotive and it

was good fun.

But you could tell

1:25:461:25:51

what they said.

Next week we have

got Stephen Mangan as a guest and

1:25:511:25:58

you have been working with him

recently.

Yes, six part show for the

1:25:581:26:03

BBC called The Split dealing with a

family of divorce lawyers, one of

1:26:031:26:10

whom moved to another company, hence

the split. It's a self-contained

1:26:101:26:16

story every week, written by Abby

Morgan, and there is a big divorce

1:26:161:26:20

which goes through all six episodes

between myself and Meera sial.

Happy

1:26:201:26:27

show?

Yes, people will be very

interested, I'm sure. I think it on

1:26:271:26:34

in April. The BBC.

There is the wild

mushroom tartare. Venison broth, and

1:26:341:26:43

after about five minutes or so,...

Let's carve that.... Bring the

1:26:431:26:50

venison out. Let it restful stop

take off a couple of chops.

Stephen,

1:26:501:26:57

preparing for a role, how long in

advance does it take for you to nail

1:26:571:27:01

the character?

If you are doing a

theatre show, it depends, it grows

1:27:011:27:08

in the rehearsal. And then more so

when the audience take on as well

1:27:081:27:13

because they are the missing

character for the few weeks you are

1:27:131:27:16

working away, so it's an interesting

thing when we start next week in

1:27:161:27:19

Cambridge.

Stephen, do you want to

try it?

Yes, thank you.

What are we

1:27:191:27:31

drinking, Olly?

Venison is a hearty

meat and they can cope with a big

1:27:311:27:34

flavoured wine so this is on offer

in Waitrose, this is Reserve Shiraz

1:27:341:27:41

St Hallett, £8 99, one of those

hearty winter warmers, and it's

1:27:411:27:46

superb. It has not been that

fashionable to have a big hearty

1:27:461:27:50

Australian Shiraz and I think some

of them are so brilliant. This

1:27:501:27:54

family have been doing it since the

1940s.

What are you doing with the

1:27:541:27:59

glasses? It is the anticipation of

what is happening. After a frenetic

1:27:591:28:06

show, it's quite a calm thing.

Yes.

I don't know why I'm putting the lid

1:28:061:28:12

on.

It's absolutely beautiful.

Good.

With the cold tartare. Beautiful.

1:28:121:28:20

Plenty of sunshine.

1:28:201:28:26

Plenty of sunshine.

Herding cuts. It

is so good. Delicious full stop good

1:28:261:28:32

luck with the tour. That all from us

from Saturday Kitchen Live. Thanks

1:28:321:28:39

to our studio guests. All the

recipes from the show are on the

1:28:391:28:42

website bbc.co.uk/saturdaykitchen.

We are back live at 10am on BBC Two

1:28:421:28:47

next week well the Winter Olympics

continue and its Chinese New Year

1:28:471:28:52

special with Ching He-Huang and Ken

Hom. Moral Best Bites for you

1:28:521:29:00

tomorrow on BBC Two. Have

1:29:001:29:01

This week Saturday Kitchen is hosted by Matt Tebbutt and he is joined by chefs Gennaro Contaldo and Eleonora Galasso, and special guest Stephen Tompkinson.

There are great moments from the BBC food archive, including clips from Rick Stein, Raymond Blanc, The Hairy Bikers and Nigel Slater. This week, drinks expert Olly Smith is picking the wines to go with the studio dishes.