Historical Properties Escape to the Country


Historical Properties

Jules Hudson looks back at some of the best historic houses featured in past programmes. He also visits a blacksmith who recreates historical fixtures.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Historical Properties. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio.

0:00:020:00:03

Great words from a Great British writer.

0:00:030:00:06

You've joined me on a special Escape to the Country,

0:00:060:00:08

as we explore some of the finest historical properties that we've had on this series.

0:00:080:00:13

And, of course,

0:00:130:00:14

I'll be revealing which Great British Bard boarded here.

0:00:140:00:17

Any ideas?

0:00:170:00:19

In today's show, we'll be delving into the past and uncovering some

0:00:310:00:35

of our best historic properties from days of yore.

0:00:350:00:39

And there are all manner of reactions, as an ancient farmhouse has them speechless.

0:00:390:00:44

The age of the building has struck you dumb.

0:00:440:00:46

-Yeah...

-I don't think we thought we'd see anything as old as this.

0:00:460:00:50

A Kentish barn gets a laugh.

0:00:500:00:52

-What d'you think?

-It's pretty good.

0:00:520:00:54

This is precisely what I had in mind.

0:00:560:00:58

-That's stunning.

-A manor house gets them screaming.

0:00:580:01:02

-I don't want you to look at that, I want you to look at that.

-Yes!

0:01:020:01:05

Really?

0:01:070:01:10

-You are joking, aren't you?

-I think she likes it.

0:01:100:01:12

I'll meet the Indiana Jones of listed properties.

0:01:120:01:16

I'll crawl through any hole, if it involves getting to see something 14th Century.

0:01:160:01:20

And I'll strike a blow in the name of historical preservation.

0:01:200:01:23

Today, we're delving into the rich architectural past of Britain.

0:01:250:01:28

We're talking houses with history, and where better to start than with this one?

0:01:280:01:32

I'm told it's the birthplace of William Shakespeare himself.

0:01:320:01:36

You're from the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust,

0:01:360:01:38

tell us a bit more about the work that you do.

0:01:380:01:41

The Trust owns five houses, all connected with members of Shakespeare's family.

0:01:410:01:45

The birthplace here behind us is the first house they bought in 1847,

0:01:450:01:50

but they also own his mother's childhood home,

0:01:500:01:52

his wife's childhood home and the houses of his daughter and granddaughter

0:01:520:01:56

and visitors can come and hopefully see all five of them.

0:01:560:02:00

-It's a family affair.

-Absolutely.

0:02:000:02:01

Now, what d'you think it's worth?

0:02:010:02:03

Well, in 1847, when the Trust bought it, they paid £3,000.

0:02:030:02:08

But it's priceless, because of the connection with Shakespeare.

0:02:080:02:12

It has to be, doesn't it? £3,000, priceless today.

0:02:120:02:14

If all that has whetted your appetite for all things historical,

0:02:140:02:18

then stick with us for the best of the best.

0:02:180:02:21

For thousands of years, Britons have built upon this emerald isle,

0:02:240:02:28

either for protection from the elements, their enemies, or for worship.

0:02:280:02:33

From the pre-historic gathering of stones, Saxon wood and mud huts,

0:02:330:02:38

right through to Victorian brick houses,

0:02:380:02:40

we have shaped our environment and created homes for comfort.

0:02:400:02:43

Take a look and you'll find that the oldest buildings standing

0:02:430:02:46

are churches, castles and grand estate houses.

0:02:460:02:49

Buildings where time and money have guaranteed solid structures and solid foundations.

0:02:490:02:54

But every now and then, dotted between these grand buildings,

0:02:540:02:57

an ancient dwelling can still be discovered.

0:02:570:03:00

From medieval halls to Elizabethan and Tudor timber-framed houses.

0:03:000:03:03

And for those lucky enough to possess a piece of history,

0:03:030:03:07

there is often no comparison when living in a historic home,

0:03:070:03:11

compared to its more contemporary cousin.

0:03:110:03:13

Now, as a former archaeologist, it'll probably come as no surprise to you to learn that some of my

0:03:130:03:18

favourite properties are those with the richest architectural and historical past.

0:03:180:03:23

Picking my favourite has been a bit of a challenge,

0:03:230:03:26

but we'll kick off with a house in the Yorkshire Dales,

0:03:260:03:29

in the company of Alistair Appleton.

0:03:290:03:31

A wonderful 17th-century cottage, complete with its very own priest hole.

0:03:310:03:35

Our prospective buyers were Wendy and Loris, who, armed with

0:03:350:03:38

£435,000, were making their bid to escape from Cardiff.

0:03:380:03:42

They wanted a spacious home, but also something of a village atmosphere.

0:03:420:03:46

So Alistair took them to the hamlet of Kildwick Grange and showed them

0:03:460:03:50

a property that I really don't think they were expecting.

0:03:500:03:53

Set on the south-facing slope of the Aire Valley,

0:03:530:03:58

Kildwick Grange is a remote village with a handful of shops and a pub.

0:03:580:04:03

So the location hit the spot, but what would they make of the house?

0:04:030:04:07

We're just outside Kildwick, this is called the Grange,

0:04:070:04:10

it's a little kind of hamlet of old farm property.

0:04:100:04:13

This one's from about 1610. So we're talking serious, serious period.

0:04:130:04:17

You can see how old it is by the windows, can't you?

0:04:170:04:20

Beautiful mullion windows at the top, all the way through.

0:04:200:04:23

What do you think of the exterior?

0:04:230:04:25

-It's fabulous.

-The windows are nice.

0:04:250:04:27

Are you worried about it being too old?

0:04:270:04:29

Well, it's been here that long, so I can't see it coming down.

0:04:290:04:33

It's not gonna fall down.

0:04:330:04:35

But whether there'll be a lot more work to do on it, I don't know.

0:04:350:04:38

But from the outside, it looks lovely.

0:04:380:04:40

Well, this is a listed building, so that's already...you've got to factor that in.

0:04:400:04:44

A Grade-2 listed building. Let's go in.

0:04:440:04:46

I can't wait.

0:04:460:04:49

This amazing property is a three-bedroomed cottage bursting with the history that they love.

0:04:490:04:54

There's a large living room, three bedrooms and extensive gardens at the front and back.

0:04:540:04:59

So the history of this place is that this used to be one big farmhouse, Grange House.

0:05:050:05:09

So this front part of the house

0:05:090:05:11

was originally the main hall, two rooms of the whole house.

0:05:110:05:16

You can see that this beam here was where the separating wall was

0:05:160:05:19

and this may have been a through hall.

0:05:190:05:22

So all of this panelling is protected.

