Episode 7 Holding Back the Years


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Episode 7

Series exploring concerns about ageing. For Dr Rangan Chatterjee's Making Sense of Your Senses Week, he sniffs out top tips on ways of saving your senses of smell and taste.


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Everything has an impact on your life.

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Whatever your age.

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From the type of house we live in...

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Oh, this looks nice.

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Yes, it's been completely renovated throughout.

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..to how much money we have to spend.

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Your wage ends up being like a normal working wage, which is good.

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What we put in our bodies...

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I don't think I've ever been "fat" fat, but I have put weight on.

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..to the secrets of our genetic make up.

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You are going to live to be 140.

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No, that'll do. I'll take everything I can get.

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So, finding out about all those things

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and more could help you mature brilliantly...

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..or slow down the ageing process just a little.

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We've tracked down the very best tips and advice

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for holding back the years.

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And now, with the help of our team,

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we're going to pass them on to you,

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-to show you how to have the time of your life.

-Whenever that may be.

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Hello, and welcome to the show that says if life's a lottery...

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..we've got your winning numbers. Here's what's coming up.

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With Britain's pensioners being targeted on so-called suckers lists,

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we find out how your parents, grandparents, and even you

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can combat the con artists.

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I would be telling them where to go.

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It would begin with F and end with F,

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so that's as much as I'm prepared to say.

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Thank goodness for that! They daren't mess with you!

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Dr Chatterjee continues his Making Sense of your Senses Week.

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Today, he's sniffing out top tips and ways of saving

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your sense of smell and taste.

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Most people will think that they have lost their sense of taste

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if their sense of smell goes, but in reality,

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for every 100 patients that I see in a specialist clinic,

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only one patient has a true loss of taste.

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The rest all have loss of smell.

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Mindfulness and relaxation therapy is the latest way the NHS

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is combating stress, but it can take some getting used to.

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Today, for the first time in his 87 years,

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Joseph gets to experience a massage.

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-Hey.

-You woke me up.

-I'm sorry. Are you feeling really relaxed?

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-Yes, it's very nice.

-I think that means, "Go away, Fiona!"

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I'll see you later.

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And at the other end of the age spectrum, Bill meets

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the home-grown students who could be the saviours of social care.

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A lot of young people wouldn't find working with older people

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-appealing at all, would they?

-That's what I felt before I started.

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It's not what you think it'll be.

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And being truthful, I thought it was going to be, like, miserable.

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But each person in that elderly people's home had a story,

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and I wanted to hear every person's story. I want to help people,

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so that's why I want to go to uni to do social work.

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Scams - they can happen to anyone at any age, but the older we get,

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the more it would seem the scammers take us for suckers.

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And losing money is often only part of the impact these scams have.

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They can leave victims feeling ashamed, anxious,

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and incredibly vulnerable.

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Thankfully, though, some people are fighting back,

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and Fiona has been to hear their story.

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It's one of the biggest crimewaves the UK has ever seen.

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We have received notice against your name...

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Let me see what I can do...

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With around £10 billion being stolen each year...

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-Can you provide me your date of birth?

-Your debit card number?

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-Your National Insurance number?

-..and it seems, the older we get,

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the more susceptible we are to becoming a victim.

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I'm in Hull to meet one of those victims. Pat Bottomley is

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someone who spent her life fostering over 100 children in the city.

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She's even got an MBE for it.

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And it's that good nature and sense of public duty that the scammers

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exploited, when they called her with an unusual demand from a man

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claiming to be from the police.

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PHONE RINGS

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Hello?

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Pat, just tell us what happened.

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The phone rang saying that they had arrested a lad in London with

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my credit card on him, £5,000 in money, four other credit cards.

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OK, and this guy who spoke to you

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said he was a police officer, didn't he?

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-That's right.

-I might have believed him if he'd said that, so...

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He gave me his name, the station he was at. They said they knew

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-this was one of the people that were doing these scams.

-OK.

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So they said, if I transferred money into these people's accounts,

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they would have police at the bank waiting for him to go

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and get the money, and they would catch this person.

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And the scammers tried every tactic they could

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when Pat wasn't convinced.

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When he was speaking to you, did you ever think, "Is this right?"

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Were you questioning it at all?

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He said, "Just ring the London number and check,"

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so he went off the line. I tried to get through, but couldn't.

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-Yeah.

-I tried to get through on my mobile, but couldn't.

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And from 11.00 in the morning, they had both my mobile

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and my house phone locked, which I didn't know.

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What made Pat even more suspicious was the fact that the caller

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seemed to know a lot of her most personal intimate details,

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including who she banked with and even the name of her son.

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Your mind must have been all over the place.

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Oh, it definitely was. And they said,

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"With your help today, we could help thousands of people."

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Thousands of people. And that's what got me.

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Believing she was helping to catch a criminal,

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Pat ended up transferring £8,500 to the scammers,

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never to be contacted again by the fake caller.

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How has it left you feeling?

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It's like being invaded, isn't it? Assaulted, almost.

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It is. And it's as raw today as it was.

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I've lost all confidence in doing things.

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I used to work for social services. It took me no time to do a report.

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It's took me nearly six months to get these reports written,

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because I just cannot sit down and do anything.

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Cos I don't trust myself to do it properly.

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It's not the money I lost. I mean, it was a lot of money.

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I'd have rather given that to my family, my grandchildren.

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It's how it's left me feeling.

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I still feel raw, I still feel an idiot,

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and I don't think I'll ever stop feeling like that.

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Poor Pat was unfortunate enough to find herself on a database full of

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people that scammers thought would be more likely to fall for a scam.

