Episode 2 Britain's Heritage Heroes


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Episode 2

John Craven and Jules Hudson champion British crafts. In the Lake District they discover a community group refusing to let their spirit die after the closure of their local shop.


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We're travelling across the UK on a mission.

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All over the country, our heritage is at risk.

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Ancient buildings and monuments are under threat of demolition.

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Valuable arts and crafts are on the brink of extinction.

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And our rich industrial heritage is disappearing fast.

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We're scouring town and country,

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in search of the nation's unsung heroes

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determined not to let our heritage become a thing of the past.

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Today, we look behind the scenes of a £9 million restoration project

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that's opening up a Cumbrian estate

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for the first time in 70 years.

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What a view to work with. Fantastic, isn't it?

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And meet a group who've campaigned tirelessly

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to save a viaduct from demolition.

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On this journey, we're uncovering the hidden treasures of our country,

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treasures that are certainly worth fighting for.

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And meeting heritage heroes saving Britain at risk.

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THEY LAUGH

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Here we are at Hartside,

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one of the highest points in the Pennines.

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Well, I've had better starts to the day, John. I have to say!

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Look at this!

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"The view in front of you is one of the most spectacular in England."

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Over there is the Lake District.

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Over there is the Solway Firth.

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THEY LAUGH

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Beautiful(!) Shall we get out of this gloom?

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Hopefully, we might see SOMETHING today.

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Yeah, it might clear as we get down to the foothills. Let's hope so.

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Ever the optimist.

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Our journey started in Northumberland, near Hadrian's Wall.

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Today, we're heading south into Cumbria and the Lakes.

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We're then venturing across the Pennines into Yorkshire,

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and ending our trail in the stunning county of Derbyshire.

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Cumbria can claim to have

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some of the most breathtaking scenery in England.

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The county has a rich agricultural landscape

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that runs alongside the dramatic hills of the Lake District.

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We're getting off the well-beaten tourist trail

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to meet the people working hard to preserve its heritage.

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Well, it's brightening up, John, down here.

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It is, and our first stop is a little village called Bolton.

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Close by the A66.

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We're not just looking, on our journey,

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at buildings at risk. We're looking at the whole social network

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in the country that might be at risk.

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Things like village shops, post offices, and pubs, and things,

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are DANGEROUSLY at risk, these days.

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I've certainly seen it first-hand where I live.

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These things are under growing commercial pressures

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from the bigger supermarkets.

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Due to cutbacks in recent years, over 2,500 post offices have closed,

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along with hundreds of pubs.

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Some communities aren't taking these closures lying down.

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After the demise of the shop and post office in Bolton,

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the locals have found another focal point for local life.

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We join them as they celebrate

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three successful years of weekly gatherings in their village hall.

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-Look at this!

-It's a party!

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Hello! Who are you?

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Hope we're allowed inside!

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Well, what a turnout!

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-Hello.

-How are things going?

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Nice to see you. Look at this!

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'They call this the Exchange.

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'It gives locals a place to get together

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'and sell home-made crafts and products.'

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Are all these from different people's back gardens?

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-That's right. Jacob and Freddie have grown the cucumbers.

-Well done!

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40 pence to £1.

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-That one's 50p.

-Right, I'll have that.

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Some greens, as well. I like fresh peas.

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-OK, Jacob, there you are.

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Now, THAT looks like just the ticket.

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-Hello, how are you?

-How are YOU?

-What kind of cheese is it?

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That one is Lincolnshire Poacher.

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And is this Stilton?

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No, that's our own blend, called Withnail Blue.

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I've got to have Withnail Blue.

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I'm a huge fan of Withnail & I. So I've got to have that.

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We farm just across from Sleddale Hall,

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which was Uncle Monty's summer house.

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Really? So, we're in film nostalgia territory, aren't we?

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I'll have a piece of that, and, yes, Withnail Blue.

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Lovely.

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Not only can you buy fantastic local produce here at the Exchange,

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you can also have a cup of tea,

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-and a cake, and a bit of a chat, can't you?

-Certainly, yes.

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What difference has it made, the Exchange, to the village?