0:05:220:05:24

-That's interesting. Grade II listed, is that?

-Grade II.

0:05:240:05:27

Right.

0:05:270:05:29

You wouldn't get rid of that, it's the character of the place.

0:05:290:05:32

-It adds to the character.

-There's a secret door there.

0:05:320:05:35

Indeed, the secret door leads to what used to be the old kitchen,

0:05:350:05:40

which has the old range in place, but is now used as a playroom.

0:05:400:05:43

Continuing through the Victorian extension is the dining room.

0:05:430:05:48

So, it gets a bit labyrinth down here.

0:05:500:05:53

-Yeah.

-This is part of the Victorian extension still,

0:05:530:05:56

you can see the original walls of the back hallway there.

0:05:560:06:00

It's almost like a pub, an old pub.

0:06:000:06:04

-It's quaint.

-It's got that feel, with the flagstones.

0:06:040:06:08

-The age of the building has struck you dumb.

-Yeah...

0:06:080:06:10

-I don't think we thought we'd see anything as old as this.

-No.

0:06:100:06:13

I think it's a shock, but it's a nice shock because it's quaint and I like it.

0:06:130:06:20

The front of the building's

0:06:200:06:21

the oldest bit and then you've got this Victorian extension.

0:06:210:06:25

But then it goes on...

0:06:250:06:26

and this 20th-century extension gives you a much lighter kitchen.

0:06:260:06:31

This is different, isn't it?

0:06:310:06:33

An unusual kitchen design, because what you've got

0:06:330:06:36

is a long galley with all your workspace facing the wall.

0:06:360:06:39

And then all your white goods and the storage is down there

0:06:390:06:43

in that sort of room at the end of the kitchen.

0:06:430:06:46

The kitchen has proved a bit of a damp squib, but upstairs has some real stunners.

0:06:460:06:50

So this is being used as the master bedroom.

0:06:540:06:57

-This is amazing!

-Look at it, that's amazing. Look at that.

0:06:570:07:01

Look up there.

0:07:010:07:02

-That was the priest hole.

-Oh, the priest hole.

0:07:020:07:05

-They hid the Catholic priests in there.

-Oh, right.

0:07:050:07:08

That's amazing, isn't it?

0:07:080:07:11

Look, you've got a proper old window seat, there.

0:07:110:07:14

-With the big Victorian sash.

-Fabulous.

0:07:140:07:16

-Can you imagine waking up here?

-I can.

-I could.

0:07:160:07:19

Very good. Well, there's lots more to see.

0:07:190:07:22

As you can see, you've got a choice of doors.

0:07:220:07:24

Let's turn to the one on the right.

0:07:240:07:26

All right. OK.

0:07:260:07:28

Despite being an old house, there's a large modern bathroom,

0:07:280:07:32

with separate shower and bath.

0:07:320:07:34

Over the landing is a double bedroom with wood-panelled walls and more original features.

0:07:340:07:39

But I've saved the best till last.

0:07:390:07:42

So, this is the little third bedroom.

0:07:420:07:45

Oh!

0:07:450:07:47

God, look at the ceiling in here!

0:07:470:07:50

-I'm teasing, of course, this is the entire reason why I brought you to this property.

-Oh!

0:07:500:07:55

That's fabulous, isn't it?

0:07:550:07:57

This is an absolute gem.

0:07:570:07:58

When I saw this room, my heart pounded a little faster.

0:07:580:08:03

And the fireplace is fantastic.

0:08:030:08:06

Look at this barrel vaulting plasterwork, it's extraordinary.

0:08:060:08:10

-I haven't seen anything like this.

-It's like going back in time.

0:08:100:08:14

And the back, look at the frieze on there, that's beautiful.

0:08:140:08:18

I would make this the master bedroom, because this is by far the grandest room.

0:08:180:08:22

-But I'd also like to show you the outside space.

-Right.

0:08:220:08:25

Follow me.

0:08:250:08:28

Mind the step.

0:08:330:08:36

So it's got quite a rake on it because we're in the Dales.

0:08:360:08:39

But you have the most space of all the houses in this little complex of buildings.

0:08:390:08:44

It's the biggest garden here.

0:08:440:08:45

They've terraced it off for the children,

0:08:450:08:48

but you could easily put your vegetables here.

0:08:480:08:51

You've also got a very nice summerhouse at the back there,

0:08:510:08:54

with electricity, so you can turn that into a workshop.

0:08:540:08:57

-So what do you think?

-I think it's a gem.

0:08:570:09:00

I think it's really nice.

0:09:000:09:01

-Impressed.

-Did you think you'd get a garden and a 400-year-old property?

0:09:010:09:06

-No, definitely not.

-No, certainly not.

0:09:060:09:08

-Do you think you can afford it?

-I think probably just about.

0:09:080:09:13

-Just about, yeah.

-What do you think it's on at?

0:09:130:09:16

445?

0:09:180:09:21

I was gonna say 440.

0:09:210:09:22

Well, this property is on the market for a very pleasing 415.

0:09:230:09:27

-Oh!

-Obviously, it's Grade II listed,

0:09:270:09:30

so that puts some people off and it's still attached.

0:09:300:09:34

I'll send you back to the house and have you look around.

0:09:340:09:38

-I'll meet you out the front.

-Brilliant, thank you.

0:09:380:09:41

Mind yourself.

0:09:410:09:43

-What do you think of the room?

-I love it.

0:09:460:09:48

I can see of furniture in here.

0:09:480:09:51

It's a bit daunting because we've never lived in a period property as old as this before.

0:09:510:09:56

I think when I first saw the house I was just blown away

0:09:560:09:59

cos I didn't expect to see anything this age.

0:09:590:10:02

The rooms were fantastic.

0:10:020:10:05

The only downside is the kitchen area.

0:10:050:10:08

I might want to change the layout there, slightly.

0:10:080:10:13

The best part was when we came out in the back garden. It was exactly what we want.

0:10:130:10:17

This has to be the most unusual house I've ever been in.

0:10:170:10:21

It's just gob-smacking.

0:10:210:10:25

To own a property like this would be almost a privilege.

0:10:250:10:28

I'm just dumbstruck.

0:10:280:10:31

Loris and Wendy were wowed by that one and who can blame them?

0:10:370:10:40

That fantastic vaulted ceiling and those gorgeous windows.

0:10:400:10:44

But they were put off by the size of the kitchen

0:10:440:10:47

and one other very important factor - it was a listed building.

0:10:470:10:51

But is listing something to fear, or favour?

0:10:510:10:53

It's an emotive subject for many house owners and many prospective buyers.