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And guess what they call this list?

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The Suckers List.

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Charming.

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And it seems that it's the nation's pensioners

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who are top of this so-called Suckers List,

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as criminals target those who are living on their own. In fact,

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Trading Standards believes that one million OAPs will be on it by 2019.

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Neil Masters is from the National Trading Standards Scams Team,

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and has worked with victim support here in Hull.

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So, we've heard a lot about this dreadfully named Suckers List.

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Does it actually exist?

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Well, we would prefer to call it a victims list,

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because that's exactly what it is.

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It's a list of people who have fallen victim to fraud.

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It's a list that is then sold on by fraudsters to other fraudsters,

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because it is seen that people on that list are susceptible

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to being defrauded again.

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All of us have personal information about us stored quite legitimately

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by companies online. Most of this is done through call centres,

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which means the information can be easily passed on to

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other organisations we haven't even had contact with.

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And how would they get access to this information?

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The victims lists are very often traded on the dark web,

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part of the internet which most of us will never access.

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It can only be accessed by specialist software and tools.

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The lists will develop as they get traded, with more information,

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to the detriment of people like you and I.

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It's very hard to combat criminals who operate on the dark web.

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The best plan is to guard against being taken in by them

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in the first place.

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I've come to the awareness campaign group, Think Jessica, where

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Marilyn Baldwin runs a passionate campaign to educate people,

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especially older people, on how to beat the scammers.

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What shows you it's a scam is that you've got to send money.

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But for her, this is more than just a public duty.

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It's a very personal crusade.

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And the next scam, clairvoyant scams.

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Marilyn, you've spent the best part of a decade teaching people

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how to avoid scams.

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Why did you get involved in the first place?

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Well, my mother, Jessica, was a victim,

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and when she was in her late 70s, she received a letter.

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It was a bogus lottery letter that she received.

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she sent money off to it, and as a result,

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her name got put on what the criminals call a Suckers List.

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And that was really when the nightmares started.

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By the nightmares, what do you mean?

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Well, scattered amongst the letters from lotteries, banks, solicitors,

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that kind of thing, there was also letters from clairvoyants.

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And these letters told her that the family were against her,

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that people wished her harm.

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-Good grief!

-Yeah.

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And turned her against anybody who tried to make her see the truth.

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So really, they'd brainwashed her, hadn't they?

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My mother wasn't diagnosed with having any mental incapacity,

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so it was very difficult to get anybody to understand, you know,

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just how strong this psychology was,

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and why it was making her behave like that.

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The family felt powerless to help,

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because even directing the mail required her mother's permission.

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As the number of letters increased daily, she began to suffer.

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It had an impact on her health as well, didn't it?

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She started to get more confused and more delusional.

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Paranoid, you know. There were times when I actually took her

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to the building society, I drove her there,

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because she was going to make her own way there anyway in the rain.

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I'd take her to the building society so she could draw money out,

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and send it off to the scams.

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It was the only way we could spend that day without an argument.

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Marilyn believes that by the last months of her life,

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her mother had received over 30,000 scam letters.

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She's sure that the stress contributed to her death.

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If a stranger walked into your house and said,

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"Oh, can you just tell me who supplies your gas?"

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"How much your house is worth?" or whatever,

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would you tell a stranger that? You wouldn't.

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So how can we avoid being caught out?

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Marilyn's got three golden rules to jam the scams.

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Number one, it's smart to be suspicious.

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Every 15 seconds, somebody falls for a scam.

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Number two, never give out your personal details or bank details

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to strangers. Number three, don't get on the hook.

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Hang up. Tell them, "No, thank you, I'm not interested," and hang up.

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So, great advice, and as a result, I can't see any of these people

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being taken for a ride any time soon.

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You look a smart lady to me.

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Do you think you'd ever be taken in by a scam?

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No, no, I don't think I would be.

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You've got to be strong, you've got to be strong, and definitely

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you don't want to talk to them unless you know the person.

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One time that did happen, I just put the phone down.

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A few minutes later, the phone rang. I said, "Hello," and THEY hung up.

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"Do you have a computer?" I say, "No".

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Half an hour later, "Do you have windows?"

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"Do we have windows? Yes, six."

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I would be telling them where to go.

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It would begin with F and end with F, so,

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that's as much as I'm prepared to say.

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Thank goodness for that! They daren't mess with you!

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You know, I'm really quite sad about some of the stories

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I've heard today. Angry, actually.

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Vulnerable people being targeted by evil people, scammers.

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But there is a way we can put a spanner in the scammers' works -

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no details, no dosh.

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You don't give them your details, they don't get any dosh.

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Time now to hear from Dr Rangan Chatterjee and the latest instalment

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in his series of Making Sense of your Senses.

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So, today he's turning his attention on how our sense of smell and taste

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could be the key to good health.

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Most of us will experience a notable loss in one of our senses

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after the age of 40.

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That's eyesight, hearing, smell, touch, taste and balance.

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But if you know what to look out for and how to get it tested,

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then treatment is available,

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not to mention top tips on preventing it in the first place.

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I'm Dr Rangan Chatterjee, and all this week,

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I will be helping you make sense of it all.

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Now, we all know that if our sight declines through age,

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we can get a pair of specs. We can even get help

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with any hearing problems, usually a simple fix.

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But just what happens when we start to lose our sense of smell?

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A rose. It might not smell so sweet,

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but that's actually just the start of the problem.

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And that's because our sense of taste is by and large governed

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by our sense of smell.