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I think it's made a lot of difference.

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Before, although for some of the elderly people,

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losing the post office was a bit of a disaster to begin with,

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because where did they cash their pension?

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If you go down to the village shop, or the post office,

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-you might meet one person. But here, you meet...

-Everybody.

-Everybody.

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And you can spend the whole afternoon seeing your friends.

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And it has REALLY brought the village together.

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Right, I'll have a cup of tea, please.

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-What would you like in the way of cake?

-A cream cake, please.

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With a strawberry on top.

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-It's a raspberry, actually.

-Oh, it's a raspberry. So it is.

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Oh, lovely. Thank you very much.

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There's one problem. Trying to find somewhere to sit!

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Ooh, lovely. I'm not supposed to eat cream.

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So don't tell my wife, will you?

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Derek Cotter is the man who rallied the community troops

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to get THIS Exchange off the ground.

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It's pretty warm in there this morning, Derek, isn't it?

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There's a tremendous atmosphere in there.

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Isn't it just? Absolutely buzzing.

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That must be a huge source of pleasure for you,

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to see this, on its third anniversary, so excited?

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It's a tremendous satisfaction.

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Although I helped found the idea, it's down to the community itself,

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in that we have 25 or so volunteers

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that turn out very frequently for it.

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What happened to give you the idea

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to take up this challenge of creating an exchange here in Bolton?

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We're approaching the building itself.

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-This is where the shop and the post office used to be.

-THIS is it?

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-Yes.

-The black postbox.

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That's simply done to avoid anybody inadvertently posting letters.

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It's also bolted off.

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As far as the community were concerned,

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this was really the social hub of the village.

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But is your success here catching on in other villages in the area?

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Yes, we managed to sell this idea to Culgaith,

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which is just across the A66,

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and they open once a week, the same as us.

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I suppose the question I'm dying to ask you is,

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would you go back to having your post office

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in exchange for the Exchange? Would you swap one for the other?

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I don't think we'd want to go back to being without the Exchange.

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Clearly, we'd like the shop, we'd like the post office.

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This is really something the community REALLY benefits from,

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and the sort of thing I'd want every community to have,

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if they could manage it.

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It's a simple idea that we can ALL take on,

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to breathe new life into our own communities.

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We're back on the road, in Cumbria,

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exploring the history of the rolling countryside.

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We have, as you know, this peculiar fascination

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-with our industrial past.

-Uh-huh.

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One of the things that always catches my eye, wherever I am in the country,

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are the great viaducts that once linked the railway system,

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and the aqueducts that linked the canal system together.

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They ARE quite spectacular, aren't they?

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How on earth did they do that? All those years ago, you know.

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Ancient technology. It's a Roman technology.

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You wonder about engine drivers on the first crossing.

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THEY LAUGH

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Hoping it had all been done properly.

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Viaducts have been built since the late 1800s

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to connect industrial Britain.

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Smardale Gill viaduct was constructed in 1861

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to carry coke and coal on the first trans-Pennines railway.

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It ran for 100 years, closing in 1962.

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Left to rot, it was threatened with demolition in the 1980s.

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A community group challenged British Rail's plans.

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Martin Holdgate is one of the locals

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who set up a trust that saved the viaduct.

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I care very much about this place.

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It's a superb bit of railway heritage.

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14 arches, 90 feet high.

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Beautifully shaped, very graceful structure.

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I've known it, and it's been part of my memory, all my life, almost.

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I would be very sad if it wasn't here for future people to enjoy.

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First thing that's got to be done is,

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the track way itself has got to be waterproofed.

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There are people already beginning to work on it,

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because we want to get that done this year,

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using our own resources.

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We have limited funds but think we've got enough for this.

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Because, if we can waterproof the track way,

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and stop the water percolating into the fabric,

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we, as it were, turn the tap of damage off.

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The viaduct sits 90 feet above a deep ravine,

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and is at constant risk from the elements.

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The added complication is that it's surrounded by a nature reserve.

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Andrew Walter of Cumbria's Wildlife Trust

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is advising them on how to protect the site.