0:10:530:10:57

Some see it as something of a black art, trying to understand,

0:10:570:11:01

for example, the rule of LBW in cricket, or the offside rule in football.

0:11:010:11:05

But fear not, we're about to lift the lid on the whole business.

0:11:050:11:08

It's the Escape To The Country rough guide to listing.

0:11:080:11:11

Listed properties have been protected by law since 1948

0:11:110:11:15

and fall under the jurisdiction of local authorities.

0:11:150:11:19

There are over 370,000 listed buildings in England alone,

0:11:190:11:23

split into three main categories.

0:11:230:11:26

Grade II is the most common, they're properties built before the 1940s

0:11:260:11:29

and and 92 per cent of all listed buildings fall into this category.

0:11:290:11:34

If the property has any special historical interest

0:11:340:11:37

then it might just make the Grade II*,

0:11:370:11:40

which means it important, but not enough to make the top slot, Grade 1.

0:11:400:11:44

Grade 1 properties are seldom in private ownership.

0:11:440:11:47

It's a category limited to architecture of a huge national importance.

0:11:470:11:51

Whatever listing you have,

0:11:510:11:53

you always need to get permission to make any changes to the building.

0:11:530:11:57

So to find out a bit more, I met up with Nick Molyneux,

0:11:570:12:01

a listing officer whose job it is to keep an eye on them

0:12:010:12:04

and sometimes make some pretty tough decisions.

0:12:040:12:06

Nick, many people will think you, as a listings officer, are the bogey man. Are you?

0:12:060:12:13

I hope not. What we are about is protecting the heritage everybody values,

0:12:130:12:18

so it can be handed down to the next generation.

0:12:180:12:21

For many, a listed building is attractive as

0:12:210:12:23

it's historic and it's got character.

0:12:230:12:25

But they'll be thinking "It's listed, I can't breathe in it,

0:12:250:12:28

"I can't live in it, without permission."

0:12:280:12:30

You will need permission to do a lot of the things

0:12:300:12:33

you might want to do it inside the building as well as outside.

0:12:330:12:36

But we are in the business of managing change, not pickling things.

0:12:360:12:39

-So you're a good guy?

-On a good day, yes.

0:12:390:12:42

'Well, certainly today is a good day

0:12:420:12:46

'to look at old buildings and Nick has brought me to a typical

0:12:460:12:49

'Grade II house to see what it's about.'

0:12:490:12:51

This is absolutely charming, isn't it?

0:12:510:12:54

It's a wonderful cottage, the kind of building you'd immediately think

0:12:540:12:57

was going to be a listable house, but it's a stone house

0:12:570:13:01

which is built in the 17th century, pre-1700, substantially complete,

0:13:010:13:04

almost automatically becomes a Grade II listed building.

0:13:040:13:08

Lots of things end up as Grade II listed buildings.

0:13:080:13:11

Everything from bits of Anglo-Saxon church

0:13:110:13:14

right the way through to 1960s concrete.

0:13:140:13:16

It looks fantastic from the outside,

0:13:160:13:18

I can only imagine what's on the inside.

0:13:180:13:20

I haven't been inside, so we're going to find some exciting things.

0:13:200:13:24

Brilliant, let's have an explore.

0:13:240:13:27

This is quite nice, isn't it?

0:13:360:13:37

Yes, we are in the kitchen which says historic building to me.

0:13:370:13:41

Absolutely. Look at the floor.

0:13:410:13:43

-It is a great floor, classic for this part of the world.

-Lovely.

0:13:430:13:47

If somebody says we like the stones, but we want underfloor heating.

0:13:470:13:52

If you take these up they're likely to break

0:13:520:13:55

so you have to be sure you know what you're doing to do that.

0:13:550:13:58

I would suggest finding somewhere else for the underfloor heating?

0:13:580:14:02

If somebody wanted to change the units for something more modern,

0:14:020:14:05

or whatever, would that be a problem?

0:14:050:14:07

They would be no concern at all.

0:14:070:14:09

A thing that might be more problematic is the range oven,

0:14:090:14:12

if you had to change the flue in any major way.

0:14:120:14:15

That's going into the fabric of the building.

0:14:150:14:18

But it probably wouldn't be an issue, just a question of how you do it.

0:14:180:14:21

As we pass from the kitchen to the sitting room,

0:14:220:14:24

we enter into one of the earliest parts of the building

0:14:240:14:27

and find a classic inglenook fireplace.

0:14:270:14:30

That is rather wonderful, isn't it?

0:14:300:14:33

Absolutely fantastic.

0:14:330:14:35

This fireplace on its own would list the property.

0:14:350:14:38

It would. Look at the mantle beam.

0:14:380:14:40

It's got that fantastic moulding on it.

0:14:400:14:42

It's also got a 17th century mantle shelf nailed on to it.

0:14:420:14:45

That's certainly fired up our interest so we head up

0:14:450:14:49

into the rafters to get a good look at the bones of the building.

0:14:490:14:53

I hope this is going to be exciting as it looked.

0:14:530:14:56

From what we have seen already I was expecting something like this,

0:14:560:14:59

but not quite as good as this.

0:14:590:15:01

Tell us what we're looking at.

0:15:010:15:03

The centre of an open hall of medieval hall house.

0:15:030:15:07

It's typical of the 14th century.

0:15:070:15:09

So that would be a no-no, touching that in any way, shape or form.

0:15:090:15:13

As you can see, it's now used as a bedroom,

0:15:130:15:15

there's a bed underneath it, but the last thing I would say to anybody is

0:15:150:15:19

"You can cut a hole in that to make a nice new doorway."

0:15:190:15:23

But we've got something else here, too.

0:15:230:15:25

I'm looking at the window, a lovely stone window, could we double-glaze that?

0:15:250:15:29

Well, putting a double glazing in is a no-no.

0:15:290:15:32

But there are several answers.

0:15:320:15:34

The first thing I would recommend is secondary glazing on the inside.

0:15:340:15:37

Something on this side of the stonework?

0:15:370:15:40

Yes, it may have a slight visual impact, but it would keep the heat in.

0:15:400:15:43

And the other one we always say,

0:15:430:15:45

which sounds rather silly when you say it, is thick curtains.

0:15:450:15:48

It sounds ridiculous. but it is very good insulator.

0:15:480:15:51

There are a number of solutions available.

0:15:510:15:54

It is never black and white, "no".

0:15:540:15:56

There is always an alternative way to cut the problem.

0:15:560:16:00

So Nick can point out some good alternatives to altering the inside,

0:16:000:16:04

but what if you want to build outside?

0:16:040:16:06

I can see why this is listed,

0:16:060:16:11

but it is not just about the property itself, is it?