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It's impossible to even make sense of a simple packet of sweets.

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So, just a really quick test.

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Basically, going to give you a nose clip to block your sense of smell.

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-Yep.

-Something to pop round your eyes so you can't see.

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Then I'm going to give you some sweets to see if you can tell me

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-what flavour they are.

-OK.

-OK.

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-How's that?

-Yep, yep.

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Pop it in your mouth and tell me what flavour it is.

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-Apple.

-Apple, OK.

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Orange. Orange.

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-Apple.

-Thought that was apple as well.

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-Yeah.

-OK. Did you find it hard to taste it?

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-Yes.

-Yeah.

-Yeah, it is.

-Yeah.

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I think without the visual and also with the nose clamp...

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..you're pretty limited.

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Out of the three, you didn't get a single one right.

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No! Says a lot, doesn't it?

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And it's the same story with everyone I test.

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-Any idea?

-Strawberry?

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-Lemon.

-OK.

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Yeah, it's a bit confusing.

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I don't think I'm very good at this.

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I can't taste anything.

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-Can you not?

-No.

-OK.

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So, you know, what's interesting is that we know that, actually,

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if we cut off our sense of smell, it's a lot harder to taste.

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-It is, yes.

-Did you find that?

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I did. I didn't know what I was eating, really.

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I think breathing through your mouth when your nose is blocked

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and trying to eat and taste is not easy.

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-But, you know...

-So, you definitely felt a difference?

-Yes.

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And as that simple test shows,

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when our sense of smell is cut off, our sense of taste goes, too.

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To find out why this happens, I've come to James Paget Hospital in

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Great Yarmouth to meet the man in charge of the UK's only clinic

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dedicated to smell and taste.

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Professor Carl Philpott is the consultant here.

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We often think of taste and smell as separate senses,

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but how closely are they linked?

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When you put food inside your mouth, you get the stimulus of true

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taste on the tongue, which are sensations of salt, sweet, bitter,

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and umami, which is a savoury sensation.

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And at the same time, the odour of the food rises through the back of

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the mouth into the nose, and that gives you the flavour of food,

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which is down to the smell. And roughly speaking, it's probably

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about 80% of flavour perception is down to smell, and 20% is taste.

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And because we label that process of appreciating flavour as tasting,

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most people will think that they've lost their sense of taste

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if their sense of smell goes.

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But in reality, for every 100 patients that I see in a specialist

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clinic, only one patient has a true loss of taste.

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The rest all have loss of smell.

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And how big of a problem is loss of smell?

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The loss of smell in the population is probably around 1-5% total loss

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of smell. Over the age of 60, 65, it becomes very much 20% or higher.

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And we know that in certain circumstances like Alzheimer's

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and Parkinson's, smell loss is very prevalent.

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So how seriously should we take a loss of smell?

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I think we should take it very seriously.

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Ultimately, it's a loss of one of our senses. It's a warning sign

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for us, when there are hazards in the home, or even just simple things

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like our own body odour and awareness of our environment.

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And I think people get very depressed when they're without it,

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because it adds a dimension to life that I think, until it's gone,

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you don't really appreciate. And I think again for the reasons

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we've already mentioned around the potential implications of

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certain diagnoses that could come out from smell loss,

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it's important to have that evaluated properly and to

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make sure there isn't a serious problem there.

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One man who is all too aware of this problem is 80-year-old Rod Goren.

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Over a period of about five years now, I've started losing

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my sense of smell, and to a lesser degree, taste.

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I just cannot smell anything at all.

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As Rod discovered, losing your sense of smell could even prove dangerous.

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I got into trouble from my son, because I was doing a little job

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on a gas heater.

0:17:420:17:45

And not being able to smell the gas coming out...

0:17:450:17:48

..I got told off. Seriously.

0:17:500:17:53

So how has this problem affected his taste buds?

0:17:530:17:57

I used to have a very, very good sense of taste,

0:17:570:18:00

but certain foods now...

0:18:000:18:01

..which I used to thoroughly enjoy,

0:18:030:18:06

I sometimes don't even wish to eat them now.

0:18:060:18:09

I certainly don't eat as much as I used to eat.

0:18:090:18:12

It is just so frustrating.

0:18:120:18:14

The one thing that upsets me more than anything is when

0:18:170:18:21

I'm mowing the grass, you can't smell the grass.

0:18:210:18:25

And that is, to me,

0:18:250:18:27

is one of the most strongest and pungent smells that I can remember.

0:18:270:18:31

I miss it terribly.

0:18:330:18:34

Now, I decided to go make an appointment and...

0:18:360:18:39

..see what can be done about it, if at all possible.

0:18:420:18:44

Today is Rod's first trip to the smell and taste clinic.

0:18:460:18:49

-Hello, there.

-Hello.

-I'm pleased to meet you.

0:18:490:18:51

My name's Tracey, and I want you to...

0:18:510:18:53

Nurse Tracey Baker will be performing a number of sniff tests

0:18:530:18:56

to determine how severe Rod's loss of smell is.

0:18:560:18:59

That's pen two.

0:19:040:19:05

That's pen three.

0:19:070:19:08

Nothing on any of them.

0:19:080:19:10

Nothing on any of them. OK.

0:19:100:19:13

So, that's come up with functional anosmia, which is no sense of smell.

0:19:160:19:21

No surprises there.

0:19:210:19:23

So it's time for a consultation with Professor Philpott,

0:19:230:19:27

where he uses a camera to get a closer look inside Rod's nose.

