Herefordshire The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Herefordshire

Si King and Dave Myers explore Herefordshire and cook a traditional county favourite at Goodrich Castle. They also visit a snail farm and discover English cassis.


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Transcript


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BOTH: We're the Hairy Bikers.

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And we're on the road to find regional recipes to rip up your appetite.

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We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

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Come on!

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Today, we're in search of the real taste of Herefordshire.

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Look, Si, it's beautiful.

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You're not wrong.

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Although it's one of England's most rural counties, you know,

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it still feels a little bit like the Archers but with a bit of grit.

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-Yes, I know exactly what you mean.

-You've got the three major towns.

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There's Hereford, Ledbury and Leominster.

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And, you know, in some of them you've still got those wonderful black and white medieval buildings.

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Over there you've got the Brecon Beacons and Wales, and the landscape, the rolling hills.

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Did you notice as we were tootling through, we've seen hops,

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we've seen apples, we've seen pears, we've seen soft fruits.

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I mean, it's quite remarkable.

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It is. Come along, let's go and hit an olde worlde town to investigate.

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On our quest to define the true flavours of Herefordshire,

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we cook up some of the county's world famous export. Everyone wants a bite.

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We head into the fields to find the juiciest blackcurrants and an extra special tipple.

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It all gets a bit damp and slimy on a snail farm.

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They really are local delicacies.

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And representing Herefordshire in the cook-off later,

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is James Arbourne.

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I bet you're great at chopping logs!

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Will we be able to beat him in the blind tasting judged by local diners?

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To find out what gets local people's taste buds racing,

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we're heading to Ledbury, an old market town steeped in history.

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Ledbury's a beautiful town, isn't it?

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I mean, you could call it half timbered paradise.

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So what do people eat in Herefordshire?

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-Well, they drink a lot of cider, will be the first thing.

-Right.

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Herefordshire beef. Very famous.

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-Yes.

-Hereford hop cheese is also a good one. That's very nice.

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-Yes, cos you produce a lot of hops here, don't you?

-Yeah.

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What is Herefordshire produce to you?

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All the fresh vegetables and fruit.

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Local ciders. Local cassis.

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Well, if you like a tipple, definitely the Hereford cider cake.

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Cider makes me giggle, you see.

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It makes me giggle a lot. Yes.

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Right, we can't wait any longer,

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we need to try some cider.

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Local expert James Marsden has offered us a sample.

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OK, what I thought we'd try now is a cider made of two different apples.

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-Brown's apple, which is a sharp, an early sharp.

-Yes.

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And Tremlett's Bitter, which is a bittersweet apple.

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I think this is my favourite cider, this year.

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The other thing that you'll notice when you taste it, is it was matured in whiskey barrels for nine months.

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That's complex, isn't it?

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-At first it hits your palate, it's quite sweet and then it goes off in a dry...

-Yeah.

-Goes on forever.

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What exactly is perry?

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Perry is made with pears.

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-Right.

-And not just any old pears but special pears. Perry pears.

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There are more than 50 varieties. It should be crisp and quite dry.

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Well, that's made with a single pear called Thorn.

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-Oh, I like that very much.

-Fermented over two years to give that finish.

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I'm very impressed with the bubble cos it's very fine.

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It's not something you associate with perry, particularly.

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-Clarity's superb.

-It is, it's excellent.

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I think these are some of England's forgotten flavours.

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Ciders and perry has become quite fashionable,

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but I think it's important to get back to the fact

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they're really old flavours.

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Back on the trail of the county dish.

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Madam, what is Herefordshire food to you?

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Well, it's beef. It's Herefordshire beef.

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There's a lot of organic beef here.

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Big hairy cows.

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Hey, this looks a canny 'in.

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Everybody's been telling us about Herefordshire beef.

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That's a pure, pure Herefordshire cross, that is. It's the most beautiful, beautiful beef.

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-Look at the colour of that fat.

-That is whopper.

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OK, look at the bark on it.

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-Nice bark on it and especially the marbling that's in the middle.

-Yes.

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So as you know yourselves when you cook that, the marbling melts and makes such delicious, tasty beef.

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There's another beautiful T-bone. Look at how dark that one is.

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That there is the fillet. And that there is the sirloin.

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-That's how it gives you your fine T-bone.

-Yeah, exactly.

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This is one of our pork sausages that we mix with a Henry Weston's special reserve cider

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which gives it that lovely little unique flavour.

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That sausage, that's a thing of beauty.

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Oh, that's fabulous. That is fabulous.

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You're very kind, thank you.

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The locals have spoken,

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the traditional taste of Herefordshire has to be beef.

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Hereford cattle are one of the UK's oldest native breeds.

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They can be traced back to the mid-1700s.

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Free Town Herefords, that's the place for beef.

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That looks like him.

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Richard's family have been breeding Herefords in Tarrington for four generations

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and his herd regularly wins show cattle competitions.

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So Richard is the man to tell us how good husbandry gives the best flavour.

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Are they the proper purebred Herefords that people talk about?

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They are pedigree Hereford cattle. Yes, this is the Free Town herd.

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-We've been in action for 102 years, now.

-Super beef.

-It is, indeed.

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-Come on in, boys.

-Thanks very much.

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These are some first calving heifers

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with their calves at foot, as you can see. We calve them when they're two and a half year old.

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-So these are young mothers.

-Yeah.

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A cow's a heifer until she's had her first calf.

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-Right.

-Then she becomes a cow.

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The main features is the white face, the red coat, the white crest, the white socks.

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-Are the Herefords farmed outside of Herefordshire?

-Oh, yes, certainly, they're all over the world.

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They estimate there's about 100 million plus Herefords or Hereford Crosses throughout the world.

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In over 120 countries.

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That's a wonderful Herefordshire export to the rest of the world, isn't it?

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I think it's our main agricultural export, yes.

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When do you slaughter, normally?

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The Hereford is fairly early maturing compared to some cattle,

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but 20, 22, 24 months. They're quite a slow-growing breed compared to some of the continentals.

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-I think that slower growing keeps the tenderness and succulence.

-That's brilliant.

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-Let's go in here, this is our stock bull.

-He's a whopper.

-Two and a half years old.

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So, Richard, what do you mean by stock bull?

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He's a stock getter and stock is cattle.

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He'll have the life of Riley. He's the dude.

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What would a bull like that be worth?

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-I paid £2,000 for him as was a year ago.

-Right.

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That would not be a top price. A top price breeding bull is 6,000.

