17/03/2018 Saturday Kitchen


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17/03/2018

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Ian Orr and Jose Pizarro and special guest Amanda Redman. Sandia Chang picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.


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LineFromTo

Good morning and welcome to the

weekend. We are live with 90 minutes

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of great chefs and mouthwatering

recipes.

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I'm Matt Tebbutt and this

is Saturday Kitchen Live!

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Welcome to the show.

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Cooking with me today are two

fantastic chefs, Ian Orr,

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who's bringing us a taste of Ireland

for St Patrick's day,

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and Jose Pizarro, whose food

will have us dreaming

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of summers in Spain.

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And Sandia Chang is back

in charge of the drinks.

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Good morning, everyone!

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How are you all?

Good, good. Happy

St Patrick's Day.

I'm excited, I

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like St Patrick's Day. It's a great

excuse for drinking, let's be

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honest. And who better to share it

with than you. Won the Irish food

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and tourism award last year, seven

time winner of best chef in Northern

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Ireland, restaurants. Overachiever.

And we will still have a pint of

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Guinness later. I only drink it once

a year, on St Patrick's Day.

What

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are you doing for us today?

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Hay Smoked Mourne Mountain Lamb,

Wild Garlic Boxty Toasted

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Oatmeal and Whiskey.

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And boxty? It's a little pancake?

Is

basically a little potato pancake,

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we will talk about it and have some

fun with it.

Jose, the godfather of

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Spanish cooking in the UK bringing

some summer sun.

We need some sand

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today.

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Trout with a mussel

and chorizo salsa.

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I wouldn't associate rainbow trout

with Spanish cooking.

We love it

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over there. Normally we have a whole

one with either a Cole Hammer and

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then pan fry it -- with Iberico ham.

And we have some interesting wines

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from some interesting regions as

well.

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As always, we've scoured the BBC

archives to bring you some classic

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foodie moments from some

of the culinary greats including

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Rick Stein, Raymond Blanc,

the Hairy Bikers and Nigel Slater.

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Our special guest is one

of Britain's most popular TV actors.

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From At Home With The Braithwaites

to New Tricks, she has enthralled

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millions of viewers.

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For her latest show she spent four

months in sun-drenched

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Sri Lanka amongst elephants

and tea plantations.

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Sounds tough!

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Please welcome, Amanda Redman!

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APPLAUSE

Lovely to see you. Four months in

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Sri Lanka. That's a tough gig. Yeah,

really tough! And now you're back to

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this snow.

I thought it was spring.

As it is nice to be back? It's a

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long time.

You miss your friends and

family, but apart from that, it's

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not a hardship, I have to say. And

we have fantastic food over there,

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amazing. And it's quite diverse and

very different to Indian food.

I

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have never been to either region, so

I don't know. Sri Lanka is the place

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to go at the moment.

It is very

beautiful and the people are great

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and food is heavenly.

Good, and nice

link! So when you talk about food

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heaven, what would it be?

It would

be carried. -- it would be curry.

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All Currys.

And you also like cod

and crab. What would be your hell

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question your hell would be

couscous.

And any fatty meat. It's

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always been that way, from a baby.

I've never been able to take fatty

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meat. I could eat couscous, but

fatty meat...

You have this strange

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sweet and savoury thing, you don't

like fruit.

I don't. Don't!

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So if the viewers give you heaven,

i'll serve you two of your favourite

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ingredients, cod and crab,

and they'll be infused

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with Sri Lankan flavours.

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I thought the obvious thing would be

a fish curry. But you don't like a

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fish curry! That was a good start

when we found that out this morning.

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I'm going to absolutely convince

you.

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I'm going to make a warming,

coconut curry with poached cod

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and crispy salt and pepper

soft shell crab.

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That will be on top, so it's not

swimming in the source.

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I'll serve that with a citrussy

cucumber and onion pickle

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and some spicy samosas.

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It'll be like being

back in Sri Lanka.

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Sounds gorgeous.

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But if Amanda gets hell,

it's going to be three

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of your worst nightmares -

fatty pork shoulder,

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couscous and a cheeky hit of sweet

fruitiness in the savoury mix.

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Some fatty but flavoursome pork

will be braised in a stock teeming

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with dreadful dried apricots

for that hellish sweet

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and savoury taste sensation.

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And to top it all off,

I'll serve it up on a bed

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of characterless couscous.

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It is harsh, but very delicious.

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But you'll have to wait

until the end of the show to find

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out which one the viewers vote for!

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So everyone, just go

to the Saturday Kitchen website

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before 11:00am this morning

and get voting.

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We also want your questions.

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You can ask our experts

anything, just dial...

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0330 123 1410.

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Get dialling now.

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As always, you can also comment

on what's cooking on social media.

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Ian, let's head to the hobs.

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What are we making?

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Everyone feel free to chip in. What

are we doing?

We are doing beautiful

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Everyone feel free to chip in. What

are we doing?

We are doing beautiful

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lamb, and we will make a potato

boxty with some white garlic. This

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is lovely Mourne Mountain lamb.

It's

a big old rump.

We will trim the fat

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right back to keep special guest

Amanda happy.

We are on the back

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foot already, so that would be good!

What I'm going to do is, in the

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restaurants we would use a lot of

brines for the fish and meat. We

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would boil the water, but this is

buttermilk. It's another brine. It's

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there to soften the meat and add a

little extra flavour, it makes it

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caramelised better. It's really

nice. We have a bit of garlic in

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here, some rosemary and a little bit

of thyme. You could do it with pork

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or chicken. We are using lamb.

You

were saying earlier, this is a

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traditional pancake, potato pancake.

I made it for the kids the other

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day. They loved it. But the first

thing they say is, it's like little

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pancakes, and it's just like that,

as savoury little pancake.

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as savoury little pancake. Leaving

the lamb overnight would be great.

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Some salt and pepper.

You are in

charge of four restaurants.

Browns

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in Derry, Londonderry. We have

Browns on the waterside, the

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original. We have Browns on the

green in Donegal, and we have the

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country house.

I keep meaning to get

there.

I hope you will come over,

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big man.

I would love to.

We will do

a night together when you come over.

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What's on the menu for St Patrick's

Day?

At lunchtime we would have

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things like Irish stew, Champ, that

kind of thing.

Do you do is

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traditional stuff on St Patrick's

Day or do you put your spin on it?

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We have the traditional stuff as

well.

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well. And nice bit of colour. We'll

put this in the oven for about 12

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minutes.

You want some wild garlic

going through the boxty?

A bit of

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wild garlic, you could put spring

onions, some smoked bacon if you

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wanted. You are making the boxty.

Some broccoli. You could also use

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asparagus if you wanted. I like to

add it to a pan with a bit of oil.

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My mother would boil the broccoli

for about four hours, but then it

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wouldn't look like purple broccoli

any more. Mum is probably watching!

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She will be enjoying that. A nice

bit of seasoning. Some salt and

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pepper.

We have some baking powder.

This is plain flour as well. So many

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different recipes for that, this is

more of an Ulster recipe. Cooked

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potato and raw potato. Some recipes

will have all cooked potato and some

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will have all raw potato.

If this is

a traditional dish to use up

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ingredients?

It would be. And when I

haven't made them in a while, they

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are lovely. There is a tradition of

boxty, a song I like to sing.

Do you

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sing it a lot?

All the time!

You

were learning the words in

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rehearsal.

My head chef at the

Waterside taught me the sun. Boxty

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on the griddle, boxty in the pan, if

you can't make a boxty, you'll never

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get your man!

A life lesson for us

all.

A nice hot pan, and these

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little pancakes. If people are

making this mix at home, just make

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it all because it doesn't keep, it

will go black after an hour or so.

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It'll oxidise. How are you

celebrating St Patrick's Day in

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London today.

I have done a big

stall in Borough Market the last

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three days, food producers that are

over. I'm doing a demo today at

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three o'clock. After that I will

watch the second half of the rugby

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and have a Guinness.

That was bad

planning on your part! Ireland doing

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so well in the rugby well.

It should

be a good game today. Looking

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forward to it. And a bit of snow

there as well.

That won't put them

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off.

I don't think so. Definitely

the luck of the Irish today.

I was

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offered tickets late last night and

couldn't go. I was very upset about

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that. Do you want some St Patrick's

Day facts?

OK.

This is my favourite,

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apparently the Irish leader will

hand a crystal bowl of shamrock to

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the US president on St Patrick's

Day. But then it's immediately given

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to the Secret Service and destroyed!

A fun fact for you. But, rosemary.

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This is the toasted oatmeal.

Absolutely delicious. Some butter,

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some seasoning and rosemary. It's

nice for some texture. Some pancakes

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here.

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here.

And if you'd like to ask any

of us a question, give us a call.

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Calls are charged at your standard

network rate.

If you'd like to make

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the sauce for the lamb.

Absolutely.

I love cooking with hay. The

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customers will get this at the side

of the table. In winter time will do

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some venison. We smoke it for a bit

of theatre but it's also flavour,

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because it's really lovely.

Do you

get enough flavour in the space of a

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minute?

You do, you could do it

longer, but we just want a subtle

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smokiness. But the lovely bit of

lamb in there.

Where is the hay

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from?

It's from a pet store. It is

edible, its food safe. Get a

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blowtorch and burn the hay.

So

you're setting fire to it and then

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putting it out?

This is an old cigar

box, it's about 40 years old. We

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have a bigger one as well.

We have

the juices of the lamb in here. Just

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drain off some fact. An annual at

this special whiskey.

It's quiet man

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whiskey.

-- and then we will add

this.

And I'm not a Guinness or

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whiskey fan, but this is beautiful.

I am, I love whiskey. I've never

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really been introduced to Irish

whiskey, though.

This is from the

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city, sweet with a bit of honey in

it. It's lovely. They are doing as

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Cherie as well. 11 years as an Irish

whiskey, and in the last year they

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have it in the sherry barrel. This

is a sweet one. That's why I gave

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you this.

I will let that calm down.

And there is a touch of honey in

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this as well.

That would be great.

Take the boxty out.

That's bringing

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off all the flavours of the meat in

their pan. It's a very simple sauce

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but very delicious. Very rich.

Back

in the day my mum wouldn't have cut

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her boxty but I will be.

