Gloucestershire The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Gloucestershire

Si and Dave explore Gloucestershire, where they cook a traditional county favourite at Gloucester's docks. They find guinea fowl in the Cotswolds.


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Transcript


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-We're the Hairy Bikers.

-On the road to find regional recipes!

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We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

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Today, we're in search of the real taste of Gloucestershire.

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Dude, I thought we were going to Gloucestershire.

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We've driven into a chocolate box!

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-I know. It's an absolute rural idyll.

-It's like Middle Earth!

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You're going along and you see Upper Slaughter, Lower Slaughter, Moreton in Marsh.

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-I'm looking for hairy feet and big holes.

-Dude, that's us.

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-Gloucestershire's a big county.

-Oh, it's massive, isn't it?

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And the Cotswolds is England's biggest area of outstanding natural beauty -

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the River Severn in the south, the Forest of Dean...

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-It's an ancient landscape so there must be plenty of nosh.

-Has to be.

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Right, investigations.

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On our quest to define the true flavours of Gloucestershire,

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we find a traditional county recipe to serve up on Gloucester Docks.

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We discover some of the best free range poultry we've ever tasted.

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A visit to a Cotswold farm reveals a great alternative to olive oil.

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And representing Gloucestershire in the cook-off is James Graham.

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Will we be able to beat him in a blind tasting judged by local diners?

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Stroud. It's very bohemian, isn't it?

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-And an absolutely bonzer farmer's market. Look at that asparagus.

-Look at that rhubarb.

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This is one of the busiest and best markets we've ever come across.

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It's a great place to discover the real tastes of Gloucestershire.

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It's a goat's cheese cheesecake.

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Oh, that's lovely.

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What's great to eat in Gloucestershire?

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There's wonderful cheeses. Wonderful bacon. Beef.

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-And vegetables. Just wonderful.

-So, it's a very fertile larder?

-It is, it is.

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-Oh, they look good. You've got good pork here.

-Can I nick that?

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-Yeah, nick that.

-Is it Old Spot?

-Gloucester Old Spot.

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We want people to realise there's meat in there.

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What do you eat here?

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-Apples. There's really good apple juice.

-Cider?

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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Last week, I bought a bag of spuds which came from all of four miles away.

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-Yeah, like that. Brilliant.

-Yeah.

-That is brilliant.

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-Oh, look. Organic milk.

-This is our special breakfast milk. It's all the cream left in it.

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It's all from our own cows and we bottle it all on site at the farm.

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-I'm Jess.

-You're Jess and it's Jess's Milk?

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-Oh, that's really good milk.

-We take it for granted,

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-but when you get something that's just that bit better, you realise what you've been missing.

-Aye.

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-Fancy a tipple?

-Oh, I love giggling juice.

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That's finest Gloucestershire perry. We've got 16 acres of orchard,

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some of them planted by my partner's great aunt in 1912.

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-Crikey!

-But the perries go back 250 years on the farm.

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And what varieties do you grow?

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Over 200 varieties of apple.

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Of those, 100 of them are Gloucestershire varieties.

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Proper indigenous ones.

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-Oh, that's dry!

-It is indeed. With food, if you imagine something...

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-Fatty.

-Belly pork.

-That would be brilliant with it.

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The single variety apple juices are really catching on. Good cloudy apple juice.

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You say cloudy but we've got one variety here, an old Gloucestershire apple called Taynton Codlin,

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and it produces a really clear juice.

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-Oh, I like that.

-Oh, it's wonderful, isn't it?

-That is wonderful.

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There's a great perfume to it at the end on your palate.

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You're a steward of the ancient apple orchard, aren't you, really?

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Oh, that's lovely.

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That's absolutely lovely.

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What to you is Gloucestershire on a plate?

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-Gloucester Old Spot pork.

-Yeah. Brilliant.

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Everything. Cheeses, meats, vegetables. Anything you want.

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-Some counties, where they've got really good products, it is difficult to pin down a specific dish.

-Yeah.

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But I bet if we delve deep, we'll find one.

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-Look at those, aren't they gorgeous?

-A nice layer of fat and a lovely eye of meat.

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-Just looks good.

-Modern housewives do not understand that meat has got be mature. They buy on colour.

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If it's bright red, they think it's good. It's bloody rubbish.

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"Butter in the cow yesterday."

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Thank you very much.

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-I think we'll have one.

-That'll make great pastry.

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-Are there any dishes...

-Any traditional dishes?

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Well, there's squab pie in Gloucestershire.

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People love pies here, don't they?

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I mean, it's a good pie tradition.

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-What's Gloucestershire produce on a plate for you?

-Cheese.

-Well, you would say that!

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Our Single Gloucester. You've got to live in Gloucestershire and own Gloucester cows.

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There's only four of us who make it. The Double Gloucester was the posh cheese.

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The cream that you left from the Single Gloucester would go in the Double.

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And so they could tell them apart, they put the orange colouring in it.

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And the posher you were, the deeper the colour.

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But we're still in search of a classic Gloucestershire dish.

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-So, any traditional recipes that you know of?

-Squab pie.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-Right.

-It used to be pigeon. But now they've made it with lamb and spices.

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-I'm quite intrigued by this squabble pie thing.

-Squab, man.

-Squabble.

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-Squab? Absolutely.

-Yeah.

-I suppose it's one of the older recipes that maybe country people might make.

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We need to revive the traditional Gloucestershire squab pie.

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And we're heading to Gloucester to convince the locals.

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Elsewhere in the country, squab pie is made from young pigeons.

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But in these parts, it traditionally uses superb local lamb and apples.

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We're cooking at the city's historic docks - a working port for over 2,000 years.

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Morning, campers, and welcome to Gloucester Docks. It's brilliant.

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It's got water and everything.

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This was the major meeting place of the sea and the canal system, that once made Britain mighty.

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It's hard to find a traditional recipe. So we've delved into the past.

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And these ancient recipes shouldn't be allowed to die out.

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-COOKWARE CHIMES

-I couldn't agree more, camper.

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-So, we've got one.

-Go on.

-It's a squab pie.

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We found this recipe that's done with lamb,

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all en-coffined in this wonderful Gloucestershire crust,

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made with handmade Gloucestershire butter.

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It starts off with the fillet of neck of lamb, or best end of neck.

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Which my colleague here is trimming into cubes.

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-Would you like some seasoned flour?

-I would.

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Neck fillet's one of those cheaper cuts which we keep banging on about.

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It's a great flavour, isn't it?

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One of my dreams is to have a barge like that. A narrow boat. I love them.

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-The seasoned flour goes into a big bowl.

-They've got a great tradition in Gloucester about lamb.

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Because of the limestone, you can grow all that verbiage and legumeage that the sheep love.

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We're going to brown the meat off because it looks slightly more attractive when you eat it.

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-Also, it seals the flavours in.

-I'm doing it in batches because we want the lamb to fry.

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Oh, it's lovely, isn't it? Summer's here.

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People are out brewing tea on their barges. Swinging swing bridges.

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-Who's got a barge, here?

-Yeah, me.

-Oh, look at you all.

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-The big one over there with the umbrella on.

-Oooh!

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It's the big one with the umbrella.

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Is yours the blue one?

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Right. So, the meat's browned off. I've chopped an onion.

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We don't waste any flavours

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so all the meet juices are going to go now into the fried onions.

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This is the pie filling. You can cook this from raw in the pastry. But...

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when we make pies from raw, it always ends up that the crust is burnt

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and the insides are half raw. So, if you cook the filling first - guaranteed super juicy.

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-Now, we want these onions brown.

-Think burger van.

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So, we put the meat into the pan with all those lovely meat juices.

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And then we put the onions, which have been browned,

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With all those lovely onion juices and, oh, look at that, man.

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And we've got some chicken stock, some water. Because there's going to be a lot flavour comes out the meat.

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Just cut some rosemary up. Pop that in.

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And a pinch of all spice. And some nutmeg. Always use fresh nutmeg.

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Some salt. And you do the pepper.

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That needs to simmer now for about 40 minutes to an hour. Or you can leave it longer if you fancy.

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-It'll just keep on getting richer and richer. So long as you don't let it boil dry and burn your pan.

-Exactly.

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Meanwhile, we'll make the pastry.

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The flour goes into the processor.

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And we're using two fats for this.

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We're using lard and some of this wonderful butter.

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Which was made yesterday, we're assured.

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That was in the cow yesterday, that. Now, what we do is we blitz it...

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It's that easy! LAUGHTER

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Nearly there.

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Poetry in a crust.

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Next, we add an egg.

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Now, as you can see, it just needs a little bit more liquid.

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Dribble it in, about a tablespoon....

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Come on, baby, form! Whoa!

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Look at that! It's going round like somebody on a waltzer!

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And there you have a ball of pastry. So, I just flour my board.

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Don't want to handle it much.

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And we need some strips.

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We make like a really thick edge on the pie.

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So, if you double the crust up on there it's just yummy.

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-< ENGINE RUMBLES

-Excuse me!

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Right, pastry's made. So, for this pie, we're using half Bramleys

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and half a good old fashioned English Gloucestershire apple.

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And we're going to put some sage in there. So, chop some sage leaves.

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And loads of black pepper.

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So, pepper, apples and sage.

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Now it's time to build the pie.

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So, actually this still needs another kind of 20 minutes, then it needs to cool down. So, we do have one...

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We made earlier!

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-You want half the meat in the bottom, like so.

-Oh, lovely.

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And half the apples. If we use eating apples, it's going to be too sweet.

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-If you use Bramleys, it's going to be too sour. So, this way...

-We get the best of both worlds.

-And it works.

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The rest of the meat. This way, we different flavours.

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Now, the crustacean. So, we need to do a layer of eggy wash on the bowl.

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-See these excess strips that I cut earlier, this is where they come in.

-Now, look at this.

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So, we just stick them on the edge of the bowl, like so.

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It's two layers because the lid's going to go on top.

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You get a nice puff pastry lightness to it.

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Now, a nice eggy wash on that.

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-The lid with the perfectly made pastry. Look at that.

-Look at that!

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-Lush.

-Just run your fingers round there, like so.

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-Your mam used to do it with her teeth, didn't she?

-Yeah, she did.

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Nobody ever went round to Dave's house for tea.

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Don't you disrespect my mother.

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I haven't said owt!

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So, cut off the excess.

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And then finger and thumb, pinch press, pinch press.

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Which is better than using your mam's false teeth. Look at that.

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Now two breathing holes.

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One and two. Eggy wash.

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All we've got to do now is put that in a preheated oven,

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about 170, 180 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes until the top's golden brown

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and we will have a Gloucestershire squab pie.

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Brought back to the place it belongs.

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-Yes.

-Squab-shire.

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-Go on, then, go on. Oh, look at that.

-That's a pie, isn't it?

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There we have it, ladies and gentlemen -

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the original, the ancient, the positively prehistoric Gloucestershire squab pie,

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brought back to Gloucestershire by a couple of Northerners.

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Now it's the moment of truth.

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What will the locals make of our Gloucestershire squab pie?

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It's lovely. I'd never put apples and lamb together normally.

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-What do you think?

-Fantastic. The lamb's really succulent.

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-You've captured Gloucester.

-Oh!

-Oh, thank you.

-The lamb and the apples, it's wonderful.

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The pastry's real nice. It's crunchy but it's soft at the same time.

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That's the lard that gives you the crunch.

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-I think it's absolutely delicious. I don't usually eat pie.

-What?!

-But you've converted me.

-Thank you.

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-Ship's cat's not too keen, is it?

-No.

-Oh, it's delicious.

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-This is lovely.

-I love nutmeg with apple.

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-The lamb is really tasty.

-Best pie I've had in years.

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-Is it?

-How old are you?

-11.

-That's a great compliment. Thank you.

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Our bid to revive the traditional squab pie was a great success.

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Next, an even bigger challenge is around the corner.

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As always, we're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant,

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using local ingredients to see who can best define the taste of the region.

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It will be up to local diners in a blind tasting to decide whose dish

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best represents the true flavours of Gloucestershire.

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Our opponent today is...

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James Graham. Head chef and owner of Allium

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in the Cotswold town of Fairford.

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Allium has received numerous awards, including the title of South West Restaurant Of The Year.

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Some of our best producers are right on our doorstep.

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I can actually see the animals we'll be using in the fields.

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I can talk to the farmer and say, these are the animals I want.

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I know that an animal going off to the slaughter is going to be absolutely at its best.

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I will only buy whole carcasses. If all you do is buy prime cuts,

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the producers end up with stuff that they can't sell so easily.

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So, we take the lot and we use the lot.

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The dialogue between our producers and us is what generates the menu.

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So our asparagus producer has literally only just started harvesting.

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But he might say, I'm sorry, James, it's not quite ready.

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So, we wait another week until it is at its best.

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Every single thing is made in house.

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Nothing bought in. Whether you start with the bread, or finish with an ice cream or have cheese biscuits,

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nothing comes through the door that we haven't made.

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We've set out to use local produce. Our clientele like the fact that

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there's a connection between the land and what we're giving them.

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They do understand food here.

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I've never sold as much offal in a restaurant anywhere.

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I can sell stuff here that I wouldn't even dream of selling in London.

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My taste of Gloucestershire is roasted local zander

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with crayfish, asparagus and a 60 degree duck egg.

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-Hi, guys, how you doing?

-Hi, how are you?

-Brought the weather with you.

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-Hello, James.

-How you doing?

-Smashing.

-Welcome to Fairford.

-Thank you very much!

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Can you headline the dish for us as it would appear on your menu?

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Roasted zander with local crayfish, white sprouting broccoli, asparagus and 60 degree duck egg yolk.

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That sounds good!

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-So, what's the texture of this fish, then?

-It's very similar to sea bass.

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This was illegally introduced into Britain a few years ago.

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We get ours from the Gloucester canal. They have to be killed if you catch them.

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If I saw that in a fishmonger's, I'd swear blind that it was a sea fish.

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Unlike most fresh water fish, it doesn't taste muddy.

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-Sometimes it's known as a vampire fish, is that right?

-Yeah.

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Look at the chompers on that.

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Fabulous. So, what first, James?

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Before we do that, I'm going to make a crayfish jelly.

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-These live crayfish. I've taken some of these and we've put them in the freezer to humanely kill them.

-Yes.

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And I'm just going to pop the crayfish into the ice cube tray.

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And then we've made a stock which we've added some agar agar to -

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a seaweed derived gelling agent, which is also heat resistant.

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We'll serve the jelly slightly warm. It's already starting to set.

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We'll pop these in the fridge.

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I thought we'd fillet the fish now.

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-Hey!

-I'm going to need one fillet from this.

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Ha! I think that'll do.

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So, I just take it through behind the pectoral fin.

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So, I'm going to put the knife nice and tightly down the spine here and then just work the meat off it.

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-Zander fingers.

-OK.

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Blooming heck! That's nuts.

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And we'll take off the cheeks.

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They're like a cod's cheek, but bigger.

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-Yeah, they're huge.

-Oh, wow!

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Obviously, all of that's still useable.

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There are loads and loads of people in Gloucestershire who are passionate about food.

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They quite often produce more then they can use

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so they'll turn up at the back door. and say, "I've got tayberries,"

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or, "I've got medlars." We made medlar jelly.

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I'll very quickly score the flesh on these, to help them stop curling up.

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Next, I'm going to get the 60 degree duck egg yolk on.

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We've got 7 duck egg yolks in here, OK?

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-They're huge aren't they, though?

-And they're such a bright yellow.

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I've also got a little bit of buttermilk, which lightens it up

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and adds a little bit of acidity to it.

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Couple of pinches of salt and a little bit of ground white pepper.

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So that will now go on at 60 degrees with it constantly turning.

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And then it'll be cooked through.

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So, asparagus - I've peeled some of it as you can see.

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Why do you peel asparagus? I've never peeled me asparagus before.

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This outside bit can be a little bitter.

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You can get rid of that and just leave the real sweetness.

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And then just nick it off there which is just above the woody bit.

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So, I'm just going to drop that in there for a couple of seconds.

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I'll pick out as much broccoli as I think we need.

0:19:550:19:59

That's been in a couple of minutes - it's nicely cooked.

0:19:590:20:01

They've kept their colour nicely. Straight into cold water.

0:20:010:20:05

The white sprouting broccoli exactly the same way.

0:20:050:20:08

Into a pan of boiling water.

0:20:080:20:10

We'll cook these leeks in a slightly different way.

0:20:100:20:12

A little bit of water and we're going to put a decent knob of butter in.

0:20:120:20:16

-But we're not going to serve all that.

-No.

-It's going to cook down.

0:20:160:20:19

Little bit of salt.

0:20:190:20:21

And then the leeks which we can just pop in there. And they will cook in that.

0:20:210:20:25

The broccoli takes a little bit less time than the asparagus.

0:20:250:20:29

-You can see it's a beautiful colour.

-Fabulous.

0:20:290:20:31

And that's straight into cold water. For the beurre noisette, again this is about half a pack of butter.

0:20:310:20:37

The milk solids in this will start to cook. And they will gradually caramelize.

0:20:370:20:41

They'll go brown and it will smell like hazelnuts.

0:20:410:20:43

Which is why the French call it beurre noisette.

0:20:430:20:45

We're also going to use a little bit of shellfish foam.

0:20:450:20:49

-Oh, he's got a foam.

-He's got a foam and a jelly.

-He'll have one of those foamer things.

0:20:490:20:53

I'm getting the gig of this restaurant now, dude.

0:20:530:20:55

So, what we've got is a little bit of,

0:20:550:20:58

of the crayfish stock here, OK? And I'm going to add

0:20:580:21:03

-an emulsifier which helps this hold its foam.

-So, it's like arrowroot in a souffle, you know?

0:21:030:21:08

-Keeps it up there.

-Yeah. Will, will maintain its structure.

0:21:080:21:11

The only other thing we're going to add to it, OK, is knob of butter and a splash of milk.

0:21:110:21:15

And a little bit of seasoning.

0:21:150:21:17

So, the beurre noisette is now coming on.

0:21:170:21:19

You can still hear it though. One of the things they always say about it

0:21:190:21:23

is it's ready when it stops being noisy.

0:21:230:21:25

-And it's just gone silent.

-It has, it has.

0:21:250:21:28

It's just gone silent. And the bubbles have got much, much smaller.

0:21:280:21:31

And you can see in the bottom you're starting to get some caramelization.

0:21:310:21:35

So, we've got half a lemon. Give it a squeeze.

0:21:350:21:38

I'll add a little bit of salt. Tiny bit of black pepper.

0:21:380:21:44

Give it a help to scrape the bottom off and that's our beurre noisette.

0:21:440:21:47

-Oh, man!

-That smells great. Yup.

-We're ready to go.

0:21:470:21:50

And that's the shellfish foam which is just coming together now.

0:21:500:21:55

The leeks are nearly ready. Just whip these out.

0:21:550:21:57

Because they'll hold now because they've got enough fat in them.

0:21:570:22:01

Next thing we're going to do is breadcrumb the cheeks

0:22:010:22:03

so that we can deep fry them.

0:22:030:22:05

So, we're going to coat them in a little bit of flour

0:22:050:22:08

which just helps protect them, OK. And then into the egg yolk.

0:22:080:22:11

If you use opposite hands for the flour and the egg, you don't get all bunged up.

0:22:110:22:14

-Top tip. Ah, you see the way he's doing...

-That's why God give you two.

0:22:140:22:18

And then we'll just give it a second coat. Just to make sure it's really well protected.

0:22:180:22:23

And make sure that you don't get too much heat too quickly. You don't want the fish to overcook.

0:22:230:22:27

OK, so we're pretty much ready now to put the dish together.

0:22:270:22:30

We'll oil up the grill. Pop that on.

0:22:300:22:34

And we'll just dot some butter around it.

0:22:370:22:39

You like your butter, don't you?

0:22:390:22:41

Well, I honestly think that butter's a really important thing for adding flavour.

0:22:410:22:45

If I served the amount of butter that we utilise for the cooking processes,

0:22:450:22:50

you'd give everyone a heart attack.

0:22:500:22:52

But there is a difference between using butter and serving it.

0:22:520:22:54

Next up we've got water and some butter from the leeks.

0:22:540:22:58

Which will help us to reheat the vegetables that we're going to use.

0:22:580:23:01

Can you see how the flesh has gone that really nice white that you get with sea bass? Now I will season it

0:23:030:23:08

with a little bit of coarse sea salt

0:23:080:23:10

which helps give it another texture as well.

0:23:100:23:13

Tiny squeeze of lemon juice.

0:23:130:23:14

Non-stick tray.

0:23:160:23:19

This is a moderate oven, 180 degrees.

0:23:190:23:21

Pop it in...

0:23:210:23:24

and off it goes. So, I'm just going to pop these in.

0:23:240:23:26

These will only take a minute or two.

0:23:260:23:28

Pop those in there. Just a little bit of black pepper for the purple sprout and for the asparagus.

0:23:280:23:34

And I'm going to go and pop the cheek nuggets in.

0:23:340:23:36

We've got a fryer at 180 degrees. Just drop these in.

0:23:360:23:40

-Hey! Cool, Graham. Zander nuggets.

-OK.

0:23:400:23:44

Right, so I'll get some plates and we'll start to...

0:23:440:23:48

To plate up.

0:23:480:23:50

First bit,

0:23:500:23:52

couple of leeks with that.

0:23:520:23:54

The 60-degree duck egg yolk.

0:23:560:23:57

It's a proper eggy colour, isn't it?

0:23:570:24:00

Zander on top. Couple of crayfish jellies.

0:24:010:24:03

-Great colours on the plate.

-This with the egg.

0:24:030:24:06

Put a little bit of the beurre noisette over the fish.

0:24:090:24:14

Tiny bit of this very heavily reduced, like, flavour here.

0:24:140:24:18

There you go. Roasted zander, local white sprouting broccoli,

0:24:200:24:23

asparagus, crayfish and a 60-degree duck egg yolk.

0:24:230:24:28

-Fabulous.

-Awesome, dude.

0:24:280:24:31

This is one of the most imaginative dishes that we've been faced with.

0:24:330:24:37

Look at the way that flakes.

0:24:370:24:39

It does.

0:24:390:24:40

Whoa, that's good fish.

0:24:410:24:43

It's every bit as tasty as a really, really good sea bass.

0:24:430:24:47

And the 60-degree duck egg.

0:24:470:24:49

-I'm going to try it with asparagus. I'm thinking of the whole hollandaise vibe.

-Yeah, good.

0:24:490:24:54

-Brilliant.

-Yeah, it's eggy.

0:24:540:24:55

-He's a very clever man.

-Yeah.

0:24:550:24:57

-Crayfish jellies.

-The flavours are balanced perfectly, aren't they?

0:24:570:25:01

-Yeah, it's lovely. Brilliant.

-Well, this is the zander cheek, isn't it?

0:25:010:25:04

-Yeah. Awesome.

-Oh!

-He could've done a chop.

0:25:040:25:07

You know, there's pork in Gloucester.

0:25:070:25:09

-Exactly. But no.

-Dredges the canal and gets a zander.

0:25:090:25:13

Of course the real judges are the locals

0:25:140:25:16

who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:25:160:25:20

James's zander is going to be a tough dish to beat.

0:25:240:25:28

So we need to find the very best ingredients that Gloucestershire has to offer.

0:25:280:25:33

Leonie McIntosh won Best Producer at the Cotswold Life Awards

0:25:330:25:37

for her free range poultry.

0:25:370:25:39

-Hi, I'm Leonie. Nice to meet you. I'm guessing you've come to look at guinea fowl.

-We have.

0:25:390:25:43

-We want to see your treasures.

-Excellent. Well, let's go and have a look.

-Fantastic.

0:25:430:25:47

Leonie started rearing guinea fowl five years ago

0:25:470:25:50

and found that they were ideally suited to the Cotswold landscape.

0:25:500:25:53

They're free range, aren't they? Crikey!

0:25:530:25:55

They always tend to drink in muddy puddles when I bring visitors.

0:25:550:25:59

I suppose it's the same way that...

0:25:590:26:01

-I kind of quite like drinking in a grotty pub rather than in a Formica bar.

-Absolutely.

0:26:010:26:06

-That is a very good analogy.

-Yes.

-Being free range is my excuse...

0:26:060:26:09

if we come here and there's no chickens outside, they've made the choice.

0:26:090:26:12

We just thought if we were chickens, how would we want to live?

0:26:120:26:16

So, Leonie, I can see lots of chickens here. But guinea fowl?

0:26:160:26:20

That's what you've come for. There's some in the corner over there with the chickens.

0:26:200:26:24

Ah, yes. I've got them. We've got them. Yes.

0:26:240:26:27

There's probably 3,000 chickens here and 300 guinea fowl. Something like that.

0:26:270:26:31

But the chickens teach the guinea fowl how to behave sensibly, so...

0:26:310:26:35

Are guinea fowl a bit stupid?

0:26:350:26:37

I don't know if they're stupid or very clever.

0:26:370:26:39

They're far lower down that chain of domestication.

0:26:390:26:42

-Can we have a closer look?

-Yeah, let's go.

0:26:420:26:44

-Super. We'll follow you.

-We'll take you to the shed over here.

0:26:440:26:48

-The space that we're providing in here is well in excess of the legal requirements.

-God, yeah.

0:26:480:26:54

I just believe you can't keep them clean and happy if you cram them in a shed.

0:26:540:26:58

I might need a helper in here, I'm afraid. To help me catch one.

0:26:580:27:02

Ah, lost him. Get them into the corner.

0:27:020:27:06

-Thanks, Leonie.

-Don't let him go.

-No... ow!

0:27:070:27:09

-I'll try and get a bigger one.

-Sorry.

-He's gone?

-Yes.

0:27:090:27:12

-There's a few gobbly ones here.

-Ah, well done.

-Well, done, Leonie.

0:27:120:27:16

I will not let go of this one. Hello, mate.

0:27:160:27:19

-They're nice, aren't they?

-They are lovely.

0:27:210:27:23

I think they're beautiful close up. These spotty feathers, they're gorgeous.

0:27:230:27:27

It's a disco diva, this one.

0:27:270:27:30

And they are fantastic characters. They've got a lot more attitude than chickens.

0:27:300:27:34

Oh, yes. I know that if I let go of this one's legs, it's going to be...

0:27:340:27:37

-He'll be off.

-He's going to be off like John Travolta.

0:27:370:27:39

-Three, two, one.

-Three, two, one... leg it!

0:27:390:27:42

-Look at him.

-I think we can safely say

0:27:430:27:46

-they never want to see you two again.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:460:27:50

We've got a very holistic approach to the way that we farm here.

0:27:500:27:53

And that starts right back at the stage of growing the food that we feed the chickens.

0:27:530:27:57

We've done a lot of work in the last few years

0:27:570:28:00

creating wildlife habitats around the edge of the crops and also within them.

0:28:000:28:05

And the idea is then you're encouraging beneficial wildlife

0:28:050:28:08

which helps with the husbandry of the crops.

0:28:080:28:11

-But also I love the fact that the farm is alive with wildlife.

-Yes.

0:28:110:28:16

What we can do now maybe is let them out.

0:28:160:28:19

JAUNTY MUSIC PLAYS

0:28:190:28:22

Like a lass with a raincoat over her head running for a bus.

0:28:250:28:29

-They've got really strong legs, haven't they?

-Yeah, they have.

0:28:290:28:32

They're bred to run. And I honestly think that meat is going to have a lot more character

0:28:320:28:37

if it's from an animal or a bird

0:28:370:28:39

that's experienced as natural a life as we as farmers can give them.

0:28:390:28:43

-Well, brilliant.

-Great. Good on you, Leonie.

-Hats off to you. Can't wait to taste your guinea fowl.

0:28:430:28:48

-Shall we go to the kitchen, then?

-Oh, yes.

-Oh, yes.

0:28:480:28:51

Yes! So, Leonie, do you have any cooking tips?

0:28:540:28:56

One of the most important things to remember with guinea fowl,

0:28:560:29:00

you haven't got the sort of fat covering you'd have on a chicken.

0:29:000:29:03

So, treat it a bit more like a game bird.

0:29:030:29:05

Guinea fowl can take some good spicing and good flavours, can't it?

0:29:050:29:08

Yeah. I mean, you shouldn't be afraid of using flavours with it.

0:29:080:29:12

I'm going to have a piece of thigh.

0:29:120:29:14

-Oh, yeah. Goodness me!

-So, you're really getting a good...

0:29:150:29:19

-Yes.

-Robust flavour from that, hopefully.

0:29:190:29:21

If somebody's familiar to eating chicken they're going to love guinea fowl, aren't they?

0:29:210:29:25

I've made a casserole.

0:29:250:29:27

It's basically a white wine version of coq au vin.

0:29:270:29:31

Guinea fowl really stands up well to casseroling - it keeps its texture.

0:29:310:29:35

Oh, that's lovely. Oh, yeah.

0:29:350:29:37

Let's go and choose you a couple.

0:29:370:29:39

-Cor, yes.

-They're lovely, aren't they?

0:29:390:29:41

I think you'll do well with these.

0:29:410:29:43

-We cannot fail to win with them, Dave.

-Fantastic.

0:29:430:29:46

-Thank you very much.

-Well, all the best with them.

0:29:460:29:49

To take on James, we'll use both the breasts and the thighs

0:29:570:30:00

of the guinea fowl, served with a caramelised apple risotto.

0:30:000:30:03

And we'll complete the dish with another true taste of Gloucestershire.

0:30:030:30:07

When you're riding around this county in spring time,

0:30:130:30:16

it's impossible to avoid the golden hue of the rape fields.

0:30:160:30:19

And now they produce a home-grown rival to olive oil.

0:30:190:30:23

When faced with poor prices for his crops, farmer Hamish Campbell

0:30:230:30:26

took a gamble and began to make his own cold-pressed rapeseed oil.

0:30:260:30:30

The entire process from harvesting to bottling takes place right here on the family farm.

0:30:300:30:36

-Hello, are you Hamish?

-I am.

-Hamish the oil man?

0:30:370:30:41

Here's a bottle each. This our cold-pressed rapeseed oil.

0:30:410:30:44

All made and grown on the farm.

0:30:440:30:46

Now, rapeseed oil, it's a good alternative to olive oil, isn't it?

0:30:460:30:49

It's very low in saturated fats.

0:30:490:30:51

Only 7%. Most olive oils are between 9 and 15.

0:30:510:30:54

And a vegetable oil can be as high as 20%.

0:30:540:30:57

Because of the way we produce it, it's just a very natural, unadulterated product.

0:30:570:31:01

Most people say it's either nutty or asparagus.

0:31:010:31:04

-Oh, yeah.

-Oh, yeah. It's lovely. Lovely great nutty flavour to it.

0:31:040:31:07

Hamish, what's the difference between your oil

0:31:070:31:10

and a standard vegetable oil, that you would get in a supermarket?

0:31:100:31:14

Normal bottle of oil is refined.

0:31:140:31:17

So, it's chemically extracted using hexane and paraffin.

0:31:170:31:20

It's then deodorised, anti-foaming agents are added.

0:31:200:31:23

-That's why you get a very see-through bland product.

-Sounds dreadful.

0:31:230:31:27

Hamish, I'm really interested to see the whole pressing process that you do with the oil.

0:31:270:31:31

-Is there any chance of having a look?

-Yeah, do.

-Brilliant.

0:31:310:31:34

These are some of our fields behind me. That's a field of rapeseed

0:31:360:31:39

being grown on Cotswold limestone brash. It's a very shallow soil.

0:31:390:31:44

Very free draining. So it dries out very quickly.

0:31:440:31:47

And we feel it adds to the flavour.

0:31:470:31:49

Right. Well, this is some rapeseed coming in.

0:31:530:31:55

The yellow flowers you see are the, the rapeseed being pollinated.

0:31:550:31:59

It sets a flower and after flowering, each plant sets like a pod.

0:31:590:32:04

-It looks like a little pea pod.

-Right.

0:32:040:32:06

Inside that pea pod is lots of these tiny little black seeds.

0:32:060:32:10

It looks like caviar.

0:32:100:32:12

-I wish it was.

-Yeah.

-So, the little pods get crushed in the combine and that's what comes out.

0:32:120:32:18

-These little black seeds.

-What happens next, Hamish?

0:32:180:32:21

-Wow.

-This is where it all happens.

0:32:220:32:24

Very simple process.

0:32:240:32:25

-Obviously the rape is cleaned, and then falls down into the tiny little hopper above the press.

-Yes.

0:32:250:32:31

And then it goes through a very slow squeezing process.

0:32:310:32:33

We don't crush the rapeseed. We squeeze it.

0:32:330:32:36

-Right.

-And as you can see the oil very slowly comes out underneath the presses.

0:32:360:32:41

This is a very simple process.

0:32:410:32:44

And therefore you get a really good high quality unadulterated oil.

0:32:440:32:47

-Brilliant.

-And that's the residue of the husks, really?

0:32:470:32:50

Yes, that is cold-pressed cake.

0:32:500:32:53

And we either use that for animal feed,

0:32:530:32:55

-some people use it to heat houses in wood burners.

-Oh, brilliant.

0:32:550:32:58

It's great. There's nothing wasted.

0:32:580:33:01

-I'm a convert to rapeseed.

-Well, I am too.

-It's great.

0:33:010:33:03

-That's what we want.

-You could call that Gloucestershire crude, couldn't you?

-Yeah.

0:33:030:33:07

-We're not quite JR yet. But...

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:070:33:10

Here we go. We've come up with something a bit different.

0:33:110:33:14

-Because you did really.

-Yeah.

-We've shied away from the conventional.

0:33:140:33:17

-So, you've gone for guinea fowl.

-Yes.

0:33:170:33:19

-We're doing a celebration of guinea fowl.

-It's like two meals in one.

0:33:190:33:23

We're doing the breast with a lime and pepper paste, really.

0:33:230:33:26

Served with a Gloucestershire apple risotto.

0:33:260:33:29

And we've got a lovely micro salad with a rapeseed and citrus vinaigrette.

0:33:290:33:33

And then the thighs are going to be boned.

0:33:330:33:35

-And we're making a rapeseed oil rocket pesto.

-I'm concerned.

0:33:350:33:38

-I am concerned now.

-See, see?

0:33:380:33:41

But will the local diners think our dish is good enough to beat James in the blind tasting?

0:33:410:33:46

Now, what we're going to do though...

0:33:460:33:49

We're just burning off their feathers, basically.

0:33:490:33:52

Just any little... any little claws or feathers.

0:33:520:33:55

-And this tightens up the meat, doesn't it?

-It tightens the skin up.

0:33:550:33:58

Makes the skin a bit more resilient when they cook.

0:33:580:34:01

-I think I've set mine on fire.

-Hey, James. Hope you haven't got any customers next door.

0:34:010:34:05

You won't have for long with this stink. "What are they cooking?"

0:34:050:34:08

-Should I get the breasts off?

-See, these are easier as well.

0:34:080:34:12

A lot of guinea fowl have got the really wobbly breastbone.

0:34:120:34:14

Whereas these, because they've been raised really nicely they've got nice straight strong bones.

0:34:140:34:19

-You know Leonie, don't you?

-I do, yeah, yeah.

0:34:190:34:21

She's a top lass who produces great chickens and great guinea fowl.

0:34:210:34:24

Nice tidy.

0:34:240:34:26

Oh, look at that.

0:34:260:34:28

-And the thighs and the meat.

-That's a smashing portion, that.

-Isn't it?

0:34:280:34:31

It would easily feed four people by the time you got the legs and everything else.

0:34:310:34:35

I've just flattened that thigh out. I've felt where the bone is.

0:34:350:34:39

And I'm going to, with a smaller knife, loosen that bone away from the flesh.

0:34:390:34:43

-It just comes away so nice and easily, doesn't it?

-It does.

0:34:430:34:46

-It's just lovely. There we are.

-Look at that. Beautiful.

0:34:460:34:49

Wash hands because I've been handling poultry and I'm now going on to the vegetable section.

0:34:490:34:53

Great, look at that. Hey, you're going to get some stock out of that.

0:34:530:34:57

Now, what we're going to do while Si carries on boning and portioning the thighs,

0:34:570:35:01

we're going to make a pesto.

0:35:010:35:03

We've got Gloucestershire cheeses.

0:35:030:35:05

How about these - half single Gloucester and half Leonard Stanley?

0:35:050:35:08

-I don't think you'll go wrong with that.

-So, I'm putting the cheese in me processor.

0:35:080:35:12

I've got a bowl of basil and rocket.

0:35:120:35:15

Some toasted pine nuts. A glove of garlic.

0:35:150:35:18

-Can't have pesto without garlic.

-And we've roasted the pine nuts as well.

0:35:180:35:21

Just to kind of come underneath that.

0:35:210:35:24

Put some salt in there...

0:35:240:35:26

and some black pepper.

0:35:260:35:28

All that's missing is the oil.

0:35:280:35:30

But first I'm going to blast this down to a paste.

0:35:300:35:33

It's going down now.

0:35:330:35:36

Now, just drizzle the oil in.

0:35:360:35:38

-Wow. Oh, yes. Don't know why I'm sounding so surprised really. It really is very good.

-Right, dude.

0:35:460:35:52

-That's the thighs boned out.

-Right. So, let's build.

0:35:520:35:55

That's going to really help moisten those legs as well. It'll be lovely.

0:35:550:35:59

Oh, aye. Cor, smashing. Look at that, lovely neat parcel.

0:35:590:36:02

She's a thick-skinned bird.

0:36:020:36:04

Right. And then we...

0:36:070:36:08

because we want that to brown, don't we, on the top?

0:36:080:36:11

-And repeat.

-They're always the best bits of any bird, aren't they?

0:36:130:36:16

-The legs. So, what's next?

-Ah, now.

0:36:160:36:18

-Apple risotto.

-Apple risotto.

0:36:180:36:20

-Shall I cut the apples?

-Yeah. Some of this fabulous local butter.

0:36:200:36:24

-Netherend Farm. As good an English butter as I've ever had.

-Absolutely.

0:36:240:36:28

So, we're just gonna put some butter in here like that.

0:36:280:36:31

And then some rapeseed oil. About, I don't know, tablespoon.

0:36:310:36:34

This is a litre of vegetable stock.

0:36:360:36:39

So, we're going to heat that up.

0:36:390:36:40

-I'm going to add the risotto rice and just coat it.

-All I've done...

0:36:400:36:46

I've got two apples. I've peeled them, cored them and sliced them.

0:36:460:36:51

I've got some boiling water and I'm going to add the zest of one lemon.

0:36:510:36:55

Blanch these apples for three minutes. Apples go in.

0:36:550:36:58

You're just looking to just soften them?

0:36:580:37:00

Yup. Then we're going to fry them in butter to caramelize them.

0:37:000:37:04

Right, three minutes!

0:37:040:37:06

That's these apples out.

0:37:060:37:08

And I'm going to dry them on some kitchen roll.

0:37:080:37:11

Put me butter back on. Right, apples go in.

0:37:110:37:14

And there's still bits of lemon zest clinging to those apples.

0:37:140:37:18

The stock's hot enough now.

0:37:180:37:20

So, all I'm going to do is just add a ladle at a time.

0:37:200:37:24

Oh, look at that, man.

0:37:240:37:25

-Oh, man, man.

-And then just stir it until all of the moisture is absorbed into the rice.

0:37:250:37:31

And then you add another ladle.

0:37:310:37:34

And just keep repeating the process until all of that stock is absorbed into the rice.

0:37:340:37:40

Those apples are looking really good.

0:37:400:37:42

I'm going to use this good quality fatty bacon.

0:37:420:37:45

To render it down to use the fat to sear the guinea fowl breasts.

0:37:450:37:49

A splash of rapeseed oil in.

0:37:490:37:52

Just to get it going.

0:37:520:37:54

So, how long do you reckon that risotto's going to take to cook?

0:37:560:38:00

-About 20 minutes.

-For the paste, for the guinea fowl breasts, I've got some lime.

0:38:000:38:04

Going to do some zest.

0:38:040:38:06

-Full of really volatile oils, lime zest, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:38:060:38:09

Juice that half a lime.

0:38:090:38:11

Some thyme.

0:38:110:38:13

I'm just going to add three tablespoons of good English wine.

0:38:130:38:18

This is from the Three Choirs vineyard.

0:38:180:38:21

-Which is a local vineyard here, isn't it, James?

-Yeah.

0:38:210:38:24

And then I'm going to add three tablespoons of good old Gloucestershire apple juice.

0:38:240:38:28

You cannot whack it, can you?

0:38:280:38:30

Clove of garlic. Some cracked peppercorns.

0:38:300:38:35

Some salt, pepper...

0:38:350:38:38

and a couple of tablespoons of rapeseed oil.

0:38:380:38:41

Want me to whizz them up for you?

0:38:410:38:44

Be lovely.

0:38:440:38:46

-Great, dude. Them lardons are doing canny.

-Dip that. That's the rub.

0:38:460:38:50

We just need to sear the guinea fowl breast in the reduced lardons.

0:38:530:38:57

Whoa!

0:39:000:39:02

Yeah, look - just, just nicely sealed.

0:39:020:39:06

Yeah. The fat and the skin of those is rendered out lovely, isn't it?

0:39:060:39:09

I'm going to take this off, dude.

0:39:090:39:12

And just let it sit for a minute.

0:39:120:39:14

-Put them in there.

-Yeah, they're lovely, eh?

0:39:140:39:17

I'm just going to give these a couple of slashes.

0:39:170:39:21

-Just to help the rub penetrate?

-Yup.

-Yeah.

0:39:210:39:23

-Lush. They look great.

-Yeah.

0:39:230:39:26

-This is quite intense, so...

-Not going to need a lot of that

0:39:260:39:29

-which that much pepper and lime in it, is it?

-No. Into the oven.

0:39:290:39:32

Moderate, 180... 15 minutes.

0:39:320:39:34

Right.

0:39:340:39:36

Now, I'm going to add the parmesan to the risotto.

0:39:360:39:38

Because if we use any other cheese then parmesan, it has the chance of splitting.

0:39:380:39:42

Becomes oily and it separates. We don't want that.

0:39:420:39:45

-These apples have come up lovely colour.

-Haven't they?

-Look at that.

0:39:450:39:49

Now, a few sage leaves.

0:39:490:39:51

Just chop it nice and finely.

0:39:510:39:53

So, we're going to put that in there like that.

0:39:530:39:55

-I'm just going to add the apples.

-I can start doing the breasts.

-Right.

0:39:550:40:00

-Look at that lovely caramelization there.

-Yup.

0:40:000:40:02

I'm with you.

0:40:060:40:08

Oh, aye. That's what I thought. I think we're there, Kingy.

0:40:080:40:12

-Grand, just going to dress it.

-Rapeseed and citrus vinaigrette.

0:40:120:40:16

-I think you've done justice to some really good produce there. Fantastic.

-There we have it.

0:40:160:40:21

-Really good job.

-A celebration of guinea fowl, from Gloucestershire.

0:40:210:40:25

-With an apple risotto.

-A fabulous stuffed guinea fowl thigh with lovely pesto.

0:40:250:40:30

And a nice kind of micro salad with a rapeseed and citrus vinaigrette.

0:40:300:40:34

-There you are, James. Tell us what you think.

-I'm really keen to try this thigh.

0:40:380:40:42

Because I think that's going to be absolutely brilliant.

0:40:420:40:45

And the skin's lovely and crispy. And it's really nice and tender.

0:40:450:40:48

-What do we reckon?

-I think that's brilliant. Pesto's quite rich, you know.

0:40:500:40:54

-Yeah.

-But the citrus really brings out that nice balance. Gives it a nice edge.

0:40:540:40:59

And I bet this risotto's just as good as well. So...

0:40:590:41:02

I think I'm up against it, to be fair.

0:41:040:41:07

It's crunch time. The diners here will taste both dishes but without any idea who cooked which.

0:41:080:41:14

First up is James's fillet of zander with crayfish jelly and a 60-degree egg yolk.

0:41:140:41:19

Well, I was impressed by the foam. My taste buds were zooming.

0:41:190:41:24

Everybody thinks of Gloucestershire as being old-fashioned and stuffy.

0:41:240:41:28

But actually it's quite contemporary and I think the dish was like that.

0:41:280:41:32

The cheek...the crust was really crisp and then really soft cheek inside. Lovely.

0:41:320:41:37

The vegetables were just on the bite. And the duck egg and the froth and things,

0:41:370:41:41

they really complemented the fish.

0:41:410:41:42

It was cooked to perfection. It was fantastic. It's just not a particularly tasty fish.

0:41:420:41:47

Very unusual presentation. And the flavour was beautiful. I finished everything on the plate.

0:41:470:41:51

'That seemed to go down very well. How will our dish fare?'

0:41:510:41:55

The apple risotto I loved.

0:41:550:41:57

-I could go home and cook that.

-In the thigh was pesto and basil,

0:41:570:42:01

and things that I wouldn't have put with a guinea fowl. Lots of ideas.

0:42:010:42:04

High point? Definitely the thigh, I think. Really enjoyed that.

0:42:040:42:08

The breast for me was was a touch on the dry side.

0:42:080:42:11

I liked the risotto. The micro salad... it's a bit hit and miss.

0:42:110:42:14

I loved the colour of the salad, as well.

0:42:140:42:16

-Because that complimented the pesto.

-The rapeseed oil dressing...

0:42:160:42:21

In May, Gloucestershire is covered with yellow fields everywhere.

0:42:210:42:24

So, yeah, Gloucestershire. Definitely.

0:42:240:42:28

-Hello, how are you?

-APPLAUSE AND CHEERS

0:42:280:42:32

-Wow! Now, that's a reception and a half, isn't it?

-That was a double Gloucester welcome.

-Wasn't it?

0:42:320:42:37

That was brilliant, thank you.

0:42:370:42:38

Well, we've had a great time. We've been blessed with the weather. So we've been flying around the lanes.

0:42:380:42:43

And we'd just like to say thanks very much. Absolutely top drawer.

0:42:430:42:47

Now to the nitty-gritty of it all really.

0:42:470:42:50

For the fish dish, please, could I have a show of hands?

0:42:500:42:54

One, two, three, four, five. OK, thank you.

0:42:540:42:59

And for the guinea fowl dish, could I have a show of hands, please?

0:42:590:43:02

One, two, three, four.

0:43:020:43:05

The fish dish...was James's.

0:43:050:43:08

APPLAUSE

0:43:080:43:10

We've got to thank James for his hospitality.

0:43:140:43:17

-You've got a fabulous restaurant here.

-Yes.

-And we've had a hoot.

0:43:170:43:21

-We have.

-Thank you so much.

0:43:210:43:23

James's zander was a worthy winner. It was one of the most innovative dishes we've come up against.

0:43:230:43:29

Gloucestershire is a beautiful county full of people who really know and love their food.

0:43:290:43:34

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:440:43:47

Email [email protected]

0:43:470:43:51

Si and Dave explore Gloucestershire, where they cook a traditional county favourite at Gloucester's Docks. They find guinea fowl in the Cotswolds and a British alternative to olive oil. Finally, they face a cook-off against top chef James Graham. Restaurant diners decide who has created the best taste of Gloucestershire in a blind tasting.


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