Leicestershire The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Leicestershire

Si King and Dave Myers explore Leicestershire, where they cook a traditional county favourite at Leicester Market. They also taste the king of cheeses, Stilton.


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Transcript


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-We're the Hairy Bikers.

-On the road to find recipes to rip up your appetite.

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We're riding coast to coast to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British. Come on!

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Today, we're in search of the real taste of Leicestershire.

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Here we are, dude, look at it. Leicestershire!

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Leicestershire.

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Slap bang in the middle of Britain's diverse manufacturing heartlands.

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And you know what, I bet they manufacture some good food here, too.

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You know, there's lots of famous people come from Leicestershire.

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-King Richard III.

-He got the hump.

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-Lady Jane Grey.

-She lost her head.

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I tell you, there's one man who definitely did eat all the pies and that's Daniel Lambert.

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He's Britain's fattest man.

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He was born in 1770 and he weighed in excess of 52 stone.

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He had a nine foot four inch waist!

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Daniel Lambert's long gone but I bet his dinners are still around.

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Dude, do you know what, we're off to a flyer.

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-Yes.

-Come on!

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On our quest to define the true flavours of Leicestershire,

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we cook up a local favourite

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that's become one of the county's best-loved exports.

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We meet the supermodels of the cow world and taste some cracking beef.

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-You are going to leave some for lunch, aren't you?

-I wouldn't bank on it!

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We learn the secret of how blue veins get into the king of cheeses - Stilton.

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And representing Leicestershire in the cook-off later is Sean Hope.

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Will we be able to beat him in a blind tasting judged by local diners?

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First stop in our food trip around Leicestershire is Melton Mowbray.

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Around these parts, Melton is hailed as the rural capital of food.

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Melton has been a market town for over a thousand years.

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With that sort of heritage,

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it's a great place to discover the county's favourite dishes.

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Si, look, it's the farmers market.

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There's going to be good food here.

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-There's a lot going on here.

-It's a proper market.

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What, to you, is Leicestershire on a plate?

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I'd say Stilton cheese, first of all.

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-Right.

-And of course, pork pies.

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Red Leicester cheese.

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-Yes.

-When I think of Melton, I think pork pie.

-Yeah.

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-Absolutely.

-Stilton cheese.

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What would be the iconic product of the county?

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-Goes well with me oatcakes, it's got to be Red Leicester cheese.

-Yeah.

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Dude, bacon, they go great with bacon.

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Could you put a rasher of bacon in there? Go on. Go on.

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-Thank you.

-Thank you very much. Look at that.

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Oh, look.

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Mmmm! Cor, the pork's good. What's Leicestershire famous for in food?

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Pork pies. Stilton.

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-Right.

-Red Leicester.

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That's the three national products, isn't it?

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-The Red Leicester.

-The Red Leicester.

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-It's so versatile, but I love Stilton, as well, in cooking.

-Yeah.

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Well, that's something that everybody's heard of,

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-Red Leicester cheese.

-Would you like to try some?

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Traditionally oats cheese. Quite dry, hard texture to it.

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You get caramelly, toffee oats.

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Oh, that's gorgeous.

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-It's made just four miles up the road.

-Wonderful. Spectacular.

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To you, what are the iconic products that Leicestershire produces?

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-What is it?

-Well, I've lived in the Melton Mowbray for a long time so it would be pork pies.

-OK.

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Pork pie.

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Pork pie.

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-Pork pie.

-Pickles. Stilton.

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That sounds lovely. Making me hungry.

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This town is full of foody gems and the cheese is great,

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but nothing gets a Hairy Biker's mouth watering like a good pork pie

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and it's so obviously Leicestershire's signature dish

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we need to get some advice from expert pie maker, Steven Hallam.

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-Steven.

-Nice to see you.

-Hiya.

-Hello, mate.

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You've got a lovely uncured natural pork, a rich crunchy pastry.

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Lovely pepperiness will come through when you try it.

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-How long have people here been making pork pies?

-About a couple of hundred years.

-Right.

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It's a by-product of the Stilton cheese industry, to begin with.

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-Right.

-The whey, the by-products are fed to pigs, lots of pork.

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the grocer and the baker got together, started using it in pies.

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Well, these pies are superb.

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-They are superb, mate.

-Very more-ish, that pastry.

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It eats like it's a digestive biscuit, doesn't it?

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Rich, sort of melts in the mouth.

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-Any top tips?

-Don't use too much flour.

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-If you get too much flour on the outside of the pastry, you'll get blisters.

-Right.

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When you get a blister, it burns on the outside, it's raw on the inside.

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-It's like the cut of the pork, you know?

-Yes.

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You can use any cut you wish.

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-We use shoulders and belly.

-Shoulders and belly. Yeah.

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We've got that. That's what we pinch.

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Well, we've got that in abundance.

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-Thanks very much. Thanks, Steven. Thank you.

-Cheers, Steve. Bye.

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Armed with the knowledge of how to make the best pie possible, it's time to get the all-important pork.

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What do we need to make a pork pie?

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He asked me if I was being sarcastic.

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We need belly pork, shoulder of pork and nice streaky bacon.

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-Will this shoulder do?

-What a man.

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-A nice shoulder for you.

-Put that in the bag for us. We're off.

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There we are. Thank you very much.

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There we go, the three ingredients.

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The deconstructed pork pie waiting for reconstruction.

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Ave Maria!

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We're off to the city of Leicester to get cooking.

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Leicester's a wonderfully kind of eclectic cosmopolitan city, isn't it?

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We're going to cook our pies in the city's market,

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the largest covered market anywhere in Europe.

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The Market Tavern, must be getting close.

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The market has been on the current site for over 700 years.

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There's a hungry crowd waiting and we'll be cooking a traditional

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Melton Mowbray-style raised pork pie, full of succulent pork with a crunchy pastry.

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-Welcome to Leicester Market.

-Yes. It's rocking here, isn't it? Good.

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People have been coming here for 700 years to buy their pegs,

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plastic buckets and all sorts of vegetables, fruit and lovely things.

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We want to do a pork pie.

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-To start with a pie, you've got to make the pastry.

-Oh, yeah.

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And this is a good old fashioned crust.

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Take hunks of lard.

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This pastry has quite a high fat content,

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being composed chiefly of lard.

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Are you ready?

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-What?

-Go on! I don't want to wait for you. Ready?

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Come on. Ah-one, ah-two, ah-one-two-three. Lard!

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CHEERING

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Now, the lard has nearly melted and into this I've got to mix some water and some milk.

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Now, obviously, be careful at home.

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You are putting liquid into fat.

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Now, it's not boiling fat but it may spit at the camera.

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Put the water in.

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Continue to heat.

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And the milk.

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Oh, that's a good idea.

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Whisk until it's emulsified.

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That means it's all combined.

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To this, I've got flour. So we mix that in with that to form a paste.

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This could be messy.

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-Oh, dude.

-Kingy.

-Watch that now.

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Could you do some salt and pepper in this, as well?

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Salt.

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Now, my main thought,

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cos it was like boiling lard,

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it's really hot to work with your hands.

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But look at that. That, ladies and gentlemen,

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is a traditional hot water pastry

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which is the right stuff for pork pies.

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So what you do is leave this to cool,

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then put it in your fridge overnight.

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A pork pie is near nothing without said filling.

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What we do is we put the belly pork in and this is the minced shoulder.

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Put that in there like that. Dave needs to chop said bacon.

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There's no mystery meat in these.

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You mash it like this.

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It gets all the fat particles activating

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to make sure that it all sticks together.

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-Kingy?

-Hello!

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Can I add this bacon to your pig fest?

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Please.

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Now, pork and sage, a marriage made in heaven,

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so about a teaspoon of dried sage,

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a quarter teaspoon of allspice.

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Do you use that instead of salt and pepper?

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-Oh, no, as well as!

-So allspice and sage and lots and lots of pepper.

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Salt.

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So that's the filling. The pastry has only another 23½ hours to rest before we can use it.

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Thankfully, here's one we did earlier.

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And we've just made it into like little lumps.

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Take your piece of hot water pastry which now looks like something you stick windows in with.

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But you've got to warm it enough in your hands for the lard to get soft.

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Place that onto the board.

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This is a dolly. You get these in various sizes and this is what you use to form your pie on.

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You put your dolly right in the middle and press it.

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Check it's loose.

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Now you start to raise your pie.

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-It's not easy.

-And raising it, you just kind of cloy it up like that.

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And raise it up your dolly. And as you flour the dolly, in theory it shouldn't stick.

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Now, you want this to go up nearly to the shoulders of your dolly.

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And this is called hand raising.

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And you can use the shape of the dolly to raise your crust.

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Very carefully, work your thumbs down there.

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Gently ease your pastry off your dolly.

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And it will look like a pastry bucket.

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Now we need to fill it and that's not by any means easy.

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We need to get like a cricket ball size piece of the filling.

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You need to get this into there without leaving any air so you throw it in.

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This requires confidence

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because you might actually destroy everything

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you've done so far.

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-I'm only joking!

-Right.

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CHEERING

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Don't worry about filling the edges because you want to leave something for the jelly.

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At this point, we need to wash our dick-dandies.

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Right. Clean hands, happy heart.

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We need some eggy wash.

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In the world of a pork pie, egg is glue and glaze.

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And then you sit the lid kind of inside it...

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..and just nip it.

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The traditional Melton Mowbray way is north, south, east and west.

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So you seal that and you go...

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north...

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south...

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east...

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west.

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And then you do the ones in between, like that.

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And you get that lovely, hand-raised, butcherific pie look.

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-Look at those beauties.

-There we are.

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Give 'em a wash of egg.

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Now, you might have noticed, we haven't put a hole in.

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This pastry's strong enough to take it. We want all the meat flavour

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to stay into the pie.

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Put that in to the oven now, about 160 degrees, for a good hour-and-a-half.

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We're going to make a proper old fashioned pig's trotter jelly.

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Get a pan...

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water,

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and pigs' trotters.

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All we've done with these is split them in half

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and just pop the pigs' trotters in the water,

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bit of seasoning.

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As they cook down,

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you get the most wonderful jelly.

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And that's because the trotters are full of collagen and sinew.

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One stick of celery cutt'n off.

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And then we're going to put a whole carrot in,

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half an onion.

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Give it a stir.

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Leave it for 3½ days. No, it's four hours!

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And then you strain it.

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And that's the jelly that you're after.

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How do we get that jelly into the pork pie?

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Duh-duh-duh-duuuuh!

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These are two pork pies that we made earlier.

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Now, they've been left to cool.

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You drill a hole in the top.

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Piping bag. Oh, look at that!

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You need to slit the top off.

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Oh! Wahey!

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Put that over the hole and start to squirt. Right. That's it.

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All we have to do now is wait for that to go cold and set to jelly.

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And that only takes 2½ hours.

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And then, finally, you are blessed, blessed,

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with a pair of stunning Leicester Market Hairy Biker pork pies.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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But what's going on inside?

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Oh!

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Look at that.

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Beautiful.

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Now it's the moment of truth.

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What will the locals make of our take of their signature dish, pork pie?

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Take a slice.

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-Do you want some pie?

-This is beautiful. The pastry's beautiful.

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Tastes like it used to, years ago.

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-Exactly.

-Brilliant.

-So does it taste of Leicestershire?

-Certainly.

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I don't normally eat pork pies. I don't like the meat in them but this is gorgeous.

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-Absolutely fantastic.

-Beautiful.

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Go on, have another.

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You're a growing lad!

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-Great. Lovely.

-Good.

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-Real Leicestershire.

-Good Leicestershire taste?

-Yeah.

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I think it's really well seasoned.

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-Yeah.

-And it tastes a bit spicy.

-Oh, geez, it's made my day.

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Good. That's a proper old fashioned pork pie.

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The bigger the dolly, the bigger the pie.

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I'm a big dolly!

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Well, the pork pie connoisseurs of Leicester

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gave our efforts a big thumbs up.

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Next though, an even bigger challenge is round the corner.

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As always, we're taking on one of the county's top chefs

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in their restaurant, using local ingredients to see

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who can best define the taste of the region.

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It will be up to local diners in a blind tasting

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to decide whose dish best represents the true flavours of Leicestershire.

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Our opponent today is...

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Sean Hope, the chef and owner of The Red Lion in Stathern.