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It's particularly important for all the life in the river,

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especially the crayfish,

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that there's no pollution, siltation, or anything brought in,

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especially for this fella.

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White-clawed crayfish are just one of the species found here,

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so any work undertaken on the viaduct

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has to be done with real care.

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Generally, there will again be fear for the stability of the structure,

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if we don't do something about it.

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That's why I'm passionate about getting the money,

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and getting it refurbished,

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and making sure it's even sounder for the next 50 years

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than it has been since the railway closed in 1962.

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Winding our way south through Cumbria,

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we're now heading to a restoration project

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on the edge of the northern Lake District.

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Today, John, it's interesting criss-crossing the country,

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as we do,

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the amount of AONBs, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty,

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and of course national parks,

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that were put together by people with some extraordinary foresight.

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It all happened while the Second World War was raging.

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There were people in Whitehall, and other places,

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thinking about the future.

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What would it be like after the war was over?

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"We want a home fit for heroes."

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It's not just the agriculture that defines the Pennines.

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Its great stately homes and castles

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-also give it a real flavour, don't they?

-Yeah, absolutely!

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A lot of those castles just fell into disrepair eventually.

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But, actually, where we are,

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not far from Penrith, is Lowther Castle.

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I think they are doing something quite interesting.

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They're not just trying to restore it all to its former glory.

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The idea is to capture it as is, warts and all.

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Lowther Castle has been home to the Lowther family

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since the reign of Edward I

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The castle and gardens are just part of their estate

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that still dominates Cumbria.

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Much of it is still in use,

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but after the death of the fifth Earl of Lonsdale,

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the castle lay uninhabited.

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To save it from complete dereliction,

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a charitable trust stepped in.

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An injection of £9 million

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is helping restore this impressive site,

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opening it up to the public for the first time in 70 years.

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Andrew Mercer is the man overseeing the project.

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Well, Andrew, this is quite something, isn't it?

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HE LAUGHS

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There's a little bit to do!

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We've been at it now for a couple of months.

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There's a huge amount of restoration and conversion to do.

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In terms of the main castle itself, are you going to tackle that?

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Will you put a roof on it, or keep it as a ruin?

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It's a ruin. That's what it is.

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It sits lovely, grandly, and very elegantly in the landscape.

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It has a real presence. We don't need a roof to be put back on it.

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We're keen to see it as a proper, well-consolidated ruin

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that will be a great landmark in this wonderful countryside.

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There's lots of clever people.

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There's the lead workers, the roofers, the stonemasons.

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There's a whole army of craftsmen.

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Today we've had seven or eight apprentices working here,

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learning these new traditional skills.

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I think, as an apprentice, to have the opportunity to learn your skills

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on such a great building as this must be great fun, a great joy.

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One of the first jobs

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for the stonemasons is making safe

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the existing stonework.

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As you can see behind me, hundreds of tonnes of work stone

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have been taken off this building,

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carefully cleaned, and then restored.

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Now comes the task of putting the whole thing back together.

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THIS is what's known in the trade as a "merlon".

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It's one of the little square pieces that turn this

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from a straightforward country house into a crenellated castle.

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And this is going up there.

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All right, Steve!

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I think I've lost count of the number of ladders!

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Hey, look, there's the block!

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Is Stanley up here, as well?

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Stanley? He is.

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-Hello, mate, nice to see you. How are you?

-Hi.

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-So, there's our merlon?

-It is.

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Isn't it gorgeous? What a view you fellas have to work with!

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Is that the old mason's mark on the end?

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That IS the mason's mark, yes.

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-There's a terrific heritage to these things.

-That's right.

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'Restoration on this scale takes real skill.

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'Each merlon has to be removed and cleaned.

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'Limestone mortar then secures it

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'to where it originally sat over 200 years ago.'

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Well done, Stanley. So, that's it, then?

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-The 20th one done.

-Yes.

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How many more to go?

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Eh...150?

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THEY LAUGH

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The plans for the grounds are as impressive.

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In its heyday, Lowther had one of the grandest gardens in England.

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Now, acres of parks, woodlands, pond and walkways

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are waiting to be rediscovered.