0:16:110:16:14

It's also about its context, its environs, if you like.

0:16:140:16:17

Curtilage - the setting of the listed building

0:16:170:16:20

and the things in that setting also encompass by the listing of the main building.

0:16:200:16:25

so things like the garage behind me are part of the listed structures.

0:16:250:16:30

They'd need permission to change them.

0:16:300:16:32

Seeing this place is packed with so many features,

0:16:320:16:35

any one of which would demand to be listed to Grade II level,

0:16:350:16:39

why it's not higher up the listing scale?

0:16:390:16:41

I'm slightly surprised it's not a II* listed building myself.

0:16:410:16:45

II* is an intermediate between Grade 1 and Grade II,

0:16:450:16:49

they're just not quite Grade 1, they're not big or important enough.

0:16:490:16:53

One place that's certainly has enough importance to merit its Grade I status is Charlecote Park.

0:16:550:17:01

The 16th century house was once visited by Queen Elizabeth

0:17:010:17:05

and it's also said a young William Shakespeare was caught poaching in the grounds.

0:17:050:17:09

So it's got form.

0:17:090:17:10

I can see why you chose this one, Nick.

0:17:100:17:13

It's not bad, is it? THEY CHUCKLE

0:17:130:17:15

Charlecote Park is owned by the National Trust

0:17:150:17:18

and is no longer lived in, only a handful of Grade 1 properties are.

0:17:180:17:22

I love the fact the house is closed,

0:17:270:17:29

technically put to bed, I think is the right term.

0:17:290:17:32

Yes, for the winter.

0:17:320:17:33

One of the things I love about my job, seeing houses when other people can't get in.

0:17:330:17:37

I can't imagine anyone wanting to plaster over

0:17:370:17:40

this ceiling, or install double-glazing.

0:17:400:17:42

So, what issues does a Grade I house like this have?

0:17:420:17:46

One of the first concerns is to make sure it doesn't burn down.

0:17:460:17:49

In a building like this,

0:17:490:17:52

putting, hiding the fire alarms

0:17:520:17:54

in appropriate places is quite easy in modern technology.

0:17:540:17:57

A building like this is historically dressed.

0:17:570:17:59

Do contents come under the guise of listing?

0:17:590:18:02

Not unless they are physically attached to the building.

0:18:020:18:05

Does it add value to a property?

0:18:050:18:07

I don't think I'm the right person to answer that.

0:18:070:18:10

I'm bound to say "yes", aren't I?

0:18:100:18:12

Particularly, the upper end of the scale.

0:18:120:18:15

You're just demonstrating how important the building is.

0:18:150:18:18

This estate certainly is important.

0:18:180:18:22

With the limitations of owning a listed property, are there any benefits?

0:18:220:18:26

I've got a listed property, can I get some money to help me look after it?

0:18:260:18:31

One of the sad realities is

0:18:310:18:32

we do have some grants from the English heritage, but it's not huge.

0:18:320:18:35

Other sources include the Heritage Lottery Fund,

0:18:350:18:38

but they aren't for private owners.

0:18:380:18:40

There isn't much money to spread around

0:18:400:18:42

all the historic buildings in the country.

0:18:420:18:45

-But listings shouldn't put people off, should it?

-No, it shouldn't.

0:18:450:18:48

People want to own old buildings and they will cost a bit more to maintain,

0:18:480:18:53

it would be false to pretend they wouldn't.

0:18:530:18:56

But they are great things to live in.

0:18:560:18:59

We have seen two great examples today.

0:18:590:19:01

It's been a fantastic insight. Thanks for your time.

0:19:010:19:04

Thanks, I've really enjoyed it as well.

0:19:040:19:06

Over the years, I've had the privilege

0:19:080:19:11

of showing some wonderful listed properties on this show,

0:19:110:19:14

not least this one coming up down in Lamberhurst in Kent.

0:19:140:19:17

We were with Roche and Nicola,

0:19:170:19:19

Roche was a man who loved all things contemporary,

0:19:190:19:22

but Nicola loved old and characterful buildings

0:19:220:19:24

so finding something that would fit them both

0:19:240:19:27

was always going to be a bit of a challenge.

0:19:270:19:30

They'd already sold their current house,

0:19:300:19:32

they had to move out within a month, so the pressure really was on.

0:19:320:19:36

For the mystery house, I took them to a 15th century barn conversion

0:19:360:19:40

with an added Georgian extension.

0:19:400:19:42

It was one of the most extraordinary properties we've ever had on the show,

0:19:420:19:46

and it blew their socks off.

0:19:460:19:47

The village of Lamberhurst is 15 minutes south of Tunbridge Wells.

0:19:520:19:57

Historically, the area was an important stopping place for those travelling from Hastings to London.

0:19:570:20:01

Today, there are several all important drinking holes,

0:20:010:20:05

a church, post office, school, and even a vineyard.

0:20:050:20:09

But on a busy road, what would Nicola and Roche think of the location?

0:20:090:20:13

Guys, this is it. It's mystery house time.

0:20:130:20:16

-Excited?

-Very.

0:20:160:20:18

To be fair, it's an innocuous start looking round here,

0:20:180:20:22

a bit of a car park, busy A21, behind us.

0:20:220:20:24

But through this hedge really is another world.

0:20:240:20:29

-What do you reckon to this lot?

-Really lovely.

-Brilliant.

-Beautiful.

0:20:320:20:36

There's a lot of garden. We'll explore it in detail later.

0:20:360:20:39

What you can see here is this lovely formal garden

0:20:390:20:42

that really introduces the property which is over here.

0:20:420:20:46

Come and tell me what you think of this lot.

0:20:460:20:49

Look at that.

0:20:500:20:52

That is beautiful. Really lovely.

0:20:520:20:54

Wow. That's very nice.

0:20:540:20:56

-Fantastic.

-It's pretty unique. It is obviously listed.

0:20:570:21:01

It was built originally roundabout 1400, to 1450,

0:21:010:21:05

as a big barn structure with four bays in it,

0:21:050:21:08

it's been occupied by people and animals once upon a time.

0:21:080:21:11

Over the years, it's become a fantastic family home.

0:21:110:21:14

-So, yeah, good impressions from the outside?

-Definitely.

0:21:140:21:17

Inside, I think, it's gonna blow you away.

0:21:170:21:20

Come and have a look at this.

0:21:200:21:23

Come in here, through this huge original door.

0:21:230:21:27

-What do you reckon?

-That is just something else.

0:21:270:21:32

That is beautiful.

0:21:320:21:34

-Wow.

-What do you think, Roche?

0:21:340:21:36

-That's pretty good, yeah.