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As well as being named AA Pub of the Year,

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The Red Lion won Best Local Produce Menu

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at the Leicestershire and Rutland Restaurant Awards.

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Being here in Leicestershire,

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we are blessed with amazing producers.

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Debbie Green's got beautiful pork, local beef,

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which we get from Northville Farm.

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We've got Stilton houses. The list is just endless.

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And I'm still discovering new and fantastic producers and suppliers

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who are passionate about growing as we are about providing good food.

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We have our own little allotment down the bottom, producing as much fresh produce as we can.

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Previously, I worked in London, but there's nothing better than being close to nature.

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It really helps with inspiration on the menu.

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Presentation's important because yes, we do eat with our eyes, but it can look as pretty

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as a doll's face but if it tastes rubbish, you're not going to eat it.

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I don't think I could ever do a nine-to-five job.

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Every day's not the same and that's what makes it such a challenge.

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To take on the bikers, my taste of Leicestershire is...

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pork faggots with sage and onion rosti, pickled white cabbage,

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steeped in Thirsty Farmers Cider, from Little Dalby.

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-That's it. The Red Lion.

-Excellent.

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-That's nice, isn't it?

-Aye, it's proper.

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-Hello. How are you?

-Welcome to Stathern.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Come in.

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-Outline your dish for us, dude.

-We have got pork faggots and we're

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going to do it with some pickled cabbage, steep it in some cider. I've got pork mince which we use.

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We're also using the other parts of the animal that probably people don't, and throw away.

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We've got the liver and the heart in there. That's all minced through.

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We've got some diced carrot, shallot and leak, garlic and we're going to finish with parsley.

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Sweat this down 'till it gets nice and soft.

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I've just got a little treat for you, as well. Thirsty Farmer.

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-Thirsty Farmer.

-Thirsty Farmer's giggling juice.

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7.2% It'll do more than make you giggle.

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Not really looking to get any colour out of that.

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A little sherry vinegar.

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Put a splash in there and when we've got to that stage, we get our Thirsty Farmer.

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That's cloudy, isn't it?

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-The tasting panel might be a bit tiddly!

-He's worrying me! He is!

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What we do is reduce all that cider right down

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so there's no excess moisture.

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As you saw earlier on, we minced in there the heart and the liver,

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combined with some of the local breadcrumbs, this'll help to absorb the moisture a little bit.

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Pop in our vegetables. You can see it's just reduced quite nicely now.

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And then we just mix the vegetables through the meat.

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Does Leicestershire give you a big, you know, a really good county larder, Sean, to work with?

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It's a Mecca. As you guys probably know,

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-Melton Mowbray's been depicted as the food capital of the British Isles.

-Yeah.

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It's a great place to be.

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So there we are. That's our base for our pork faggots.

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Pop a bit of salt and pepper in there, then.

0:17:530:17:55

We're going to bind it but we're using crepinette.

0:17:550:17:58

-Pig cling-film, isn't it?

-It is. It's edible pig cling-film.

0:17:580:18:02

You can use just some nice streaky bacon

0:18:020:18:04

but I tend to find it's a bit too bacony for the job.

0:18:040:18:06

-That's a good size.

-That's a good faggot, that.

0:18:060:18:09

Two faggots a portion, I think.

0:18:090:18:10

So I'm just going to wrap it nice and gently.

0:18:100:18:14

-Would you like to roll a faggot?

-Yes.

0:18:140:18:16

There you go.

0:18:160:18:18

Then roll it over so it's nice and sealed.

0:18:180:18:20

That's it.

0:18:200:18:23

It's tidy. I think you'll find mine is the symmetrical one.

0:18:230:18:26

Very good. I think you'll find mine is the one with the CND sign on it.

0:18:260:18:31

The rebel faggot.

0:18:320:18:34

So, we're going to need a frying pan.

0:18:340:18:36

Welland Valley rapeseed oil.

0:18:360:18:38

It's a great alternative to olive oil.

0:18:380:18:40

And it'll take the temperature.

0:18:400:18:42

A knob of butter starts to foam.

0:18:420:18:44

-A good indication that the pan's hot enough.

-Right.

-Faggot's going in.

0:18:440:18:48

I'll just pop them in like that.

0:18:480:18:50

We can start adding them all. Another little tip -

0:18:500:18:52

start at twelve o'clock and then go round and use it like a clock face

0:18:520:18:57

so you don't forget which one you need to flip first.

0:18:570:19:01

Then start turning them round. We're looking to get them golden brown.

0:19:010:19:06

They should just stay quite nicely like that.

0:19:060:19:08

-We're going to bake them in the oven.

-Yeah.

0:19:080:19:10

Somewhere about 190, for about 35, 40 minutes.

0:19:100:19:15

Not too long, just so they're just hot in the middle and let them rest a little bit.

0:19:150:19:19

-We're going to put them on a trivet.

-Right. Yes.

0:19:190:19:22

-So you get the heat top and bottom.

-To that, I've got a good old classic cooking apple.

0:19:220:19:26

Nice and chunky.

0:19:260:19:29

And I'm just going to put it in the pan, support the faggots on to it.

0:19:290:19:33

Say you were doing a pork loin, could you make a trivet of baking apples for that?

0:19:330:19:37

Absolutely. Right, guys, we're going to put this in the oven to grill.

0:19:370:19:41

The main garnish we'll be using is a sage and onion rosti.

0:19:410:19:44

And we're going to be doing this pickled cabbage, white cabbage, and steep it with cider.

0:19:440:19:48

Cider's in. White wine vinegar in there.

0:19:480:19:51

-Could you use cider vinegar?

-Yeah. You could.

0:19:510:19:54

I've got in here a little bit of stock, as well.

0:19:540:19:56

-Again, this is pork stock. Or if you haven't got it, chicken stock.

-Yeah.

0:19:560:20:00

But we're using pork stock, anyway.

0:20:000:20:01

-Right, now, this is going to go on the stove, right, and we're going to bring it up to the boil.

-Right.

0:20:010:20:07

-OK, chef.

-Cooking that alcohol out a little bit.

0:20:070:20:10

Not too much cos you want it to steep and flavour the cabbage.

0:20:100:20:14

Do you want to just scrape this for me?

0:20:140:20:16

What we're going to do then is put all our ingredients in...

0:20:180:20:21

our cabbage, our sliced onion and apple.

0:20:210:20:24

Then, I think, a great ingredient with pork and apple is cinnamon,

0:20:240:20:29

-so we've got a little bit of flax there.

-Yes.

-Pop that in.

0:20:290:20:32

We'll add a bit of honey, chopped thyme.

0:20:320:20:35

It's about a sprig's worth.

0:20:350:20:36

Back on steam. Bit of a stir. OK.

0:20:360:20:39

So next thing we'll be going on to is the sage and onion rosti potato.

0:20:390:20:43

We're using Maris Piper.

0:20:430:20:44

I need that mandolin.

0:20:440:20:46

BIKERS: Whoa!

0:20:490:20:51

We need enough for six portions, don't we?

0:20:510:20:54

So, nice and quickly.

0:20:540:20:56

We do this other one which went really well, with salmon.

0:20:580:21:01

We did a cheese and onion rosti.

0:21:010:21:03

Now, we're going to slice the onion.

0:21:030:21:05

So just using, probably about a fifth of onion to potato.

0:21:050:21:09

If I use too much onion, it doesn't crisp up as much as you like,

0:21:090:21:12

and I'm going to put some sage in there, sage leaves. Very quickly, chop through that.

0:21:120:21:16

-Every supermarket you can buy fresh sage.

-Yes.

0:21:160:21:19

-Absolutely.

-It used to be a rarity.

0:21:190:21:21

Mix it together like that.

0:21:210:21:24

We're going to get our frying pan on the go. Can we have a drizzle in that pan there?

0:21:240:21:28

-Yes, sir.

-You've got the pickled cabbage that we've done.

0:21:280:21:31

It's just come up to the boil so I'm now just going to give that a stir,

0:21:310:21:35

all we need to do is grab some cling-film.

0:21:350:21:38

Again, this is something that can be done in advance and it's brilliant cold, as well.

0:21:380:21:42

This crispy bacon, crumble it in so you get that real crispy...

0:21:420:21:48

you know, like frazzle flavour? So, there you go. Keep that now.

0:21:480:21:51

It's just going to permeate through.

0:21:510:21:52

Brilliant. None of the flavours evaporate into the atmosphere.

0:21:520:21:56

Potato, sage and onion, in we go.

0:21:560:21:59

Sizzle. Sizzle. Sizzle.

0:21:590:22:02

It needs to make that noise...

0:22:020:22:04

-Yeah.

-Cos otherwise you end up with a boiled piece of potato and it's not going to have that desired effect.

0:22:040:22:10

-You want it nice and crispy and golden brown on the outside.

-Cor!

0:22:100:22:14

-And lovely and soft in the middle, bit like an armadillo.

-Yeah.

0:22:140:22:17

That's a big rosti.

0:22:170:22:18

That's my type of rosti, that, dude. It's a big'un.

0:22:180:22:22

So, just compacting it down a little bit and just waiting

0:22:220:22:26

for it to golden brown in about two or three minutes.

0:22:260:22:29

-It's important that you have enough oil for it to fry evenly.

-Yes.

0:22:290:22:33

Otherwise, it could catch. We're going to caramelise some apples.

0:22:330:22:36

We are going to be using a Brava.

0:22:360:22:39

We're going to give it a nice covering of sugar.

0:22:390:22:41

This will help it to caramelise nicely.

0:22:410:22:44

Straight back on the gas.

0:22:440:22:46

So I've got asparagus, beautiful little baby turnips, as well.

0:22:470:22:51

We've blanched them, what we call blanch and refresh.

0:22:510:22:54

We've cooked them perfectly. All we need to do is reheat. Gravy.

0:22:540:22:57

This is made from pork stock with a little bit of cider and Madeira reduction and white wine.

0:22:570:23:02

OK. So we're going to warm that up.

0:23:020:23:04

OK. Rosti is about ready now, guys, so we just flip that.

0:23:040:23:07

-Look at that.

-That's perfect.

0:23:070:23:10

That's nearly done. These are our

0:23:100:23:12

caramelised apples. Probably a bit of sherry vinegar would be good.

0:23:120:23:16

Yeah.

0:23:160:23:17

Gonna need that tray there. Let's see how our pork faggots are doing.

0:23:170:23:20

Oh, yes.

0:23:200:23:22

In the middle.

0:23:220:23:24

They do look great.

0:23:260:23:28

-Oh, that's a crunch!

-Yeah.

0:23:320:23:34

Bit of apple on there.

0:23:350:23:37

A little jus.

0:23:370:23:40

Crispy bacon, and these little bad boys.

0:23:400:23:42

Yes!

0:23:420:23:44

-You might say.

-Oh! Yeah!

-Are you nicking it?!

0:23:440:23:49

This is Red Lion's interpretation of Leicestershire on a plate.

0:23:490:23:53

Pork faggots, pickled white cabbage,

0:23:530:23:55

local cider, and sage and onion rosti.

0:23:550:23:58

Get stuck into the faggot.

0:23:580:24:01

Oh, yeah. I think what's great about it, the balance of meat to offal.

0:24:030:24:09

-What Sean's put in's perfect.

-Yeah.

0:24:090:24:11

-They're really tasty.

-Texture's great.

0:24:110:24:14

-It's got the regionality of it perfect, hasn't it?

-Yeah.

0:24:140:24:17

Try some of the apple with it.

0:24:170:24:19

It's just perfectly executed.

0:24:190:24:21

Yeah. It's lovely.

0:24:210:24:22

-Lovely.

-That's a good plate of food.

0:24:250:24:28

Let's not try and get too fancy?

0:24:280:24:31

No. No. It's got to be real food, you know.

0:24:310:24:35

-Beautiful.

-Yeah. Top.

0:24:350:24:38

It's all very well what we think but the real judges are the locals

0:24:380:24:41

who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:24:410:24:45

Sean's faggots were a great use of the county's produce.

0:24:460:24:49

We'll need some superb ingredients to compete

0:24:490:24:52

but I think we might just have the answer.

0:24:520:24:55

We're off to visit Pat Stanley and her award-winning longhorn cattle.

0:24:560:25:00

Longhorn beef is prized around the world

0:25:000:25:02

but the breed's origins lie right here in Leicestershire.

0:25:020:25:07

-Wow.

-You can't keep a longhorn in here.

-No.

0:25:070:25:10

-It'll trample your rhododendrons.

-You'd never get your roses up.

0:25:100:25:12

-Good girl.

-There she is.

0:25:120:25:14

-Pat!

-Can we come in?

0:25:140:25:16

Up there. There's cows with handle bars.

0:25:160:25:18

-It's good, isn't it?

-Aye.

0:25:180:25:20

-Hello. I'm Dave.

-Hi. I'm Pat.

0:25:200:25:23

Hello, Pat. Very nice to meet you.

0:25:230:25:24

This is Natasha, the Claudia Schiffer of the cow world.

0:25:240:25:28

She was breed champion of the longhorns at the Royal Show in 2004.

0:25:280:25:34

Wow!

0:25:340:25:35

Natasha.

0:25:360:25:38

It's not the first supermodel that's walked out on me, you know.

0:25:380:25:41

Are they traditional to Leicestershire?

0:25:410:25:43

They are indeed and they were made very famous here in the 18th century

0:25:430:25:47

by a man called Robert Bakewell, who was the first person

0:25:470:25:50

to ever breed them just specifically for meat.

0:25:500:25:53

-Right.

-Really.

-Yeah. They were the first beef breed.

0:25:530:25:57

Right. In the country?

0:25:570:25:59

-In the country. In the world, in fact.

-In the world?

0:25:590:26:02

In the world. The meat is incredibly flavoursome and tender.

0:26:020:26:07

You don't need to chew it.

0:26:070:26:09

You just push it to the top of your mouth and it just melts in the mouth. It's beautiful.

0:26:090:26:13

-Which cuts are the best?

-The ones at the back.

0:26:130:26:16

They are kind of back end heavy, aren't they, the longhorns?

0:26:160:26:19

Absolutely. And that's what Robert Bakewell did.

0:26:190:26:22

He moved the meat from the front end of the animal and he changed

0:26:220:26:25

-all that flesh to the back end where all the good bits are.

-Yes.

0:26:250:26:28

All the roasting joints and the steaks,

0:26:280:26:31

instead of at the front where it's all stew and mince.

0:26:310:26:35

So, really, it's one of the first attempts to turn the cow

0:26:350:26:37

into a product for eating, rather than a tool, you know, for the farm.

0:26:370:26:41

-Absolutely.

-You know, Si, it's wonderful.

0:26:410:26:44

I think here, we've established the longhorn, it's kind of at the roots of British beef eating

0:26:440:26:49

and also, that's in Leicestershire, in the heart of England.

0:26:490:26:52

And maybe Pat can advise us how to cook it, as well.

0:26:520:26:55

-Walk this way, boys.

-Oh, not half.

-I like her, she's good, in't she?

0:26:550:26:58

Oh, let's taste it, then.

0:27:000:27:02

Oh, Lord!

0:27:020:27:03

Scary moment cooking for cooks.

0:27:030:27:06

No!

0:27:060:27:08

-Lovely.

-There we go, boys. Try that.

-That smells fantastic.

0:27:080:27:12

Me first longhorn.

0:27:120:27:13

-That's wonderful.

-It's fabulous.

0:27:170:27:19

You are going to leave some for lunch, aren't you?

0:27:190:27:22

I wouldn't bank on it. What cut is this, Pat?

0:27:220:27:24

Braising steak. It's amazing, isn't it?

0:27:240:27:26

-It's just falling apart. It's just melting.

-It is absolutely great.

0:27:260:27:30

The grain of the meat, as well, is wonderful, isn't it?

0:27:300:27:33

The flavour's fantastic. Are they all for the longhorns?

0:27:330:27:36

They're all for the longhorns and they are last season's haul.

0:27:360:27:39

-That's one season?!

-One season.

0:27:390:27:41

And I have to say that a lot of those cups have gone back already.

0:27:410:27:45

I see why you call them supermodels.

0:27:450:27:47

Is there any chance we can buy some of your supermodel?

0:27:470:27:50

Just step outside and go and see our butcher.

0:27:500:27:52

Brilliant. Thank you.

0:27:520:27:55

-Away, Mr King.

-Supermodel stew.

0:27:550:27:56

-It's like a sweetie shop, this.

-It is.

0:27:580:28:00

-What can we do for you, gents?

-Let's do what Pat did.

0:28:010:28:04

That was fabulous. It's gotta be.

0:28:040:28:06

So Rich, are you a fan of the longhorn?

0:28:080:28:10

Yeah. Very much so, actually.

0:28:100:28:12

It's a superb soft texture with it.

0:28:120:28:14

That's just what you want.

0:28:140:28:16

-Thanks, Rich.

-All the very best.

0:28:160:28:18

To take on Sean, we'll make a longhorn beef pie with our own puff pastry.

0:28:180:28:23

We'll serve it with a celeriac mash and honey roasted beetroot.

0:28:230:28:26

But the dish wouldn't be complete without another famous taste of Leicestershire - Stilton.

0:28:280:28:33

Stilton and Leicester cheese.

0:28:410:28:43

The king meets the king of cheese.

0:28:430:28:45

Alan Whiston has been making cheese here for over 25 years.

0:28:450:28:49

What this man doesn't know about Stilton isn't worth knowing.

0:28:490:28:51

Ena Sharples.

0:28:510:28:53

-Welcome to the store.

-Crikey.

0:28:530:28:55

What a smell.

0:28:550:28:57

-Ammonia.

-You'll get ammonia in here.

0:28:570:28:59

How long have you been making cheese here, Alan?

0:28:590:29:01

There's been cheese on the premises since 1780

0:29:010:29:04

but the fundamentals are the same as they were donkey years ago.

0:29:040:29:07

What has changed is the modern controls. The controller with the ingredients...

0:29:070:29:11

-And hygiene, which is why we're like this.

-Absolutely.

0:29:110:29:13

There's only six dairies left making Stilton, across Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.

0:29:130:29:18

The birth of a Stilton is like many other cheeses.

0:29:180:29:22

After rennet has been added to milk, the whey is removed and the curds are packed into moulds.

0:29:220:29:26

After five or six days, the coat of each cheese is smoothed to prevent any air entering.

0:29:260:29:31

But as the crust begins to form, its time to add the famous blue veins

0:29:310:29:34

that turn an ordinary cheese into the king of cheeses.

0:29:340:29:37

So, Alan, how do you get the blue bits in the Stilton?

0:29:370:29:40

Well, actually, we call the process piercing.

0:29:400:29:42

-Follow me and I'll show you where it happens.

-Oh, brill.

0:29:420:29:45

There's no blue in these at the moment. Put it on this machine here.

0:29:450:29:49

-It's simply called a piercing machine.

-Yeah.

0:29:490:29:51

Place the cheese on the rotating wheel.

0:29:510:29:53

Close the safety hood.

0:29:530:29:55

WHIRRING AND BANGING

0:29:560:29:59

You can see the needles have actually come through

0:29:590:30:02

into the centre of the cheese to allow the oxygen in there.

0:30:020:30:05

Right. So where the oxygen goes in, the seed grows and you get

0:30:050:30:08

the blue veins running along the lines of the needles.

0:30:080:30:11

-Absolutely. We'll go and have a look at some maturing cheese, eh?

-Yes. That'd be great.

0:30:110:30:16

Now, just to give you an idea of the maturing process

0:30:160:30:19

from a young cheese right the way through to the real McCoy,

0:30:190:30:22

as we might say,

0:30:220:30:23

this is what we call a cheese iron,

0:30:230:30:26

so the grader will come along

0:30:260:30:27

and actually do a grade on the cheese.

0:30:270:30:31

-And, of course, this is much too young, at the moment, to select for any customers.

-Yeah, it is.

0:30:310:30:36

-You can see that it's young.

-Yeah.

-It's very pleasant, though.

0:30:360:30:39

We'll now look at another cheese which is now six to seven weeks.

0:30:390:30:43

You'll see a lot more bluey.

0:30:430:30:45

The blue that is there becomes a little bit more defined.

0:30:450:30:47

So I'll put that back in.

0:30:470:30:49

I love that. I think that's great. What happens next?

0:30:490:30:52

The only thing that makes good Stilton is age.

0:30:520:30:54

So we now move to something around eight to nine weeks of age.

0:30:540:30:58

We're looking for nice open texture,

0:30:580:31:00

blue two thirds of the way up the iron.

0:31:000:31:02

Lovely, nice and creamy on the back of the iron.

0:31:020:31:05

That's blue, too, isn't it?

0:31:050:31:06

A lot happening between six weeks and ten weeks.

0:31:060:31:10

That's when it really all happens.

0:31:100:31:12

That's lovely, isn't it, Dave?

0:31:120:31:14

If we move on again, to something that's around about ten to eleven weeks of age...

0:31:140:31:19

-Do you want to have a go, Si?

-Yeah.

0:31:190:31:21

-That'd be great.

-There you go.

-This is a privilege.

0:31:210:31:23

-You can join the club then.

-Right.

0:31:230:31:25

Oh, that's a lovely feeling.

0:31:250:31:27

You are now a Stilton iron thruster.

0:31:290:31:31

The blue bits are now really quite...

0:31:310:31:34

Speckly.

0:31:340:31:35

That's perfect for cooking.

0:31:370:31:39

Yeah. It is perfect. I reckon the king's met the king.

0:31:390:31:42

-I like the idea of this cos you can snaffle.

-Is that the one you'd like to take away with you then?

0:31:420:31:46

-This is the king.

-Is it heavy?

0:31:460:31:49

It is. Thanks ever so much, Alan.

0:31:490:31:52

I think we've found the one. It's time to go home.

0:31:520:31:55

This is the boy-o, dude!

0:31:550:31:57

-Come on while it's still daylight.

-Do you want a blanket before we go outside in the cold?

0:31:570:32:02

-Sean.

-Yes.

0:32:040:32:05

We've done our homework.

0:32:050:32:07

-Have you?

-We're doing longhorn beef and Stilton pie.

0:32:070:32:11

Served with local celeriac and potato mash.

0:32:110:32:14

And honey roasted beetroot balls.

0:32:140:32:16

With a butternut squash puree with a little bit of nutmeg.

0:32:160:32:19

But, will local diners think our dish is good enough

0:32:190:32:21

to beat Sean in the blind tasting?

0:32:210:32:25

Look at this. It's an ugly looking beast, isn't it, celeriac?

0:32:250:32:27

But, basically, what I've done is, I've just cut them even sizes.

0:32:270:32:31

-Potatoes in one pan. Keep the flavour in one pan.

-Right.

0:32:310:32:34

Celeriac in the other.

0:32:340:32:36

-I'm going to stick them on the stove.

-OK.

0:32:360:32:38

It's going to be like an open-top kind of bistro pie.

0:32:380:32:41

I'm going to make some puff pastry. I am a great fan of frozen puff pastry.

0:32:410:32:44

However, cos I'm a mad man, we try and make our own puff pastry.

0:32:440:32:49

-I've got flour, some salt.

-Yeah.

0:32:490:32:52

And I want my buttery chunks. The butter's chilled. It's cold.

0:32:520:32:56

I do great pastry at home.

0:32:560:32:58

I've got Carrara marble-tops.

0:32:580:33:00

Oh, you had to say that, don't you? You're such a tart.

0:33:000:33:04

So, I'll just break this up.

0:33:040:33:05

Now, I'm not going for crumbs cos I want bits of butter

0:33:050:33:08

cos the butter's going to make it puff up and it's going to make it super rich.

0:33:080:33:12

I'm going to do the butternut squash puree. I'm going to start with this.

0:33:120:33:16

All you do is cut it in half.

0:33:160:33:19

Get those seeds out.

0:33:190:33:21

I've got big lumps of butter in there. I've got lots of air in.

0:33:210:33:25

To that, add some iced water.

0:33:250:33:27

I'm going to smear some butter on them.

0:33:290:33:31

-So now, I just need to wrap that in cling-film.

-Right. OK.

0:33:310:33:34

Put it in the fridge. Leave it to stand.

0:33:340:33:37

We're going to add salt and pepper.

0:33:370:33:39

-There you go then, man.

-Thanks, dude.

0:33:390:33:41

And face down and they go in to a hot oven for about 35 minutes.

0:33:410:33:46

-Right.

-I'll get on with my puff.

0:33:460:33:48

There's such a lot of butter in it. Should hold together nicely.

0:33:480:33:52

So roll that out.

0:33:520:33:55

Look at that. The colour of it's fabulous, isn't it?

0:33:550:33:58

This is the second stage in making puff pastry.

0:33:580:34:02

You fold it into three.

0:34:020:34:04

One...

0:34:040:34:06

two...three...like so.

0:34:060:34:08

It's the layers that are going to give you the flake.

0:34:080:34:11

So now, we roll it out again.

0:34:110:34:15

One. Three.

0:34:150:34:18

We put that back like that.

0:34:180:34:20

Now, that goes in to the fridge for half an hour. There we go.

0:34:200:34:25

-I'm going to get on with the filling for our longhorn beef and Stilton pie.

-This is the longhorn.

0:34:250:34:30

Yeah. Now, this is braising steak.

0:34:300:34:32

Before we make the pie, it has to marinade.

0:34:320:34:34

-Put the meat in to the bowl.

-What's the marinade?

0:34:340:34:37

Some garlic. And we just chop that.

0:34:370:34:40

Two peppercorns.

0:34:400:34:42

Just keep them whole cos they'll start to release the flavour

0:34:420:34:46

as they expand and we're going to put some nice sprigs of thyme in.

0:34:460:34:50

Pour the brew in. And we want about 400 mils of this in here.

0:34:500:34:54

Give that a stir like that.

0:34:540:34:56

Put clingfilm over it and it sits in its own loveliness for two-and-a-half hours.

0:34:560:35:00

-Shall I put this out the way?

-We haven't got two-and-a-half hours to wait.

0:35:000:35:04

Here's one we've done earlier.

0:35:040:35:06

Yeah. This has been sat now for about three hours.

0:35:060:35:09

Now, look how the colour of the meat's changed.

0:35:090:35:12

-It's started to absorb nicely.

-It has. I'm going to take the meat out.

0:35:120:35:16

Strain off the marinade.

0:35:160:35:18

That's that. We'll keep that cos that's going to be part of our gravy.

0:35:180:35:22

This is some seasoned flour.

0:35:220:35:24

Pat this dry. The important thing is to do it in batches, really,

0:35:260:35:29

because the last thing that you want to do is stew the meat.

0:35:290:35:33

Pastry's ready now. This has chilled out and we've got to do the next double turn.

0:35:330:35:38

Roll this out. One.

0:35:380:35:41

Two. Three.

0:35:410:35:42

Quarter turn.

0:35:420:35:44

I always think a rough puff pastry is plywood.

0:35:440:35:47

You've got one grain one way, one grain the other.

0:35:470:35:50

Turn it.

0:35:500:35:52

And roll it.

0:35:520:35:54

-Can you pass us that oval cutter, Kingy?

-Yes, mate.

0:35:540:35:57

This is the chef ring we're using for packing the beef.

0:35:570:36:01

-Right. OK.

-So the logic is that it should sit.

-OK.

0:36:010:36:05

One. Two. I always do spares because I'm an insecure person.

0:36:050:36:11

LAUGHTER

0:36:110:36:13

-Put them in the fridge now till we're ready.

-Shall I take them?

-Thank you.

0:36:150:36:18

Brown this off now.

0:36:180:36:20

There's going to be a celeriac and potato mustard mash.

0:36:220:36:25

So it can all go back in the same pan.

0:36:250:36:27

What I'll do now is I'll put that back on the stove

0:36:270:36:30

to dry it, cos when it's mashed, it'll be super fluffy.

0:36:300:36:33

What we've got in the pan is a little bit of colour.

0:36:330:36:36

And just continue like that until all the meat's browned.

0:36:360:36:40

-Sean.

-Yes.

-Could you get me those kind of puff-pastry tops out the fridge?

-Course I can.

-Brill.

0:36:400:36:46

What we're going to do now is give it a little bit of kind of bistro chic.

0:36:470:36:51

We're going to slash the tops.

0:36:510:36:53

Then egg and bake them and they'll come out like an armadillo's back.

0:36:530:36:57

-Pop that into an oven, preheated, about 180 degrees.

-OK.

0:36:570:37:02

About 15 minutes till it's light and fluffy and barking at the moon.

0:37:020:37:05

-Nought like a bark at the moon, dude, is there?

-Ooh!

0:37:050:37:08

To this pan we're going to add some shallots, halved.

0:37:080:37:11

If you want super-fine mash, you need one of these.

0:37:110:37:17

-And the answer is, "No, I don't know what I'm doing."

-I'm going to add the mushrooms to these shallots.

0:37:170:37:23

There's no lumps in that.

0:37:230:37:26

Some cream. Some butter. I mean, you can't go wrong with butter.

0:37:260:37:30

I really want to beat that. We don't want lumps. White pepper for this, not black.

0:37:300:37:34

-Salt.

-I've browned off the mushrooms. I've browned off the shallots.

0:37:340:37:39

And we're going to add that to the browned beef.

0:37:390:37:42

Mustard, the final ingredient.

0:37:420:37:45

I think about...that much.

0:37:450:37:47

I've deglazed the pan with some of that lovely local beer. Half a litre of beef stock.

0:37:470:37:53

The marinade, just added a sprig of thyme there.

0:37:530:37:56

Transfer this to the hob. Now, we can cook this in the oven, 160 degrees,

0:37:560:38:01

for about an hour-and-a-half to two hours.

0:38:010:38:04

That'll start to thicken up and it'll end up looking like that.

0:38:040:38:09

Honey beetroot balls. Now, this beetroot has been blanched for about half an hour till it's soft.

0:38:090:38:14

You plunge your baller into the centre

0:38:140:38:17

-and out pops the beetroot ball.

-Mega. Mega.

0:38:170:38:21

What about using baby beetroot?

0:38:210:38:23

-All right!

-LAUGHTER

0:38:230:38:26

Shut up, you.

0:38:260:38:27

Put some thyme on there. Oil.

0:38:270:38:30

A splash of balsamic vinegar.

0:38:300:38:32

And some honey.

0:38:330:38:34

Now, we need to roast that

0:38:340:38:36

for about 15 minutes.

0:38:360:38:38

-That's all right.

-That is good timing.

0:38:380:38:40

Aggh!

0:38:420:38:43

Kind of hot, like. It's so roasted.

0:38:430:38:47

-It's almost gone like mashed potato inside, anyway.

-Lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-Give it a blitz.

0:38:470:38:53

I'll start chopping up the Stilton for the sauce.

0:38:550:38:58

I'm going to put this in a pan to get any of the excess moisture out of it, OK?

0:38:580:39:02

The honey beetroot balls are coming along terrifically.

0:39:020:39:05

Sean, three of your finest dinner plates, sir.

0:39:050:39:09

Coming up.

0:39:090:39:10

The longhorn beef's done. That needs the Stilton putting in and stirring.

0:39:130:39:17

-That's just gently melting through?

-Yeah.

0:39:170:39:20

It'll still be quite predominant?

0:39:200:39:22

And... The rough buttered puff-pastry tops are done, so we'll put those up there.

0:39:220:39:27

I'll fill my piping bag with the potatoes. Can you roll my beetroots, Kingy?

0:39:270:39:31

-Yeah. No worries, dude.

-This is a very hot world that Sean exists in.

0:39:310:39:35

Sean used to be 23 stone up until two years ago but he turned the extractors off.

0:39:350:39:40

-Shall I do the beef, Kingy?

-Yes, please. Yeah.

0:39:420:39:44

We top that with our little beauties.

0:39:470:39:49

Look at that. Just like Mr Whippy.

0:39:520:39:56

-Nice, dude. Nice.

-Oh, you beauty, Kingy.

0:39:580:40:01

Honey-roasted beetroot balls.

0:40:010:40:02

-With a little nutmeg.

-That's fantastic. You've done Leicestershire proud.

0:40:020:40:07

Well, there we have it. Leicestershire on a plate.

0:40:070:40:10

There we go, chef.

0:40:100:40:12

We've made a longhorn beef and Stilton pie.

0:40:120:40:15

-Served with potato and celeriac mash.

-With honey-roasted beetroot balls.

0:40:150:40:19

And butternut squash, puree it with nutmeg.

0:40:190:40:22

He's gone for the beetroot balls, Kingy.

0:40:220:40:24

He's gone for them, dude.

0:40:240:40:26

They are a little bit sweet, man, those beetroot.

0:40:270:40:30

The beef, it just has absorbed that ale really well, so the marinade,

0:40:300:40:35

as you say, just takes it on really well.

0:40:350:40:38

The beef and Stilton is superb. Just got that masked overtone of it now.

0:40:380:40:43

And I like the rough...

0:40:430:40:44

The rough folk love it. Thanks!

0:40:440:40:46

That's fantastic. Thanks, guys.

0:40:460:40:49

Leicestershire will be proud of you two.

0:40:490:40:51

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:40:510:40:53

It's crunch time. The diners here will taste both dishes without any idea who cooked which.

0:40:530:40:59

First is Sean's pork faggots with pickled cabbage in cider and a sage-and-onion rosti.

0:40:590:41:04

The faggots were presented nicely.

0:41:060:41:08

It looked meaty and hearty,

0:41:080:41:10

but at the same time, having the fresh vegetables gave it a kind of counterbalance.

0:41:100:41:15

I love the mixture of the pork and the apple and the sage.

0:41:150:41:18

I was surprised how moist it was, how rich it was, how sweet it was.

0:41:180:41:23

-The little baby turnip went so well with it.

-Delicious. Loved it all.

0:41:230:41:27

The softness of the meat of the faggots and the crispness of the rosti, in particular,

0:41:270:41:32

worked well together.

0:41:320:41:33

I actually think it represented the county very well.

0:41:330:41:36

We have a predominance of local meats here,

0:41:360:41:39

so, all in all, I would say that is a good Leicestershire dish.

0:41:390:41:42

That seemed to go down very well. How will our dish fare? Well, fingers crossed.

0:41:440:41:48

The beef was fab. Beautifully tender.

0:41:490:41:51

Subtle Stilton coming through.

0:41:510:41:54

It was fun and colourful and represented the whole of Leicestershire.

0:41:540:41:57

I thought it was really rustic.

0:41:570:41:59

It reminded me of home cooking, something I could have done myself.

0:41:590:42:03

Whilst the pastry was nice at the beginning, it was quite crispy,

0:42:030:42:06

towards the middle it felt a bit heavy.

0:42:060:42:08

The flavour of the celeriac and mustard mash was too strong in comparison with the meat dish.

0:42:080:42:16

Immediately drawn to the beef.

0:42:160:42:18

-It looked tender and succulent and juicy.

-Beautiful Stilton.

0:42:180:42:22

Wonderful beef. I would put that down as Leicestershire.

0:42:220:42:26

Hello! How are you?

0:42:260:42:28

Well, thank you very much for coming today.

0:42:300:42:34

We've had a great time.

0:42:340:42:35

It's been fabulous, cooking with Sean.

0:42:350:42:38

It's been great. We've had a great time in Leicestershire.

0:42:380:42:41

We've got to get down to the nitty-gritty of it.

0:42:410:42:45

You must vote for one or the other.

0:42:450:42:47

OK? You can't vote for two.

0:42:470:42:50

All right. For the faggots, please, could I have a clear show of hands?

0:42:500:42:55

One. Two. Three. Four. Five. OK.

0:42:550:42:58

And for the beef and Stilton pie, please.

0:42:580:43:03

One. Two. Three.

0:43:030:43:06

Four.

0:43:060:43:08

That was just...!

0:43:080:43:10

OK. The faggots...

0:43:100:43:11

-..were Sean.

-Well done.

0:43:140:43:17

-Thank you.

-Fabulous.

0:43:170:43:20

Obviously, the beef and Stilton pie we got from Marks'!

0:43:200:43:24

'Well, Sean is a talented chef and those faggots are some of the tastiest we've ever eaten.

0:43:240:43:29

'Leicestershire is a county with real food traditions that are loved around the world.'

0:43:290:43:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:540:43:56

Si King and Dave Myers explore Leicestershire, where they cook a traditional county favourite at Leicester Market. They visit the supermodels of the cow world and taste the king of cheeses, Stilton. Finally, they face the challenge of a cook-off against top chef Sean Hope. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Leicestershire in a blind tasting.


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