Just making

it a bit more like the restaurant.

I

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have to make it a bit more cheffy!

The boxty is delicious on its own.

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That would go down to the customer.

And this lovely smoked flavour in

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the lamb is lovely.

Wow. So you are

staying in London the whole weekend

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or will you race back?

I'm doing the

demo today and then we will chill

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out tonight and head back home

tomorrow.

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We love coming over. We get to see a

few places, markets, and Jennifer

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comes over with me as well. A nice

bit of lamb. Beautiful colour. It is

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amazing. This is a mint gel. You

blitz on the mint. We thicken it

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with Ultra-Tex. It is a type of

starch. Easy to get on the Internet?

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Yes. Why am I shading? I am

panicking. A nice bit of broccoli.

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You could use a spider gives if you

wanted to. We have some of this

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lovely toasted oatmeal.

There is the

sauce.

Like so. Amazing. This sauce,

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I am so happy you are making it.

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I am so happy you are making it. A

nice bit of that. We have trimmed

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the fact really well, Amanda.

Thank

you.

We are trying to win you over.

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There we have it. What is it called?

We have our lamb which is mugged in

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hay, with potato boxty, toasted

oatmeal, and a Quiet Man whiskey

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sauce.

Right, let's see what you

make of this. There is the lamb with

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the whiskey sauce. Look at that.

Fantastic. You worked for a couple

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of years at the River cafe. When you

look at your dishes, the last time

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you came on, you did the dish that

was quite similar, but I cannot see

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much River cafe.

What did you take

out of that? Simplicity at its best,

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find the best produce and do very

little with it. We still do fish

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with lemon and parsley in the

restaurant but it is finding your

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own style as well.

It was an amazing

experience.

How is that? Beautiful.

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The smokiness is stunning.

Cheers.

What are we drinking? I have picked

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a wine from Georgia. This is what we

call orange wine. It is essentially

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an weight wine that has been sitting

with the skin on. It is called

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Tblvino Qvevris. It is named after

the vessel that the Georgians put

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the wine in. It is a clay vessel and

deep-rooted underneath the ground,

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and they keep the wine in there for

three weeks. Witnesses from?

From

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Georgia, the eastern part of

Georgia.

Where can you buy a? It is

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from Marks & Spencer. It is great

that Marks & Spencer is carrying

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such unusual wines. It is largely

undiscovered. It has got lovely

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tanning. It has red wine tannins

Internet, which goes well with the

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meat. It has got hay, honey, spaces.

This is good with you, nice

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combination?

I am in heaven.

Excellent. We're getting there.

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Remind us what you're doing? We are

going to do pan-fried rainbow trout

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with chorizo, mussels and a close

salsa.

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salsa. -- and tomato salsa.

0:18:250:18:27

Don't forget, if you want to ask us

a question this morning,

0:18:270:18:30

just call 033 0123 1410.

0:18:300:18:31

That's 033 0123 1410.

0:18:310:18:32

Lines close at 11:00 am today.

0:18:320:18:34

You haven't got long

so get dialling.

0:18:340:18:36

Or you can tweet us a question

using the hashtag Saturday Kitchen.

0:18:360:18:38

And don't forget to vote

for Amanda's food heaven

0:18:380:18:41

or hell on our website.

0:18:410:18:42

Now let's catch up with Rick Stein

on one of his Long Weekends.

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He's back in Copenhagen

for the first time in 12 years

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and on the hunt for smorre-brod,

a very special Danish open-sandwich.

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Well, I'm very pleased

to be back in Copenhagen.

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I've only been here once before,

about 12 years ago.

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I don't actually remember the food

as being particularly good then,

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apart from, I think it was called

Smorrebrod, something like that.

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These big, sort of, open sandwiches

that were so colourful.

0:19:220:19:24

Smorgasbord?

0:19:240:19:25

Not smorgasbord!

0:19:250:19:26

Smorrebrod.

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Something like that.

0:19:270:19:28

I might not have it quite right.

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But I just thought

they were wonderful.

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But then, over the years, I've been

reading about new Nordic cuisine,

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about how they're very,

very keen just to give you dishes

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made from local ingredients

and they don't like olive oil,

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they don't like tomatoes, anything

that doesn't come from Denmark.

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But also I've been reading

about the Danes and apparently

0:19:450:19:47

they're about the happiest

people on Earth.

0:19:470:19:49

But just at the moment,

just out of the airport,

0:19:490:19:52

I'd quite like a beer.

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The Danes make very good beer.

0:19:530:19:56

Hello.

0:19:560:19:57

Hello.

0:19:570:19:58

Welcome on board.

0:19:580:19:59

Rick, my name is.

0:19:590:20:00

It's nice to meet you.

0:20:000:20:01

Hi, Rick.

0:20:010:20:02

Please come inside.

0:20:020:20:04

This looks fun.

0:20:040:20:10

This looks really nice.

0:20:100:20:13

That's fabulous.

0:20:130:20:15

I can feel I'm at sea.

0:20:150:20:18

I'll sleep well with that.

0:20:180:20:21

What a beautiful view.

0:20:210:20:23

Look at that building over there.

0:20:230:20:25

That's fantastic.

0:20:250:20:26

Like medieval Copenhagen.

0:20:260:20:28

Something new here,

something Victorian there.

0:20:280:20:31

What a lovely room,

what a lovely view.

0:20:310:20:36

Wonderful, wonderful, Copenhagen -

salty old queen of the sea.

0:20:360:20:44

Breakfast on the top deck,

more or less right slam

0:20:450:20:48

in the middle of the city.

0:20:480:20:51

OK, it comes out of a machine

and it's not brilliant but look

0:20:510:20:57

where we are!

0:20:570:20:58

I have to say I'm very

happy to be here.

0:20:580:21:01

This is the first time I've arrived

on one of my weekends away and it

0:21:010:21:05

hasn't actually been raining,

or, more usually, snowing.

0:21:050:21:11

Cycling is a great thing to do.

0:21:160:21:19

I haven't done it for about, well,

going on about 50 years.

0:21:190:21:24

Memories of distant summers

came flooding back.

0:21:240:21:31

Everyone who comes here comes

to see the Little Mermaid

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and so very little she is.

0:21:340:21:37

And Hans Christian Andersen

wove her into the tragic tale

0:21:370:21:39

of a young princess of the sea

who sacrificed her true

0:21:390:21:42

identity to become human.

0:21:420:21:50

From my limited

experience, Copenhagen

0:21:530:21:55

is an extremely cool place.

0:21:550:21:58

You can sense that everywhere

you go, in the bars

0:21:580:22:01

and restaurants, in the markets

and around the harbour.

0:22:010:22:05

It seems stuffed with good,

convivial people, friendly

0:22:050:22:07

and agreeable all the time.

0:22:070:22:11

It's as if they've come

from the Nice People Department

0:22:110:22:16

at central casting.

0:22:160:22:17

I like it here, I really do.

0:22:170:22:20

I was trying to think

what it is I like about Copenhagen.

0:22:200:22:23

I think, first of all,

there's no high-rise buildings.

0:22:230:22:27

I love places like New York

but you almost get a sense of panic

0:22:270:22:30

in a big city with big buildings.

0:22:300:22:34

And the other thing

I like about it is it's quiet.

0:22:340:22:37

You can hear yourself

think, you know?

0:22:370:22:44

And I think the reason

for that is that half,

0:22:440:22:47

well over half the transport

in Copenhagen, is by bike.

0:22:470:22:50

And the nice thing about the bikes

is they're not that special.

0:22:500:22:53

They're just very ordinary bikes.

0:22:530:23:00

The other thing I've noted is that

everybody looks healthy.

0:23:000:23:02

They must be having a good diet.

0:23:020:23:04

They must be eating plenty of fish.

0:23:040:23:06

I know that Copenhagen has

a new cuisine but I wanted to touch

0:23:060:23:09

base with its traditional

gastronomic roots.

0:23:090:23:15

And that is the open sandwich on rye

bread and this is the oldest

0:23:150:23:18

place in town to get it.

0:23:180:23:21

Schonnemann.

0:23:210:23:22

'Famous for its

smorrebrod.' Fabulous.

0:23:220:23:27

This is...

0:23:270:23:33

the traditional smorrebrod but it

could be different kind of toppings.

0:23:330:23:36

I came here to Copenhagen 12 years

ago and I just remember this

0:23:360:23:39

above everything else

as being really special.

0:23:390:23:44

I found a lot of the food then

was very similar to British food.

0:23:440:23:48

A lot of roast meat

and lots of vegetables.

0:23:480:23:51

But this was your little jewel -

the jewel in the Danish

0:23:510:23:54

crown was these.

0:23:540:23:57

Smorrebrod.

0:23:570:24:04

Smorrebrod.

0:24:050:24:06

Smorrebrod.

0:24:060:24:07

It's trying to get that last 'd'.

0:24:070:24:09

Do it again.

0:24:090:24:10

Smorrebrod.

0:24:100:24:11

Smorrebrod.

0:24:110:24:12

Exactly!

0:24:120:24:13

Now this is why I like it so much.

0:24:130:24:15

It's the rye bread.

0:24:150:24:19

The black bread covered with lard

and then herrings and then apples,

0:24:190:24:21

celery, onions and cream.

0:24:210:24:23

Probably sour cream.

0:24:230:24:29

Capers, nasturtium leaves

and chervil and probably a few

0:24:290:24:33

other bits of leaves

in there as well.

0:24:330:24:35

Erm...

0:24:350:24:36

Utterly delicious.

0:24:360:24:37

Very...

0:24:370:24:38

..very fresh.

0:24:380:24:42

It tastes healthy and good for you.

0:24:420:24:44

You have the sweetness,

the sourness, the...the bitterness.

0:24:440:24:48

Everything which you need

to have a full dish.

0:24:480:24:52

And then you need to have schnapps.

0:24:520:24:54

As well?

0:24:540:24:55

Schnapps is very good.

0:24:550:24:56

Oh, dear.

0:24:560:25:02

I was hoping she wouldn't say that

but it would be very rude not to.

0:25:020:25:06

One complements the other.

0:25:060:25:07

I could become quite addicted.

0:25:070:25:09

Oh, yeah.

0:25:090:25:11

Mm.

0:25:110:25:12

Yes.

0:25:120:25:13

Lusciousness, that's the thing.

0:25:130:25:19

Thanks, Rick.

0:25:190:25:20

Fantastic.

0:25:200:25:26

Now, as today is St Patrick's Day,

which is celebrated in more

0:25:260:25:29

countries than any other national

festival, I thought I had to use

0:25:290:25:32

some traditional Irish

ingredients to celebrate.

0:25:320:25:36

I'm going to put a little dish

together. I am going to braise shin

0:25:360:25:41

of beef in some Guinness, or stoke

even, and I am going to Sofia

0:25:410:25:47

Coppola oysters, and serve those

with potatoes and do a little bit of

0:25:470:25:52

sour soda bread, sorry, soda bread

dipped in mustard with parsley as a

0:25:520:25:56

garnish. That is pretty much it.

First of all, we need to season the

0:25:560:26:03

shin quite well. We will brown that

and get a decent colour on it in the

0:26:030:26:07

pan, take it out, and we will brown

the vegetables and I will show you

0:26:070:26:12

the rest. Let's talk about the

second series, Good Karma Hospital.

0:26:120:26:16

The first one went down a storm, 7

million viewers? Yes, it did. Back

0:26:160:26:23

for a second outing. For people who

have not seen it, tell us the

0:26:230:26:26

premise of the show.

It is basically

about the hospital called the The

0:26:260:26:32

Good Karma Hospital in southern

India that has no money. It is

0:26:320:26:37

staffed by a few doctors here are

basically doing it for the love

0:26:370:26:41

rather than anything else. A young

British Asian doctor comes out,

0:26:410:26:45

because she is fed up with the NHS.

She wants to try something new so

0:26:450:26:50

she comes over to us and it is her

journey discovering her heritage,

0:26:500:26:55

and discovering the vagaries of what

goes on there.

I was catching up

0:26:550:26:58

with a few episodes of the second

series last night. I got a sneak

0:26:580:27:02

preview. Is there no changing with

series? There was a will they, on

0:27:020:27:12

the love interest?

We are trying to

steer away from the soap opera

0:27:120:27:16

element of it. We are trying to

develop the characters more, so the

0:27:160:27:20

audience understands where they are

coming from. And how they react to

0:27:200:27:25

the various stories of the week.

That come out of the hospital, which

0:27:250:27:31

are different from what make one in

hospitals here.

And your role is,

0:27:310:27:36

you are in charge, strong, gutsy,

Bolasie woman.

If I can say that?

0:27:360:27:42

You can. -- ballsy woman. It is a

strong role. Do you associate

0:27:420:27:54

yourself with that type of role?

Yes, probably.

What does your

0:27:540:27:59

husband Colyer? Nightmare. He does.

When you saw the script, you got

0:27:590:28:06

quite excited about it?

Yes, I just

thought the writing was great. I

0:28:060:28:10

liked the fact it was fresh and

different, and also, the one-liners

0:28:100:28:17

that the writer has given my

character, they are every actor's

0:28:170:28:20

team.

So I said yes. Is that how you

pick a role. You are notoriously

0:28:200:28:27

very good at picking roles. Lots of

what you have done on.

It is all in

0:28:270:28:33

the writing, that is the most

important thing. If I read a script

0:28:330:28:36

and I do not start to get a cup of

tea, I go right to the end, then I

0:28:360:28:44

know.

And the writer is a former NHS

Doctor? That is right. He wrote it

0:28:440:28:53

on his own experiences, based in

South Africa?

That is right, he is

0:28:530:28:59

still a doctor, actually.

That gives

it a certain degree of credibility,

0:28:590:29:03

what you're seeing on screen.

Yes,

and we have medical advisers and

0:29:030:29:07

sets everything is done properly.

Let's just recap the recipe. The

0:29:070:29:13

meat is brown. That is resting. In

here, celery, onion, tomato puree. I

0:29:130:29:20

will put in some bay leaves, garlic,

a bit of thyme, and then end with

0:29:200:29:26

the stout. It is quite bitter, so

you need to boil it to get rid of

0:29:260:29:33

the bitterness and then you're left

with its lovely flavour. Then a

0:29:330:29:38

touch of style going in there, back

in with the meat and braise it for

0:29:380:29:42

around 2.5 hours.

0:29:420:29:48

around 2.5 hours. That is it.

Right,

Sri Lanka, why Sri Lanka? Can I just

0:29:480:29:52

ask?

You know when you do that... If

it is and script?

When you do that

0:29:520:30:03

with the pan, the onions, why do

they not go everywhere?

I am just

0:30:030:30:07

flicking them on the edge. They

would if I did that.

0:30:070:30:14

Sometimes it goes over you.

Let's

talk about Sri Lanka. This was

0:30:140:30:20

supposed to be filmed in India,

originally goa, but she found it too

0:30:200:30:27

built-up.

It is a bit too touristy.

But in Sri Lanka, the terrain is

0:30:270:30:35

virtually identical to where it was

set, so it was the ideal place.

A

0:30:350:30:39

bit of stock in there. Spending four

months in place, for some people it

0:30:390:30:45

sounds idyllic, but when you are

away from your husband and daughters

0:30:450:30:48

and rest of the family, it's quite

tough.

It is tough. That's the bit I

0:30:480:30:53

found the hardest. And also because

the Internet goes down a lot. It

0:30:530:30:57

means you can't get through. And

four months is actually quite a long

0:30:570:31:04

time.

It's a very long time. And you

have to do it in one hit, you can't

0:31:040:31:09

break it up?

No. Some of the

regulars are able to, but I'm not.

0:31:090:31:16

I'm there. In every other respect it

is a fabulous place to work. I'm

0:31:160:31:22

sitting by the pool learning my

lines. It's not a hardship.

It is

0:31:220:31:29

very immersive, isn't it? Does that

translate then as a character on

0:31:290:31:34

screen? Would you have more of an

understanding with the role you are

0:31:340:31:37

playing and the people you are

talking to?

I think so. Because you

0:31:370:31:42

haven't been to India.

No.

Is one of

those places you go to and you

0:31:420:31:49

become immersed in the culture

immediately, and it affects you,

0:31:490:31:52

either in a negative way or mostly,

from what people say, in a positive

0:31:520:31:57

way. It really does affect you and

you feel changed when you come home.

0:31:570:32:01

Really? Does it affect how you...

It

does. It's an extraordinary tape

0:32:010:32:09

they have on life.

After seeing how

hospitals are run, and the writers

0:32:090:32:15

have a knowledge of that, presumably

that makes you more appreciative of

0:32:150:32:22

the NHS.

We are so lucky over here!

I know there are always issues.

0:32:220:32:27

There are, but we are very lucky.

The thing that got me, I think,

0:32:270:32:32

particularly with the people there,

there isn't much complaining going

0:32:320:32:35

on.

People are just happy and

grateful.

They get on with life and

0:32:350:32:41

grateful for living.

In terms of the

food, presumably it's always quite

0:32:410:32:46

strong curry.

I love that.

Just not

with fish!

I've always felt that the

0:32:460:32:57

flavour of fish is so delicate, I

can't see it working with heavy

0:32:570:33:01

spices.

I've never had that problem!

We will see. Or maybe not.

Your mum

0:33:010:33:10

lived in India.

She was born there.

You grew up eating that kind of

0:33:100:33:15

thing.

We did, eating curries at a

time when there were not many Indian

0:33:150:33:22

restaurants over here, but my mum

used to cook it and we ate it from

0:33:220:33:26

an early age.

I read that it made

you feel closer to your mother,

0:33:260:33:31

being out there and experiencing

these things she would have

0:33:310:33:35

experienced.

Yes, the first time I

went to India, I turned to my

0:33:350:33:38

husband and said, I get my mother. I

get her. It explains so much. The

0:33:380:33:45

exotic nests of it. -- the exotic

nature of it.

When did you get back

0:33:450:33:53

from Sri Lanka?

Got back in

November. It's a fast turnaround.

0:33:530:34:03

Needed to get back because of the

weather.

You have been working with

0:34:030:34:08

a friend, Neil Morrissey. You have

never actually been on screen

0:34:080:34:12

together before. But you have known

each other for a long time.

Yes.

Are

0:34:120:34:20

you changing scripts, how it work?

It's because we have been doing it

0:34:200:34:25

for a long time, we find it very

easy to work with each other. We

0:34:250:34:32

also have very similar thoughts

about things. That always helps.

Can

0:34:320:34:37

you look at a script and read it and

think, that wouldn't happen, all we

0:34:370:34:41

can change this?

Yes, but we can

have discussions with the writers

0:34:410:34:46

and what have you. It's a lovely way

of working. That looks gorgeous!

Are

0:34:460:34:53

you happy with this? It's not a

fatty piece of meat, it's very lean,

0:34:530:34:58

delicate and tender.

Beautiful.

My

oysters, just sauteed with a bit of

0:34:580:35:08

butter. Lemon and a touch of

tarragon. Some parsley in there with

0:35:080:35:13

the potatoes. I have also heard your

husband does most of the cooking at

0:35:130:35:20

home.

He does.

He doesn't leave you

in charge of the knives?

He will not

0:35:200:35:27

let me anywhere near lives! I am so

clumsy. -- near knives. The first

0:35:270:35:35

time he came over for Sunday lunch,

I was cooking. I know this is a

0:35:350:35:40

shock horror, but I had an electric

carving knife. He was appalled when

0:35:400:35:43

he saw it. I was talking to him like

this and I was going through the

0:35:430:35:49

wire. That kind of thing.

He looks

at you and thought, you're a keeper!

0:35:490:35:56

LAUGHTER

Nothing shouts love more than

0:35:560:36:03

somebody... Murdering a piece of

meat with an electric carving knife.

0:36:030:36:09

There is the oxtail. Some salad, a

bit of oil.

0:36:090:36:18

bit of oil. Let's dress that up a

little bit. How are you with

0:36:190:36:22

oysters?

I love them.

Phew! Braised

shin of beef, sauteed oysters, some

0:36:220:36:34

sauteed potato. That's pretty much

it, and a bit of soda bread. Let me

0:36:340:36:38

know what you think what I'll clear.

What would we drink with this?

A

0:36:380:36:45

stout, dark ale, or maybe a nice,

crisp side air. A lovely refreshing

0:36:450:36:50

contrast to the dish. -- crisp

cider. You could do a red wine

0:36:500:36:59

perhaps, or some sherry.

It's quite

universal!

This is gorgeous.

0:36:590:37:08

So what will I be making for Amanda

at the end of the show?

0:37:080:37:11

Will it be her food heaven -

a divine trio of cod,

0:37:110:37:14

crab and Sri Lankan spices?

I'll serve crispy soft-shell

0:37:140:37:17

crab and some perfect

poached cod in a creamy,

0:37:170:37:20

spicy coconut curry along

with an onion and cucumber

0:37:200:37:22

pickle and some samosas.

0:37:220:37:23

Heaven on a plate.

0:37:230:37:28

But if Amanda gets hell then I'm

0:37:280:37:30

afraid it's fatty pork,

sweet dried apricots and couscous!

0:37:300:37:33

I'm going to marinade some pork

shoulder and then braise it

0:37:330:37:35

in a stock that is bursting

with dried apricots for that satanic

0:37:350:37:38

sweet and savoury combination

and then to secure this dish's place

0:37:380:37:42

in hell I'll serve it

on a bed of couscous.

0:37:420:37:45

Don't forget, what she

gets is down to you.

0:37:450:37:47

You've only got around 25 minutes

left to vote for Amanda's food

0:37:470:37:50

heaven or food hell.

0:37:500:37:51

You've got the power!

0:37:510:37:53

So go to the Saturday Kitchen

website and have your say now!

0:37:530:37:56

We'll find out the result

at the end of the show.

0:37:560:37:59

Now, it's over to Raymond Blanc

for some of his Kitchen Secrets.

0:37:590:38:02

He's pan-frying pollock and serving

it with a puree of potatoes from his

0:38:020:38:05

own incredible kitchen garden.

0:38:050:38:06

Take a look.

0:38:060:38:13

Raymond's kitchen garden,

bursting with herbs,

0:38:250:38:27

fruit and vegetables.

0:38:270:38:28

Today, Raymond is on the hunt

for potatoes to serve

0:38:280:38:30

with his next fish dish.

0:38:300:38:31

Several varieties grow

here but Raymond wants

0:38:310:38:33

the perfect one for puree.

0:38:330:38:34

I'm looking for Estima potatoes.

0:38:340:38:36

And I thought we had some.

0:38:360:38:41

Marie, my lovely Ann Marie.

0:38:410:38:43

The kitchen garden is

tended by Ann Marie.

0:38:430:38:47

We work 25 years together,

so Ann Marie is the head gardener.

0:38:470:38:52

What I want today is Estima potatoes

where is the Estima that we grew?

0:38:520:38:56

Oh, Raymond, they've been and gone.

0:38:560:38:57

The other chefs have been down

and they've long gone.

0:38:570:38:59

They were a very good crop.

0:38:590:39:01

Can you, please, next time,

put on those Estima, "for RB".

0:39:010:39:03

"Don't touch."

0:39:030:39:05

..Only!

0:39:050:39:06

With no Estimas, Raymond

chooses the Bintje variety,

0:39:060:39:09

with its yellow flesh

and creamy texture.

0:39:090:39:12

King Edward or Maris Piper

are also good for mashing.

0:39:120:39:17

Oh, that's what I love about this

garden, it's so peaceful(!) Let's

0:39:170:39:19

have a look at that.

0:39:190:39:24

Those would never make

it to the supermarket.

0:39:240:39:26

Never.

0:39:260:39:27

It's lovely.

0:39:270:39:28

Look at that.

0:39:280:39:30

It's a bit like me.

0:39:300:39:31

I'm not going to comment!

0:39:310:39:37

So with those wonderful Bintjes I am

going to do a potato puree.

0:39:370:39:44

The potato puree will accompany

Raymond's pan fried

0:39:500:39:53

pollock in a caper sauce.

0:39:530:39:59

It's a wonderful

line caught pollock.

0:39:590:40:00

They are part of the cod family.

0:40:000:40:02

They're pretty soft, you know.

0:40:020:40:03

Wrinkled.

0:40:030:40:06

Big vitreous eyes.

0:40:060:40:09

And what is wonderful now,

that's not an expensive

0:40:090:40:12

fish and there is plenty

in our coast as well.

0:40:120:40:14

OK.

0:40:140:40:15

It's not a big one.

They can go like that.

0:40:150:40:19

The potatoes have been

cut into equal pieces

0:40:190:40:21

and simmered for 25 minutes.

0:40:210:40:23

Once soft, they're

ready to be pureed.

0:40:230:40:26

Voila.

0:40:260:40:29

Raymond uses his trusty old mouli

rather than a masher to give a light

0:40:290:40:33

and smooth pureed potato.

0:40:330:40:36

And of course you would feel very

tempted to put into a food processor

0:40:360:40:41

but there you would work out

the starch and your potato

0:40:410:40:43

would be like elastic.

0:40:430:40:46

And I don't like to chuck out

old things which have

0:40:460:40:49

served you very well.

0:40:490:40:52

Voila.

0:40:520:40:55

Add milk and butter.

0:40:550:40:57

You can make it as

rich as you want to.

0:40:570:41:01

And nice and fluffy.

0:41:010:41:05

It melts.

0:41:050:41:08

I think Ann Marie should be very

proud of her potatoes.

0:41:080:41:11

There is no doubt about that.

0:41:110:41:14

Adam, taste that.

0:41:140:41:16

Great, huh?

0:41:160:41:17

Keep your potato puree warm

by leaving it in a pan of hot water.

0:41:170:41:25

Wash that for me.

0:41:260:41:27

Oui, chef.

0:41:270:41:31

The head, please, for me.

0:41:310:41:32

Adam has very kindly

filleted the fish for me.

0:41:320:41:34

Eh, voila.

0:41:340:41:37

The way I'm going to cook them

is pan fry, to create a wonderful

0:41:370:41:40

caramelised outside.

0:41:400:41:43

Will provide a most delicious treat.

0:41:430:41:44

OK.

0:41:440:41:46

So now I'm melting my butter.

0:41:460:41:48

That colour is exactly perfect.

0:41:480:41:50

The butter is foaming.

0:41:500:41:51

I can smell it.

0:41:510:41:55

It's hazelnut colour I go first

flesh side down, OK.

0:41:550:41:59

To give a lovely browning.

0:41:590:42:01

A soft browning.

0:42:010:42:02

You can hear that pan.

0:42:020:42:04

What a lovely noise, you know.

0:42:040:42:06

The heat is browning the fish.

0:42:060:42:10

OK.

0:42:100:42:11

And equally some juices,

the protein of the fish,

0:42:110:42:15

are leaking out at the bottom

of the pan which are

0:42:150:42:19

being solidified.

0:42:190:42:20

Voila.

0:42:200:42:21

Absolutely amazing.

0:42:210:42:23

After three minutes on each side

transfer the pollock

0:42:230:42:26

to the oven on a high heat...

0:42:260:42:28

Two minutes.

0:42:280:42:29

..for a couple of

minutes to finish off.

0:42:290:42:33

To go with the pollock,

a Grenobloise sauce made

0:42:330:42:36

from capers, lemon, shallots,

croutons and herbs.

0:42:360:42:39

It's a French classic that

complements seafood perfectly.

0:42:390:42:43

Don't ask me Grenobloise.

0:42:430:42:45

Grenobloise means from Grenoble.

0:42:450:42:49

And there is nothing from Grenoble,

which reminds me of Grenoble!

0:42:490:42:52

That comes from Spain.

0:42:520:42:53

That comes from anywhere.

0:42:530:42:54

OK.

0:42:540:42:55

The bread as well.

0:42:550:42:57

It's simple and it's lovely.

0:42:570:42:59

Use the juices from

the pan fried fish.

0:42:590:43:01

Add chicken stock

and a splash of water.

0:43:010:43:03

Voila.

0:43:030:43:05

And then after it's easy.

0:43:050:43:07

Really, it's easy.

0:43:070:43:10

You just throw everything in, OK.

0:43:100:43:12

A bit of capers.

0:43:120:43:14

Just a bit of diced lemon,

the segments of lemon.

0:43:140:43:16

OK.

0:43:160:43:17

Few shallots.

0:43:170:43:20

Some great big fat Spanish

capers and then you finish

0:43:200:43:23

off with fresh herbs.

0:43:230:43:26

Chervil is a little-known

herb in Great Britain.

0:43:260:43:28

And what a shame.

0:43:280:43:30

It is so fantastic

Simple yet delicious.

0:43:300:43:38

There you've got some

amazing flavours.

0:43:420:43:46

It's a very simple dish,

which is very achievable

0:43:460:43:49

at home, and it will give

you a lot of pleasure.

0:43:490:43:52

Finally a few croutons

to add texture and a

0:43:520:43:54

sprinkling of fresh herbs.

0:43:540:43:57

The lovely Ann Marie, can you come?

0:43:570:43:59

We are ready for you.

0:43:590:44:00

You want to taste your potatoes?

0:44:000:44:02

Absolutely.

0:44:020:44:03

Taste that.

0:44:030:44:06

Mm!

0:44:060:44:08

What about the potatoes,

are they passing the test?

0:44:080:44:10

I think you've done them justice.

0:44:100:44:11

One genius to another genius!

0:44:110:44:18

Thank you, Raymond!

0:44:210:44:23

Right, still to come: In honour

of St Patrick's Day,

0:44:230:44:26

we sent chef Jordan Burke to Hoath,

Dublin's seafood capital,

0:44:260:44:29

to get the low-down

on the famous Dublin Bay prawn,

0:44:290:44:31

which is being celebrated

with its own festival this weekend.

0:44:310:44:35

It's almost omelette challenge time!

0:44:350:44:38

That means it's time for some puns.

0:44:380:44:39

So, Amanda, brace yourself.

0:44:390:44:45

Ian and Jose, now that you've

made yourselves At Home

0:44:450:44:48

(With The Braithwaites),

it's time for you to show off some

0:44:480:44:51

New Tricks for a speedy omelette.

0:44:510:44:57

You're laughing out of sympathy, I

can feel it.

0:44:570:45:00

I don't want any bad feelings

though, it's all about Good Karma.

0:45:000:45:03

Will Amanda get her food heaven,

a dreamy Sri Lankan spiced cod

0:45:030:45:06

and crab curry with a cucumber

pickle and samosas?

0:45:060:45:09

Or her food hell, fatty shoulder

of pork with a sweet and sour

0:45:090:45:12

stock served on a bed

of Amanda's dreaded couscous?

0:45:120:45:15

There's still a chance for you to

vote on the website and we'll find

0:45:150:45:18

out the results later on!

0:45:180:45:19

out the results later on!

0:45:190:45:19

Right, on with the cooking.

0:45:190:45:20

Jose, what are we making?

0:45:200:45:25

I am told this is your 15th

appearance on the show. That means

0:45:250:45:29

you have done the show more than I

have. I deserve a drink after.

0:45:290:45:36

Really?

Do you fancy one? I am

telling you, I will need one.

I need

0:45:360:45:43

something nice.

What are we doing?

We are going to pan fry rainbow

0:45:430:45:49

trout, this beautiful fish. The oil

is amazing. It is so cheap.

We need

0:45:490:45:56

more of this. It had a bad

reputation in the UK for a long

0:45:560:46:00

time. People often do not like fish

with small bones.

You can buy it in

0:46:000:46:06

the supermarket like that. Just the

fillets? It is £9 50 41 kilo.

We

0:46:060:46:12

went through a stage of just putting

them under the grill with some

0:46:120:46:16

almonds.

That was it. That sounds

interesting.

0:46:160:46:26

interesting. The new cuisine at that

time, trout?

That was exciting

0:46:260:46:31

stuff. Amazing. I think that was a

1970s dish. Did you come across

0:46:310:46:39

trout and almonds? Yes, my mum used

to make it.

Did you enjoy it?

No.

0:46:390:46:45

That is why you're so beautiful. Use

silver tongued devil. Salt and

0:46:450:46:50

pepper the fish. Then we're going to

put it in a little bit of oil. We

0:46:500:46:57

will leave it cooking like that for

around seven minutes, very slow. The

0:46:570:47:02

fish needs to cook from the skin to

the top. Then we just flip it over

0:47:020:47:09

and finish it.

It is done. The last

time I saw you we were in Spain

0:47:090:47:15

together, in Seville, eating ham. It

was a very nice trip.

Thank you very

0:47:150:47:21

much.

We had a lovely time. We drank

lots of June. They were rather

0:47:210:47:26

surprised that there were so many

British air stinking game. We were

0:47:260:47:30

not. It was wonderful, lovely trip.

I am just cutting some chorizo. This

0:47:300:47:37

is cooking chorizo. We will put it

in with a little bit of oil.

Not too

0:47:370:47:44

much. Where does this love of

chorizo come from?

Because I love

0:47:440:47:48

Spanish food. I have worked a lot in

Spain. So Spanish food is divine.

0:47:480:47:57

Spanish cuisine is all about the

simplicity. It is about making

0:47:570:48:01

ingredients that bring all the

flavours together. It is how I

0:48:010:48:04

really grew up, in my lovely

Extremadura.

Good link.

0:48:040:48:16

Extremadura.

Good link.

This week am

doing the Extremadura gastronomic

0:48:180:48:22

week.

Amazing products.

An amazing

region. It is where I am coming

0:48:220:48:25

from.

You remember where we were?

Yes. Just two hours north.

0:48:250:48:32

Beautiful.

What are the regional

specialities? We have pork, cheese,

0:48:320:48:41

unbelievable wine. Lamb is to die

for. It is how I grew up, beautiful,

0:48:410:48:53

simple.

It is not a seafood region?

It is all in line? The only fish

0:48:530:48:59

that we had, the trout and salt cod.

We are taking out the chorizo now.

0:48:590:49:06

We are going to leave the oil. Now

you have got these three restaurants

0:49:060:49:13

in London, you specialise in Spanish

cuisine, but you use lots of British

0:49:130:49:18

products?

You have to. I do believe

it is so important to look after the

0:49:180:49:26

people around you. This is my home,

the UK is my country. I love that.

0:49:260:49:32

The best from here, and the rest of

Spain. At the moment we cannot do

0:49:320:49:38

Iberian ham in the UK.

It is very

unique, I guess.

We fry the onions

0:49:380:49:49

and the garlic. A little bit longer.

You can see a bubbling.

Lovely.

0:49:490:49:56

Lovely here, yes.

0:49:560:50:02

Lovely here, yes. Tim tomatoes. At

this time of the year, they are not

0:50:020:50:05

great, but in my restaurant, we have

a type of hanging tomato. They are

0:50:050:50:14

nice and small with a really hard

skin. In Spain, we are hanging them,

0:50:140:50:20

and we go through the whole year.

They keep really juicy inside and

0:50:200:50:26

get sweeter and sweeter.

Heaven.

That is one of my dessert island

0:50:260:50:33

dishes.

So simple. Simple is good.

Simple is good. I am going to jobs

0:50:330:50:41

on parsley.

You have also written

four books.

Yes, I am working on the

0:50:410:50:48

next one. They are always regional?

Yes, the first one was about one

0:50:480:50:56

region, the second about another. My

publisher said, we have to go

0:50:560:51:00

deeper, ingredients.

OK. Is that

standard first Spanish chefs in

0:51:000:51:10

Spain, seasonality?

I think it is

important for everyone. The day that

0:51:100:51:15

we forget the seasons, we are out.

0:51:150:51:25

we forget the seasons, we are out. I

cannot believe that we have

0:51:250:51:27

asparagus from Peru in this country

when we have the best asparagus in

0:51:270:51:31

the world.

There is a certain

excitement about waiting for the

0:51:310:51:35

season is coming round, using it and

then it is gone for another year.

It

0:51:350:51:39

is waiting for something unique.

How

are you doing with the mussels? They

0:51:390:51:43

are coming on. If you would like to

try this recipe or any of the other

0:51:430:51:49

recipes today, go to the website.

You can also vote for Amanda's food

0:51:490:51:55

heaven or food hell. I will leave a

few in the shell, yes?

For your

0:51:550:52:05

finished dish? Yes, for decoration.

A little bit of olive oil.

These

0:52:050:52:13

mussels are delicious. Amazing. They

are Scottish.

This is another

0:52:130:52:19

favourite of yours?

Is that right?

Mussels, yes.

Mussels have the

0:52:190:52:28

flavour of the sea, coming through

your mouth. Some of the liquid as

0:52:280:52:35

well, like that. You can see how the

fish is already cooked. You could

0:52:350:52:43

stop there are? You could stop

there. I will turn it over. Almost

0:52:430:52:48

nothing. Beautiful crispy skin. We

are going to put some parsley here

0:52:480:52:54

as well. Maybe do that.

0:52:540:53:02

as well. Maybe do that.

Yes, I am

interested.

What is your next big

0:53:020:53:07

going to be about? It will be an

Extremadura and Andalusia. You know

0:53:070:53:16

the best thing about writing books?

On the check at the end?

Sorry, that

0:53:160:53:23

was quite cynical. Research, that is

what it is. Me and my partner,

0:53:230:53:29

eating and drinking, meeting the

most incredible people and having

0:53:290:53:34

lots of fun.

And that is called

research? Presumably that is tax

0:53:340:53:39

deductible as well. Excellent.

Lovely.

Now just the fish. Watch

0:53:390:53:47

yourself.

There is something going

on.

I can sort that, do not worry.

0:53:470:54:00

Then just finished. This is a

popular finish, the parsley oil?

We

0:54:000:54:05

love parsley. When I arrived in the

UK, the only herbs we were using

0:54:050:54:10

were believed, parsley and thyme.

The only food that people knew was

0:54:100:54:23

calamari?

Yes, but there is more

than that. We have more than

0:54:230:54:29

chorizo, sangria and Ayala. Remind

us what that is called? We have

0:54:290:54:35

stunning rainbow trout, with

chorizo, tomato, and mussels, for

0:54:350:54:42

Amanda.

Beautiful, well done. Right,

let's take this over. Good bread,

0:54:420:54:49

always. You have worked a lot in

Spain, you say?

I have. Look at it,

0:54:490:55:00

it is like a painting.

Simple,

beautiful. You know, it is flavours.

0:55:000:55:06

Today is a lovely day outside.

We

need that kind of Spanish food. On a

0:55:060:55:13

day like this, do you think people

want that kind of food?

0:55:130:55:20

want that kind of food?

I think

people want to feel Sun, like

0:55:200:55:25

Amanda's TV series.

They want to

bring memories. Good memories?

Yes,

0:55:250:55:31

that is just beautiful.

And we are

drinking sherry?

When I get to match

0:55:310:55:42

wine with Jose's food, I get excited

because I get to use sherry. In this

0:55:420:55:47

country they have a bad reputation

because we think of sherry as being

0:55:470:55:51

really sweet. This is Barbadillo

Manzanilla Solear. It comes from the

0:55:510:55:56

coast. Kimi, this always reminds me

of when you have spent all day at

0:55:560:56:01

the beach and the way that your skin

smells, that saltiness from the

0:56:010:56:05

auction.

It is a lovely place to be.

It is a lovely sipping wine with

0:56:050:56:15

fish and with meat, is specially

with chorizo and rich tomato sauces.

0:56:150:56:23

It is salty.

Like the ocean. It is a

beautiful place, close to the sea.

I

0:56:230:56:31

can drink sherry with anything. Any

time.

Right, let me do this link.

0:56:310:56:38

Now let's catch up with Si

and Dave, the Hairy Bikers.

0:56:380:56:41

They're on their Asian Adventure

and have arrived in Bangkok,

0:56:410:56:43

where they are throwing themselves

into the incredible

0:56:430:56:45

street-food scene.

0:56:450:56:53

We've arrived in Thailand

for a two-week gastronomic journey

0:57:010:57:04

that's guaranteed to set our taste

buds on fire.

0:57:040:57:06

This week, we're exploring

and investigating the Central Plains

0:57:060:57:08

home to rice paddies,

ancient capitals, spectacular

0:57:080:57:10

ruins and the street food

capital of the world,

0:57:100:57:12

Bangkok.

0:57:120:57:15

Central Thailand is the original

home of the Thai food that we have

0:57:150:57:20

come to know and love in the UK

because most of the people

0:57:200:57:23

who opened the first Thai

restaurants in the UK came

0:57:230:57:25

from this region.

0:57:250:57:26

They gave us red curry, green curry,

pad Thai and green papaya salad.

0:57:260:57:29

But I can't wait to find out

what else is on the menu, Kingy.

0:57:290:57:33

Like millions of people each year,

we're arriving at the gateway to it

0:57:330:57:36

all, the capital city,

Bangkok.

0:57:360:57:43

It's the most visited

city on the planet.

0:57:430:57:50

MUSIC: One Night In

Bangkok by A-Teens.

0:57:510:57:53

Yes!

0:57:530:57:55

We love a tuk-tuk!

0:57:550:57:58

All through the city you can smell

charcoal and pork and seafood.

0:58:020:58:05

And all the lovely herbs.

0:58:050:58:11

It's permeating the atmosphere.

0:58:110:58:12

We've got a tuk-tuk.

0:58:120:58:13

Oh, it's going to be lush.

0:58:130:58:20

Bangkok is the street food

capital of the world.

0:58:230:58:27

There are an estimated half

a million people hawking their food

0:58:270:58:30

on the streets of Bangkok.

0:58:300:58:36

That's nearly 5% of the entire

population of Bangkok.

0:58:360:58:39

Street food stalls were introduced

to Bangkok in the late 19th-century

0:58:390:58:42

by Chinese migrant workers

who wanted cheap and

0:58:420:58:44

quick places to eat.

0:58:440:58:46

Street food is a national obsession.

0:58:460:58:50

Many people say it's where true Thai

cuisine can be found.

0:58:500:58:55

Me and Dave here are looking forward

to seeing if we can find it.

0:58:550:59:01

Whether you work in a bank

or building site, most locals buy

0:59:010:59:05

street food at least once a day.

0:59:050:59:08

We are meeting Daniel,

a Canadian who has lived

0:59:080:59:11

here for ten years and presents

a web TV show about

0:59:110:59:14

Thai culture and food.

0:59:140:59:17

Daniel and his Thai friends know

the best stalls to visit.

0:59:170:59:22

It is such a good way to eat.

0:59:220:59:24

Something you can't replicate.

0:59:240:59:25

You can't reproduce it.

0:59:250:59:29

I think Thai restaurants around

the world have tried to recreate

0:59:290:59:31

that street food experience that

people who come to Bangkok

0:59:310:59:34

fall in love with.

0:59:340:59:36

It is funny, you see some people

at home in the guidebooks say,

0:59:360:59:39

"You don't eat street food,

you'll get sick."

0:59:390:59:41

You live on it, you don't get sick!

0:59:410:59:44

I've lived in Thailand for 12 years,

I eat street food every day.

0:59:440:59:47

I have been hospitalised once

from a five-star hotel.

0:59:470:59:49

There you are!

0:59:490:59:51

Never from street food.

0:59:510:59:56

Competition on the street is fierce,

so many vendors specialise in just

0:59:560:59:59

one dish which they become

quite famous for.

0:59:591:00:02

Some street vendors have more

infrastructure than others.

1:00:021:00:05

One day he'll have a chain!

1:00:051:00:10

And with food this good and super

cheap, no wonder many

1:00:101:00:14

Bangkokians don't cook at all.

1:00:141:00:16

In fact, many modern apartments

are being built without kitchens.

1:00:161:00:21

You have ordered one

of these to go home, right?

1:00:211:00:23

Yeah.

1:00:231:00:24

Have you?

1:00:241:00:26

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

I have.

1:00:261:00:27

That is the whole thing, isn't it?

1:00:271:00:32

Everybody can take away.

1:00:321:00:33

Yeah, maybe I'm hungry about 10pm.

1:00:331:00:34

And just eat.

1:00:341:00:35

Just before you go to sleep!

1:00:351:00:37

It is the third and fourth meal.

1:00:371:00:38

Thais have this insatiable appetite.

1:00:381:00:40

Maybe the fifth.

1:00:401:00:41

They can eat five

or six meals a day.

1:00:411:00:43

OK, this gets a little cramped

but let's try and make our way in.

1:00:431:00:47

Some stalls have a cult

following and their owners

1:00:471:00:51

are street food celebrities.

1:00:511:00:59

The lady here, the cook,

her name is Jay Fai,

1:01:001:01:02

which means Auntie Fai in Thai.

1:01:021:01:04

She is a legend,

she is an institution.

1:01:041:01:05

She has the freshest and the largest

ingredients you will ever see.

1:01:051:01:11

She is a little lady

there but she is like a musician!

1:01:111:01:13

She's basically on fire

round there with five woks!

1:01:131:01:16

Let's go, let's meet her.

1:01:161:01:17

And take a look.

1:01:171:01:20

HE SPEAKS THAI.

1:01:201:01:22

Hello, Jay Fai!

1:01:221:01:26

Do you know, I have noticed

there is no gas here.

1:01:261:01:29

This is on charcoal braziers

with a fan blowing through.

1:01:291:01:32

You should get a better taste.

1:01:321:01:34

This is natural cooking.

1:01:341:01:35

It's like a barbecue.

1:01:351:01:38

And by the look of our

first dish, Auntie Fai's

1:01:381:01:40

reputation is well-deserved.

1:01:401:01:42

Look at the size of that omelette.

1:01:421:01:44

This is the crab omelette.

1:01:441:01:47

Crab omelette is Jay

Fai's signature dish.

1:01:471:01:50

Unlike the French omelettes we eat

at home, Thai omelettes

1:01:501:01:53

are deep-fried so they are fluffy

on the inside but crispy

1:01:531:01:56

on the outside.

1:01:561:01:59

I think I am about to have one

of those food epiphanies,

1:01:591:02:02

that happens very rarely.

1:02:021:02:03

Is it that good?

1:02:031:02:04

It is amazing.

1:02:041:02:09

It's so good it makes me giggle.

1:02:091:02:11

We eat like kings,

we eat like kings here.

1:02:111:02:14

You do eat like kings.

1:02:141:02:15

It's unreal!

1:02:151:02:18

I wish I could verbalise it better

but it is just unreal.

1:02:181:02:22

With street food you can run

the gamut from going for 20 baht

1:02:221:02:25

for a freshly-squeezed fruit juice

to what is basically a Michelin-star

1:02:251:02:29

quality meal all on the street.

1:02:291:02:32

What I love about it,

it is accessible.

1:02:321:02:34

It's jeans, T-shirt and beer.

1:02:341:02:37

But where food is concerned

there is no compromising

1:02:371:02:39

and for a lot of people

it is a way of life.

1:02:391:02:45

Come on!

1:02:451:02:48

No sleep till bedtime -

the night is young.

1:02:481:02:51

Thanks, boys!

1:02:591:03:01

Let's hope that Amanda gets

a food epiphany too.

1:03:011:03:03

Her fate is sealed.

1:03:031:03:06

The heaven and hell

vote is now closed.

1:03:061:03:08

And we will reveal the results

at the end of the show.

1:03:081:03:11

Now let's take some

calls from our viewers.

1:03:111:03:13

Simon from the Netherlands is first

up.

Good morning.

1:03:131:03:17

Simon from the Netherlands is first

up.

Good morning. Monday is my

1:03:171:03:22

wife's birthday and I have a couple

of wonderful pigeons... I'm thinking

1:03:221:03:27

of pan frying them, or cook them

sous vied, but I have done that

1:03:271:03:37

before and I'm looking to do

something different.

Pigeon recipes.

1:03:371:03:42

Maybe braised down the legs with

garlic and Sherlock

1:03:421:03:50

garlic and Sherlock -- shallot. Some

Parmesan with that. Should be

1:03:521:03:58

delicious.

A tweaked, Amanda?

You're

making me read this out. Carol

1:03:581:04:07

Marshall says, I love the beautiful

Amanda, she looks amazing! Thank

1:04:071:04:15

you!

Is that it in?

I'm looking at a

lamb shanks, any tips on how to cook

1:04:151:04:24

them and what is best to serve with

them.

A nice way to cook it, seal it

1:04:241:04:30

all over, like we did before, and

then white wine, loads of garlic and

1:04:301:04:34

cook it in the oven. Turn the oven

on really high for a good half an

1:04:341:04:39

hour, but you lamb shanks in, turn

the oven off, and about four hours

1:04:391:04:43

later, the lamb shanks will cook

with enough heat.

There is a lot of

1:04:431:04:50

love for you on social media, so we

made you read it out to embarrass

1:04:501:04:55

you. Sean is the next.

I have some

prawns and I would like to make a

1:04:551:05:04

recipe I've had in Spain. On the

beach. They are a favourite of mine.

1:05:041:05:13

Jose?

It's a difficult thing to do.

It's an emulsion made from the

1:05:131:05:22

gelatin from the official stop maybe

do it with chilli and garlic. The

1:05:221:05:25

best thing to do, plenty of garlic

and chilli. Cooking olive oil. But

1:05:251:05:32

the prawns in and cook, leave them

whole, peel them, but leave the head

1:05:321:05:38

and tail is on. Cook them very quick

in the oven. And suck their head,

1:05:381:05:46

that's the best thing with the

prawns.

Not sure where to go with

1:05:461:05:52

that. What would you drink with

that?

I think a lovely she and a

1:05:521:06:01

lovely, refreshing ice cold cava.

And it would stand up to the chilly

1:06:011:06:07

as well.

1:06:071:06:10

As it's St Patrick's Day,

we sent chef Jordan Bourke

1:06:101:06:12

to the beautiful harbour village

of Howth, known as the seafood

1:06:121:06:15

capital of Dublin, to learn

all about its famous

1:06:151:06:17

Dublin Bay Prawn.

1:06:171:06:24

Island is home to some amazing

seafood and I'm heading to the

1:06:261:06:29

gorgeous fishing village of Howth,

just outside Dublin, home of the

1:06:291:06:35

Dublin Bay prawns. And with it being

St Patrick's Day, they are holding a

1:06:351:06:40

festival to celebrate this delicious

crustacean. Heading ashore to find

1:06:401:06:43

out more. I'm Pleasure to meet you,

Sean. I believe you are the local

1:06:431:06:49

expert on Dublin Bay prawns. And you

are even known as Sean the prawns.