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-Right.

-Really?

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-Yes.

-I think we'd better leave him to his empire, really.

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This is my son, Tony, he prepares one of our young bulls for showing.

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-It's an important part of pedigree breeding that you show your stock to other breeders.

-Yes.

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You advertise your wares, in effect. First, they have to be washed and then hairs clipped,

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to try and improve the profile a little bit of the animal.

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Sort of blow it to keep all the dust out.

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You mean, you hair-dry your cows?

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We do, yes. It's an important part of the preparation of cattle for showing.

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Tony, can I have a go, cos I've done an elephant?

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-Certainly, course you can.

-Brill. Are there any rules?

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-Brush gently upwards. You're raising the hair up.

-Yeah.

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He's enjoying that. Look at his tail.

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You're a bonny lad. Is there, like, rules for grooming a bull?

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There's definitely techniques to emphasise the bull in the right places

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and to groom him in the best possible way you can.

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Bobby Dazzler.

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With Richard and Tony's Hereford meat,

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we're on our way to the kitchen. We're cooking in Goodrich Castle.

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Built in the 11th century, it stands majestically in the valley of Symonds Yat.

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We're cooking up the perfect Herefordshire roast beef with a homemade horseradish sauce.

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You can't come to Herefordshire and not cook beef.

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We visited the great Herefordshire beef producer...

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who's there. The way we're doing the sirloin, it's actually...

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something, well, it's your gig really. It's your recipe.

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First time I had it was at the christening of one of your children.

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Yes, of which I have many. It's very simple.

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Take some peppercorns. You take some English mustard and then some salt.

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-Yes.

-And you make a rub. This rub goes all over this beautiful piece of Herefordshire beef,

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but before we do that, what we have to do is we take the beef and we sear it.

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And what we're going to do is we're going to leech some of the fat out as it just sears.

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One thing that I've got...

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about a tablespoon black peppercorns.

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I'm just grinding it down cos you want it quite gravelly.

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Some sea salt. About a tablespoon.

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English mustard, it was built for beef, wasn't it?

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We are going dead traditional on this one.

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And you can't do beef without mustard or without onions.

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So, all that wonderful rendered down fat...

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we're going to put some butter in there and do a whole heap of fried onions to go with the beef.

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It's my sort of food.

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It's great! OK.

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That's the bone.

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We're gonna use that as a little trivet.

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We've seared the beef off and now, the rub that Dave made, all you do, it's very, very simple.

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Rub it nicely into the skin. And it's a good coating. Don't be frightened of it. Just rub it in.

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So, here, we've got the rendered down beef juices, the fat...

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the big knob of butter... and put the onions in.

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And just let these sweat down till it's like a big onion cake.

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Now, then, the rules of cooking beef.

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Set your oven to 220 degrees centigrade, a hot oven.

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Put the beef in for 30 minutes at that.

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Now, after that first 30 minutes,

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you turn that down to 160 degrees centigrade,

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then you calculate depending on the weight of the beef.

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For rare beef, it's 20 minutes per kilo.

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Whatever you do, though, you need to let the beef relax.

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Bring it out the oven, chill out for 15 minutes before you carve it,

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and the core temperature of the meat will go up ten degrees.

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This piece is two kilos.

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That's correct.

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-And we want it rare.

-Rare going on to medium rare.

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So, we need that to go in now at 220 degrees for 30 minutes.

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-Yes.

-So we want two lots of 20 minutes, that's another 40 minutes.

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-An hour and a half.

-No, it's not, actually,

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it's one hour and ten, total cooking time and rest for 15.

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To go with our beef, we have another super traditional accompaniment, but we're making our own.

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-What's that?

-Horseradish root. Look.

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Fresh horseradish and it's a good root, that.

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Horseradish? Call that horseradish. That's a root.

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Excuse me, can we borrow your root?

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-You certainly can.

-Did you grow that yourself?

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-My mother did.

-Look at that.

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We're gonna make a creamed horseradish cos that's kind of slightly mellower,

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nice and sticky and it's great for a beef sandwich.

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Look at the cream. You can tell the quality of the root

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and the quality of the horseradish by the colour of it.

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It's so, so beautiful.

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We want about four teaspoons. It's going to be quite lively,

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this horseradish sauce so you're not going to need much more than that.

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Whoa! Ho-ho!

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Next step, I want a tablespoon of white wine vinegar.

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And if it wasn't hot enough, a good pinch of English mustard powder.

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Teaspoon of sugar.

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That's just to counteract the vinegar and all the sharp things.

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Salt and pepper. Guess what comes next?

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-Cream.

-Cream.

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Which?

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Si, have a taste of this, see what you think.

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Is that or is that not the best horseradish ever?

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Yes. Fabulous.

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That's been half an hour now, let's have a look.

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Yes. Look, that's searing up, beautifully.

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So we knock that down to 160 degrees centigrade.

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And as it's a two kilo piece of meat, we want it to be done rare, so we leave it now for...

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20 minutes, per kilo.

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-Which is?

-40 minutes in total cos it's a two kilo bit of meat.

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And then we leave it to rest for?

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-About ten, 15 minutes.

-Brill.

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-Well, it's looking good.

-It certainly is.

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Let's see if it works. Right.

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What we need to do now is to put a temperature probe in that meat

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to see the temperature inside.

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We want about 45 degrees for rare.

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It's now 60 degrees for medium.

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52 degrees. 53.

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That's perfect for carving. Go on, Kingy.

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Right, dude.

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Oh, that for my money's perfect.

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Take the bap and just press it in there...

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in those juices, like so.

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Look at that.

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Not much of this horseradish.

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We don't want to kill the beef.

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-Oh, look.

-It's a work of artness.

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Blob of horseradish there. Compote of onions there.

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There we have it. That's our tribute to the Hereford beef, the pride of Herefordshire.

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So, thank you, ladies and gentlemen.

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It's time to give the local people a taste and get their verdict.

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What will they make of our take on Hereford roast beef and homemade horseradish?

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OK. There you go.

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-Terrific.

-It's good and rich and sort of farm-y.

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I'm not normally much of a horseradish fan but this is really, really good.

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Words can't describe it. It's too scrummy.

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Look at that, they like the baps.

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I shall be making my own horseradish in future.

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-Tony.

-Tony, have we done you proud?

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Very well cooked. It's got the sweetness there.

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-You've got a bit of the horseradish, as well.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, excellent.

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-Have we done justice to your horseradish?

-We have, indeed.