0:19:270:19:31

What we like to do in these circumstances is just do

0:19:380:19:41

a full check and make sure there's nothing rare in the background

0:19:410:19:45

that's causing this problem, so we would organise an MRI scan

0:19:450:19:48

of your brain just to look at the detailed pathways in the brain

0:19:480:19:52

to see there's no problems there.

0:19:520:19:54

Is there any chance at all that Rod might be able to regain

0:19:540:19:57

-his sense of smell?

-The honest truth at the moment is we don't know

0:19:570:20:01

until we've done some further tests.

0:20:010:20:03

If I happen to pick up something unusual such as

0:20:040:20:07

a mineral deficiency that may be treatable, then it may be

0:20:070:20:10

reversible, so it would be speculation at this point.

0:20:100:20:14

Unlike glasses or hearing aids,

0:20:140:20:16

there's no quick fix for losing your sense of smell.

0:20:160:20:19

However, there are important coping mechanisms.

0:20:190:20:23

Making sure that they take precautions at home,

0:20:230:20:25

so fitting a gas or smoke detector in the home environment

0:20:250:20:29

as a hazard warning. To make sure their label their food so they know

0:20:290:20:32

when food goes out of date, because often they miss that cue.

0:20:320:20:35

But also to involve their family members and friends.

0:20:360:20:39

If a sense of smell is part of their daily work schedule, then

0:20:390:20:43

talk to their managers and their teams about their losing that sense,

0:20:430:20:47

and have help with that.

0:20:470:20:49

I think one of the key things that when you talk to people for

0:20:490:20:52

the first time about suffering with smell and taste loss,

0:20:520:20:55

is they think they're on their own, they think that it's just them.

0:20:550:20:59

The sense of isolation is really prevalent, so actually explaining

0:20:590:21:03

to them that they're not alone, that lots of other people out there are

0:21:030:21:06

like them, brings them in out of the cold, if you like, and allows them

0:21:060:21:09

to feel that there's a community out there that can help them.

0:21:090:21:12

It's amazing how little we understand of two senses that are

0:21:130:21:16

so important for so many different aspects of our daily lives.

0:21:160:21:20

But having seen the work that's going on here

0:21:200:21:22

at Professor Philpott's clinic,

0:21:220:21:23

I think a better understanding of taste and smell

0:21:230:21:26

is most definitely on the menu.

0:21:260:21:28

If nostalgia is your thing,

0:21:290:21:31

you're going to love this next part of the show,

0:21:310:21:33

where we help exercise your old, or perhaps not so old, grey matter.

0:21:330:21:37

All you have to do is watch the following clips and work out

0:21:370:21:41

-when it all happened.

-And the question,

0:21:410:21:43

well, it's very straightforward - what was the year that was?

0:21:430:21:46

Here's how the game works. We're going to show you a few key events

0:21:520:21:56

that all happened in the space of a year, but which year?

0:21:560:21:59

And here's why you should play along - psychologists have said

0:21:590:22:02

that nostalgia can promote a sense of wellbeing and vitality

0:22:020:22:06

in us all, so this could help you hold back the years.

0:22:060:22:09

Can we from the beginning...?

0:22:100:22:12

Background action! Action!

0:22:140:22:16

If it were an American film, it would be unbearable.

0:22:190:22:21

It would be treated with a great deal of sentiment

0:22:210:22:24

and a lot of feel-good emotions,

0:22:240:22:27

and happily, it's done so lightly.

0:22:270:22:30

He's written it like

0:22:300:22:32

someone throwing a stone across the surface of a pond.

0:22:320:22:35

The IBM Simon was the world's first.

0:23:200:23:22

It was recalled after six months.

0:23:220:23:24

The battery only lasted for an hour,

0:23:240:23:26

and it weighed the same as a bag of sugar.

0:23:260:23:28

I think it was ahead of its time, and it was before the technology

0:23:280:23:30

that was needed to support it was really ready as well, so that's

0:23:300:23:34

part of the reason it wasn't a brilliant commercial success.

0:23:340:23:36

The answer to that at the end of the show.

0:23:420:23:44

Now, they say that life is what happens when you're busy doing

0:23:440:23:47

something else, which is why it's important to slow down and relax,

0:23:470:23:52

whatever age you are.

0:23:520:23:53

Yeah, but this idea is now being backed up by science,

0:23:530:23:57

because mindfulness, as it's sometimes referred to,

0:23:570:24:00

is being offered on the NHS.

0:24:000:24:02

What does it actually involve, and does it work?

0:24:020:24:04

Well, Fiona and friends have been finding out if keeping calm

0:24:040:24:08

can help us all carry on.

0:24:080:24:10

Nowhere in the UK can claim to be home of the Fountain of Youth

0:24:110:24:16

like Bath, where the ancient thermal spas have helped relax,

0:24:160:24:19

rejuvenate and replenish both locals and visitors from far afield.

0:24:190:24:24

Today, over a million people of all ages take to the waters each year,

0:24:240:24:29

all wanting to look and feel younger than their years.

0:24:290:24:33

So, what are you hoping for when you get in?

0:24:330:24:35

Something warm and relaxing.

0:24:350:24:36

Rest!

0:24:360:24:38

Relax and recuperate from all the hustle and bustle of London.

0:24:380:24:42

It's unusual to see a gent.

0:24:420:24:44

I don't know why. It's so relaxing, and it's good for your joints,

0:24:440:24:47

-especially when you get to my age.

-Exactly!

0:24:470:24:49

It's nice to go away and do something, or nothing, really.

0:24:490:24:52

It's nice to take stock and just relax and switch off

0:24:520:24:54

and not have your phone next to you for a few hours.

0:24:540:24:57

Given such anecdotal evidence, it's perhaps not surprising

0:24:580:25:01

that sales of anti-ageing spa treatments and mini breaks claiming

0:25:010:25:05

to take years off you have gone through the roof in recent years.

0:25:050:25:09

But of course, not everyone relishes the thought of going full frontal

0:25:100:25:14

at a spa. For ages, I didn't want to do that,

0:25:140:25:17

and then I had my first massage and I became a convert.

0:25:170:25:21

I've arranged for Mearle, 76, and Carlton, 87,

0:25:210:25:24

who'd never tried a spa, to come and give it a go.

0:25:240:25:28

Now, are you really pleased to be here, or are you a bit nervous?

0:25:280:25:31

I'm a bit nervous, but I'm very pleased.

0:25:310:25:34

Have you ever had a massage before?

0:25:340:25:36

No, not before. First time.

0:25:360:25:38

You've never really been indulged and looked after and

0:25:380:25:42

-treated to a spa?

-No, not at all, no.

0:25:420:25:44

Well, today's the day!

0:25:440:25:46

-Off you go.

-Thank you very much.

-And we shall see you later.

0:25:460:25:48

There are any number of treatments, massages and rubs that you can get

0:25:540:25:58

at the average spa, but we're starting these novices off lightly,

0:25:580:26:02

given its their first time. Mearle is getting a foot massage.

0:26:020:26:06

-Mearle?

-Hello.

-Hey, how's it going?

0:26:080:26:11

Very well indeed. Like I want to go to sleep.

0:26:110:26:14

I feel really drowsy.

0:26:140:26:16

Good. You can hold a lot of stress in your feet, actually,

0:26:160:26:20

so that's all melting away by the sounds of it.

0:26:200:26:23

My feet are really hot.

0:26:230:26:25

-Good.

-Yes.

-I'll leave you to it then, yeah?

0:26:250:26:28

You carry on relaxing.

0:26:280:26:29

Meanwhile, Carlton relaxes with my favourite - a head massage.

0:26:290:26:34

-You wake me up, my dear.

-I'm sorry!

-I'm enjoying it.

0:26:340:26:38

-Are you feeling really relaxed?

-Yes, it's very nice, very good.

0:26:380:26:42

I think that means, "Go away, Fiona!"

0:26:420:26:44

I'll see you later.

0:26:440:26:46

Well, it seems Mearle and Carlton are both enjoying their first-ever

0:26:460:26:50

massage, but I want to find out if there's any scientific proof to

0:26:500:26:54

the claims that destressing can help us hold back the years.

0:26:540:26:58

Meeting me is Dr Janet Withall from the University of Bath.

0:26:580:27:02

So, Janet, what is stress? What effect does it have on our bodies?

0:27:020:27:06

Well, the stress mechanism,

0:27:060:27:08

I suppose, is that when we're feeling in danger or scared,

0:27:080:27:13

our bodies release stress hormones, so as an example,

0:27:130:27:17

if you step off the pavement into the middle of a busy road,

0:27:170:27:21

a car comes hurtling towards you, the adrenaline kicks in,

0:27:210:27:25

you breathe very quickly, your heart pounds, and it

0:27:250:27:28

gives you the energy to deal with the situation very quickly.

0:27:280:27:33

So short bursts of stress are actually essential,

0:27:330:27:35

they're helpful to our everyday functioning?

0:27:350:27:38

Yeah. The problem is, if people feel stressed for longer periods,

0:27:380:27:43

the effects of those hormones can turn from positive to negative.

0:27:430:27:47

Prolonged exposure to stress can contribute to many health problems,

0:27:490:27:52

such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

0:27:520:27:56

The risk of these is already higher as we age,

0:27:560:27:59

which makes it even more important to avoid stress in later life.

0:27:590:28:03

Ageing brings with it its very own forms of stress, doesn't it?

0:28:050:28:10

Exactly. I'm sure there's no time of life when there isn't

0:28:100:28:14

lots of reasons to be stressed, but as people age,

0:28:140:28:18

they may suffer losing a partner, having to care for someone

0:28:180:28:22

long-term, and even worrying about their own health.

0:28:220:28:26

-And their mortality.

-And their mortality, yes,

0:28:260:28:29

so these things really can't be controlled.

0:28:290:28:32

What we can do is have some impact on how we react to those stresses.

0:28:320:28:38

Back at the spa, Carlton and Mearle are off the massage table

0:28:400:28:44

and have taken to the waters.

0:28:440:28:46

Are you enjoying it, Mearle?

0:28:460:28:48

Very relaxing.

0:28:480:28:49

What's it like? Where do you think you are now?

0:28:490:28:51

In the tropics in Jamaica. In the sea.

0:28:510:28:56

You'd better stay there, then!

0:28:560:28:58

-I'm in Antigua.

-Antigua?

0:28:580:29:00

I'm in the sunshine, and I can't keep still, I want to go round.

0:29:000:29:03

-You enjoy it.

-I could stay here all day!

0:29:030:29:07

All right, guys, I'll leave you to it.

0:29:070:29:09

Enjoy. Enjoy. I don't need to tell them to enjoy, they're loving it!

0:29:090:29:14

Actually, I wish I'd gone in.

0:29:140:29:16

Of course, massages and spas aren't the only ways to relax.

0:29:180:29:21

There are lots of simpler and cheaper options too.

0:29:210:29:24

I'm meeting Jackie Hawken, who teaches mindfulness techniques.

0:29:240:29:28

What is mindfulness?

