Lincolnshire The Hairy Bikers' Food Tour of Britain


Lincolnshire

The Hairy Bikers look for the best of each county's larder. In Lincolnshire, they taste free-range beef and lamb, and get their hands dirty on a cauliflower farm.


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Transcript


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We're here to find regional recipes to rev up your appetite.

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-We're riding county to county to discover, cook and enjoy the best of British.

-Come on!

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We're here to define the true taste of Lincolnshire.

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It's a bit flat, isn't it?

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Flat? David, the great DH Lawrence once wrote of this magnificent land

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his endless love of the horizontal,

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where the great levels of sky and land in Lincolnshire

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meant to him the eternity of the will.

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But you can't eat levels of sky and land, can you?

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You can if you grow stuff on them.

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Lincolnshire produces one fifth of the fresh produce of Britain

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and has the greatest proportion of Grade 1 double-cropping super land.

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-You've been on the internet again, haven't you?

-There's a few bits going on up there, son.

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There's got be more to it than the humble Lincolnshire sausage.

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-It'll be good, this.

-It will. Let's go for a coast.

-Come on.

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On our quest to define the true flavours of Lincolnshire,

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we drive into the cathedral town of Lincoln to bake a traditional dish served the local way.

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We visit a farm specialising in native rare breeds,

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where Dave finds he really can talk to the animals.

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HE GOBBLES LIKE TURKEY

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And we're forced to put our backs into it and do some hard labour,

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harvesting cauliflowers.

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Representing Lincolnshire in the cook-off is Colin McGurran.

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Will we be able to beat him using the county's finest ingredients?

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We're off to Louth to bend the ears of the people of Lincolnshire

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and find out what sums up their county on a plate.

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-What a beautiful town!

-Isn't it?

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Maybe it's a good place to look for a sausage or a poacher.

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Rick Stein said it was one of the food capitals of Britain.

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-Did he?

-Yeah.

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Hello, ladies. How are you?

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What are the iconic ingredients or dishes of Lincolnshire?

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-I breed cattle so beef, mate!

-Ah, brilliant!

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When you drive from Skegness down to Boston, you can smell cabbages.

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We do like Lincolnshire sausages.

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We are mainly down for the sausages. Lincolnshire sausages.

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-What are Lincolnshire sausages like?

-Very nice.

-Beautiful.

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They're just nice.

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This shop, Lakings, it's an institution in Louth.

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It's one of the great Lincolnshire pork butchers.

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If we're going to get fine Lincolnshire products, this is the place to start.

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The original Lincolnshire sausage made in this building for 100 years.

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-In Lincolnshire, you put herbs into your sausage.

-It's English sage that makes the flavour.

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This is one of the best sausages I've ever had.

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At this point I could almost be converted from the Cumberland.

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I've never had Lincolnshire sausage like this. This is the real thing.

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What else do you have that is particular to Lincolnshire?

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We have the Lincolnshire haslet, which takes the pork sausage a step further.

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It's a roasted sausage meat,

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but there's something else in there as well.

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-Pig's liver.

-Yes, it's pigs liver.

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-It's wonderful.

-It is.

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-This is Lincolnshire stuffed chine.

-What's the chine?

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The chine is a section cut out of the neck of a pig served on the bone.

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In fact, a few years ago, when they wanted us to chop all the pork down to check the spinal cord,

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we had to get parliamentary approval

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to say that we could still serve our chine on the bone.

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Look at that, man!

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What else is in there? Parsley. Mint?

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And a little bit of onion.

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We're preparing some stuffed chine at the moment.

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-Would you like to see how it's done?

-Ooh, yeah. Aye!

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This is a pair of shoulders of pork, delivered this morning.

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We saw down either side of the spine.

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Is it only Lincolnshire that does a stuffed chine?

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It's very unique to Lincolnshire.

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This is the basic chine.

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This is now cured, packed in salt, ready for preparation.

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-The same as you would do if you were making bacon?

-Exactly.

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We're cutting into this,

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and you work all the way down the side here and prepare it like that.

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-So there's little pockets where you can stuff the herbs.

-Exactly.

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These are like pages in a book.

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Every two years, we have a competition in Lincoln

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and one category is stuffed chine.

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In Louth, it's very hotly contested between the local butchers.

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They will mark you on how evenly you slice it up.

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Lincolnshire meat is clearly special but there's so much more on offer.

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What to you is the taste of Lincolnshire?

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-Lincolnshire plum bread. Delicious!

-Really?

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Lincolnshire plum bread is a great favourite.

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What do you have with a plum bread?

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Lincolnshire poacher cheese.

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Definitely Lincolnshire plum bread, but you have it with proper butter and cheese.

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-Have you got any tips for plum bread?

-You've got to put the water and the fat in hot.

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Everybody is going on about Lincolnshire plum bread.

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A baker's. Got to find out what it is.

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That's our plum bread. Would you like to try some?

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-Not half!

-Look at that!

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-It's packed with fruit.

-It's made with sultanas, raisins, currants.

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It's spiced, like a really good teacake.

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Traditional recipe?

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It is traditional, yes. It's made with all local ingredients.

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-The true taste of Lincolnshire.

-It is, yeah.

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-We can have a go at that.

-D'you reckon?

-I reckon we can.

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-I think we should.

-That's decided.

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We'll cook plum bread, but we need some local cheese to go with it.

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This cheese shop sells every local variety from Cote Hill Blue

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to Yellow Belly, but it's the poacher we're interested in.

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I'll let you taste this vintage poacher.

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This would be made in August '07.

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When you cut the truckle open and smell it, you can smell the summer.

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Wow! Yes, you can!

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-It's beautiful.

-Very nice, isn't it?

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Could I take a nice big slice of Lincolnshire poacher, please? Cheers.

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We've got all the poacher we need, so now it's time to get baking.

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Lincoln is the county town of Lincolnshire,

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famous for its stunning cathedral, a landmark that can be seen for miles.

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Today it's home to our mobile kitchen, where we'll be cooking

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Lincolnshire plum bread topped with local poacher cheese.

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There's a lot of hungry mouths to feed!