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Landscape designer Dominic Cole

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has the task of reviving this 17th-century garden

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for everyone to enjoy.

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This is the central core of the garden. We're restoring most of it.

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What's all this going to be? Lawns?

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These will be different types of lawns.

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Some will be formal. Some we want to have as wild flowers,

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so we'll use wild flowers from the local area.

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We'll work with the ecologist to do that.

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This is a memory of the bowling green. Very formal.

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Then, a bulb lawn. So you have something for all seasons.

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We're taking that formal structure of the paths

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and using that as the basis onto which we'll overlay

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our garden from this generation.

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So, you're not actually rebuilding the place,

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you're giving a flavour of what it was like?

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That's right. Because there's so much going on here,

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and we can look at another period, one of the summerhouses.

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Lovely.

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What's exciting is we're walking through

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from one period to another.

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What we're coming up to now is a much later period,

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the Victorian period.

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What is THIS?

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This is one of the Victorian summerhouses.

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It has this most wonderful character.

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It's almost Hansel & Gretel.

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You've got the gingerbread house.

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It has its original decoration. It's exciting to find it.

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There were 24 of these throughout the gardens.

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There's just a couple left.

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-Will you be using it again?

-Very much so.

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We're assuming the planting is holding it together.

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You can see the two ivies on either side,

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which are now very much entangled with the decoration.

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So, we think this won't need a lot more than a haircut.

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We're certainly not going to attempt to strip the ivy off it.

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-This old place is idyllic, isn't it?

-It's fantastic.

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It WOULD be, if it wasn't for the noise your men are making.

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I apologise for the noise. We're doing some tree work.

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More clearance, to open up new views.

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Next will be this fantastic vista,

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down the pond from the summerhouse.

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'With more than a hundred acres to play with,

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'Dominic and his crew

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'have certainly got their work cut out.'

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Jules, you've been at the big house.

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Let me show you the view from a little house.

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Look at that. Isn't it sweet?

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A diamond jubilee summerhouse for the Lonsdale family.

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But look at the view that it has.

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-Perfectly sited, isn't it?

-Isn't that fantastic?

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This view was really just the view of the Lonsdale family

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and their visitors.

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But now, we can all have a look at it.

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We've all got a chance. It's wonderful, isn't it?

0:17:350:17:37

What I like is they're doing a very inclusive project.

0:17:370:17:40

The house has its issues,

0:17:400:17:42

but I love the fact they're going for this romantic ruin.

0:17:420:17:45

They're also opening up the stable block,

0:17:450:17:48

to make that a real venue for visitors,

0:17:480:17:50

and 130 acres of gardens we can all now explore.

0:17:500:17:52

A place that was very much at risk has now been saved.

0:17:520:17:56

From what you've seen, do you think money well spent?

0:17:560:18:00

-I do, indeed.

-I agree with you.

0:18:000:18:02

They're our Heritage Heroes here, aren't they?

0:18:020:18:04

THEY LAUGH

0:18:040:18:05

It's fantastic to see part of Cumbria's rich heritage

0:18:050:18:09

being opened up for all.

0:18:090:18:12

And there are more hidden gems to be discovered on our journey.

0:18:120:18:17

Keep right on to the end of the road.

0:18:170:18:21

# Keep right on to the end

0:18:210:18:25

# Though the way be...#

0:18:250:18:28

Or something like that.

0:18:280:18:29

-Something like that.

-Harry Lauder.

0:18:290:18:31

HE LAUGHS

0:18:310:18:33

'Oh, the joys of car sharing with Mr Craven!

0:18:330:18:37

'On our heritage trail, we're discovering

0:18:370:18:40

'food, arts and crafts fighting for survival.

0:18:400:18:44

'In Cumbria a campaign has taken hold

0:18:440:18:46

'to promote a great British delicacy.

0:18:460:18:48

'Marmalade.'

0:18:480:18:50

Winston Churchill insisted on Seville oranges

0:18:500:18:52

being imported to Britain during the war.

0:18:520:18:55

He claimed marmalade was vital for morale.