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Look at the littl'un. Is that good, sweetheart?

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Our beef and horseradish baps went down a treat but a bigger challenge is just around the corner.

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As always, we're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant, using local ingredients

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to see who can best define the taste of the region.

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Local diners will decide whose dish best represents the true flavours of Herefordshire.

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Our opponent today is...

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James Arbourne,

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head chef at The Bridge At Wilton.

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Local lad, James, came to The Bridge four years ago.

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His imaginative cooking is adored by locals and he's quickly gaining a national reputation.

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It's great being a chef in Herefordshire because we are surrounded by the best produce.

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If Herefordshire didn't have the best produce, I wouldn't use it,

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but it's pointless me going anywhere else cos I can't get it better.

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Lots of our produce we use is from less than ten miles away.

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We use Dairy House, at Weobley, for our dairy products.

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Our eggs we get from Winn's Free Range Eggs. They're not far away, at all.

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My butcher, Andy Cornwall, in Ross, will call and say,

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"I've got some fantastic wild boar from the Forest of Dean,"

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or "The beef's particularly good at the moment."

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My suppliers are always on the phone to me.

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We've got a vegetable garden, our gardener tends to grow us things

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that we can't pick up at market all the time, things like Jerusalem artichokes,

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but also he grows the staples, root vegetables, peas, broad beans, strawberries.

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The beauty of having the supplies so close is that it's so fresh.

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If I want to change something on the menu, you know, I can source that ingredient within minutes.

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Flavours of Herefordshire Awards we've won now for a couple of years running.

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It's an award for using local produce, it's very satisfying to win,

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but we do understand that we're only as good as our last meal.

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To take on the bikers today, my taste of Herefordshire is...

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best end of Phocle Green pork

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with a twice-baked Herefordshire hop souffle and a Broome Farm perry reduction.

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Here we are at The Bridge At Wilton.

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I hope James knows what he's letting himself in for.

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So, James, what you cooking?

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What we've got is best end of Phocle Green pork,

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with twice-baked Herefordshire hop souffle and a Broome Farm perry reduction.

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-Fabulous.

-What we've got is the loin on the bone.

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-Yep, OK.

-So we're going to take it off the bone.

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-Look at that there.

-That's coming off the bone lovely.

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I'm not going to take any bone off this side here.

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That's kind of accurate, that.

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-We've got some bones there.

-Yeah.

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None of our beautiful Herefordshire produce goes in the bin.

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Basically, with this dish, all we want is the eye of the meat.

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When people are coming and spending good money,

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they don't want to be chewing through sinew and fatty bits.

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Expertly done, chef.

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-It is, isn't it?

-Takes a little time. Bit fiddly.

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Absolutely trounce you in the cook-off, unfortunately, gentlemen.

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There's many that have said that, James. Many have said that.

0:16:540:16:56

These little bits in to make a bit of stock.

0:16:560:16:59

So, basically, all we've got there is the eye of the meat.

0:16:590:17:04

So this is a full larder trim now.

0:17:040:17:06

The finishing touch for this...

0:17:060:17:09

just gonna wrap it in a slice of cured ham.

0:17:090:17:12

-One more of those.

-Look at those.

0:17:120:17:14

We're gonna get these little beauties in the fridge.

0:17:140:17:16

What we're gonna do now is our souffles. First bake.

0:17:160:17:19

The beauty of a twice-baked souffle is that you get to tip it out

0:17:190:17:22

-and then you get a nice golden crust around it, as well.

-Yeah.

0:17:220:17:26

-What have you put in here?

-A little olive oil.

-Olive oil.

0:17:260:17:28

OK. In here, I've got some breadcrumbs and some toasted hops.

0:17:280:17:33

-Interesting.

-Now, did you know, Herefordshire produce more than half the hops in the UK?

0:17:330:17:38

-So unlucky Kent.

-Really.

-Yeah.

0:17:380:17:42

Hops give a great flavour, don't they?

0:17:420:17:44

-It's just a bitter note, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:17:440:17:47

What we setting fire to now?

0:17:470:17:48

In here we have got milk, some grated Hereford hop cheese. Just gonna melt that.

0:17:480:17:53

Got flour here for our souffle.

0:17:530:17:55

Going to pop that in there and what I've tried to do is get a more seriously cheesy flour.

0:17:550:18:01

-Fab.

-So we've taken the butter content of the souffle, so we can't make a roux anymore.

0:18:010:18:05

Bake the flour first, cook out the flour cos you can't cook it out in the butter for the roux.

0:18:050:18:10

-Of course.

-Bit of salt and pepper in here.

0:18:100:18:12

Just waiting now for our cheese to melt, even, and our milk.

0:18:120:18:17

Right. There's our timer for our flour.

0:18:170:18:20

Five minutes. Right on cue.

0:18:200:18:23

All of it, bang it in there.

0:18:230:18:25

-Right, give that a good old mix now. See it all come together.

-Yeah.

0:18:250:18:29

But we still need to cook that out a little bit more.

0:18:290:18:31

A little blend over here, make sure there's no lumps in there. Put it back on the heat.

0:18:310:18:36

Cook it out a little bit more.

0:18:360:18:38

Just work that flour.

0:18:380:18:40

This is a bit of milk now I'm just adding, just to loosen the mixture.

0:18:400:18:44

Give it a good old mix.

0:18:440:18:47

See, just dropping, dropping consistency.

0:18:470:18:49

Bit more salt going in there, now. Pepper.

0:18:490:18:52

So we've got egg whites in here.

0:18:520:18:53

-Pinch of salt in there.

-Yeah.

0:18:530:18:55

To help the egg whites break down. I'm going to whip my egg whites up.

0:18:550:19:00

Give them a good old whisk.

0:19:000:19:02

Just gonna add a little lemon juice to that.

0:19:020:19:04

-What does the lemon juice do?

-Just helps them rise.

0:19:040:19:07

-You see these just starting to come up now.

-Yes.

-That's peaky.

0:19:090:19:12

It's getting there. Egg whites going in there, so we're folding them in,

0:19:120:19:16

bit by bit, gently. Basically, we've got quite a bit of mixture here,

0:19:160:19:19

but with a souffle recipe, it doesn't divide down very well.

0:19:190:19:22

-So you make a big batch up.

-I've made plenty.

-Good lad.

0:19:220:19:25

Here we go. So we're going to put a little bit of mixture in there.

0:19:250:19:29

About half full. Half full cos we've got a little extra going in there now.