-THEY ALL LAUGH

0:21:360:21:39

-This is precisely what I had in mind.

-That's stunning.

0:21:390:21:42

If you buy a property like this,

0:21:420:21:45

as well as being its owner, you're also its sort of guardian, if you like,

0:21:450:21:50

because you're looking after something that's really unique.

0:21:500:21:54

-Would you want to take that on?

-Definitely.

0:21:540:21:57

That's an easy sell!

0:21:570:21:59

Come and look at the kitchen.

0:21:590:22:01

-Step over the threshold.

-Fantastic.

0:22:030:22:06

-Look, stainless-steel.

-Hooray.

0:22:080:22:11

That's good, that's really nice.

0:22:110:22:15

That has so much character, as well. That's great.

0:22:150:22:18

The attention to detail, no surprise that the guy that did this up is into antiques.

0:22:180:22:24

You get a sense, here's a man who knows his history,

0:22:240:22:28

and has made a fantastic contribution to this building.

0:22:280:22:31

-Want to see more?

-Yep.

0:22:310:22:32

Come with me.

0:22:320:22:34

Well, that's a really good start, but there's plenty more to see.

0:22:340:22:39

You tell me what you make of this.

0:22:390:22:42

-Wow.

-That's great.

0:22:420:22:47

-Yeah?

-Definitely.

0:22:470:22:49

That's the first, "wow". I'm delighted.

0:22:490:22:53

-It is an extraordinary thing.

-You don't get more character than that.

0:22:530:22:58

This is very much the medieval part of this property.

0:22:580:23:03

-OK.

-But it has another part, too, which is a bit later.

0:23:030:23:07

It's a modern extension built during the earlier 18th century,

0:23:070:23:12

which makes it Georgian. So you can pick and choose.

0:23:120:23:14

If you get a bit bored of the 15th century,

0:23:140:23:18

jump forward 200 years through here.

0:23:180:23:22

'The house is very much a building of two eras

0:23:220:23:26

'and I think Nicola and Roche will love how it contrasts from room-to-room.'

0:23:260:23:30

Through here, a little downstairs loo.

0:23:320:23:36

And this is the Georgian bit, the Georgian front

0:23:360:23:40

of that 15th century property.

0:23:400:23:42

That's very nice, just a nice size living area.

0:23:420:23:44

-It's a good space.

-Great fireplace.

0:23:440:23:46

Right, well, let's...

0:23:460:23:48

Let's see in here.

0:23:480:23:51

Come up here.

0:23:530:23:54

This is the master bedroom.

0:23:540:23:58

That's brilliant. Really light.

0:24:010:24:04

-A completely different feel.

-This is the Georgian front.

0:24:040:24:08

So this is above your living room.

0:24:080:24:11

-This issue of the road...

-Yeah.

0:24:110:24:14

These windows are not double or secondary glazed, but even so, it doesn't offend me that much.

0:24:140:24:19

It doesn't seem that bad, actually.

0:24:190:24:22

I find it a bit annoying. If this is a main bedroom.

0:24:220:24:26

-Bags of space.

-Nice and light, as well.

0:24:260:24:28

And to top of the master bedroom there's an en suite.

0:24:280:24:31

There are two more bedrooms on this floor,

0:24:310:24:35

but on the second floor is the fourth bedroom which would make a great kids room.

0:24:350:24:40

But I'm taking them straight out to see the garden.

0:24:400:24:43

Set within three acres of land, outside the kitchen is a patio which leads to a pond.

0:24:460:24:51

Areas of mature country gardens, and ornamental walkways.

0:24:520:24:58

And the main body of the garden which has fantastic views of open farmland and woodland.

0:24:580:25:03

-Mature oak trees.

-Beautiful.

0:25:030:25:05

Lots of young sapling oak trees growing all over here.

0:25:050:25:08

All in all, you've got three acres.

0:25:080:25:11

-Wow!

-Fantastic.

0:25:110:25:13

So, is this doing it for you?

0:25:130:25:15

Definitely.

0:25:150:25:16

-Let's talk about how much it's going to cost you.

-Right.

0:25:160:25:21

Possibly, something around 795.

0:25:210:25:24

795, yeah, I mean, that's... 795.

0:25:240:25:28

-799.

-799.

0:25:280:25:30

What's four grand between friends?!

0:25:300:25:32

All right, OK...

0:25:320:25:34

It's good news.

0:25:360:25:37

It's not 799, nor is it 795.

0:25:370:25:41

-It's on the market for £770,000.

-OK.

0:25:410:25:47

-Right.

-Which I think,

0:25:470:25:49

when you compare it to what we have seen on our journey, isn't bad.

0:25:490:25:53

-I'm very surprised at that.

-Three acres... For what you get.

0:25:530:25:59

It's probably that price because of the road.

0:25:590:26:01

But if you can overcome that in your own minds,

0:26:010:26:04

you do get a bit of a bargain.

0:26:040:26:05

So, go and have a good look around. Off you go.

0:26:050:26:09

Obviously, it's got that massive wow factor.

0:26:140:26:17

More than any other house around here is going to have, so I think

0:26:170:26:20

that's its unique selling point, if you like.

0:26:200:26:23

It's so memorable.

0:26:230:26:25

I don't think... You wouldn't

0:26:250:26:27

get bored of coming through here and looking at this,

0:26:270:26:31

I think it's something people would really remember when they walked in.

0:26:310:26:35

I always dreamt of a place like this,

0:26:350:26:38

with tons of character, real quirkiness to it,

0:26:380:26:44

and what more could you ask for?

0:26:440:26:45

It's got a multi-faceted personality,

0:26:450:26:48

I'm totally in love with it.

0:26:480:26:50

If history proves anything it is that sometimes buyers' reactions

0:26:560:27:00

are not always predictable.

0:27:000:27:02

Whilst showing Roche around I was concerned

0:27:020:27:04

that it was a step too far for a man who wanted everything contemporary and sleek.

0:27:040:27:09

But as it turned out, both he and Nicola absolutely loved it.

0:27:090:27:13

However, the road next door was a deal breaker,

0:27:130:27:15

despite the fact the house itself was absolutely fantastic.

0:27:150:27:19

I suppose that just goes to prove that location really is all-important.

0:27:190:27:23

Whether it's medieval mullions you're after, or Jacobean jewels, take a look at this selection

0:27:230:27:28

of properties currently on the market from all over the country

0:27:280:27:32

and for all kinds of budgets.

0:27:320:27:33

This Grade II listed thatched lodge

0:27:330:27:35

is priced just under half-a-million pounds.