0:29:290:29:31

A lot of us don't really live in the world, we live in our heads.

0:29:310:29:35

-Absolutely.

-So with mindfulness,

0:29:350:29:38

it's paying attention in a particular way on purpose

0:29:380:29:43

in the present moment, and non-judgmentally.

0:29:430:29:47

It's simply, can I be sitting on the ground with my back to an oak tree,

0:29:470:29:54

listening to a robin singing? Even just for ten seconds.

0:29:540:29:59

That is being mindful.

0:29:590:30:01

Who better to try out this technique than our intrepid volunteers?

0:30:030:30:07

They've been joined by a friend, Verona,

0:30:070:30:09

who has come to try out a way to relax on a budget.

0:30:090:30:12

So, think of a colour that represents to you

0:30:120:30:16

healing and cleansing.

0:30:160:30:18

Breathing in this healing colour now to every cell in your body,

0:30:180:30:22

cleansing and healing.

0:30:220:30:24

And breathing out the dark, grey smoke of staleness

0:30:240:30:28

that dissolves as it leaves your body.

0:30:280:30:32

Considered to be around 2,500 years old, mindfulness practices

0:30:340:30:38

were inspired mainly by teachings from the Eastern world.

0:30:380:30:42

You see, people would say,

0:30:420:30:45

"Oh, well, I don't think that's going to work for me".

0:30:450:30:47

I totally agree that people can be cynical.

0:30:470:30:50

Although this comes out of Eastern philosophy and wisdom,

0:30:500:30:54

it's very much now a present-day thing which is helping people

0:30:540:30:58

with anxiety, depression.

0:30:580:31:00

Even if you just say to somebody,

0:31:000:31:03

"OK, just try breathing deeply three times into your tummy."

0:31:030:31:10

And then breathing all the way out.

0:31:100:31:13

Now I'm breathing out.

0:31:130:31:16

So, allowing all the sounds that surround you now to knit together

0:31:180:31:22

like a comfort blanket of sound.

0:31:220:31:25

And thoughts inevitably arise.

0:31:260:31:31

Let those thoughts show themselves and dissolve.

0:31:310:31:36

If all this is seeming a bit too alternative for you maybe,

0:31:360:31:39

then you might be surprised to hear that mindfulness is now being

0:31:390:31:42

recommended by the NHS, with some researchers claiming that its

0:31:420:31:47

benefits can help us keep off weight, treat pain, and of course,

0:31:470:31:50

keep us mentally fit, too.

0:31:500:31:52

OK, time to find out now the final verdict

0:31:540:31:56

from Mearle, Carlton and Verona.

0:31:560:31:59

Hey, hey. You're coming out with smiles on your faces!

0:31:590:32:03

So, Verona, how was it?

0:32:030:32:05

It was lovely.

0:32:050:32:07

And it made my body feel really light and just relaxed.

0:32:070:32:09

Not heavy, just light.

0:32:090:32:11

-Oh, that's lovely!

-Very relaxing, yeah!

0:32:110:32:14

Because we don't really breathe properly, do we?

0:32:140:32:17

We really don't, we're rushing all the time.

0:32:170:32:19

I mean, you can do mindfulness at home, you see.

0:32:190:32:23

So you have to try and keep that balance.

0:32:230:32:25

And my hair. When I've done my hair, I went to sleep!

0:32:250:32:29

Well, these three have been a real tonic for me today,

0:32:310:32:33

but what they've also shown me is that it really is important to

0:32:330:32:37

step back, to look after your mind, to do the exercises.

0:32:370:32:41

Yes, it would be lovely to treat yourself to a day at the spa,

0:32:410:32:44

but if you don't have the money to do that,

0:32:440:32:47

there are other things you can do to have a peaceful, relaxed life.

0:32:470:32:51

No-one helps us all hold back the years, I reckon, like

0:32:510:32:54

the nation's nurses, but with over 33,000 leaving the NHS last year

0:32:540:32:59

alone, where's the next generation of staff going to come from?

0:32:590:33:02

One place that's come up with part of the answer

0:33:020:33:05

is a school in Manchester,

0:33:050:33:07

which is putting health at the heart of the curriculum.

0:33:070:33:11

This leaflet is coming through your letterbox one day soon.

0:33:110:33:14

This year sees the 70th anniversary of the NHS, an institution that has

0:33:170:33:22

helped us all stay well and healthy in so many different ways.

0:33:220:33:26

And yet, many are worried about the NHS's own wellbeing in the next

0:33:260:33:31

70 years, as record numbers of staff leave, never to return.

0:33:310:33:35

However, there might be reason for optimism.

0:33:350:33:38

Welcome to Manchester Health Academy,

0:33:380:33:41

where they're putting the emphasis on holding back the years.

0:33:410:33:44

-Hello, I'm Bill.

-Hello, welcome.

0:33:490:33:51

Principal Kevin Green, head boy Jack, and head girl Lauren

0:33:510:33:54

are showing me around.

0:33:540:33:56

So what exactly is a Health Academy, then?

0:33:560:33:59

The difference with us and other academies,

0:33:590:34:01

our sponsor is the National Health Service,

0:34:010:34:03

the Manchester University Foundation Trust.

0:34:030:34:05

We are their only school they sponsor.

0:34:050:34:07

They provide us with a number of opportunities to get our children

0:34:070:34:11

into the world of care and hospital services.

0:34:110:34:15

And this is a school with friends in other high places,

0:34:200:34:22

namely the Manchester United foundation.

0:34:220:34:25

So why Manchester United?

0:34:270:34:29

Well, it's a way to demonstrate to children

0:34:290:34:32

the value of a healthy lifestyle.

0:34:320:34:33

So we do lots of work with the foundation.

0:34:330:34:35

It's a network, really, of, if you like,

0:34:350:34:38

advocates of the club that they want to give something to the community.

0:34:380:34:42

So it's not surprising there's a big emphasis on sport here...

0:34:450:34:49

Oh, brilliant!

0:34:490:34:50

..although not everyone can get full marks.

0:34:510:34:54

That's good, he just missed the net. Very close.

0:34:560:35:00

The idea behind the Health Academy is simple -

0:35:000:35:02

give young people a head start in health care by training them in

0:35:020:35:06

the skills they need while they're still at school.

0:35:060:35:08

And in the future, the NHS may depend on them because of its

0:35:080:35:12

staffing crisis, in particular, its problem getting nurses.

0:35:120:35:15

The head of nursing at Manchester's Metropolitan University

0:35:170:35:20

is Paul Tubbs.

0:35:200:35:22

We're facing a large number of staff in the NHS at the moment

0:35:220:35:26

who are reaching a certain age, who are retiring, and at the same time,

0:35:260:35:31

the number of candidates applying to do nursing is falling.

0:35:310:35:35

That produces a perfect storm of fewer entrants into the profession

0:35:350:35:40

while more are actually leaving.

0:35:400:35:43

And Paul can see one particular storm looming on the horizon.

0:35:430:35:47

I think that nurses that have joined the profession from abroad

0:35:470:35:51

have actually contributed hugely to the NHS.

0:35:510:35:55

With the Brexit agenda, we're not sure whether nurses from the EU

0:35:550:36:01

in particular will continue to find it attractive to come into the NHS,

0:36:010:36:06

and we have seen a number of nurses leave the NHS and go back home.

0:36:060:36:11

There's no doubt that a massive part of the NHS's success has been

0:36:110:36:15

down to the various waves of immigration since the 1950s -

0:36:150:36:19

with every position, from doctors and nurses

0:36:190:36:21

to porters and cleaners,

0:36:210:36:23

filled by generations of people from India, the Caribbean,

0:36:230:36:26

the Philippines and the EU.

0:36:260:36:28

Olea de la Iglesia is a physiotherapist

0:36:280:36:32

originally from Spain, who joined the NHS and 2002.

0:36:320:36:36

But in recent years, Olea has felt that things have changed,

0:36:360:36:40

both inside and outside.

0:36:400:36:43

By the time 2016 came,

0:36:430:36:48

we were basically being dictated how long we could see a patient for,

0:36:480:36:53

how long each appointment could be,

0:36:530:36:54

and I was actually afraid of walking into a new patient's home,

0:36:540:36:59

because I didn't know whether I was going to get abuse,

0:36:590:37:02

or whether I was going to be told that I was an unworthy migrant.

0:37:020:37:04

It did happen a few times, and that was enough.

0:37:040:37:08

Because when you're putting everything you have into this,

0:37:080:37:11

all you want to do is belong to be appreciated.

0:37:110:37:14

And if you don't feel belonging or appreciation,

0:37:140:37:16

you just think, "I'm wasting my time here."

0:37:160:37:19

So after more than 15 years, Olea is going home to Spain.

0:37:190:37:23

At the moment, there is already 40,000 vacancies

0:37:230:37:25

within nursing in this country.

0:37:250:37:27

And once a lot of us leave and there's more pressure

0:37:270:37:31

being put on the people that remain,

0:37:310:37:34

this is not going to improve.

0:37:340:37:36

And with one in 11 posts in NHS England currently unfilled,

0:37:360:37:41

could the solution lie in training more of our young people

0:37:410:37:44

to fill the gap?

0:37:440:37:45

Back at the academy, Helen Walker, Director of Health,

0:37:450:37:48

certainly thinks it's the way forward.

0:37:480:37:51

We're looking at employability skills,

0:37:510:37:53

obviously that's key for the future.

0:37:530:37:55

So every year, I have a plan which links my curriculum

0:37:550:38:00

to practical activities.

0:38:000:38:02

So, we will take the students to the hospital,

0:38:020:38:05

they do work experience.

0:38:050:38:06

There are about, what, 800 students at this school...

0:38:060:38:09

-Yeah.

-..at the moment, at the academy?

0:38:090:38:11

How many of them do you think will end up in the health care business?

0:38:110:38:15

In terms of our sixth form, I'd say that 60 to 70% of my students

0:38:150:38:19

get offers from university, and probably half of those

0:38:190:38:23

have gone on to do health-related degrees,

0:38:230:38:26

which is really successful and, you know,

0:38:260:38:28

that gives them real opportunities in the future.

0:38:280:38:31

Well, that's the view from the top, but now I want to hear

0:38:320:38:34

how the pupils themselves are preparing for the future.

0:38:340:38:38

I'm joining them in their social care class,

0:38:380:38:41

which today is focusing on the subject of ageing.

0:38:410:38:44

Quite appropriate, really.

0:38:440:38:45

Girls, can you write the title down, please, which is Later Adulthood?

0:38:520:38:56

And straightaway, I had a question.

0:38:560:38:58

Excuse me, miss, what's later adulthood?

0:38:580:39:00

Girls, can any of you tell Bill what age range

0:39:000:39:03

you were looking at for later adulthood? Carolyn?

0:39:030:39:05

-65 plus.

-65 plus.

0:39:050:39:08

That's not me.

0:39:080:39:10

OK, so we're going to be looking at anything

0:39:100:39:12

that can affect someone who is 65 and over.

0:39:120:39:15

Shelby, what do you think we're looking at?

0:39:150:39:17

Like the way something like your functions stop working,

0:39:170:39:20

like your legs.

0:39:200:39:21

-Your walking ability starts to decrease.

-Walking ability.

0:39:210:39:23

So those are mainly regressions that we look at in older age.

0:39:230:39:28

You know, there might be a temptation

0:39:280:39:30

to see a place like this as a bit non-traditional and trendy.

0:39:300:39:33

But being here today and seeing what actually happens

0:39:330:39:36

really gives us hope for the future.

0:39:360:39:39

Have you worked out what you want to do later in life?

0:39:390:39:41

I want to be a midwife.

0:39:410:39:43

Either a special needs teacher or a neo-natal nurse.

0:39:430:39:45

And a crucial part of making that happen

0:39:470:39:50

is getting pupils out of the school and into the sort of places

0:39:500:39:54

they can learn practical, first-hand lessons.

0:39:540:39:57

Today, the sixth-formers are at Manchester Royal Infirmary

0:39:570:40:00

to take part in a workshop

0:40:000:40:01

on communicating with people with learning difficulties.

0:40:010:40:05

Things that we use out on the wards to help patients communicate if they

0:40:050:40:08

can't talk to us, so by pointing and pictures.

0:40:080:40:12

That can be about how they're feeling, if they're in pain.

0:40:120:40:15

For the pupils at the Manchester Health Academy,

0:40:150:40:17

it's not just about qualifications,

0:40:170:40:19

but life-changing experiences as well.

0:40:190:40:22

Olivia is in sixth form and has just completed a work placement

0:40:220:40:26

in a residential care home.

0:40:260:40:27

Before I actually went, I didn't want to go, because I thought...

0:40:290:40:32

I thought it wasn't going to be for me.

0:40:320:40:34

-But when I went, I loved it.

-What did you like about it?

0:40:340:40:36

So, I formed a close bond with a lady called Lily,

0:40:360:40:39

she had dementia, but she always remembered me.

0:40:390:40:41

And we just used to sit there, I used to paint her nails,

0:40:410:40:44

and we just used to speak about her life.

0:40:440:40:46

And the key thing is, asking other people who know that person best

0:40:460:40:49

before you go in and do the activities.

0:40:490:40:51

The environment, your body language, your tone of voice,

0:40:510:40:53

will all make a massive difference.

0:40:530:40:55

Because he stated that he likes painting and art,

0:40:550:40:58

we suggested that they should put him in a coloured room.

0:40:580:41:01

And use short sentences and don't make it too confusing for him.

0:41:010:41:06

A lot of young people wouldn't find working with older people appealing

0:41:060:41:10

-at all, would they?

-That's how I felt before I started.

0:41:100:41:12

It's not what you think it will be.

0:41:120:41:14

And being truthful, I thought it was going to be, like, miserable.

0:41:140:41:17

But each person, that elderly person, they had a story,

0:41:170:41:20

and I wanted to hear every person's story.

0:41:200:41:23

I want to help people,

0:41:230:41:25

so that's why I want to go to uni to do social work.

0:41:250:41:28

# Those were the days of our lives... #

0:41:280:41:33

So, despite the difficulties the NHS faces,

0:41:330:41:36

is it still a good place for young people to set their sights on?

0:41:360:41:39

I would have to say yes,

0:41:400:41:42

because I am a nurse and have been for 50-odd years.

0:41:420:41:45

But, yes, it is very satisfying.

0:41:450:41:47

There is a huge range of specialisms that nurses work in.

0:41:470:41:53

In order to get more people into the profession,

0:41:530:41:55

there needs to be further education in schools.

0:41:550:41:59

I think the more they know about the range of opportunities that exist,

0:41:590:42:03

the more people will apply for health care working.

0:42:030:42:06

Well, it's been an interesting day at the Health Academy

0:42:080:42:10

and it's nearly home time.

0:42:100:42:12

But there's just one more thing I have to do...

0:42:120:42:14

Hello, students. We've learned a lot here today,

0:42:180:42:20

and I see that the future is safe in your hands.

0:42:200:42:23

So, as a token of my appreciation,

0:42:230:42:26

I know you're all Manchester United supporters, most of you,

0:42:260:42:28

but I'm going to give you something which I think is from a club

0:42:280:42:31

just as great, my own team,

0:42:310:42:33

the mighty Wycombe Wanderers!

0:42:330:42:36

-ALL:

-Boo!

0:42:360:42:39

I'll take it that's a no, then!

0:42:390:42:41

BELL RINGS

0:42:440:42:46

Let's just quickly give you the answer to our

0:42:480:42:49

What Was The Year That Was? archive quiz.

0:42:490:42:52

-Fiona?

-1994 is the year.

0:42:520:42:55

Oh, that was the year the...

0:42:550:42:57

That one... The Channel Tunnel opened.

0:42:570:42:59

-The Channel Tunnel opened! That one!

-Yes.

0:42:590:43:01

-We'll be open for business the same time tomorrow.

-We will. Bye-bye.

0:43:010:43:05

# Oh, yes, I do

0:43:050:43:08

# You know I love you

0:43:100:43:13

# I always will

0:43:130:43:16

# My mind's made up

0:43:160:43:18

# By the way that I feel

0:43:180:43:22

# There's no beginning

0:43:220:43:24

# There'll be no end

0:43:240:43:27

# Cos on my love you can depend... #

0:43:270:43:33

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