1:06:491:06:53

In some places, absolutely.

For

those who don't know, Dublin Bay

1:06:531:06:58

prawns have different names.

They

are known as Norwegian, but they can

1:06:581:07:05

also be

1:07:051:07:14

also be called langoustine, and we

know it as scampi in the UK.

We can

1:07:141:07:21

see your brother with a haul. We

have about 20 crates. These guys are

1:07:211:07:27

still moving. Will I lose a finger?

He looks reasonably cross.

Just hold

1:07:271:07:33

it like that. I've had a nip from

them before and it's quite sore.

1:07:331:07:39

What about Dublin Bay prawns makes

it different to the average broadly

1:07:391:07:43

getting the supermarket?

They are

almost unique. I have travelled a

1:07:431:07:46

fair bit around the world and it's

very rare you get something you and

1:07:461:07:50

prepare, you could eat this as it is

at this moment, sushi. Just raw.

1:07:501:08:04

I love cooking Dublin Bay prawns

simply, cooking them simple, cuts

1:08:101:08:16

down the middle.

We have some garlic

butter with these. The prawn meat

1:08:161:08:21

taken out of the shell. The joy of

it is when it gets to the plate.

1:08:211:08:27

Tempora is the same thing can stop

deep fry it in butter and oil. It

1:08:271:08:34

goes well with soy sauce.

You serve

all sorts of fish with your menu.

1:08:341:08:40

Our Dublin Bay prawns popular?

Absolutely, people come from all

1:08:401:08:44

over to eat them.

What makes people

come back?

It's a unique texture.

1:08:441:08:50

Much more tender than lobster and a

sweet flavour.

You are part of the

1:08:501:08:55

festival, will you just be doing

these?

It's a celebration of all

1:08:551:08:59

Irish fish. Grapes shellfish on the

east coast.

We have been talking

1:08:591:09:04

about them enough, we might as

diving. I will go for the garlic

1:09:041:09:07

butter.

I will have the tempora.

Nothing like eating fresh fish

1:09:071:09:16

beside the sea. Almost in the sea.

So if you're in Ireland this can

1:09:161:09:20

come down to Howth for festival.

1:09:201:09:26

come down to Howth for festival. Or

get yourself some Dublin Bay prawns

1:09:261:09:28

and cook them up, happy St Patrick's

Day. STUDIO: Do you use these?

We

1:09:281:09:36

do, they are beautiful. Expensive

but gorgeous. You could eat about

1:09:361:09:39

ten of them.

They are expensive, but

we need to eat more all the lies

1:09:391:09:47

they will disappear abroad.

They are

stunning, so sweet.

1:09:471:09:54

stunning, so sweet.

You've tried

these before. Do you see a lot of

1:09:541:09:56

this ending up in Spain?

We have in

northern Spain, Gillislee. But

1:09:561:10:03

everybody says the good ones come

from this country.

The cold water

1:10:031:10:08

makes a big difference.

Are you a

fan, Amanda?

It's beautiful. And so

1:10:081:10:14

sweet.

We have loads of them, we

could eat them all later.

1:10:141:10:22

It's omelette challenge time.

1:10:261:10:27

Jose and Ian - neither

of you are on our new board.

1:10:271:10:30

So everything's to play for.

1:10:301:10:31

I think I'll end up in the middle.

If I can.

What about Jose?

1:10:311:10:43

If I can.

What about Jose?

Because

I'm old enough, I think I might be

1:10:431:10:45

in the tail.

With the seniors.

1:10:451:10:56

in the tail.

With the seniors.

Maybe

put some make-up on the bald spot.

I

1:10:561:10:59

will be joining you there shortly.

1:10:591:11:04

The aim is to make fast,

edible three-egg omelettes that

1:11:041:11:06

are good enough to feed

to our hungry crew.

1:11:061:11:08

CREW CHEERS.

1:11:081:11:11

A bit lame.

1:11:111:11:13

But if they're not, they'll

go in the compost bin.

1:11:131:11:16

CREW BOOS.

1:11:161:11:17

So will it be crew or compost?

1:11:171:11:18

Your time will stop when your

omelettes hit the plates.

1:11:181:11:21

Let's put the clocks on the screen.

1:11:211:11:23

Are you both ready?

1:11:231:11:24

3, 2, 1, go!

1:11:241:11:28

How many eggs?

Three.

1:11:281:11:34

This isn't bad. It's a new cuisine,

remember that.

What's that?!

1:11:461:11:56

I think you might have just got away

with that.

A bit of seasoning

1:12:011:12:05

on-air.

Its caramelised butter.

It's

very runny. Wow.

I think I know

1:12:051:12:17

who's going to for lunch today.

Burnt on the outside and runny in

1:12:171:12:21

the middle.

It's edible. Great

seasoning... Absolutely.

No

1:12:211:12:28

seasoning. Yours looks like a right

mess, but it's actually very nice.

I

1:12:281:12:35

was panicking at the end.

Do I have

a salt issue? Are you deliberately

1:12:351:12:41

not seasoning for me? Wow, I'm not

going back for more. I will put you

1:12:411:12:49

both on, just.

Just.

1:12:491:12:58

both on, just.

Just.

Jose, 30.68,

very good.

1:12:581:13:04

very good. And 34.04 for Ian.

APPLAUSE

1:13:041:13:09

Clapping yourselves! Let's put you

up here. Jose might end up there.

1:13:091:13:15

Maybe.

1:13:151:13:21

So will Amanda get her

food heaven - a holy

1:13:211:13:24

trinity of cod, crab

and Sri Lankan spices?

1:13:241:13:26

Or will it be a hellish

combination of fatty

1:13:261:13:28

pork, sweet and sour

flavours and couscous?

1:13:281:13:29

We'll find out after Nigel Slater

shows us another of his

1:13:291:13:32

simple suppers - a quick

and easy aubergine curry.

1:13:321:13:35

I think spices are

absolutely phenomenal.

1:14:101:14:12

It just really enhances flavour

in any particular dish you have.

1:14:121:14:14

You try any sort of cuisine, they've

always somehow got some spices in.

1:14:141:14:17

Ketan Varu is a self-confessed

spice obsessive.

1:14:171:14:19

I love using spices

in every way possible.

1:14:191:14:21

If I'm on holiday, I need to take

some kind of spices to give me that

1:14:211:14:25

sort of flavour enhancer that

I need.

1:14:251:14:27

Ketan produces ready-made spice mixe

for a wide variety of recipes.

1:14:271:14:29

It's understanding what the flavours

do that allows you to play

1:14:291:14:32

with them in your cooking.

1:14:321:14:34

These are Indian dry chillies.

1:14:341:14:34

It just gives you a nice flavour.

1:14:341:14:36

It gives you a bit of

heat, but not too much.

1:14:361:14:39

Whereas if you use the ground

chilli, you get a lot more intense

1:14:391:14:42

flavour of the heat.

1:14:421:14:43

When you try the flavour

of cumin, it's...

1:14:431:14:45

It's intense, it's really powerful.

1:14:451:14:46

Quite an earthy flavour,

almost a bitter flavour.

1:14:461:14:48

Really worth having this

in your store cupboard.

1:14:481:14:56

Whenever I've got a little

sniffle or a cold, I always

1:14:571:14:59

have a nice hot curry.

1:14:591:15:00

It always sorts me out,

gives me that boost.

1:15:001:15:03

Using your own spice mix

doesn't have to take long.

1:15:031:15:05

Here's an idea for a really

quick vegetable curry.

1:15:051:15:08

This dish is based

around aubergines.

1:15:081:15:11

They need about half an hour

in a colander in the sink,

1:15:111:15:14

with a little bit of salt on them.

1:15:141:15:19

That just draws out some

of the water in the aubergine.

1:15:191:15:21

Then they don't drink

all your precious olive oil.

1:15:211:15:24

Whilst they're softening,

roughly chop up some onions,

1:15:241:15:28

and add to a hot pan,

along with some chopped garlic

1:15:281:15:31

and some finely-shredded ginger.

1:15:311:15:37

I'm going to let those soften a bit

before I put the spices in.

1:15:371:15:40

And I don't want the spices to burn.

1:15:401:15:47

For this curry, I'm adding

crushed cardamom...

1:15:481:15:54

a flurry of dried chilli flakes,

a spoonful of turmeric...

1:15:541:15:57

and a scattering of cumin seed.

1:15:571:16:05

Then add some chopped tomatoes,

some water, and season

1:16:081:16:10

with salt and pepper.

1:16:101:16:14

So these have relaxed a little

bit, the salt has just

1:16:141:16:17

drawn out a few juices.

1:16:171:16:18

They're just much softer.

1:16:181:16:23

If you haven't got a griddle,

you could do these under

1:16:231:16:26

an overhead grill.

1:16:261:16:27

Of course, you could

just fry them in oil.

1:16:271:16:30

All you want to do is soften them,

so that they can go in there

1:16:301:16:33

and just bubble away.

1:16:331:16:35

Once the aubergines

are in the pot, let them simmer

1:16:351:16:38

for about half an hour.

1:16:381:16:40

We want them to be nice and squishy.

1:16:401:16:48

So...

1:16:511:16:58

You see, that's quite hot.

1:16:581:16:59

I want...

1:16:591:17:07

HE COUGHS.

1:17:071:17:08

I want to calm it down!

1:17:081:17:10

There are several ways

to calm a curry down.

1:17:101:17:12

And for me, the best is yoghurt.

1:17:121:17:13

You can use any dairy produce.

1:17:131:17:15

You know, when you add

dairy produce to a curry,

1:17:151:17:17

it quite often curdles.

1:17:171:17:18

There's many different ways

to stop it curdling,

1:17:181:17:20

but I think the easiest way

is to switch off the heat.

1:17:201:17:26

It's only when the dairy

produce boils it actually

1:17:261:17:28

causes you any trouble.

1:17:281:17:31

And if it does curdle,

and sometimes they do,

1:17:311:17:35

it really isn't

the end of the world.

1:17:351:17:39

It's not going to

affect the flavour,

1:17:391:17:42

it's just going to look

a little bit grainy.

1:17:421:17:45

As it's so punchy, I'm also

adding some creme fraiche,

1:17:451:17:47

another soothing element that

will thicken your curry.

1:17:471:17:49

Then pop in some fresh

coriander and mint leaves,

1:17:491:17:51

to help soften the blow.

1:17:511:17:54

Hm.

1:18:031:18:05

Gosh.

1:18:051:18:09

HE SNIFFS.

1:18:091:18:11

Quite bright.

1:18:111:18:14

It makes my eyes water.

1:18:141:18:18

But there's also a silkiness,

a softness to it, that's come

1:18:181:18:21

from the dairy produce.

1:18:211:18:22

And then there's the

freshness of the ginger,

1:18:221:18:24

and the earthiness of the turmeric.

1:18:241:18:27

It's just really rather gorgeous.

1:18:271:18:33

Thanks, Nigel.

1:18:331:18:35

Time to find out whether Amanda

is getting her food

1:18:351:18:37

heaven or food hell.

1:18:371:18:45

Food heaven is a gift of three

of Amanda's favourite foods, cod,

1:18:511:18:54

crab and Sri Lankan spices.

1:18:541:18:55

Or food hell is fatty pork

with couscous and sweet flavours

1:18:551:18:58

mixed in with savoury!

1:18:581:18:59

What do you think you have got?

I do

not know. I can tell you a massive

1:18:591:19:04

70% of people went for food heaven.

Thank you. That shows you how

1:19:041:19:13

popular you are, because by and

large it is around 50%.

1:19:131:19:17

popular you are, because by and

large it is around 50%. Thank you.

1:19:171:19:19

Let's get on with this. I will

converge into this curry, hopefully.

1:19:191:19:25

Soft-shell crabs. I will drop those

in the fryer. Some of this milk, a

1:19:251:19:30

little of spice, we will put that in

the curry. Ian is going to do little

1:19:301:19:36

samosas. Jose is making a pickle.

Let's get on with this. Do you make

1:19:361:19:44

curries at home or have you had

enough of them?

I can never have

1:19:441:19:48

enough. My husband does. He can

cook. I do not bother any more.

1:19:481:19:53

There is no point. Fit enough. He

has got a spice rack to die for?

1:19:531:20:03

Yes, he does.

He has a tanned as

well. They are good, good fun. -- a

1:20:031:20:11

tandoor.

You have got on

domestically?

Yes.

How the other

1:20:111:20:16

half live.

I was interested to find

out that your father did Cordon Bleu

1:20:161:20:24

back in the 1960s.

Yes, he was very

ill, he had leukaemia. He recovered,

1:20:241:20:30

but to pass the time, when he was

recovering at home, he did this

1:20:301:20:35

course. He ended up opening a

restaurant with a friend.

Really?

1:20:351:20:39

That is interesting. Ireland, ages

ago, back in 1965, Michael Caine was

1:20:391:20:49

doing the Chris Farrell, and he was

the first man to ever be seen to

1:20:491:20:52

cook on screen? Is that real? 1965.

It was around the same time. We take

1:20:521:21:02

it for granted, but it proves that

it was not normal.

It was not the

1:21:021:21:08

norm. No.

Saute that. In real life,

you would do this longer. Just ten

1:21:081:21:19

minutes on the chillies. I have got

something you greet, some turmeric,

1:21:191:21:26

some white pepper, chilli powder.

It

is quite potent. Great. The hotter

1:21:261:21:34

the better.

We will top this up with

some tamarin. And a little bit of

1:21:341:21:39

sugar. Just to take the edge of the

bitterness. I am going to use

1:21:391:21:44

coconut milk.

This is what you would

find in Sri Lanka?

Yes. Tell us, how

1:21:441:21:51

did you get into acting in the first

place?

I burned myself badly when I

1:21:511:21:57

was a baby and I had to go to

hospital. I was there until I was

1:21:571:22:00

five.

When I came out I was

hyperactive. I bet.

That was a long

1:22:001:22:05

time. They sent me to a ballet class

on a Saturday morning but I have two

1:22:051:22:11

left feet and I am clumsy, so I kept

bumping into all the other kids, so

1:22:111:22:17

they suggested a drama class that

was upstairs.

I went and that was

1:22:171:22:20

it.

Simple as that?

Yes, absolutely.

It has kind of come full circle.

Now

1:22:201:22:30

you have a school? Yes, they are

theatre school.

One of your former

1:22:301:22:37

pupils is Lisa Faulkner.

You have a

very active role. Yes, I am going

1:22:371:22:41

there after this. I shall be working

there after this.

It sounds very

1:22:411:22:47

hands-on, lots of experts coming in.

It is trying to give something back.

1:22:471:22:52

I believe people into coming along

and giving classes. -- I bully

1:22:521:22:59

people. An interesting choice of

words.

It works. I have got milk, it

1:22:591:23:07

will give its sweetness, a little

bit of powder in there. The flour,

1:23:071:23:13

and I will dip the crabs in both of

these. Now the cod, skin side up.

1:23:131:23:21

That will protect it a little bit.

It smells beautiful.

Well,

1:23:211:23:29

hopefully, you will like it.

It

tastes amazing. What advice would

1:23:291:23:33

you have for women in the industry?

You're a big advocate of women

1:23:331:23:38

getting strong roles. Throughout

their career, rather than stopping

1:23:381:23:43

in their 30s or 40s?

Exactly. You

have got to represent the people who

1:23:431:23:48

watch television. Really, it tends

to be women over the age of 40.

1:23:481:23:54

Therefore they should be

represented, I feel. Also, we are

1:23:541:23:59

52% of the population, but the

balance is very much the other way.

1:23:591:24:04

I also read that you think that

Europe and the states are ahead of

1:24:041:24:08

the UK?

I think so. They do not seem

to be frightened of older women.

1:24:081:24:13

Perhaps not so much the case here.

Right, the crabs are in. Are you

1:24:131:24:20

getting on? All. The samosas look

lovely. Well done. Much better than

1:24:201:24:27

rehearsal.

1:24:271:24:32

rehearsal.

What happens in

rehearsals stays in rehearsals.

It

1:24:321:24:39

is the most difficult thing to do.

That is why I give it to him. Crabs

1:24:391:24:46

will not take much time at all.

Very, very thin. Traditionally you

1:24:461:24:52

would not have soft-shell crabs in

Sri Lanka. It just makes them very

1:24:521:24:57

easy to read.

Have you had them

before?

No. Interesting little

1:24:571:25:03

creatures. They shed their skin, so

during that period they get very

1:25:031:25:08

soft and you can read the shell. It

sounds a bit macabre, but it tastes

1:25:081:25:13

delicious.

1:25:131:25:20

delicious. You were working at the

Bristol Old Vic?

Yes, it was quite a

1:25:201:25:28

year. Who was there a? Daniel Day

Lewis.

1:25:281:25:36

Lewis. Miranda Richardson. Nick

Farrell, there were a whole load of

1:25:381:25:43

us.

What you're doing in your

theatre school, is it something that

1:25:431:25:54

more and more people should be

doing? Are you one of the few who

1:25:541:25:59

are doing things like this? Bringing

in experts and showing kids how to

1:25:591:26:02

do it properly?

Yes, I do not

think... Yes, more people should be

1:26:021:26:12

doing it, really. I think so. I

think it is important. If you do it

1:26:121:26:18

for a living, you're keeping up with

the latest trends so you can offer

1:26:181:26:22

them something which is tangible.

Is

it a business where people are very

1:26:221:26:28

giving? Do they help youngsters

coming up through the ranks? Yes,

1:26:281:26:32

yes, I would really say that.

It is

a very competitive industry. It is a

1:26:321:26:38

bit like you guys with the cooking,

you have got to be passionate about

1:26:381:26:42

it. If you're passionate, you want

to pass it on to other people.

I

1:26:421:26:47

suspect there are lots of times when

you question your life sat on the

1:26:471:26:51

sofa, where it is the next job

coming from, that is a massive part

1:26:511:26:54

of acting?

That is a massive part of

it, yes, but the passion should

1:26:541:26:59

never go. If it goes, give up. It is

better to go home.

Absolutely.

It is

1:26:591:27:11

nicely, what we are doing. I will

get the cod. You boys ready?

1:27:111:27:20

get the cod. You boys ready? Right,

do you want to grab the wine,

1:27:201:27:26

Sandia? Absolutely. I am sorry about

the mess. If you are not that brave,

1:27:261:27:32

just try the crab. Thank you. Then

we have a little salad.

Stick a

1:27:321:27:41

couple of samosas on.

Lovely.

What

are we drinking? I like red wine to

1:27:411:27:47

go with curries. Pienaar are.

1:27:471:27:55

go with curries. Pienaar are. --

pinot noir. This is Chilean. It is

1:27:551:28:01

from Asda.

1:28:011:28:06

from Asda. The light fruitiness

balances well with the spices in the

1:28:071:28:09

curry, and with this seafood. You

have won her over.

I had faith in

1:28:091:28:17

you. What have you tucked into? The

cod. Good. It is lovely. It turned

1:28:171:28:24

out nice in the end. Just to remind

us, Good Karma Hospital, tomorrow

1:28:241:28:30

night, 9pm on ITV.

Yes. I do not

watch television at all, but I will

1:28:301:28:35

be doing that.

Thank you. Thanks,

cheers. Happy St Patrick's Day to

1:28:351:28:41

everyone.

1:28:411:28:41

That's all from us today

on Saturday Kitchen Live.

1:28:411:28:43

Thanks to all our studio guests,

Ian, Jose, Sandia and Amanda.

1:28:431:28:46

All the recipes from the show

are on the website,

1:28:461:28:48

bbc.co.uk/saturdaykitchen.

1:28:481:28:50

Don't forget, I've got more

Best Bites for you tomorrow

1:28:501:28:52

at 9:15am on BBC Two.

1:28:521:28:53

Have a great weekend.

1:28:531:28:55

Bye!

1:28:551:29:01

Matt Tebbutt is joined by chefs Ian Orr and Jose Pizarro and special guest Amanda Redman. There are great moments from the BBC food archive, including clips from Rick Stein, Raymond Blanc, the Hairy Bikers and Nigel Slater, and drinks expert Sandia Chang picks the wines to go with the studio dishes.