0:27:350:27:38

Situated in the village of Ouston in Suffolk,

0:27:380:27:41

this mid-19th century brick and flint house

0:27:410:27:44

retains much of its period charm,

0:27:440:27:46

including open fireplaces and stone mullioned casement windows.

0:27:460:27:50

The house has three bedrooms and four reception rooms.

0:27:500:27:54

Or for £1,225,000, this former medieval

0:27:550:28:00

hunting lodge with mature gardens and three ponds

0:28:000:28:04

is in Norton Little Green in Suffolk.

0:28:040:28:07

Not surprisingly it's Grade II* listed

0:28:070:28:09

and dates from the 16th century.

0:28:090:28:11

It has six bedrooms and three reception rooms.

0:28:110:28:14

But if you want a property with over 700-years of history

0:28:150:28:19

take a look at this.

0:28:190:28:21

At £2 million this Grade II listed manor house

0:28:210:28:24

is outside the village of Capel in Surrey.

0:28:240:28:26

With records dating back to 1282

0:28:260:28:29

this magnificent property has extensive formal gardens.

0:28:290:28:32

Inside there is a wealth of original features

0:28:320:28:35

including oak doors and floorboards.

0:28:350:28:37

Well, it is a sad fact of life that things get lost,

0:28:410:28:44

and, of course, they get damaged.

0:28:440:28:46

But what do you do if it's a 14th century it doorknob,

0:28:460:28:50

or an 18th century window stay?

0:28:500:28:52

Well, I'm here at Calke Abbey to meet a man who's made a business

0:28:520:28:56

out of replacing the irreplaceable.

0:28:560:28:58

I'm meeting David Benford from Blackstage,

0:29:000:29:03

a company that specialises in repairing and replacing antique ironmongery.

0:29:030:29:07

-I'm David.

-What a wonderful location.

0:29:070:29:09

Our blacksmiths are busy here at the moment.

0:29:090:29:12

I'd like to show you round.

0:29:120:29:14

Please do, what a great location.

0:29:140:29:16

'David's company recently replaced the locks and latches in the hut

0:29:160:29:21

'used by a Shackleton in his attempt to reach the South Pole.

0:29:210:29:25

'Today, however, we're in a warmer and slightly grander location.

0:29:250:29:29

'In a state of decline and disrepair,

0:29:290:29:31

'Calke Abbey was donated to the National Trust in 1985

0:29:310:29:35

'and a major maintenance project has been carried out.

0:29:350:29:38

'No less important - outbuildings.

0:29:380:29:40

'So, David is taking me to the stable block at the back of the house.'

0:29:400:29:45

Tell me more about the work that you do.

0:29:450:29:47

This house was constructed in the mid-18th century

0:29:470:29:50

-and, over that of time, everything's had a lot of wear and tear.

-I can imagine.

0:29:500:29:54

There are some window fittings that are broken and missing

0:29:540:29:58

and we aim to replace them using traditional sensitive methods

0:29:580:30:02

to the architecture of the building.

0:30:020:30:04

-Easier said than done.

-It certainly is.

0:30:040:30:06

-There's a lot of work involved.

-Let's have a look around.

0:30:060:30:10

-So this is what you're up to.

-This window is broken.

0:30:150:30:18

That iron stay has broken off and we can't refit it,

0:30:180:30:22

so what we are going to do is hand forge a new one

0:30:220:30:25

and fix it to the window so the window can operate effectively.

0:30:250:30:29

There are an awful lot of windows here.

0:30:290:30:31

-There are a lot.

-You've got a lot to make.

0:30:310:30:33

I'm doing them one at a time and each piece is made individually for each window.

0:30:330:30:38

Every one handmade.

0:30:380:30:40

The hands with such a mammoth responsibility belong to Greg and his apprentice,

0:30:400:30:45

who have a forge a couple of miles away.

0:30:450:30:49

-METALLIC CLANGING

-That sounds industrious.

0:30:490:30:51

Here's the forge.

0:30:510:30:55

Please come in. Let me introduce you to the blacksmiths.

0:30:550:30:58

What a scene. Nice to see you.

0:30:580:31:01

-This is David and this is Greg.

-Nice to see you.

0:31:010:31:05

This is a fantastic looking forge.

0:31:050:31:07

This is what I imagine a blacksmith's forge

0:31:070:31:09

to look like in the traditional sense. How old is it?

0:31:090:31:12

This is the original forge.

0:31:120:31:14

-This has been a forge for hundreds of years?

-That's right.

0:31:140:31:18

I love that you're keeping these old traditions alive.

0:31:180:31:21

Clearly, you're the new apprentice.

0:31:210:31:23

When do you become a fully qualified blacksmith?

0:31:230:31:26

I'm getting there now, but you never stop learning.

0:31:260:31:31

-When Greg says so, you're qualified.

-Yes.

0:31:310:31:34

How's he doing?

0:31:340:31:35

When I have to start making the tea is when he's qualified.

0:31:350:31:39

How do we begin?

0:31:390:31:41

There's our old one and that'll be the new one.

0:31:410:31:44

The extra length to allow for the folding and forming of the eye

0:31:440:31:47

and the rolling up of that.

0:31:470:31:49

'Without any ceremony, the wrought iron goes straight into the forge.

0:31:490:31:53

'The forge makes quick work of melting the metal

0:31:530:31:56

'so on with the safety goggles.

0:31:560:31:58

'Originally, it was made from wrought iron, which is no longer produced on an industrial scale,

0:31:580:32:02

'so Greg has to source his from scrap dealers and foreign stocks.'

0:32:020:32:06

How do you know when it's hot enough?

0:32:080:32:11

It needs to reach fire welding temperature,

0:32:110:32:13

-which, with iron, is a white heat.

-Whit heat?

0:32:130:32:16

Look at that.

0:32:160:32:17

'The first stage is to make an eye at the end of the stay,

0:32:190:32:22

'so Greg makes quick work of flattening the metal.

0:32:220:32:25

'Speed is of the essence as, the cooler the iron gets,

0:32:250:32:28

'the less malleable it becomes.

0:32:280:32:30

'A quench in the water and it's cool enough to handle.'

0:32:300:32:33

So, there's our eye.

0:32:330:32:35

Now, I'll pass that to David

0:32:350:32:37

to do the second part of forming the eye

0:32:370:32:39

by cutting the notches out either side.

0:32:390:32:42

'Traditionally, the notches would have been chiselled away, the modern convenience

0:32:420:32:47

'of a hacksaw makes a more accurate and speedier cut.

0:32:470:32:51

'And the elbow work falls to the apprentice.'

0:32:510:32:53

Look at that, there it is.

0:32:530:32:55

'It's amazing to see the speed at which Greg and David operate.