0:18:550:18:59

It's since declined in popularity.

0:18:590:19:01

But, one woman who's lucky enough

0:19:010:19:03

to call the historic house of Dalemain her home,

0:19:030:19:06

is declaring she'll defend it forever.

0:19:060:19:08

I made marmalade with my mother, and it was all good fun.

0:19:080:19:12

When I got married, I came to live at Dalemain.

0:19:120:19:15

It's a house open to the public.

0:19:150:19:16

It has this enormous archive,

0:19:160:19:19

and nobody has ever really delved into it, until recently,

0:19:190:19:22

when we had an archivist who found all sorts of things, and treasures,

0:19:220:19:28

including this huge archive of marmalade recipes.

0:19:280:19:32

In the archive at Dalemain,

0:19:340:19:36

we discovered this wonderful, ancient recipe book.

0:19:360:19:40

It was created and pulled together about the end of the 1600s.

0:19:400:19:44

So it's a very ancient book.

0:19:440:19:46

But it is stuffed full of wonderful marmalade recipes,

0:19:460:19:49

which we can now use.

0:19:490:19:51

The idea is,

0:19:510:19:52

we're using ancient recipes, and perpetuating them for the future,

0:19:520:19:57

and it's truly exciting.

0:19:570:19:59

Already it's going liquid.

0:19:590:20:02

Wonderful.

0:20:020:20:04

And it can just boil for a little bit longer.

0:20:040:20:08

And then it will be ready to pot,

0:20:080:20:10

which will be delicious.

0:20:100:20:12

Ladled with history, Jane Hasell-McCosh

0:20:130:20:15

decided to bring marmalade into the 21st century.

0:20:150:20:18

Five years ago, she launched the World Marmalade Awards.

0:20:180:20:22

It draws support and entries from around the world.

0:20:220:20:27

I think the most important thing

0:20:270:20:29

is our artisan producer's competition.

0:20:290:20:32

That's all about the small producers who are making marmalade

0:20:320:20:35

with the open pan method,

0:20:350:20:38

and using recipes often belonging to their granny, or their great-granny.

0:20:380:20:43

But, they are perpetuating what they learned,

0:20:430:20:46

and then producing it on a commercial scale.

0:20:460:20:49

Now, that commercial scale may be tiny amounts

0:20:490:20:51

sold in the village post office, or the local shop.

0:20:510:20:55

But they are producing the marmalade of today,

0:20:550:20:59

and that, to me, is the lifeline to marmalade production of the future.

0:20:590:21:04

THIS is what you can't beat.

0:21:060:21:08

A nice cup of tea, with a view like this.

0:21:080:21:11

Isn't it gorgeous?

0:21:110:21:14

As WB Yeats said about another lake, "Peace comes dropping slowly here".

0:21:140:21:18

Oh, John. I'm going to cry now.

0:21:180:21:20

THEY LAUGH

0:21:200:21:22

Cheers!

0:21:220:21:23

Our final stop on our journey through Cumbria is Brougham,

0:21:270:21:32

just south of Penrith.

0:21:320:21:34

We've already had a nice look at Lowther,

0:21:350:21:39

which was a pretty ambitious endeavour.

0:21:390:21:42

£9 million going into that one.

0:21:420:21:45

How about another grand house that...?

0:21:450:21:47

Has it got a roof on?

0:21:470:21:49

-It HAS got a roof on it.

-Good.

0:21:490:21:50

But they haven't got that sort of money to spend.

0:21:500:21:54

This is very much a homespun operation, at Brougham.

0:21:540:21:57

It's been saved from the teeth of a housing development.

0:21:570:22:01

They've compromised slightly,

0:22:010:22:03

on how they've allowed the housing to happen around it.

0:22:030:22:07

They've given some land for housing

0:22:070:22:09

on the understanding they can keep the hall itself.

0:22:090:22:12

Ah, Brougham Hall!

0:22:120:22:14

-Look at that.

-That IS a castle, to me.

0:22:140:22:17

-That IS a castle.

-It's castellated.

0:22:170:22:19

Let's go and find out the story.

0:22:190:22:21

-They must have been small in those days.

-You can say that again.

0:22:210:22:25

Look at this place! Wonderful!

0:22:250:22:26

-LOUDSPEAKER:

-'Hello. Please help us in our private endeavour

0:22:260:22:29

'to restore this 14th-century fortified house.'

0:22:290:22:32

It's the voice of the Almighty!

0:22:320:22:34

-We're being watched!

-And they're wanting money.

-I think they are.

0:22:340:22:38

Dig deep, John. Go on!

0:22:380:22:41

Hey, look at this!

0:22:410:22:42

"On the 15th October 1905,

0:22:420:22:44

"Edward VII set off

0:22:440:22:45

"through this arch to Raby Castle

0:22:450:22:47

"in the first motorcade

0:22:470:22:49

"in the north of England

0:22:490:22:51

"by a British monarch."

0:22:510:22:53

Winston Churchill was here, as well. In 1942.

0:22:530:22:56

This is quite something, isn't it?

0:22:560:22:58

Very different feel from the outside.

0:22:580:23:01

-No big house, or anything.

-No.

0:23:010:23:03

'Brougham Hall has an incredible history.

0:23:050:23:07

'Royalty, Lords and commanders of war

0:23:070:23:10

'have all taken sanctuary

0:23:100:23:13

'within these walls.

0:23:130:23:15

'But in the 1980s, it was to be pulled down

0:23:150:23:17

'to give way to a new development.'

0:23:170:23:19

There are the new houses, then.

0:23:190:23:21

That's obviously part of the deal that meant the rest of this

0:23:210:23:25

wasn't covered in houses, either.

0:23:250:23:27

But, if it wasn't for one individual with some serious foresight,

0:23:270:23:30

-this would have been completely lost.

-You're right.

0:23:300:23:33

'It's incredible to think it was down to one man

0:23:330:23:37

'that this hall was saved.

0:23:370:23:39

'Christopher Terry visited Brougham in his early 20s.

0:23:390:23:42

'When he heard it was to be demolished,

0:23:420:23:44

'he made it his mission to save it.

0:23:440:23:47

'He took over the development of the site,

0:23:470:23:49

'and was able to rescue the Hall

0:23:490:23:51

'by building residential houses in the grounds.

0:23:510:23:54

'It's now open to the public

0:23:540:23:56

'and the converted stables are home to local businesses.

0:23:560:24:00

'Their rent, along with some charitable funding,

0:24:000:24:02

'is allowing Christopher to restore the rest of the site.'

0:24:020:24:06

At the beginning,

0:24:060:24:08

friends of mine said I'd got the Nobel Prize for Lunacy.

0:24:080:24:11

But, we've done enough of it now

0:24:110:24:15

to have proved that we CAN do it.

0:24:150:24:18

This is where we started, in January 1986.

0:24:180:24:22

We rebuilt this south wall,

0:24:220:24:25

and we took on 22 youngsters, who'd never had a job.

0:24:250:24:28

-And they made a very credible job.

-They certainly have.

0:24:280:24:31

It looks very impressive, doesn't it?

0:24:310:24:33

And then we worked our way the whole way round,

0:24:330:24:36

and we've got as far as the tearoom, there.

0:24:360:24:39

We've done over half, in area.

0:24:390:24:42

And, we are viable.

0:24:420:24:44

We can pay our bills.

0:24:440:24:45

'Christopher is also committed

0:24:450:24:47

'to re-housing the mass of historical documents

0:24:470:24:51

'that are currently under wraps in this store room.'

0:24:510:24:54

What have you got HERE, Christopher?

0:24:540:24:57

This looks very impressive.

0:24:570:24:59

This is the visitors' book, from 1888 onwards.

0:24:590:25:03

I should tell you the Royal Family used Brougham as the halfway house

0:25:030:25:09

between Windsor and Balmoral,

0:25:090:25:11

from 1857 to 1905.

0:25:110:25:14

For example, here we have the future King George V

0:25:140:25:17

coming as Prince George, in 1892.

0:25:170:25:22

There's Albert Edward, later King Edward VII,

0:25:220:25:24

and, sending a telegram from Balmoral

0:25:240:25:28

to say thanks very much for having me.

0:25:280:25:32

This is just a very small section of the amazing archive here.

0:25:320:25:35

What would have happened to it if you hadn't stepped in?

0:25:350:25:38

I think, if we hadn't come along when we did,

0:25:380:25:41

both Brougham Hall, and the history attaching to Brougham Hall,

0:25:410:25:45

would have been smashed off the face of the earth.

0:25:450:25:50

Getting this history on display

0:25:500:25:52

will help secure Brougham Hall's future

0:25:520:25:55

and put it back on the map as an important historic site.

0:25:550:25:58

What I love about this place is, there's clearly a lot more to it

0:25:580:26:01

than just the restoration and conservation of the building itself.

0:26:010:26:05

It's also become a real haven for many local artisan industries.

0:26:050:26:09

There's a wedding planner here, an IT consultant,

0:26:090:26:11

even a country furnishing store.

0:26:110:26:14

All of them have a direct contribution to make

0:26:140:26:17

in keeping this place an ongoing success.

0:26:170:26:20

Piers Merry was one of the teenagers

0:26:200:26:22

who helped rebuild the hall.

0:26:220:26:26

The work inspired him to take up stonemasonry.

0:26:260:26:30

He's dedicated his life to learning these heritage skills.

0:26:300:26:33

His work is now acclaimed around the world.

0:26:330:26:37

Piers!

0:26:370:26:38

I've found you! What a place to work!

0:26:380:26:40

This is a stonemason's dream, isn't it?

0:26:400:26:43

A vaulted ceiling...

0:26:430:26:45

There's not many people who have a vaulted ceiling in their workshop.

0:26:450:26:48

-Nice to see you. How's things?

-Very good.

0:26:480:26:51

I gather you started out here 15-odd years ago,

0:26:510:26:54

when they were beginning to restore the castle walls, and so forth?

0:26:540:26:57

Yeah. It was my first job.

0:26:570:26:59

It was the most fun job I could find when I was at school.

0:26:590:27:03

I used to come here, and dig out, and excavate.

0:27:030:27:06

Find the good stone, separate the bad stone.

0:27:060:27:09

They had face workers and stonemasons working here.

0:27:090:27:12

We came in and got as much ready for them as we could.

0:27:120:27:15

One thing that strikes me about Brougham is this hotbed

0:27:150:27:18

of local businesses that have come into it,

0:27:180:27:21

which not only keep it going, but have a direct investment,

0:27:210:27:25

a real passion for its survival.

0:27:250:27:27

And you're one of those people.

0:27:270:27:29

Would you ever want to work anywhere else,

0:27:290:27:32

-or is Brougham where you want to be?

-No, no. I want to be here.

0:27:320:27:35

It's wonderful. Look at it. Look at the office!

0:27:350:27:39

THEY LAUGH

0:27:390:27:40

Yeah! Look at the office. This is a nice place to be.

0:27:400:27:43

Brougham Hall certainly looks to have a future

0:27:430:27:45

as rich as its past.

0:27:450:27:48

This has been a great day travelling across Cumbria.

0:27:500:27:54

Lowther Castle is spectacular,

0:27:540:27:57

and it's great news that it's being preserved for future generations.

0:27:570:28:01

And the buzz of the Exchange in Bolton is fantastic.

0:28:010:28:05

The locals have created a whole new centre

0:28:050:28:09

where community spirit can thrive.

0:28:090:28:11

Next time, we're in the Yorkshire Dales

0:28:110:28:14

to see how local funding is helping a community to help itself.

0:28:140:28:17

And we explore the industrial heart of the Pennines,

0:28:170:28:21

as we visit a textile mill

0:28:210:28:24

whose creative future is reaching new heights.

0:28:240:28:28

How about that?

0:28:280:28:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:28:540:28:57

John Craven and Jules Hudson champion British crafts. In the Lake District they discover a community group refusing to let their spirit die after the closure of their local shop and post office, and the massive restoration work taking place on the impressive Lowther estate.