0:19:290:19:33

We're gonna pop a little chunk of cheese, the Hereford hop, in the middle.

0:19:330:19:36

Now, when you cut through it, and this opens the souffle, it's going to ooze.

0:19:360:19:40

Now, we don't have a fan-assisted oven here, otherwise you'd have a fan-assisted oven a bit less, 175.

0:19:400:19:45

-Yeah.

-And cook them for ten minutes.

0:19:450:19:47

This, what we're doing now, is known as a bain-marie.

0:19:470:19:49

-Yeah.

-In we go. Timer on.

0:19:490:19:51

It's a myth you can't open the oven door when you're cooking souffles.

0:19:510:19:55

Just be careful. Next I get my perry on to reduce. Nice big pan on.

0:19:550:19:58

Now, this is Broome Farm perry.

0:19:580:20:00

Broome Farm is about a mile and a half that way.

0:20:000:20:03

If you drink too much of this you won't be able to stand up.

0:20:030:20:06

-Cor, yeah.

-I'm off!

0:20:060:20:08

What I'm going to do with this, I'm gonna reduce it.

0:20:120:20:14

When it comes down to a certain level, I'm gonna add a little bit of glucose to it,

0:20:140:20:18

should thicken it up. That's very sour. We're gonna sweeten it up.

0:20:180:20:22

-Sweet and sour. Sweet and sour pork.

-Perfect.

-Everyone's a winner.

0:20:220:20:25

Hoo!

0:20:250:20:26

Little bit of oil in there.

0:20:270:20:28

-Just some roughly chopped vegetables there.

-Right.

0:20:280:20:31

-This consists of onions, carrots.

-Shallots.

-Shallots.

0:20:310:20:34

We're going to get a little bit of colour on that.

0:20:340:20:37

Put some caramelisation on there.

0:20:370:20:39

Just going to give it that sweet flavour. In with our perry.

0:20:390:20:42

Then we're going to reduce that down, as well.

0:20:430:20:46

What I'm going to do next is I'm going to put my mash on.

0:20:460:20:49

What I'd like to do, as well, just rinse them off, as well.

0:20:490:20:52

Coming down to a syrup, you can see there. Liquid is reducing nicely.

0:20:520:20:56

-We're gonna add some of our pear juice to that.

-Right.

0:20:560:20:58

-These juices are all from Herefordshire.

-Souffle, chef.

0:20:580:21:02

How are these looking now?

0:21:020:21:04

Beautiful.

0:21:040:21:05

-Yeah, happy with those. Don't mess around with salt, though. Get it in there.

-Yeah.

0:21:070:21:11

So that's the mash on, the sauce and our reduction ticking over nicely.

0:21:110:21:16

Now going to do the crushed roots. Same principle with the mash.

0:21:160:21:19

I'm going to cut these into manageable size pieces.

0:21:190:21:23

It is quite fashionable now to serve crushed vegetables.

0:21:230:21:27

So we want a little bit of oil in the pan.

0:21:270:21:29

Weobley Dairy House butter.

0:21:290:21:31

Coat our vegetables in that. Salt and pepper.

0:21:310:21:33

Give it a good old turn over. Just turn it over.

0:21:330:21:36

Put a lid on top of that. That's to stop the steam coming out.

0:21:360:21:41

-We've got our reduction now of our sauce and you can see our perry and our juice.

-Yeah.

0:21:410:21:46

It's reduced down to almost nothing.

0:21:460:21:48

-We're gonna add to that is reduced pork stock from the bones that we had earlier.

-Yeah.

0:21:480:21:53

A little simmer of our reduced pork stock and our perry and pear juice.

0:21:530:21:57

And that is our sauce. Do you see how they're starting to sweat there?

0:21:570:22:01

-Yeah.

-And you've got the nice sort of syrupy, the juices coming out of there. Can you smell that?

0:22:010:22:06

-Yes.

-Buttery sweet vegetables there.

-Oh, yes.

0:22:060:22:10

Now, for a garnish for the dish, I'm going to make a little pear compote,

0:22:100:22:14

almost like a little chutney, a light chutney, to go with it, so it's like a posh apple sauce.

0:22:140:22:19

-Right.

-Right, OK? I'm gonna do a couple of little pear crisps to sandwich my pear compote.

0:22:190:22:25

So nice thin slice.

0:22:300:22:31

-They're conference pears?

-Yeah, there we go. Going to dip those in syrup.

0:22:330:22:38

This paper is phenomenal.

0:22:380:22:40

Put them on to some siliconised paper and dry them out in the oven.

0:22:400:22:43

And you just pop them in an oven,

0:22:430:22:45

-turn it right down.

-Yeah.

0:22:450:22:47

In the bottom.

0:22:470:22:49

-How long for, James?

-It's better to leave them all day, just very, very low heat. Dry them out.

0:22:490:22:54

Have you done some earlier, chef?

0:22:540:22:56

I have. Just dried out. Little bit of golden on them and you end up with something like that.

0:22:560:23:01

Perfect, aren't they?

0:23:010:23:03

We're going to peel these.

0:23:030:23:05

Chop them. I'm going to cook them with some perry pear juice,

0:23:050:23:09

a little bit of vinegar, maybe a little bit of sugar,

0:23:090:23:12

cos you're gonna cook it right down to, like, a jam.

0:23:120:23:16

So, basically, just throw this in the pan.

0:23:160:23:19

Bit of perry. Splash. Bit of pear juice.

0:23:190:23:21

-Supercharge the pears.

-Yeah, and we're gonna reduce that.

0:23:210:23:24

We might add a little sugar, we might not,

0:23:240:23:26

depends on how sweet the pears are. Put this sauce now through a cloth.

0:23:260:23:29

-Yeah.

-It strains off any sediment.

0:23:290:23:32

So I'm going to let that just pass through into there

0:23:320:23:35

and we should have a lovely clear glass-like sauce,

0:23:350:23:38

you can see through it.

0:23:380:23:39

See, good old-fashioned.

0:23:390:23:40

-You know when the potatoes are done, stick a knife in.

-Yeah.

0:23:400:23:43

Stick a knife in. Nice and soft.

0:23:430:23:46

Give it a shake. I'm going to put them in the oven for a minute,

0:23:460:23:49

-dry them out, so we get a nice firm mash.

-Yeah.

0:23:490:23:51

Stops you getting a sloppy mash, then you can add more butter, hence more flavour.

0:23:510:23:55

So that's your 'tatoes dried.

0:23:550:23:57

Spuds dry. A little mash.

0:23:570:23:59

-We're just going to pass it through here. This just ensures there's no lumps.

-Really.

-Absolutely.

0:23:590:24:04

No mash goes out of here without being passed.

0:24:040:24:06

That's seen some action, that.

0:24:060:24:09

-It has, hasn't it?

-It's a really dry, fluffy mash.

0:24:090:24:11

-That's without the butter?

-Yeah.

-Back in the pan.

0:24:110:24:13

We've got a good old spoonful of butter that's gone in there.

0:24:130:24:16

-Can you see?

-Yeah.

-Lots of butter, cos it's just...

0:24:160:24:19

-Yeah.

-You guys know that. A little bit of a mix before service.

-Yeah.

0:24:190:24:23

Make our mash up nice and fresh.

0:24:230:24:25

Hereford potatoes in there.

0:24:250:24:27

Herefordshire butter, not a lot else.

0:24:270:24:29

Salt and pepper. And that is it.

0:24:290:24:31

-Bag it up.

-Yeah.

0:24:310:24:33

Cut the end. So we've got our roots there come right down. Just going to give these a good old mashing.

0:24:330:24:38

Put that to the side of the stove.

0:24:380:24:39

The moment of truth. The one that you're praying all goes wrong.

0:24:390:24:42

Well, I am praying.

0:24:420:24:45

Silicone paper in there. Give them a little shake.

0:24:450:24:48

-Ah, so get it out now.

-There we go.

0:24:500:24:53

And what happens when we reheat them in the oven for the twice-bake,

0:24:530:24:56

is the breadcrumbs and the hops outside toast up.

0:24:560:24:59

Fantastic. They look like a big macaroon.

0:24:590:25:01

Two pounds on there for the pork. Little bit of olive oil.

0:25:010:25:04

I'm going to season the other side of these, now.

0:25:040:25:07

Going to cook them both sides.

0:25:070:25:10

Again, look, you've got a nice golden ham there.

0:25:100:25:13

-Beautiful.

-Yeah.

0:25:130:25:15

Bit of Herefordshire butter in there now.

0:25:150:25:18

Nice foaming butter over the top. Yeah. Just feel that.

0:25:180:25:21

It's still very rare...

0:25:210:25:22

so we're going to roast that in the oven now for a few minutes.

0:25:220:25:25

-They look edible, don't they?

-Yeah.

0:25:250:25:27

Let's put four minutes on the timer there. Put the souffles in.

0:25:270:25:30

-How long do the souffles take on the second baking?

-A couple of minutes.

0:25:300:25:33

Purple sprouting, straight in the boiling water.

0:25:330:25:38

-It's all coming together now.

-That's your crushed roots.

-That's the crushed root.

0:25:380:25:42

-They're only gonna need another minute, but see how they're puffing back up?

-Yeah.

0:25:420:25:47

There's our mash in our piping bag.

0:25:470:25:50

Little rosette, there.

0:25:510:25:53

So I'm going to drape some purple sprouts now over the mash.

0:25:530:25:58

-That's our perry that's reduced down.

-Yeah.

0:25:580:26:01

And then finished with glucose syrup.

0:26:010:26:04

So there's our pear sandwich.

0:26:040:26:06

Nice, light chutney.

0:26:060:26:08

Keep it nice and warm while we do the dressing.

0:26:080:26:13

Just like an ice-cream sandwich.

0:26:130:26:15

-Oh, man!

-That's perfect.

0:26:150:26:17

Salt, pepper... on there like that.

0:26:170:26:19

So, James, just headline your dish.

0:26:220:26:25

We've got a best end of pork,

0:26:250:26:27

twice-baked Hereford hop cheese souffle

0:26:270:26:30

and a Broome Farm perry reduction.

0:26:300:26:32

Now then, that's something I would order in a restaurant.

0:26:320:26:35

It's fabulous. Perfectly cooked.

0:26:350:26:37

-Oh, crikey.

-Crisp, crisp.

0:26:380:26:41

It's gorgeous. The hops go through that root mash, don't they?

0:26:430:26:48

-It's good, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:26:480:26:50

It's all very well what we think but the real judges are the locals

0:26:500:26:53

who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:26:530:26:56

James' pork with local pears was really delicious and a great taste of the county.

0:26:560:27:02

We need something special to take him on.

0:27:020:27:04

-Hereford is home to a traditional British ingredient that's recently fallen out of favour.

-Snails.

0:27:040:27:09

And the local breeder, Tony Vaughan, is making the introductions.

0:27:090:27:13

They're bigger than the average garden snail, aren't they?

0:27:130:27:16

-Yes, they're a slightly larger cousin of them.

-Yes.

0:27:160:27:18

-They're very juicy, aren't they?

-These ones are, yes.

0:27:180:27:21

What is that trail?

0:27:210:27:22

You know when you see this trail...

0:27:220:27:24

Well, that's a protective trail that the snails will lay down

0:27:240:27:28

so that they don't rip the bottom of their foot,

0:27:280:27:30

so they lay this down so that it glides across a rough surface.

0:27:300:27:33

So, Tony, who buys your snails?

0:27:330:27:36

-We sell them to Heston Blumenthal, Marco Pierre White, Shane Osborn.

-Crikey. So these are top-end snails.

0:27:360:27:41

Yes, certainly in the West Country, they were known as wallfish

0:27:410:27:44

cos where they were located, they were simply knocked off the wall.

0:27:440:27:48

We are one of the largest consumers of snails in the world,

0:27:480:27:50

We just don't know it. They're just called welks and winkles.

0:27:500:27:53

We eat somewhere in the region of about 18,000 tonnes of these a year, yet we don't regard them as snails.

0:27:530:27:59

Yeah, Let's have a look at one, Tony.

0:27:590:28:01

-Right. Let him grab hold of you.

-I will. Are you on?

0:28:010:28:05

Very clean and beautiful things.

0:28:050:28:07

How did we used to eat them?

0:28:070:28:10

Certainly, steak and snails has been a tradition in this country for as long as I know,

0:28:100:28:17

that steaks were being sold with, or prepared with snails.

0:28:170:28:22

-It's a match made in heaven, isn't it?

-Could you show us how to farm snails, Tony?

0:28:220:28:26

Yeah. Go on then. Gonna go in to our breeding room.

0:28:260:28:28

The room has a light system which emulates the sunlight and dark.

0:28:280:28:33

The humidity in here is 85% and the temperature is 20 degrees centigrade.

0:28:330:28:39

It does have the atmosphere like an old mouldy cellar.

0:28:390:28:42

Yes, and also, it has that characteristic smell.

0:28:420:28:45

What do you feed them on, Tony?

0:28:450:28:46

We feed them on a cereal-based meal...

0:28:460:28:48

-Right.

-..which contains everything they would normally need.

0:28:480:28:53

It's a dried substance, as well,

0:28:530:28:56

because we couldn't use wet leaves cos they'd just rot.

0:28:560:29:01

What I'm going to show you now is the different stages.

0:29:010:29:04

We've got the breeders which'll mate and lay eggs.

0:29:040:29:08

-It's like caviar.

-Soft, aren't they?

0:29:080:29:11

-Yeah.

-These are the eggs.

0:29:110:29:12

They will take 14 days to hatch.

0:29:120:29:15

-These are the babies.

-Right.

0:29:150:29:17

And then, gradually, they get bigger and they go from this stage

0:29:170:29:21

to these ones here which are about seven to ten weeks old.

0:29:210:29:24

So, Tony, how long from egg to table?

0:29:240:29:27

Roughly 20 weeks from the egg to the finished product which would be these ones here.

0:29:270:29:32

Right. The bag of beauties.

0:29:320:29:34

It's a whole world that I didn't even know existed.

0:29:340:29:38

-Brilliant. Thanks, Tony.

-Thank you.

0:29:380:29:40

Tony's suggestion of serving snails with beef is great,

0:29:400:29:44

so let's crown some Hereford beef with a snail crust and a snail beignet on the side.

0:29:440:29:49

I think we need just one more taste of the county to really give this dish the edge. Something fruity.

0:29:490:29:55

Despite its French reputation, cassis is being produced in the UK, right here in Herefordshire.

0:29:550:30:02

And it's not just any old cassis, it's won two stars in a Gold Tastes Award 2008.

0:30:020:30:06

Jo Hilditch is going to show us the fruits of her labour.

0:30:060:30:10

Here's one of our plantations of blackcurrants.

0:30:100:30:13

We've got eight varieties growing on the farm.

0:30:130:30:15

These are not quite in full flower but we don't want to see a big frost now, that's for sure.

0:30:150:30:20

Why is Hereford so good for making blackcurrants?

0:30:200:30:23

Well, this sloping land is really good. The frost all drains away.

0:30:230:30:27

The quality of the soil is good.

0:30:270:30:29

And the sun shines, sometimes.

0:30:290:30:32

My family has been here about 150 years

0:30:320:30:35

and they started growing fruits in the 1880s when they were first here.

0:30:350:30:39

I know that my grandfather was supplying Smithfield Market

0:30:390:30:43

cos I've got wonderful old marketing material.

0:30:430:30:45

And then it went on from there.

0:30:450:30:47

My dad started supplying a local jam maker

0:30:470:30:49

and then this big UK drinks maker, so, it's gone from there.

0:30:490:30:52

We sell some locally in the supermarkets and the grocers.

0:30:520:30:56

We have to find a new avenue to get rid of the excess crop now.

0:30:560:30:59

So you've got your cassis.

0:30:590:31:01

Got the cassis. Come in. This is the winery.

0:31:010:31:04

Blackcurrant Central. Tell us about cassis cos, I mean, from going to France, we know the Kir,

0:31:040:31:09

-which is white wine and cassis. We know the Kir Royale, which is champagne and cassis.

-Yeah.

0:31:090:31:14

-But what is it?

-It's an alcoholic product and we only make it up to 13%.

0:31:140:31:18

-They make it a lot stronger in France but here we do it to 13%.

-How do you make cassis?

0:31:180:31:23

We take our blackcurrants from the field which we harvest by machine.

0:31:230:31:27

We send them off to somebody to be crushed and pressed and they come back just as the pure juice.

0:31:270:31:32

-OK.

-And then we put them in the big vats which are just next door.

0:31:320:31:36

-Right.

-And there's about 200 gallons in each vat.

0:31:360:31:39

And then we start the fermentation process.

0:31:390:31:41

We put in some yeast and some nutrients to begin with, get it bubbling, get it going.

0:31:410:31:46

That takes a couple of weeks. And then we just keep it going with more yeast and maybe some more sugar.

0:31:460:31:51

We'll try and just keep it going up to 13%.

0:31:510:31:53

-Do you want to try a bit?

-Oh, yeah.

0:31:530:31:55

Oh, madam, I thought you'd never ask.

0:31:550:31:57

-Just a sip cos we are on the bikes.

-I know.

0:31:570:31:59

Normally, you wouldn't drink it on its own, but it's great in cooking.

0:31:590:32:03

It's really good venison stew or sorbets or something like that. Enjoy.

0:32:030:32:07

-Oh, yeah. Thank you.

-It's not as syrupy and sweet as the French one.

0:32:070:32:11

-No.

-Oh, man, that's fabulous. It's got a great acidity to it.

0:32:110:32:14

I'd like that with ice and a glass of lemonade. Or with beef.

0:32:140:32:17

-Hereford beef.

-Hereford beef.

0:32:170:32:19

Yeah, because the thing is, it's not sweet, it's not sticky.

0:32:190:32:23

So if you made a red wine and cassis sauce,

0:32:230:32:25

you're not going to kill the beef, are you?

0:32:250:32:27

-You're not going to turn it. Your cassis rocks.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks, Jo.

0:32:270:32:31

And all the best. Good luck for using it in the cooking.

0:32:310:32:34

We're going to do a garlicky snail topped fillet of Hereford beef.

0:32:360:32:41

Served with a snail beignet and a little quenelle of spinach.

0:32:410:32:48

Accompanied by straw potatoes and with some roasted garlic and a cassis and red wine sauce.

0:32:480:32:54

But will the local diners think our dish is good enough to beat James in the blind tasting?

0:32:540:32:59

Snails have been eaten in this country for centuries.

0:32:590:33:03

OK. They went a bit out of fashion but, you know, in the olden days, they were known as wallfish,

0:33:030:33:08

so from this point on, gentlemen, this shall be known as a wallfish.

0:33:080:33:12

That's our first ingredient.

0:33:120:33:14

Step one, I need, first, some melted butter.

0:33:140:33:17

Now these snails, these are what you call blanched.

0:33:170:33:20

So these are blanched wallfish.

0:33:200:33:22

All I'm doing now is roughly chopping them.

0:33:220:33:25

Don't they look lovely? Finely chopped shallots.

0:33:250:33:28

Has to be done with care cos it's classically French, reducing a shallot to atoms.

0:33:280:33:32

-Well, it's a wallfish gratine, do you know what I mean?

-Yeah.

-Bit of garlic going in there, mate.

0:33:320:33:36

-You can't have wallfish without garlic, can you?

-That's true.

0:33:360:33:40

-Effectively, this is a crust you're making, with breadcrumbs, butter.

-It's like a wallfish gratine.

0:33:400:33:45

Some breadcrumbs, which are pretty dry.

0:33:450:33:47

Plenty of salt on the snail wallfish.

0:33:470:33:50

Now what we do, melted butter...

0:33:500:33:54

That on now.

0:33:540:33:56

Can you pass the parchments?

0:33:560:33:58

Two bits of baking paper.

0:33:580:34:00

Can you pass us the rolling pin, chef? Roll this, like that...

0:34:000:34:04

gently. I'm not making pasta.

0:34:040:34:06

Thank you. Now, just put this in the freezer till it goes firm, then I'll be able to cut out roundels.

0:34:060:34:12

What we're going to do is straw potatoes, draw them across

0:34:120:34:15

and we're going to have like a julienne, small but long strips.

0:34:150:34:18

-Nice.

-Yeah, and then we're going to rinse them off

0:34:180:34:21

to get all of the starch off them.

0:34:210:34:22

So these are snails for the beignet.

0:34:220:34:25

A beignet, basically in English is a fritter, yeah?

0:34:250:34:28

Yes, like choux pastry.

0:34:280:34:30

What I'm gonna do, while Dave's chopping the herbs,

0:34:300:34:33

I'm going to take these over to the tap and rinse them cos I want the water to run clean.

0:34:330:34:37

I've got chervil, tarragon, parsley and thyme.

0:34:370:34:41

To that I'll add a good glug of olive oil...

0:34:410:34:46

salt...

0:34:460:34:47

and pepper. And leave these little fellas just to marinade for about half an hour.

0:34:470:34:52

Just going to do a couple of heads of garlic.

0:34:590:35:02

Going to start the process of our sauce.

0:35:020:35:05

What we've got is about 200mls of red wine.

0:35:050:35:07

And just to sweeten it, we put some port in there, two bay leaves,

0:35:070:35:11

six juniper berries in there. We're going to reduce this by half now.

0:35:110:35:16

Two heads of garlic, topped and tailed. Sea salt.

0:35:160:35:20

Olive oil.

0:35:210:35:23

I'll roast that for about 20 minutes.

0:35:230:35:25

-This is fantastic, this product.

-Wonderful, isn't it?

-Brilliant.

0:35:250:35:28

When you mix that cassis with a wallfish, it can be like nitro-glycerine.

0:35:280:35:32

I've got to be honest, guys.

0:35:320:35:33

I never thought I'd see snails, Herefordshire fillet of beef

0:35:330:35:36

-and Herefordshire cassis on the same plate.

-You're not the only one!

0:35:360:35:40

-If I lose, I will put it on the menu. How's that?

-Great, done.

0:35:400:35:43

So I'll make the croutons, mate.

0:35:430:35:45

Elton John.

0:35:460:35:48

Nice marbling in that fillet, guys.

0:35:490:35:51

-Isn't that beautiful?

-Yeah.

0:35:510:35:54

That's reduced by about half.

0:35:540:35:55

I've taken the juniper berries and I'm putting the crouton in

0:35:550:35:59

the oil and butter, that's all I've got to say

0:35:590:36:02

and the rest will do itself.

0:36:020:36:03

Next minute you see 'em it'll be golden.

0:36:030:36:05

Onward. I'm going to put that back into the pan.

0:36:050:36:09

This is what you get in proper kitchens. Proper beef stock, isn't it? That's beef gold.

0:36:090:36:13

Be careful with that cos, you know, it's powerful stuff.

0:36:130:36:17

I'm going to put a tablespoon of cassis into there.

0:36:170:36:21

Look at these, like three golden doubloons.

0:36:210:36:25

-Clear the decks.

-I'm just about to sear these steaks off, OK?

0:36:250:36:30

-Nice hot pan.

-Salt.

-Got that.

0:36:300:36:31

This side goes on to the hot surface.

0:36:310:36:35

Salt on at the end. A little bit of pepper on again.

0:36:380:36:41

They should just lift off now lovely, look at those.

0:36:410:36:44

-A lovely bit of beef, that.

-That's wonderful.

0:36:440:36:47

Now we're going to add some butter and take it off the heat.

0:36:490:36:53

Look how gorgeous they are.

0:36:530:36:54

-Now, we're going to finish them off in the oven with the snails.

-Yeah.

0:36:540:36:58

So really, they can just rest, now.

0:36:580:37:01

The next bit of preparation before the final push is to make the batter for the beignet.

0:37:010:37:06

So, first thing is to get some water.

0:37:060:37:08

Put that on the boil and we're going to emulsify some butter in with it.

0:37:110:37:15

Listen, while you're doing that, I'm just going to sweat off the old spinach.

0:37:150:37:19

As you can see, I have seemingly achieved the impossible.

0:37:190:37:22

I've emulsified fat and water and made one, but the flour needs to go in. Now, I do this off the heat.

0:37:220:37:28

Go on. Mix it in.

0:37:280:37:30

This'll be better, won't it?

0:37:310:37:33

Now, put that back on the heat. This is the profiterole bit, isn't it?

0:37:330:37:37

-You've got to beat that flour in there, you've got to get it working.

-I'm working it.

0:37:370:37:42

Right.

0:37:470:37:49

Two.

0:37:510:37:52

One.

0:37:520:37:53

Last thing you want is your shell in your eggs.

0:37:530:37:57

-I'm going, Kingy.

-Oh, do go.

0:37:570:37:59

-Is someone setting me up?

-No, go!

0:37:590:38:02

What about the whisk?

0:38:050:38:07

-Gentle, gentle.

-I've passed that point of no return, now.

0:38:100:38:14

That's what you want. Just look at that. Strange but true.

0:38:180:38:21

So, mix that together.

0:38:220:38:24

That's it, it's got a lovely texture, hasn't it?

0:38:260:38:28

Beignet madness.

0:38:280:38:30

Two pans of hot oil.

0:38:300:38:31

One for the beignet, one for the straw potatoes.

0:38:310:38:34

Look at that. Snail butter biscuit. Look.

0:38:340:38:36

Wallfish, let's see if it'll cut.

0:38:360:38:38

-I will put these in the oven.

-Are you timing, Kingy?

0:38:450:38:49

I'm timing, dude. Two minutes.

0:38:490:38:51

Go.

0:38:510:38:52

Just going to test the beignet mix. Which pan do you want, Si?

0:38:550:38:59

-I'll take the far one.

-Yeah, fine.

0:38:590:39:01

Hasn't fallen to pieces, yet.

0:39:010:39:04

Right, dude, there's the timer.

0:39:040:39:05

-I think they may be slightly... we should finish them off under the grill.

-I think so.

0:39:070:39:11

I want to get the beignets in. The beignet mixture is here.

0:39:110:39:15

It's looking quite nice, that.

0:39:150:39:17

Kingy, you beauty.

0:39:220:39:24

So when they stop singing, means that's sizzling, means they've released all their moisture,

0:39:240:39:29

they're going to be nice and crisp. That's what you want.

0:39:290:39:32

Yeah, listen.

0:39:320:39:33

FOOD SIZZLES

0:39:330:39:35

Nice.

0:39:350:39:36

Right, Dave, steaks are out and resting.

0:39:380:39:40

Beignets are nearly done. Time to get the plates and plate up.

0:39:400:39:43

Croutons.

0:39:430:39:45

-Got this juice in your sauce.

-Yeah, man.

0:39:470:39:50

-Got to have green on the plate, haven't you?

-Yeah.

0:39:500:39:52

That looks all right.

0:39:520:39:55

What can I say, gentlemen, you've surpassed yourselves.

0:39:570:40:01

There we have it, James. That's a taste of Herefordshire.

0:40:010:40:03

It's a gratine of snails on a Hereford beef fillet.

0:40:030:40:08

Garnished with the most lovely cassis and red wine reduction.

0:40:080:40:12

Snail wallfish beignet,

0:40:120:40:14

served with a confit garlic and buttered spinach and straw potatoes.

0:40:140:40:20

Have a bit of everything, chef. Look at that.

0:40:220:40:25

It's gutsy. It's got oomph.

0:40:290:40:32

Fillets, good and flavoursome.

0:40:320:40:34

It's nicely caramelised, juicy. Loads of garlic.

0:40:340:40:36

You did say there was garlic but it works. Beignet's lovely.

0:40:360:40:40

Straw potatoes, crispy.

0:40:400:40:43

And the jus is...

0:40:430:40:45

monster.

0:40:450:40:46

It's the moment of truth. The diners here will taste both dishes but without any idea of who cooked which.

0:40:460:40:52

First up is James' best end of Phocle Green pork with twice-baked hop souffle and a perry reduction.

0:40:520:40:59

-It's very delicate.

-The chutney's really, really nice with the pork.

0:40:590:41:02

It's really nice, these are crunchy.

0:41:020:41:04

First impression of the dish was fantastic. Had the wow factor.

0:41:040:41:08

The pear chutney topped with that little pear crisp,

0:41:080:41:11

it takes time to do, I'm sure, but it's well worth it.

0:41:110:41:14

A bit chewy, got stuck in your teeth.

0:41:140:41:16

You don't normally serve pears with pork although that is a wonderful alternative.

0:41:160:41:21

For me, it was a Herefordshire meal, with the pork, the Herefordshire hop.

0:41:210:41:25

Souffle was very good, very nicely double-baked and finished off and mashes were perfect.

0:41:250:41:29

No lumps or anything. Absolutely lovely.

0:41:290:41:32

I thought the pork was really well cooked.

0:41:320:41:35

It was really moist and I could never get it to taste like that.

0:41:350:41:38

They seem to like that.

0:41:380:41:40

Next to be served is our dish.

0:41:400:41:42

Fingers crossed.

0:41:420:41:44

Quite a strange combination. You wouldn't expect snail with the beef.

0:41:450:41:49

I've had snails before.

0:41:490:41:50

Bit chewy but these ones weren't, so cooked to perfection.

0:41:500:41:54

The snails and everything else, I didn't enjoy at all.

0:41:540:41:56

I think I'd try them again, possibly with a little less garlic so you can taste the flavour more.

0:41:560:42:01

Cassis was very good with it. Fillet was a little bit too rare for my liking.

0:42:010:42:06

The crispy potatoes cos they were hard to get round. I prefer a chip.

0:42:060:42:10

Hello, hello. How are you?

0:42:100:42:14

I must say, we had a brilliant time in Herefordshire.

0:42:140:42:17

I mean, you've got incredible kind of landscape and rolling hills and products and cider...

0:42:170:42:22

-Kingy's giggling juice.

-I love it.

0:42:220:42:24

Well, we're going to name both dishes.

0:42:240:42:26

For the dish that you like the most and you felt represented Herefordshire most,

0:42:260:42:31

we'd like a show of hands.

0:42:310:42:33

For the pork dish.

0:42:330:42:34

One. Two.

0:42:360:42:38

So could I have a show of hands, please, for the snail, beef and cassis dish?

0:42:380:42:45

One. Two. Three. Four.

0:42:450:42:47

Five. Six. Seven.

0:42:470:42:49

The pork dish was James and the beef dish was ours.

0:42:490:42:53

We definitely need a recount.

0:42:530:42:55

THEY LAUGH

0:42:550:42:56

I think that both dishes were really, really fantastic.

0:42:560:43:00

I think maybe some of us plumped for the snail and beef

0:43:000:43:03

cos the beef was the traditional Herefordshire but then with the quirkiness of the snails

0:43:030:43:08

but I do think that James' dish was very complex and very much fine dining and it was totally delicious.

0:43:080:43:14

Yeah, it was very delicious.

0:43:140:43:15

Absolutely. Absolutely. James, we'd just like to thank you so much.

0:43:150:43:19

We've learnt so much from you and thanks for having us.

0:43:190:43:21

The beef is an undeniable winner in this county

0:43:210:43:24

but James was a brilliant competitor and so impressive in the kitchen.

0:43:240:43:28

His food is exceptional.

0:43:280:43:29

Herefordshire has so much on offer and a great variety of produce. It's well worth the visit.

0:43:290:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:420:43:45

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:450:43:47

Si and Dave explore Herefordshire, where they cook a traditional county favourite at Goodrich Castle. They also visit a snail farm and discover English cassis. Finally, they face a cook-off against top chef James Arbourne. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Herefordshire in a blind tasting.


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