0:32:550:32:58

'Teamwork is essential.'

0:32:580:33:00

To watch it happen is just terrific, really.

0:33:000:33:03

They're the best.

0:33:030:33:05

It's beginning to take shape

0:33:050:33:07

and David is kind enough to offer me a chance of helping out.

0:33:070:33:12

You can have a go at doing it with a hot set.

0:33:120:33:14

What, heating it up?

0:33:140:33:16

Yeah, I've never had an apprentice before so you can be my first one.

0:33:160:33:19

You're on.

0:33:190:33:20

I'm holding this, you're going to whack it?

0:33:200:33:23

-Are you ready?

-There's your set and your mark's there.

0:33:230:33:25

Hold it firmly.

0:33:250:33:27

'It is nerve-racking and although

0:33:290:33:31

'I'm just holding the set in place,

0:33:310:33:33

'I'm keen not to move an inch or it could be a disaster.'

0:33:330:33:36

-OK.

-There we go, right, so, one there,

0:33:370:33:39

'But they're impressed enough to let me loose with the hammer

0:33:390:33:43

'and the key here is to hit the hammer as flat as possible

0:33:430:33:46

'otherwise I'll end up denting the metal instead of flattening it.

0:33:460:33:50

'With a weary arm, I hand back to the professional.

0:33:500:33:54

'He does make it look easy.

0:33:540:33:55

'The workmanship here is inspiring

0:33:550:33:57

'and, seeing how precisely Greg controls the hammer,

0:33:570:34:00

'it's no surprise that blacksmiths

0:34:000:34:02

'were once called upon to perform dentistry.'

0:34:020:34:05

Look at that. That is absolutely glowing, isn't it?

0:34:070:34:10

'With a few finishing details, a piece of history is remade.'

0:34:100:34:14

-Happy?

-Yep.

0:34:160:34:18

Where's the old one?

0:34:190:34:21

Let's just have a look at that.

0:34:210:34:23

That's it, that way round.

0:34:240:34:26

You did make it look very simple, but I can see it's very complicated.

0:34:260:34:31

David, thank you very much for getting us down here.

0:34:310:34:34

-You're welcome.

-I look forward to seeing that back in the abbey. Brilliant.

0:34:340:34:38

Come on. Who wouldn't want to live in a wonderful old property like that?

0:34:420:34:47

shortly, we'll be exploring my final offering in this,

0:34:470:34:50

our tour of some of the best historic properties that we've had on the show.

0:34:500:34:54

Before we get to it, we've been through the archive,

0:34:540:34:57

we've dusted off the tapes and have this wonderful selection

0:34:570:35:00

of some of the other properties we've had on the show.

0:35:000:35:03

In Somerset, I took a break and let Martin and Gail choose their own property.

0:35:030:35:08

They're all quite pretty. Which one do you fancy?

0:35:080:35:12

-That one over their looks the best.

-Yeah, that looks good over there.

0:35:120:35:15

They had an eye for historic properties,

0:35:150:35:17

choosing a 19th century schoolhouse.

0:35:170:35:20

I was just worried Gail wouldn't make it around

0:35:200:35:23

to see all of the period features.

0:35:230:35:25

-That is really nice. My heart's going.

-Really?

0:35:250:35:28

Yeah, my heart's pounding.

0:35:280:35:30

Don't die on me, girl.

0:35:300:35:31

But the gallery kitchen soon had her fighting fit.

0:35:310:35:35

-Fantastic.

-Amazing.

-You're a bit lost for words.

0:35:350:35:37

I am, actually, cos I am now thinking

0:35:370:35:40

there is more to this house.

0:35:400:35:42

There's an awful lot more. Open that door.

0:35:420:35:45

I don't believe this.

0:35:470:35:49

Oh, yes.

0:35:490:35:51

That is just amazing. It's breathtaking.

0:35:510:35:54

Over in Suffolk, Tim Vincent showed history buffs

0:35:540:35:57

Carol and Bill another lovely schoolhouse.

0:35:570:36:00

It's lovely, absolutely lovely.

0:36:000:36:03

Love these converted old buildings.

0:36:030:36:05

Carol's enthusiasm soon rubbed off on Bill.

0:36:050:36:08

-This is lovely.

-Isn't that fantastic?

0:36:080:36:11

This is just the sort of room I'd like.

0:36:110:36:13

The modern kitchen had them arguing about the chores.

0:36:130:36:17

Do you see yourself washing up here with Bill sunbathing outside?

0:36:170:36:20

-No, me washing up.

-Other way around.

0:36:200:36:22

Up in Northumberland, Chris and Sally were bowled over by a battle house.

0:36:220:36:27

LAUGHTER

0:36:270:36:30

-It's gorgeous.

-Beautiful.

0:36:300:36:32

The fortified kitchen secured their interests.

0:36:320:36:35

-Look at the thickness of the walls.

-Where do you start?

0:36:350:36:37

That is pretty much a metre thick.

0:36:370:36:41

Outside, they didn't know what to look at next.

0:36:410:36:44

I want it!

0:36:440:36:46

-You want it?

-Yes.

0:36:460:36:48

Trawling through the archive, finding the best of the best for this show,

0:36:510:36:56

has been great fun, not least this -

0:36:560:36:58

my final offering for today's programme.

0:36:580:37:00

It takes me back to one of the very first house tours

0:37:000:37:03

I ever conducted on Escape To The Country.

0:37:030:37:05

We were in Dorset in the company of Emma and Malachi.

0:37:050:37:09

They had £450,000 to spend to find their dream home

0:37:090:37:13

and, for that money, Emma wanted a kitchen she could roller-skate around.

0:37:130:37:17

The property you're about to see wasn't the oldest we've ever had on the programme,

0:37:170:37:21

but it wasn't bad, it was Georgian.

0:37:210:37:23

It was packed full of character and grandeur.

0:37:230:37:26

As for Emma and Malachi, it blew them away.

0:37:260:37:29

Two Miles east of Dorchester,

0:37:320:37:33

the pretty village of Stinsford has strong literary traditions.

0:37:330:37:37

Thomas Hardy lived here and the village features as Mellstock

0:37:370:37:40

in his book Under The Greenwood Tree.

0:37:400:37:42

In fact, he was so attached to the place,

0:37:420:37:45

his heart was buried in its 13th century church.

0:37:450:37:47

With so much history in the village,

0:37:470:37:50

I thought I'd start my tour with a little surprise.

0:37:500:37:53

I want you to look at that.

0:37:540:37:56

Yes!

0:37:560:37:57

THEY ALL LAUGH

0:37:570:38:01

You are joking.

0:38:010:38:02

I think she likes it.