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Here we are, Lincoln Cathedral, amidst a posse of yellow bellies!

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-Here we are!

-We're making your traditional plum bread.

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Plumming means the drying of fruit.

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It doesn't mean to say you have to have plums in it.

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Before we get started, we're gonna make a nice cup of tea.

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We're using Earl Gray because it's slightly scented.

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What we're doing is infusing the fruit with the tea.

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As Kingy's chopping his prunes, half a pack of butter goes into a pan for melting.

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Hey. Prunes, quartered!

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We'll put these in a glass bowl because it makes it easier to see the infusion.

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-Got some raisins and sultanas as well.

-Fruit that has been plummed.

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We've got a lovely pot of Earl Gray tea.

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-CATHEDRAL BELL CHIMES

-Somebody's at the door.

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Look at that!

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Let those steep.

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In a bowl, we're going to put good Lincolnshire knobbly eggs.

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-That's what it says on the box.

-It does - knobbly eggs!

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Knobbly eggs!

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To that, we want...

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..150 mls of full milk.

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Full milk.

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To that, we want six tablespoons of soft brown sugar.

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-Five...

-Six!

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Now into that we whisk the butter to form an emulsification of great joy.

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Now we add the spicy stuff.

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One and a half teaspoons of allspice

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-and lovely cinnamon.

-We love cinnamon.

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Give the dry goods a whisk in.

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Vanilla extract. Never use vanilla essence.

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Essence is chemicals - it's not good.

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Vanilla paste is good as well.

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Lastly, add the yeast.

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Look at that. It's lovely, that.

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Flour. What we'll do is mix this with that.

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-Whack it in, dude, whack it in. That's it.

-Just work that through.

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It's time to strain the fruit.

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Be careful, because these might be a bit hot.

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Can you see how they've all plumped up?

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What you need to do is work the fruit into the dough.

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It needs to be a soft, unctuous mixture and...

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CROWD LAUGHS

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What have you done to our set? Oh, Myers, man!

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Wait a minute. Right.

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That's it. You're a liability, you!

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What we need to do is work the fruit all the way through

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-that lovely, doughy, gorgeous mixture.

-You don't want clusters of fruit.

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The dough needs to be kneaded. It's time to knead it.

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I'll flour the board.

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-What's your name?

-Jake.

-Great. Shorty, here, hold that.

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Good lad.

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Don't pinch it!

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Right. Shorty, come here. Pull this up, would you?

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-Me sleeve!

-I'll take that.

-No, the other way, you loony!

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This is a soft dough.

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One of the rules about bread-making, be it plum bread or bread bread,

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-the softer the dough, the better the loaf.

-Now...

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There is no right or wrong way to knead dough.

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What you're doing is releasing the proteins

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and encouraging the elasticity...

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You're encouraging the elasticity all right!

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I think a tad more flour might be in order, dude.

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Lovely.

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Put that in a bowl.

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Cover that with cling film or a damp tea towel

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and leave to prove for a couple of hours.

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That's another bread myth,

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you have to put it in the airing cupboard. You don't.

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It just takes longer to rise.

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The slower the proving, the wetter the dough, the better the loaf.

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However, we do have a proving oven.

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Pop this to rise for a couple of hours.

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Here's one we did earlier!

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-CROWD CHEERS

-As you can see, it's full of life.

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-BEEPING

-That came out the oven, but that was a proving oven.

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-Hello!

-I thought it was a Tesco's truck.

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You know - beep, beep, beep...

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I thought it was the timer on the oven!

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So, we need to knock the air out of this

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before we put it into the oven.

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At this point you can start to smell the yeast activating in the loaf.

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-It's lovely.

-Oh, yes!

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Take a loaf tin, non-stick or otherwise...

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And put it there! Like that!

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It's a good idea to plop it in, it gets the air out.

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Just put it down like that, then leave that again

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with a tea-towel over it to double in size for about an hour.

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We'll just pretend this has been left for an hour, left to rise.

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We'll put this in the oven to bake.

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It'll take about an hour in a medium-high oven.

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So, here we go.

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About an hour later, we'll pop out your Lincolnshire plum bread.

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This is what it should look like.

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Look! See? What a set of loaves, missus!

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It's plump, it's juicy, it's spicy.

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Aah! Look at that - it's still steaming.

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-Nice, that. Nice texture.

-Lovely.

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We've got butter, and add to that a sliver of poacher,

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one of the finest cheeses ever.

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There we have it, a taste of paradise.

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Lincolnshire plum bread, poacher cheese and good company.

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What more could you want?

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I hope we've done Lincolnshire proud.

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There's only one way to find out.

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-Help yourselves.

-Just dive in, gang.

-Make sure you get a bit of cheese.

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Mmm, fantastic!

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Just like my nan used to make. It is spot on.

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That looks gorgeous.

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-There you are.

-It looks really nice.

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-Thanks, darling.

-It's too delicious to describe.

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Too delicious to describe! You can't get better than that, can you?

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That seemed to do the trick!

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A fruit loaf with cheese is a great tasty mix.

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But our next challenge is just around the corner.

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We're taking on one of the county's top chefs in their restaurant,

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using local ingredients to see who can best define the taste of the region.

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It'll be up to local diners to decide

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whose dish best represents the true flavours of Lincolnshire.

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Our opponent today is Colin McGurran,

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head chef and owner of Winteringham Fields.

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Colin bought the restaurant aged 28, and since he's been in charge

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it's been recognised by the Good Food Guide as the 4th best restaurant in the UK.

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I started off in France at Domaines Hauts de Loire,

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which is two-Michelin-starred.

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Very similar to this. It was in the country, a hunting lodge.

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The style of what I'm doing now is what I remember from all those years ago.

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Lincolnshire is very, very good for produce.

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It's very flat, easy farming land.

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We're lucky with vegetables and the things we get.

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Lincoln red beef, salt marsh lamb.

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Out of all the counties, Lincolnshire is one that's very much focused on rural market produce.

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We try and grow what we can.

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We have a herb garden.

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We have our own lamb, poultry, eggs.

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The eggs are fantastic, great for souffles, creme brulees.

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When you look after your own produce, you have a greater respect for it.

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There's no wastage.

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You don't burn it as often. You take good care of it.

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But ultimately the flavour is a lot better.

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A lot of chefs get it wrong, they think about presentation first.

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If you get a really pretty plate in front of you,

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by the time you've had two mouthfuls, it's ruined.

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The most important thing is flavour, without a doubt.

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To take on the bikers, my taste of Lincolnshire will be

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Lincolnshire haslet beignet,

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pigs' trotter sauce, sage foam and rhubarb puree.

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Bring it on!

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-Wa-hey!

-How are you doing? Welcome.

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Pleased to meet you. How's things?

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-Nice to see you.

-How you doing?

-Yeah, good.

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Well, come in, guys.

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Colin, what are you going to do for us today?

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Today, guys, I'm going to do a local beignet of haslet.

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And we're going to sit that on some pigs' trotters.

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-A sage foam and some rhubarb puree with that as well.

-Sounds beautiful.

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-I'm going to start off with the beignet mix.

-What's a beignet?

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Beignet's like a doughnut mix.

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Melt some butter into the water.

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Let that boil away. When that boils, I add my flour.

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Beat the flour in. Then we add the egg yolks and the eggs.

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-Just like a choux pastry?

-Exactly like a choux pastry.

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This dish here is very old-fashioned.

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The rhubarb now and the haslet go very well.

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The tartness of the rhubarb works really well

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with the richness of the haslet and the pork. They work well together.

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Salt marsh pork? I always associate salt marsh with lamb.

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Yeah. You can do the same with pork, and you get a lot more flavour to your pork.

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This next stage is very important.

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What we're doing now, we're going to mix in the flour.

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We make choux pastry. You've done this before, haven't you?

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This is the part they all turn wrong and I ended up with a pot of putty.

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-I don't know what happened.

-Temperature's important.

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If you throw it all in together, it's better than adding it bit by bit.

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It's important to keep beating. If you don't, it will soften.

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You want to get that gluten out and get it quite gooey and stretchy.

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-So while that's cooling, we'll get on with the haslet.

-What's in it?

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This one is pork mince.

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It's sage, onion, a lot of different seasonings as well.

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So when you use that into another mixture,

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you get the roasted flavour without roasting it.

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OK, so next we're going to add my eggs, one at a time.

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If it's too hot, you'll cook the eggs.

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You see a bit of steam coming off, which is OK,

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-but you don't want to start curdling it.

-You don't want scrambled eggs.

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So, while that's mixing now, the rhubarb should be just stewing.

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Add a bit of sugar to that, rhubarb does get a bit of tartness.

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We don't want to cook rhubarb too much so it stews,

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because when you try and blend it, all the fibres will get tangled.

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So now I'm just going to quickly chop some shallots and add that to the mix.

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So that's all ready.

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-Great.

-Just let that rest now.

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The next thing, the trotter sauce.

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-You like trotters?

-Yeah, love them.

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Pigs' trotters, soak overnight.

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Then next morning, put them into a selection of vegetables,

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carrots, leeks, things like that.

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We won't infuse too much flavour. We just want the skin.

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We're just going to work away the meat from the bone.

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Even the flesh here is fabulous.

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You can pull it apart, there's no weight with that. Then you're off.

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Is that OK to stand? I won't drop...

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The final thing I'm going to add to that is some pork trim,

0:17:390:17:44

some belly as well.

0:17:440:17:45

-You can see how white that is.

-That's fabulous.

0:17:450:17:48

A nice layering of fat there.

0:17:480:17:52

If you do me the honours of just folding that pork into that mix

0:17:520:17:55

then I can get on with these trotters.

0:17:550:17:58

There's the trotters. Take quite a bit of the fat off

0:17:580:18:01

because the fat on the trotter is gelatinous, quite unpleasant.

0:18:010:18:04

Basically, I've made some stock...

0:18:040:18:07

-Would that be a demi-glace, chef?

-Ooh!

0:18:070:18:10

So all we're going to do now, I'll add the trotters and let that stew.

0:18:100:18:14

and it'll just dissolve some of the trotters into there as well.

0:18:140:18:18

OK, voila.

0:18:180:18:20

OK, so that's just going to sit there and rest.

0:18:200:18:23

Now we're going to make the rhubarb.

0:18:230:18:27

I've got a bit too much liquid, so I'm going to strain some of it away.

0:18:270:18:31

We're just going to blend it. Got a nice bit of kit here.

0:18:310:18:34

It blitzes pretty much everything you can think of.

0:18:340:18:37

Horsepower in a blender. They are, aren't they?

0:18:370:18:40

-I think it's about five horsepower.

-Yeah!

0:18:400:18:43

Just to break it up.

0:18:430:18:44

-Voila.

-Wow.

-There's no messing about, just rhubarb, sugar, water.

0:18:490:18:53

-That's it.

-That's it.

-Yeah.

0:18:530:18:55

And now I'm just going to let that rest there as well.

0:18:550:18:57

Next thing we're going to do is make a quite exciting thing.

0:18:570:19:01

We're going to make a sage foam.

0:19:010:19:03

Chef? Any chance of a suck at the bone of the trotter?

0:19:030:19:05

-Suck on the bone! Yeah!

-You know, I like them.

0:19:050:19:09

-I'm going to boil some milk.

-Ohhh...

0:19:090:19:11

-You really... I thought you were joking!

-No, I like it!

0:19:110:19:14

I can't believe he's done that!

0:19:140:19:16

My dog does that.

0:19:180:19:19

Your dog's probably got more table manners!

0:19:210:19:24

OK, so now we've got the sage.

0:19:240:19:27

-That's a lot of sage!

-When you boil anything with greens, herbs,

0:19:270:19:32

if you boil it in milk and it gets too hot,

0:19:320:19:34

it'll turn like hay, you know, you get that kind of wet grass taste.

0:19:340:19:38

So what we're going to do

0:19:380:19:39

is just blanche that in there and then blitz it.

0:19:390:19:42

That's a traditional flavour of Lincolnshire. Lincolnshire sausage.

0:19:420:19:46

Most Lincolnshire sausages have sage and onion and all sorts.

0:19:460:19:49

That's cos you add herbs, isn't it? In Cumbria, we add pepper.

0:19:490:19:54

Cumberland sausages, very spicy.

0:19:540:19:56

-I don't know if you can smell that...

-Oh, yes.

0:19:560:19:58

Once you've got to that stage, we're going to blitz it.

0:19:580:20:02

That's pretty much it. Now we're just going to strain it.

0:20:070:20:10

Cor! The smell!

0:20:120:20:15

Stick your beak in there. Fabulous.

0:20:150:20:18

This part about the foam,

0:20:180:20:20

you could hand-blend it and it would foam up.

0:20:200:20:22

But as soon as you put it on the plate, it would collapse again.

0:20:220:20:26

So we're going to add some lecithin, which is a chemical.

0:20:260:20:29

You put it in, you foam it and it kind of keeps its structure,

0:20:290:20:33

so you can spoon it on the plate and it will last while you're eating.

0:20:330:20:36

OK, so now we're going to hand-blend it.

0:20:360:20:39

These are great for foaming and things.

0:20:390:20:41

Good for emulsifying stocks, just before they go on the pass.

0:20:410:20:45

OK, we'll leave that for the time being on the side again.

0:20:460:20:50

Pretty much ready for getting the haslet on.

0:20:500:20:53

-Pork doughnuts!

-Yes!

0:20:530:20:56

Basically, the choux pastry was just like a binder. OK?

0:20:560:21:01

Do you want me to throw one of them pork trotters in?

0:21:010:21:04

No, no, there's no need to be rude!

0:21:040:21:05

-Perfect colour, isn't it?

-It is. He's good, isn't he?

-Yeah.

0:21:090:21:13

I'm just going to put these in the oven, just to keep them warm, really.

0:21:130:21:17

So plating up, trotter sauce.

0:21:170:21:21

Because they've been in the sauce,

0:21:210:21:23

all the fat has melted away so it's very, very delicate and soft.

0:21:230:21:27

The rhubarb is the opposite contrast.

0:21:290:21:31

So you just want a bit there.

0:21:310:21:34

-That's the haslet.

-I want to eat that.

0:21:370:21:40

And then, I love belly pork, sliced.

0:21:410:21:46

That's beautiful.

0:21:460:21:48

-Voila.

-Absolutely fabulous.

0:21:500:21:53

Chef, c'est magnifique! C'est bof!

0:21:530:21:56

C'est bof?! Pau-pau-pau!

0:21:560:21:59

It's lovely, innit?

0:21:590:22:01

Look at this.

0:22:010:22:05

-Have some of this rhubarb. I like the sound of that.

-So do I.

0:22:050:22:08

Look at that.

0:22:080:22:09

Oh, Mother Riley!

0:22:110:22:13

-Oh, that works.

-There's a lot of taste in that.

0:22:130:22:17

Get out of it!

0:22:170:22:18

Interesting, the bits of trotter...

0:22:190:22:22

Taste those on their own. They just melt.

0:22:220:22:25

-That was mine.

-I've left you the big bit.

0:22:250:22:27

All those flavours together, superb.

0:22:270:22:30

Big savoury hits.

0:22:300:22:32

What I do like about it is underneath it all,

0:22:320:22:35

there's that element of rhubarb, and it's just clean and cuts through.

0:22:350:22:42

Lovely.

0:22:420:22:44

Well, I think we've got our work cut out to say the least.

0:22:440:22:49

Right away. Let's crack on.

0:22:490:22:51

But it's the locals who will decide whose dish is best in a blind tasting coming up.

0:22:510:22:56

Colin's haslet beignet was a true taste of the county

0:22:560:23:00

and we want to make sure our dish is as local as possible.

0:23:000:23:03

Lincolnshire is one of only two counties

0:23:030:23:05

to have its own native breeds of pig, sheep and cattle.

0:23:050:23:08

On Woodlands Farm,

0:23:080:23:09

they're doing their bit to make sure these breeds continue to thrive.

0:23:090:23:13

It's a rare place for rare breeds, so I gather. Ah!

0:23:130:23:18

'Andrew Dennis is making the introductions

0:23:180:23:20

'and our first meeting is with a Lincolnshire curly coat pig.'

0:23:200:23:23

DAVE LAUGHS

0:23:250:23:27

-It's an afro pig!

-It's a pig in an Aran jumper!

0:23:270:23:30

-Look at that!

-I'm sorry, mate, but you look cracking!

0:23:300:23:34

-This is Gavin.

-Hello, Gavin.

0:23:340:23:36

It's just his hairdo! He's like you when you get out of a sauna.

0:23:380:23:42

-This is Stacey.

-Hello, Stacey!

0:23:440:23:47

And her six piglets. They're about two weeks old.

0:23:470:23:50

-Cor...

-These local breeds, which are traditional,

0:23:500:23:53

tend to be low input, so they're ideally suited for organic farming, which in itself is low input.

0:23:530:23:59

Have some more nuts.

0:23:590:24:01

I mean, why this breed? Why are you doing what you're doing?

0:24:010:24:04

I feel as a Lincolnshire farmer, born and bred,

0:24:040:24:07

that we've got a responsibility to try and preserve our local heritage.

0:24:070:24:11

And as luck would have it, there seems in recent years

0:24:110:24:14

to have been a renaissance of interest, as I'm sure you find,

0:24:140:24:17

in local breeds, which have far more flavour.

0:24:170:24:21

We'll look at the world's largest flock of Lincolnshire Buff chickens,

0:24:210:24:25

-which runs to about 30 birds.

-Lincolnshire...

0:24:250:24:28

-Lincolnshire Buff.

-Buff?

0:24:280:24:29

-They're incredibly rare.

-There they are.

0:24:290:24:32

Now that's what you call free range.

0:24:320:24:34

The chicken's a woodland bird, which is often forgotten.

0:24:340:24:37

In common with many of the traditional breeds, it's dual-purpose.

0:24:370:24:41

These ones are table birds and egg layers.

0:24:410:24:43

-Right.

-We also keep rare breed turkeys at Woodlands.

0:24:430:24:47

These originated from Norfolk, which is the next door county.

0:24:470:24:50

HE GOBBLES LIKE TURKEY

0:24:500:24:52

That's a good impersonation.

0:24:520:24:54

This is our breeding stock. We've got the lavender blue

0:24:560:25:00

and the bourbon red, the Norfolk bronze and the Norfolk Black.

0:25:000:25:04

These were saved from extinction quite recently, but they have the gamiest flavour of all.

0:25:040:25:09

Really delicious.

0:25:090:25:11

-Are you looking forward to Christmas?

-HE GOBBLES

0:25:110:25:14

THEY GOBBLE

0:25:140:25:15

-It's a windy part of the world, isn't it?

-Amazing wind.

-Nearly got me wig off.

0:25:150:25:20

What do we have here, Andrew?

0:25:220:25:24

We've got some Lincoln longwool rams here.

0:25:240:25:27

Three rams. They've been out mating with the ewes, and they've just come indoors now.

0:25:270:25:31

These are rare breed, and there are less than 500 breeding ewes left in the world.

0:25:310:25:35

Crikey. How have they adapted to suit the Lincolnshire landscape?

0:25:350:25:41

They have the longest wool of any sheep in the world.

0:25:410:25:44

When you have weather conditions like this, they're ideally suited.

0:25:440:25:47

Because it's flat and there is a lot of wind,

0:25:470:25:50

-their coats protect...?

-Exactly.

0:25:500:25:52

-Crumbs.

-Ooh.

-This is Mishak.

0:25:520:25:55

-And you'll be a Lincoln Red.

-He's a Lincoln Red, yeah.

0:25:550:25:58

He's a magnificent lad, isn't he?

0:25:580:26:00

Putting on a show, he is!

0:26:000:26:03

He's superb.

0:26:030:26:04

Steady on, dude!

0:26:060:26:08

-Are you itchy?

-He loves the fresh straw.

0:26:080:26:11

It's rather like having a shower for them, you know.

0:26:110:26:14

-He'd weigh about a tonne, I should think.

-Cor!

0:26:140:26:16

And he'll be put out in the spring with about 25 cows.

0:26:160:26:23

-25?

-Which is roughly the amount they'd be with in the wild, I think.

0:26:230:26:29

Well, you're very beautiful.

0:26:290:26:31

You are. I have to say, your bum stinks.

0:26:310:26:33

It clear these animals are fantastically well cared for

0:26:350:26:38

and that should surely make for great tasting meat.

0:26:380:26:41

OK, I've chopped up some fillet steak. This is Lincoln Red.

0:26:410:26:45

I'm looking forward to this. Country Life voted the Lincoln Red

0:26:450:26:48

as being the best beef in the country.

0:26:480:26:50

I reckon this will take not very long at all.

0:26:500:26:53

So Andrew, how long have your family been cooking your beef in this kitchen?

0:26:530:26:57

As a family, we would have been eating Lincoln Red beef for, God, hundreds of years, literally.

0:26:570:27:03

It's wonderful, isn't it, it really is a case of a proper family farm.

0:27:030:27:07

-Yes or no?

-Oh, God, yes.

0:27:070:27:09

Lincolnshire Red...

0:27:090:27:11

Delicious. Seriously good beef. It's hung for a long time, isn't it?

0:27:130:27:16

Three weeks, yeah.

0:27:160:27:18

The thing I like best, it's terribly tender.

0:27:180:27:21

It melts in your mouth.

0:27:210:27:23

I know exactly where this comes from,

0:27:230:27:27

where the animal's grazed and so on and so forth.

0:27:270:27:31

It's beef with a story. I think that's important too.

0:27:310:27:34

We're going to cook up Andrew's Lincoln Red beef in a herby suet pudding

0:27:340:27:38

with some of his lamb's kidneys cooked in sherry alongside.

0:27:380:27:41

But we need some good local veggies to go with this delicious meat.

0:27:410:27:45

Lincolnshire is so fertile. You could grow anything here.

0:27:520:27:55

Lincolnshire is one big veggie patch.

0:27:560:27:58

60% of Britain's cauliflowers are grown here.

0:27:580:28:01

Mark Nundy's family has been working this farm since 1946.

0:28:010:28:06

If anyone's going to know about the best local veg, it's him.

0:28:060:28:10

-Welcome to Lincolnshire.

-Wow, look at that!

0:28:100:28:13

This is the harvesting rig, boys.

0:28:130:28:16

This is what we cut the cauliflower with.

0:28:160:28:18

There's no bending down.

0:28:180:28:19

-We've still got to bend down.

-Do what?! Where do we go?

0:28:190:28:23

-Which way?

-This way.

0:28:230:28:24

-If you get on there, we'll get down the field.

-Go on, mate, go on.

-I'm in.

0:28:240:28:28

-OK, boys, shall we?

-Come on, mate.

-We've got some knives for you.

0:28:380:28:43

That's not a knife, it's a machete.

0:28:430:28:45

Right, let us at them.

0:28:450:28:47

So we're looking for something like that one.

0:28:470:28:50

Chop the leaves off first...

0:28:500:28:54

nice and level, nice and neat, and then we put it on a cup.

0:28:540:28:58

Bit of cheese, you've got dinner. I love cauliflowers.

0:29:010:29:04

There's a few to get through like.

0:29:040:29:06

Once we've got 1000, we'll pack up.

0:29:060:29:09

Oh, great, only 999 to go!

0:29:090:29:14

-OK, off we go.

-Wait a minute, there's nobody driving.

0:29:140:29:19

To steer it, and to change gear.

0:29:190:29:23

Look at this.

0:29:230:29:26

Fast, innit?

0:29:280:29:29

-Don't be frightened of the knife. Let the knife do the work.

-Right.

0:29:310:29:34

Don't be frightened of the knife. You let the knife do the work.

0:29:340:29:38

I will, filleting your giblets, in a minute!

0:29:380:29:41

I'm coming back here for my holidays.

0:29:410:29:43

Do you know, there's so much you can do with cauli.

0:29:430:29:45

Each individual cauliflower suggests a new recipe.

0:29:450:29:49

You could have cauliflower cheese,

0:29:490:29:52

du barry soup, goujons and aloo gobi.

0:29:520:29:54

It's endless.

0:29:540:29:55

-That one's a fritter.

-These have been in the ground eight months.

0:29:550:29:59

Some will be not quite big enough, so we'll leave them to grow on.

0:29:590:30:03

Why do cauliflowers do so well in Lincolnshire?

0:30:030:30:06

It's been traditionally grown here for generations. Basically, the area's nice and flat.

0:30:060:30:10

Hundreds of years ago, it was under water. So the soil's fertile and young.

0:30:100:30:14

-Is it true the soil in Lincoln is so good you can actually double crop most things?

-You can.

0:30:140:30:19

This field will be cropped again this year and planted and cut before Christmas.

0:30:190:30:23

-It's like Einstein's brain, isn't it?

-Try a bit of that.

-Lovely.

0:30:230:30:27

-You don't need to do any cooking.

-No, it's sweet, it's good.

0:30:290:30:33

-Fresh.

-We're cooking against Colin McGurran.

0:30:330:30:36

-We want to put Lincolnshire on a plate. We've got to have cauliflower.

-Definitely.

0:30:360:30:40

An important vegetable for the county. One which has put us on the map.

0:30:400:30:44

-What's your favourite cauliflower dish?

-Cauliflower cheese. Usually on its own.

0:30:440:30:48

-We've got to do a take on that, man.

-We'll try and do the best cauliflower cheese we can.

0:30:480:30:55

-Right, off we go.

-We're off.

0:30:560:30:58

We're doing a steak in red wine, suet herbed pudding.

0:30:580:31:02

With kidneys cooked in sherry.

0:31:020:31:04

All dressed with a cauliflower cheese puree.

0:31:040:31:06

And a few crushed peas.

0:31:060:31:08

-Yes, with a bit of gravy.

-Oh, yes.

0:31:080:31:10

It will be up to local diners to decide whose dish best represents the true flavours of Lincolnshire.

0:31:100:31:16

I'll do onions. Cos when you're making a beef suet pudding,

0:31:160:31:20

the first thing is basically to make a really good beef stew.

0:31:200:31:24

I'm going to cut some fine lardons of this lovely streaky bacon.

0:31:240:31:29

I'm going to get some oil warm, ready for his lardons,

0:31:290:31:32

cos we're going to render that down,

0:31:320:31:34

so we use the bacon fat to cook the meat.

0:31:340:31:37

-Where did you get this from?

-This is local.

-This is Lincolnshire Red.

-It is.

0:31:370:31:41

A red, short-horned beast indigenous to Lincolnshire.

0:31:410:31:44

What will happen is when that starts to cook, it will just separate out slightly.

0:31:440:31:49

With Lincoln Red, if you eat it, you know you're eating Lincoln Red. It's gamey, rich.

0:31:490:31:53

It certainly stands out above other beefs as well, in flavour.

0:31:530:31:58

I'm just doing some seasoned flour for the beef, two tablespoons of flour and some salt and pepper.

0:31:580:32:04

-So this is a mixture of all different cuts, is it?

-Yeah,

0:32:040:32:07

so we have to be careful we get everything cooked through.

0:32:070:32:09

But if some of the meat drops to bits, it's all to the good really, cos it's a pudding.

0:32:090:32:13

They're good in them copper pans. They absorb the heat a great deal.

0:32:130:32:17

-They're not cheap though, are they, Colin?

-No, they're not, no.

-What would that set you back, £100?

0:32:170:32:22

No, a copper pan like that is about 280, 290.

0:32:220:32:25

-£280?

-Yeah, for a pan like that.

0:32:250:32:27

I've lost the use of me knees there!

0:32:270:32:29

This goes to the seasoned flour, nicely covered.

0:32:290:32:34

Meat goes to oil and rendered down bacon fat.

0:32:340:32:38

-Just to get a bit of colour.

-Now I'm going to fiddle on with me kidneys.

0:32:380:32:42

Now there's a sinew that surrounds the kidney that we don't want.

0:32:420:32:46

And there's a core inside. We don't want that either.

0:32:460:32:48

You can take a pair of scissors, which is a very laborious way of doing it. But it's efficient.

0:32:480:32:53

I'd just hack it off with a knife, to be honest.

0:32:530:32:56

So there you go.

0:32:560:32:58

That's the core that you've taken out that you don't want and that's a lovely, clean kidney.

0:32:580:33:03

The beef's browned. Add the onions.

0:33:030:33:05

We want to sweat these down, we don't want to burn them.

0:33:050:33:08

And just stir those onions into the pan, half a litre of good beef stock.

0:33:080:33:14

And about 300 mls of good red wine.

0:33:140:33:17

Look at that.

0:33:170:33:19

Put a couple of bay leaves in, just let them moulder away.

0:33:190:33:23

I'm going to make a bouquet garni for that. Take some sprigs of thyme, some parsley.

0:33:230:33:29

I'm going to bind that with a bit of string,

0:33:290:33:31

like so.

0:33:310:33:32

Put that in there, just bury it.

0:33:320:33:35

And now there's two lovely little finishes for this.

0:33:350:33:39

Delia, in her steak and kidney puddings, always uses Worcester sauce.

0:33:390:33:43

Rick Stein, he always uses soy sauce.

0:33:430:33:46

Give me Worcester sauce any time.

0:33:460:33:48

And as we're on a French cultural exchange...

0:33:480:33:50

le cognac. Brandy and beef go great.

0:33:500:33:53

Now that is the filling for the steak puddings. Now we need to cover that.

0:33:530:33:58

Now, because the pan was £280, apparently we can't afford a lid, so just use a frying pan.

0:33:580:34:05

Now we leave that to simmer

0:34:050:34:07

for about two hours.

0:34:070:34:10

Then take the lid off and simmer for another half an hour to reduce that stock

0:34:100:34:14

to get the demi-glace, where all the flavour is.

0:34:140:34:17

-How's that? Is that enough?

-That's lovely, thank you.

0:34:170:34:20

The other kind of elemental part to a steak pudding is the suet.

0:34:200:34:24

We start off with self-raising flour, cos the baking powder in that gives it a bit of a lift.

0:34:240:34:29

Some shredded beef suet.

0:34:290:34:30

And about a teaspoon of salt. We'll put it in the mixture.

0:34:300:34:34

A teaspoonful of dried thyme and a pinch of dried sage.

0:34:340:34:38

Remember, it's a steamed pudding, and dried herbs, when they're steamed, give off loads of flavour.

0:34:380:34:44

-We make that into a dough.

-Once you've done that, do you have to let it rest?

0:34:440:34:48

Yes, but what I do is put an egg yolk in it, kind of get it really, really heavy dough, first.

0:34:480:34:55

I'm just getting elements prepped for our next dish to go with this, which is the kidneys in sherry.

0:34:550:35:00

Just put the yolk on there.

0:35:000:35:02

It's all herby and rich. Now that's that suet pastry.

0:35:020:35:05

Now we need to leave that in the fridge for about half-an-hour to firm up.

0:35:050:35:10

Now, I know what you're thinking

0:35:100:35:12

and I am not going to say. I've said it enough,

0:35:120:35:14

but we have got some stew that we cooked early this morning

0:35:140:35:17

and we have got some suet that we put in the fridge some time ago to firm up.

0:35:170:35:21

The chilled suet and this is the filling for the steak puddings.

0:35:210:35:26

-Two hours, been reduced and left to chill.

-Yours does look good.

0:35:260:35:30

It smells even better.

0:35:300:35:33

Plenty of butter. Dust these with flour. Give them a little knock out.

0:35:330:35:38

Now the rolling pin for making a suet pudding is indispensable.

0:35:380:35:42

It's not just for rolling out, as you'll see in a minute.

0:35:420:35:45

Take a snooker ball sized piece of suet.

0:35:450:35:48

I want it quite thin.

0:35:480:35:49

Form it like that.

0:35:490:35:51

Put that in there like that.

0:35:510:35:53

And then just shape it with your fingers.

0:35:530:35:56

Let me just start filling these.

0:35:560:35:58

Look at that. Loveliness. And I want them quite full.

0:35:580:36:01

-Could you do an eggy wash?

-No problem.

-Thank you.

0:36:010:36:05

-Looking good.

-Now, the lids.

0:36:050:36:07

Put the lid on, like so.

0:36:070:36:10

Pinch.

0:36:100:36:12

Now just run the rolling pin like that.

0:36:120:36:15

It cuts your excess pastry off.

0:36:150:36:17

And it seals the top.

0:36:170:36:19

Very good, very good.

0:36:190:36:21

And repeat.

0:36:210:36:22

And all that remains is for these to be double wrapped in foil,

0:36:220:36:26

placed in the steamer for 20 minutes to half an hour,

0:36:260:36:29

and you'll have a lovely pudding.

0:36:290:36:32

Lovely. Right, gonna do a creamed cauliflower cheese

0:36:320:36:36

with Lincolnshire cauliflower plucked by our own fair hands.

0:36:360:36:39

This is dead simple, but so tasty.

0:36:390:36:41

Do you put sugar in your puree at all?

0:36:410:36:44

No, do you think it's a good idea?

0:36:440:36:46

I'd put a bit in, because sometimes cauliflower gets quite bitter.

0:36:460:36:49

Cauliflowers are a much-underrated veg, aren't they? They're superb.

0:36:490:36:53

Just going to boil this till it's soft.

0:36:530:36:55

We're gonna make some gravy, so I'll put that in there to warm up.

0:36:550:36:59

Then we're gonna strain that, reserve the meat.

0:36:590:37:01

But all the liquor will just be really pure gravy.

0:37:010:37:04

This is the start of the kidneys in sherry. We've got onion, celery and some carrot.

0:37:040:37:09

What we're going to do is we're going to put those in a pan and sweat them off.

0:37:090:37:13

-A bit of oil.

-These potatoes, they've just been boiled till they're soft and left to go cold.

0:37:130:37:18

So I can peel them now. I'm just going to cut them into cubes.

0:37:180:37:23

And then all of the celery. And then most of the carrot.

0:37:230:37:27

I'm just going to put that back on the stove and just let that go for a minute or two.

0:37:270:37:31

Just need to get that nice and soft.

0:37:310:37:33

Look at that. Little squares, all uniformly the same.

0:37:330:37:36

We're gonna push all those lovely juices through the sieve

0:37:360:37:40

and that's gonna form the basis of our gravy. Smashing. Job's a good'un.

0:37:400:37:45

I'm gonna put the kidneys in this pan

0:37:450:37:47

and I'm not gonna overload the pan because if you do, they stew, and that's what we don't want.

0:37:470:37:52

For the cauliflower cheese puree, Lincolnshire Poacher.

0:37:520:37:55

Beautiful stuff, isn't it?

0:37:550:37:57

-I don't want to make it too cheesy.

-It's quite a powerful cheese.

-Yeah.

0:37:570:38:00

Look at that, lovely.

0:38:020:38:04

Now what I'm going to add to this pan is about a dessert spoon of fresh thyme.

0:38:040:38:10

-That does smell good, eh?

-We're just going to put those down to rest, put some garlic in there now.

0:38:100:38:17

The cauliflower goes into the turbo blender with some salt, white pepper

0:38:170:38:22

and about two tablespoons of good cream.

0:38:220:38:25

Look at that!

0:38:290:38:32

That's smoother than Brad Pitt on the pull.

0:38:320:38:34

Put some caster sugar in, take away the bitterness.

0:38:340:38:37

This was Colin's suggestion and, by crikey, it's a good'un.

0:38:370:38:40

I'm just going to warn that through and melt some cheese into it.

0:38:400:38:43

Some of the Lincolnshire Poacher. Shall I get the potatoes on?

0:38:430:38:46

Just fry them till they're golden.

0:38:460:38:48

What we're gonna do is just push the kidneys through.

0:38:480:38:51

And then we want about a dessertspoon of sherry in there.

0:38:510:38:54

Meanwhile, we've got to do the peas. We just want those blanching a bit till they're soft.

0:38:540:38:59

Knob of butter to the gravy.

0:38:590:39:01

Creme fraiche, le puddings.

0:39:010:39:03

Ah! They are hot.

0:39:030:39:06

They would be, they've just come out of the steamer.

0:39:060:39:09

I'm just finishing this with some parsley.

0:39:090:39:12

-Right, look at that.

-That looks very, very good guys.

0:39:160:39:18

Very, very good.

0:39:180:39:20

That's the way to do it.

0:39:200:39:21

Yes.

0:39:230:39:24

Look at that.

0:39:240:39:26

-Looks good.

-Gravy?

0:39:260:39:28

That's it.

0:39:280:39:31

Right, there we have our taste of Lincolnshire on a plate.

0:39:310:39:35

Lincolnshire red beef, steak and wine suet pudding,

0:39:350:39:38

with fabulous kidneys and sherry, cauliflower cheese puree and crushed local garden peas.

0:39:380:39:44

With a snowstorm of Parmentier potatoes.

0:39:440:39:47

-Oh, yes.

-Very, very good, guys.

0:39:470:39:49

OK, well, suet has to be my favourite thing, so I'll stick into that first.

0:39:490:39:53

Oh God, it's terrible this. "And the winner is..."

0:39:580:40:00

What do you think, what do you think?

0:40:000:40:02

I think it's fabulous.

0:40:040:40:05

I like the herbs in the suet. But more than anything, this cauliflower puree is fabulous.

0:40:050:40:10

Works really well, really, really well. I'm not surprised if that won't be on the menu.

0:40:100:40:15

Those kidneys should just melt.

0:40:150:40:18

It's very, very good.

0:40:220:40:24

It's not complicated,

0:40:240:40:26

it does what it says on the tin.

0:40:260:40:27

But the puree of cauliflower and cheese is great, especially with the freshness of the peas.

0:40:270:40:33

Well done, lads, really nice. It's gonna be a close one.

0:40:330:40:36

It's crunch time.

0:40:380:40:39

The diners here will taste both dishes but without any idea who cooked which.

0:40:390:40:43

First up is Colin's haslet beignet with a rhubarb puree and a sage foam.

0:40:430:40:49

That's really good.

0:40:490:40:52

-Mmm.

-It's beautiful. Oh!

0:40:520:40:55

Presentation, out of 10 - 10. No problem at all.

0:40:580:41:01

As soon as I saw it, I thought, that looks good. And it was. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

0:41:010:41:06

The pink, vibrant rhubarb was a really good contrast to the other colours.

0:41:060:41:10

The haslet was lovely.

0:41:100:41:12

That is a local thing, so that's good for Lincolnshire.

0:41:120:41:15

The texture of the dumpling was fairly coarse and it was very interesting.

0:41:150:41:20

The sage was slightly overwhelming.

0:41:200:41:23

I didn't think it was gonna be a trotter.

0:41:230:41:26

I've never eaten it before and it was absolutely lovely.

0:41:260:41:29

The sage and the pork, it's a tried-and-tested combination, it works very well.

0:41:290:41:34

So it was a good representation of Lincolnshire.

0:41:340:41:37

They seemed to like that, but now it's our turn. Fingers crossed.

0:41:370:41:41

-That's gorgeous.

-Oh, that's lovely.

0:41:440:41:46

It reminds me of the steak and kidney puddings I used to have as a child.

0:41:460:41:51

The beef was succulent, the gravy was tasty, and I liked the vegetables as well.

0:41:510:41:56

Suet was just a little bit heavy for me. But because it wasn't an enormous portion, it was enjoyable.

0:41:560:42:03

In my schooldays, we used to make some money going pea-pulling, so it's definitely Lincolnshire.

0:42:030:42:08

And that cauliflower, wow!

0:42:080:42:10

Anybody who didn't like kidneys, I think, would be encouraged to eat them having tasted that.

0:42:100:42:15

Hello, how are you all?

0:42:150:42:17

Well, what a wonderful dining room. Isn't it a wonderful restaurant?

0:42:220:42:26

-Isn't it?

-We've had a good old rake around Lincolnshire, haven't we?

-Oh, we have, great county.

0:42:260:42:31

Veggies particularly, you're all a bit green fingered, aren't you, really?

0:42:310:42:35

Wonderful. Great meat, fabulous. Had a great, great time.

0:42:350:42:39

Right, we need to get down to business.

0:42:390:42:42

So, for the haslet beignet, could I have a show of hands?

0:42:420:42:48

So that's two for the haslet beignet.

0:42:500:42:52

And for the steak and kidney pudding, please, a show of hands?

0:42:520:42:56

Seven.

0:42:570:42:58

The haslet beignet was Colin's and we did the steak and kidney pudding.

0:42:590:43:04

I do have to say, we've been the guests of a great chef.

0:43:040:43:08

Oh yes, we've learned so much off Colin.

0:43:080:43:11

Yet again, yet again.

0:43:110:43:13

I'd just like to say, it was a very close call.

0:43:130:43:15

I enjoyed them both very much. It was a very difficult decision.

0:43:150:43:19

Thank you very much, Colin. It's been a wonderful experience cooking in your kitchen.

0:43:190:43:23

Amazing! We won, Dave.

0:43:230:43:25

Colin's haslet beignet was such a good taste of the county.

0:43:250:43:28

The flat land of Lincolnshire

0:43:280:43:30

is rich with veggies and wonderful meat.

0:43:300:43:32

This is a place we'll definitely be returning to.

0:43:320:43:35

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:490:43:52

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:520:43:55

Series which follows the Hairy Bikers as they visit a different British county in every episode, sampling the best of local ingredients and meeting the people keeping culinary traditions alive. Here, Si and Dave explore Lincolnshire, where they cook a traditional county favourite in Lincoln, taste free-range beef and lamb, and get their hands dirty on a cauliflower farm. Finally, they go head to head in a cook-off against top chef Colin McGurran. Restaurant diners decide in a blind tasting who has delivered the best of Lincolnshire on a plate.


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