0:38:020:38:04

This is very different from everything we've seen before,

0:38:070:38:12

but it's very grand. It's a slice of manor house

0:38:120:38:15

here in the middle of Dorset built around 1750

0:38:150:38:19

by a lord for his naughty daughter

0:38:190:38:24

who ran off with somebody who wasn't of the right social class.

0:38:240:38:27

So he built this for her and tucked her away out of sight down here.

0:38:270:38:31

Is it of interest?

0:38:310:38:32

I'd like to be tucked away in there, too.

0:38:320:38:34

Come on, then.

0:38:340:38:36

Before they get carried away,

0:38:390:38:40

I should point out that they don't get the whole building.

0:38:400:38:44

It's been divided into nine separate residences,

0:38:440:38:47

but they are all still pretty grand in their own right.

0:38:470:38:51

They retain original Georgian features,

0:38:510:38:54

huge fireplaces, converted servants' quarters and fantastic proportions.

0:38:540:38:58

So, guys...

0:39:030:39:04

This is your hallway.

0:39:040:39:08

Wow!

0:39:080:39:09

Very grand.

0:39:090:39:11

Very nice.

0:39:110:39:13

-I'm blown away.

-Interesting.

0:39:180:39:20

I'm kind of surprised because you loved the cottage look but...

0:39:200:39:24

This feels like our own manor.

0:39:240:39:26

We could be lord and lady.

0:39:260:39:29

There's a closet aristo in you two, actually.

0:39:290:39:32

And the nine-foot tall fireplace

0:39:320:39:34

would look right at home in the grandest of baronial halls.

0:39:340:39:38

Wow! HE LAUGHS

0:39:380:39:40

Look at that. Look at that.

0:39:400:39:43

They aren't many places with a fireplace like that, I can tell you.

0:39:430:39:47

I have got to say, no. That's unbelievable.

0:39:470:39:51

-That is truly unbelievable.

-It's a fireplace your mates will remember.

0:39:510:39:54

I've got to say, it's very tasteful.

0:39:540:39:58

It's beautiful. I'd move in tomorrow.

0:39:580:40:00

So, they both really seem to have fallen in love with this property.

0:40:000:40:04

Lovely, great big high ceilings.

0:40:040:40:06

These I love, look at these.

0:40:060:40:09

'This part of the house has always been grand, but the tasteful conversion

0:40:090:40:13

'means that the former scullery in the basement

0:40:130:40:15

'is no longer off-limits for the lord and lady of the manor.'

0:40:150:40:19

Wow.

0:40:190:40:20

What do you think of this?

0:40:240:40:27

-What could we do with this?

-This is amazing.

0:40:270:40:30

-You did say you liked the idea of a basement.

-This is perfect.

0:40:300:40:35

This is like a dining area.

0:40:350:40:36

This is fantastic dining area.

0:40:360:40:38

This could be a wine cellar, a music studio, a games room,

0:40:380:40:42

What would this have been used for?

0:40:420:40:43

This would have been storage, kitchen, servants' quarters.

0:40:430:40:47

When Emma said that she'd love to be able to roller-skate around her kitchen,

0:40:470:40:51

I'm not sure she really thought that I'd come up trumps.

0:40:510:40:54

But it's always good to fulfil someone's fantasy.

0:40:540:40:57

I love this kitchen. Malachi, get me those roller skates now.

0:40:570:41:01

-This is very good.

-What do you think?

0:41:010:41:04

Handmade oak kitchen.

0:41:040:41:06

-Lovely.

-Is this a place you think you could roller-skate round?

0:41:060:41:09

-Absolutely.

-I think it's a potential.

0:41:090:41:11

Jules!

0:41:110:41:14

There you go. Get your skates on, love.

0:41:140:41:18

'And there's plenty more to see.

0:41:180:41:20

'Upstairs, first stop is the master bedroom.'

0:41:200:41:23

-En suite.

-Yeah.

0:41:230:41:25

Grand enough for a lord, my lord.

0:41:250:41:27

My Lord, I think it's a yes.

0:41:270:41:29

-If I come and see you here, I'll have to call you sir, aren't I?

-You might.

0:41:310:41:35

The other bedrooms and family bathroom aren't as grand as the ground floor rooms

0:41:350:41:39

but I think they do the job.

0:41:390:41:41

The huge garden is shared with the other nine residences.

0:41:430:41:47

This really is communal living on a grand scale.

0:41:470:41:50

This building may have an aristocratic heritage,

0:41:500:41:53

but they wouldn't have to be members of the landed gentry to afford it.

0:41:530:41:56

How much change do you think you'd have from your budget of 450,000?

0:41:560:42:03

-There would be change?

-This house is on the market for £440,000.

0:42:030:42:07

So we'd have £10,000 spare?

0:42:070:42:10

You could buy it and go on holiday to celebrate.

0:42:100:42:12

Why would I go on holiday when I've just moved into this place?

0:42:120:42:16

I can see this has moved you in a way which,

0:42:160:42:18

to be honest, I didn't expect it to.

0:42:180:42:20

Go back inside, have a good look.

0:42:200:42:23

It's a lot of money.

0:42:230:42:25

Tell me what you think afterwards.

0:42:250:42:27

-Let's run.

-Let's go.

0:42:270:42:28

Wow! This one has definitely blown my mind away.

0:42:330:42:36

Coming into the first main room, mind-blowing.

0:42:360:42:40

Huge, beautiful expanse.

0:42:400:42:42

I love the fireplace. Stunning.

0:42:420:42:44

-Did you ever think we could afford this?

-No.

0:42:440:42:47

-Something as grand?

-No, not really.

0:42:470:42:49

A dream come true. Final.

0:42:490:42:51

Well, what a house and what a couple.

0:42:550:42:57

If only every house tour went that well.

0:42:570:43:00

But there's no denying they fell in love with a classic Georgian gem.

0:43:000:43:04

That was one of the very first house tours

0:43:040:43:06

I ever conducted on Escape To The Country.

0:43:060:43:09

Some would think it's rather a fitting end to this,

0:43:090:43:11

our romp through some of the best of the best

0:43:110:43:13

when it comes to the historic properties from this series.

0:43:130:43:17

I've enjoyed looking back at them. I hope you have to.

0:43:170:43:20

I'll see you next time.

0:43:200:43:21

If you feel like escaping to the country

0:43:230:43:25

and would like our help then why not apply online?

0:43:250:43:28

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:470:43:50

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:500:43:53

Jules Hudson looks back through the archives at some of the best historic houses featured in past programmes. He examines what it means to be a Grade 1 and Grade 2 listed building and visits a blacksmith who specialises in recreating historical fixtures.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS