Episode 14 Gardeners' World


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Episode 14

Monty Don adds a touch of the exotic to the damp garden by planting a tree fern and protects his new soft fruit garden from feathered predators with netting.


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Hello, welcome to Gardeners' World.

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Now, it was no great surprise that last week,

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people voted for the rose as the Golden Jubilee plant.

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The truth is that roses enter our hearts in a way

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that no other plant does and there are so many different kinds that

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there is bound to be at least one that will not just enhance

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your garden, but also enrich your entire life.

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They are just beautiful, joyous plants.

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One thing, particularly at this time of year, is do deadhead.

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Deadhead daily if you can.

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Cut back to a leaf and that will stimulate new growth

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and more flowers.

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Now, yesterday was the summer solstice,

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which means if you want to be gloomy,

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the nights are going to draw in,

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but we do have at least another month or so of lovely,

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long evenings, so let's make the most of them.

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On tonight's programme, we meet the husband and wife team behind

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the spectacular 25-year-long restoration

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of West Dean Gardens in Sussex.

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Nick Bailey learns about a beneficial predator in our gardens.

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And we discover the therapeutic benefits

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of a church garden in Lewisham.

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And I shall be protecting soft fruit

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as well as planting some hardy geraniums.

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This is unusual for me, because I don't often plant trophy plants

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here at Longmeadow, most of everything you can see has been

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grown either from seed or cuttings

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or very young plants that we've grown on.

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But I think a tree fern deserves being the exception to that,

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because they are fabulous plants and worth the extra money,

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little bit of time and a little bit of trouble that they take.

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I've also always wanted to have a tree fern here at Longmeadow

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ever since I visited a tree fern forest ten years ago in New Zealand.

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It was one of the most beautiful places I've ever been in my life.

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It was a spiritual experience.

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Well, I may not be able to recreate that exactly, but here at the back

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of the pond, with the shuttlecock ferns and the soft green light

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from the shade of the trees and the shrubs, I think it'll be at home.

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It is worth stressing that tree fern forests

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are highly protected and you should only buy one if it has got

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a label like this on it,

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which is a guarantee that it is licensed,

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because only so many are licensed every year and can be exported.

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If it doesn't have the label, don't buy it.

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Now, you need to understand that a tree fern is not a tree,

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it's a fern that looks like a tree,

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so the so-called trunk, which is this, actually is a mat of roots

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around bundles of rhizomes which are in columns and which feed the fern.

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So that it's important that this is feeding the plant,

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it has access to moisture and the so-called roots

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at the bottom just anchor it into place.

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There are a whole number of tree ferns you can buy,

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but Dicksonia antarctica

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is by far and away the hardiest and the easiest to grow.

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So, this is the one to opt for.

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Actually, if you grow Meconopsis,

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the lovely blue poppy, and it's happy,

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then tree ferns will be happy, too,

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because they both share that need to be moist, but not soaking wet.

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To be warm, but not hot.

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And to be cool, but not cold.

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Dig a hole about six inches deep,

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because when you plant it, effectively,

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you're burying the stem

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and you want it to be as tall as possible,

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they grow really slowly, about an inch a year.

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So when you position it, put it where it looks good

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and that is what it's going to look like,

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probably for the rest of your life.

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You can see once you get down below the initial surface of the soil,

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it's pretty dry.

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So, I'm going to add a little bit of goodness underneath there,

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as much as anything else, to create a root run.

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And that will be an ericaceous compost mix.

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I've got some wool compost mixed up with leaf mould,

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which will give just the right start in life.

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Ericaceous compost traditionally has always been

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provided by peat. But peat bogs are becoming increasingly rare

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and an awful lot of gardeners, like myself, now don't want to use peat,

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particularly if we don't have to.

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And there are very good alternatives.

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You can have wool compost, you can have bracken compost,

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you can have pine bark compost,

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they all give you an ericaceous environment for plants to grow in.

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You can see that that is a very shallow hole,

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but when you see the roots, you'll realise why. There we go.

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The roots on that are whiskery.

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So if I place it like that

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and then fill back around it and firm it in,

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hopefully that will be strong enough to stop at toppling.

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And you may have to stake it if it's a bit windy,

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but on the other hand, you shouldn't plant it somewhere

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where it's very exposed to wind.

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Firm that in.

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You do need to make sure that the drainage is good,

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it doesn't sit in a puddle. I think that's going to stay put.

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Right, before we have the ground revealed and release the fronds

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to fall in what I hope will be a graceful and elegant arch,

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I'm going to water it.

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And I won't water it like I would do most plants.

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When you water tree ferns, yes, you need to water them in

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to a certain extent, but equally important

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is to water the roots on the stem.

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This will love being dripping wet.

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The water just falls down to the roots, that's plenty.

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Whenever it's dry, if it hasn't rained for two or three days,

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come out and just give it a dousing like that.

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Now, the big reveal.

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Now you can see they've used horticultural fleece to tie it,

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and this will need fleecing in winter,

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but we'll come to that in October.

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OK. There we are.

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Dicksonia antarctica, hopefully making itself at home.

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A touch of the exotic that will transform any garden.

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But actually that's not what I want it to do here.

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I want it to blend in and perhaps I can get

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just a taste of that wonderful forest in New Zealand.

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Now, obviously, we all get inspired when we visit places

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and see plants and we want a little bit of them at home.

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You don't have to go to New Zealand for that, of course,

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you can visit gardens here in the UK and there will always be

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something that will enrich your own gardening experience.

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But sometimes they do more than that.

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Sometimes they change your whole world view

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and West Dean in Sussex is one of those.

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Now, 25 years ago, it looked nothing like it does today.

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It has been transformed by Sarah Wain and Jim Buckland.

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And last July, we went and paid them a visit.

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We returned to this country from Australia.

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We were managing a gardening centre in West London

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and this job came up and I just thought, well,

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that's got it all, really.

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And that's what we really want to do.

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And that was in 1991.

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When I first saw it, it looked sad.

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-It looked sad, but with lots...

-Lots of potential, yeah.

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You could see underneath that it had lots to offer,

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it just needed revitalising and bringing out.

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You could see how it would become...

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I fixated on broken this, heaps of rubbish everywhere

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and he just goes, "No, in five years' time,

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"this is going to look terrific".

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The major work initially was the walled garden.

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While the restoration of the glasshouses was going on,

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we were getting on with laying out the walled garden,

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preparing the beds, planting the fruit,

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a lot of research went on in the very early days

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as to what we were going to grow.

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-It was very exciting, I have to say.

-Fantastic.

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Everything was changing all the time.

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What was fantastic about then was whatever we did

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was a big improvement on what was there. And it was all new.

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We didn't want it to be a museum,

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we wanted it to be a working walled kitchen garden.

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We wanted to put the life back into it that had been there

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at the turn of the 19th, 20th century and these places

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were great powerhouses and incredibly innovative in their day

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and we wanted to capture that and we wanted to make our mark.

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The Harold Peto pergola was built in the early part

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of the 20th century.

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It was derelict when we came in as much as the '87 storm

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had really fixed it good and proper.

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And it was one of the first things that we restored

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and then planted it up with roses and Clematis and vines

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and used plants like Alchemilla and Hostas and ferns underneath

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to just make it very lush in summer months.

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After the walled garden,

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the pergola is the thing probably that sticks in people's minds,

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because it's very immediate.

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And it's got that architectural structure.

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We started growing chillies at West Dean in the early 1990s.

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Jim went on a study tour to America and he went

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to the Brooklyn chilli festival

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and came back and said, "Why don't we grow some chillies?"

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We eventually grew about 75 different varieties

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and we thought, "Oh, we must put on a little show."

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And it was just going to be a day affair,

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a bit like a little fete and Gardeners' World came

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and filmed our collection.

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So we got this amazing publicity.

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We were completely inundated with people and now

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it's a three-day show and we're celebrating 21 years this year.

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There's a lovely variety called Hungarian hot wax

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and you can grill it, stuff it, pickle it, use it as a fresh chilli,

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you could make chilli pastes out of it, it's very diverse

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in what it offers you.

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And it looks fantastic.

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And although they're a culinary plant,

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they're also highly ornamental and easy to grow,

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which is a great thing.

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I would always say use fresh compost,

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it needs to be very free draining and we feed regularly,

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maybe twice weekly and make sure you take all the old leaf litter off

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all the time, because it can act as a sponge for fungal spores.

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And don't forget to harvest.

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If you let all the chillies just stay on the plant,

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the plant will think, "I've done my duty,

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"I don't need to produce any more."

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So by harvesting them,

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the plant will continue to flower and produce more fruit.

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We came up with this notion of an ornamental fruit garden.

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We've got around 100 varieties of apples,

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something like 45 varieties of pear, 25 varieties of plum,

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all grown in a very great diversity of ways.

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And the object is - A - to be productive,

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but perhaps for us more importantly to be beautiful.

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Particularly the goblets and the four-winged pyramids

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really do capture people's imagination.

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I think the other great thing about these, as well as being beautiful,

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they're very appropriate for contemporary modern small gardens.

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You know, trained fruit is a great way of getting fruit into a garden

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and by training them on the wall as espaliers or as cordons,

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even if it's only a very modest crop,

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at least you can go out there and pick one and nosh on it.

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And they're beautiful.

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I've always felt that one of our objectives is for people

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to come here and leave here feeling better.

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On the whole, that certainly seems to be the case.

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But as we all know, a garden is a process, not an object,

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so it goes forward, it moves on, it's dynamic.

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So I'm proud to have sort of had the vision and have carried it out.

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And been given the opportunity, we've been so well supported.

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-We have. But it has been a love affair, hasn't it?

-Yeah, yeah...

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-I would say. I mean...

-And we don't have children.

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Exactly. So this has been our baby

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and we've poured all the energy into this place.

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I do urge you to go to West Dean

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at the earliest possible opportunity.

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You can get all the details from our website.

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And I love the hot borders in late summer.

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And as a direct consequence decided to add much more orange

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to the Jewel Garden and there is bound to be something

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that you will see there and want to add to your own garden.

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Come on, dogs.

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Come on.

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This is the new fruit garden

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that was dug just this winter and spring.

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Now, it's not done too badly, but it has suffered,

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as the whole garden has, really,

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from terrible weather we've had for the last few weeks.

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We've had really high winds,

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we've had heavy rain and the whole place is feeling rather bruised.

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But, nevertheless, the cordon apples,

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which are growing around the edge

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not doing too badly, they were hit by the late frost in April,

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so if you've got fewer apples than normal this year,

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don't worry, you're not alone, but my main concern is the currants.

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I've got blackcurrants growing along here and as they're beginning

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to ripen and you can see the fruit here is coming,

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the birds will have them before we can, so I need to net them.

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Now, you need protection, but you don't need a fancy fruit cage,

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they're fine and I've had them in the past and they're great,

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but they are expensive and quite a fiddle to put up,

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you can do something much more temporary.

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I'm just simply going to put in some posts,

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put a flowerpot on the top and then drape netting over

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and for the next month or so, that's all this will need.

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But the critical thing is to do it before the fruit ripen,

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because what happens, of course, is you say,

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"Oh, I'll do that this weekend."

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And the weekend comes and you go out there

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and the blackbirds have taken the lot.

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You do need to get on and do this quickly.

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Blackcurrants grow really well on this rich clay loam.

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They are the only currant that needs as much food as you can give it.

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Whereas gooseberries and redcurrants and white currants

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are much tougher and more adaptable than that,

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but if you're growing blackcurrants,

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give them sun and give them really rich soil.

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Blackcurrants, of course, have a very distinctive taste

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and make a wonderful sauce,

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but, for me, they are indispensable

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as the true taste of summer when made into summer pudding.

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Nothing could be simpler.

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You line a pudding basin with slightly stale white bread,

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then you boil up the blackcurrants,

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maybe some redcurrants, and a few raspberries.

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Pour them into the basin. Seal it over with more bread,

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put it in the fridge for 24 hours.

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Then you take it out,

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tip it onto a plate and the bread will be marbled with the juices,

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you slice into it and you get this flow of rich, dark, fruity juice.

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And eaten with single cream is just heaven.

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The taste of summer.

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I want to just cut them to the same size,

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so if we go off the smallest one

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which is the height of my nose,

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useful measurement.

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So on this one...

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I bought these pots so I can put them on top like that...

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..to support the nets.

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There we go.

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That is all the easy bit.

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Now you're going to watch one man struggle to put a net up

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on his own without becoming a terrible tangle.

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Well, it's a bit Heath Robinson, but it'll do the job.

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One thing I would say is whatever you're using in the way of netting,

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try and keep it as taught as you can and that will stop birds getting

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tangled into it and then when we've harvested the currants,

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which will be in a few weeks' time,

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all this can be taken away.

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But by and large, you don't need to construct elaborate defences

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to protect your flowers or your crops.

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A healthy garden has an ecosystem which has a relationship

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between pests and predators that balances itself out.

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And Nick Bailey's been to Oxford to look at the intriguing

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relationship between one particular pest and its predator.

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A sign of pest activity can be this

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happening right at the base of the plant.

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What appears at first glance to be whitefly are in actual fact

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aphid exoskeletons, the discarded bodies or husks of aphids

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are happening further up in the plant.

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If we look higher up here, you can see the flower buds

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are absolutely smothered in active aphids sucking sap out of the plant

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and dripping honeydew all the way down these stems.

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These tiny savages have evolved to be extraordinarily successful.

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They can decimate a plant in no time at all.

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In fact, a single female left to her own devices

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can produce the equivalent of a metric tonne of aphids

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in just one season.

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Tempting as it may be to introduce chemicals to deal with garden pests,

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those chemicals can actually be really damaging to the ecosystem

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and, in fact, your garden is already full of miniature combatants

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ready to take on the battle.

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Dr Chris Jeffs of Oxford University

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has a biological solution to garden pests.

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As a horticulturalist, of course, I totally geek out about plants.

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But your interest in the outside world is a little bit different.

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Well, everybody sees plants first thing,

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that's what smacks you in the eye,

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but when you look a bit closer, there's all these tiny little things

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that are darting around.

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And that's what really got me fascinated

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by the outdoor world is there is so much more going on

0:21:330:21:36

than you think there is.

0:21:360:21:37

And your particular interest is in the parasitoid wasp.

0:21:370:21:40

Yeah, definitely, they're useful to everybody

0:21:400:21:42

and that's the appeal to me.

0:21:420:21:44

We're researching and we're studying

0:21:440:21:46

something that is useful to everybody.

0:21:460:21:47

So what's the most obvious way that they help gardeners?

0:21:470:21:50

How they help gardeners? So everybody's probably

0:21:500:21:53

had the greenfly and blackfly on their crops.

0:21:530:21:55

These parasitoids get rid of those pest problems for you

0:21:550:21:58

or reduce them.

0:21:580:22:00

And so the key to bringing in these parasitoids

0:22:000:22:03

is about getting the right plants, so what would you recommend?

0:22:030:22:07

Well, this one, this one is exactly perfect, actually.

0:22:070:22:10

So this is fennel and it's exactly what we're looking for

0:22:100:22:14

for parasitoids. You've got lots of clusters of very small

0:22:140:22:18

little flowers and they're like open little plates for parasitoids.

0:22:180:22:22

Because unlike bumblebees, they don't have the really long tongue

0:22:220:22:25

to go down tubular flowers, these are tiny little things,

0:22:250:22:28

so they really do need these open dishes of flowers to go for.

0:22:280:22:30

And I guess that would work across all the Apiaceae species,

0:22:300:22:33

so things like coriander or cow parsley

0:22:330:22:35

-or any of the ornamental garden umbels.

-Definitely.

0:22:350:22:39

So this one's ideal.

0:22:460:22:47

This is an Asteraceae, so these have oodles of nectar

0:22:470:22:50

for parasitoids as well.

0:22:500:22:52

So, really, it's ideal,

0:22:520:22:53

because it's not just a beautiful garden ornamental,

0:22:530:22:56

it's also nectar and a food source

0:22:560:22:59

-for these super-useful parasitoid wasps.

-Exactly.

0:22:590:23:01

So it's about being savvy with your garden.

0:23:010:23:04

You're planting for us to look nice,

0:23:040:23:06

but you're also giving some food to these wasps

0:23:060:23:08

-and they can be useful to you as a result.

-Fantastic.

0:23:080:23:11

Hey, James, you all right?

0:23:120:23:14

I'm curious to see how parasitoid wasps can help us gardeners

0:23:140:23:18

tackle the aphid menace,

0:23:180:23:19

so we've set up a macro studio to see them in action.

0:23:190:23:23

This is our first close-up of a parasitoid wasp.

0:23:250:23:27

I mean, this looks huge on the screen,

0:23:270:23:29

what sort of size is this in reality?

0:23:290:23:31

It's just a few millimetres.

0:23:310:23:32

So you'd probably barely see it in the garden.

0:23:320:23:34

It's only when you know about them that you really start to notice them

0:23:340:23:37

and that's what I like about them,

0:23:370:23:39

it's this little hidden world that you have going on here.

0:23:390:23:42

-So can you see its antennae at the front?

-Yeah.

0:23:420:23:44

So it's trying to sense the chemicals emitted by the aphids,

0:23:440:23:48

so it's going through a few dead ones here,

0:23:480:23:50

it's coming closer to one of the live...

0:23:500:23:53

-Oh, can you see, the aphid just kicked.

-Oh, wow, it knows.

0:23:530:23:56

-Oh, wow!

-It knows the wasp is there, that's it defending.

0:23:560:23:58

So it's like - "Get away, get away, get away." It's kicking it.

0:23:580:24:01

And the wasp is just marauding around,

0:24:010:24:03

it's just trying to find its first victim. The aphid...

0:24:030:24:06

-Can you see...?

-Oh, wow.

-Its abdomen is right underneath it there.

0:24:060:24:09

The ovipositor, the sting that it lays its eggs with

0:24:090:24:13

is coming right underneath it, look...

0:24:130:24:15

-That's amazing.

-Got it... Did you see?

-Wow.

0:24:150:24:18

-That was it then? Job done.

-Yep, yep, it's so quick,

0:24:180:24:21

they are so quick at what they do.

0:24:210:24:22

It's going for another one now, another one.

0:24:220:24:25

Two.

0:24:250:24:27

Three...

0:24:270:24:28

Oh, it's going for the kids...

0:24:280:24:30

So once the egg has been deposited, how long is the life cycle?

0:24:300:24:34

How long is it before the aphid's killed?

0:24:340:24:37

About two to three weeks, just under a month,

0:24:370:24:39

that kind of thing, from egg to emerging as a new wasp.

0:24:390:24:43

-That is the developing wasp.

-Oh, my God, that is repulsive.

0:24:430:24:46

It's repulsive, but useful.

0:24:460:24:48

Gruesome, but they're so effective at what they do, yeah?

0:24:480:24:51

That's the wasp wriggling around inside...

0:24:510:24:54

It's huge. I mean, that's revolting.

0:24:540:24:57

It's a living larder,

0:24:570:24:58

it's basically eating it from the inside,

0:24:580:25:01

whilst it's still alive.

0:25:010:25:02

Nothing can survive that, right? Being hollowed out from the inside?

0:25:020:25:05

It's amazing that aphid's still moving. Extraordinary.

0:25:050:25:09

How many could they attack in a day?

0:25:090:25:11

Well, each of them can lay 200 to 300 eggs

0:25:110:25:14

over the course of their lifetime,

0:25:140:25:16

so, if you're releasing them into your glasshouse

0:25:160:25:19

and you've got 100 or 200 of them, that's big, big numbers.

0:25:190:25:21

-That's thousands and thousands of aphids being taken out.

-Exactly.

0:25:210:25:24

-Brilliant, it's such a good solution.

-Oh, yeah.

0:25:240:25:27

It's such a good solution.

0:25:270:25:28

Well, that may look pretty brutal,

0:25:330:25:35

but it's one wasp that we can all welcome to our gardens.

0:25:350:25:40

Well, umbellifers are great for attracting predatory wasps,

0:25:400:25:44

but they're beautiful, too,

0:25:440:25:46

and I like to grow as many as possible.

0:25:460:25:49

But none are better than this.

0:25:490:25:52

This is Ammi majus.

0:25:520:25:54

And I sow it in September,

0:25:540:25:56

overwinter the plants in the cold frame,

0:25:560:25:58

then plant them out in early April.

0:25:580:26:00

The only problem with them is that they are irresistible to rabbits.

0:26:000:26:04

They are a member of the carrot family after all.

0:26:040:26:06

But if they can avoid the rabbits,

0:26:060:26:09

they grew up, good and tall, four, five feet tall

0:26:090:26:12

and will flower this lovely, lacy inflorescence.

0:26:120:26:16

Perfect here in the Writing Garden.

0:26:160:26:19

Now, Flo Headlam has been visiting gardens that either used by

0:26:190:26:24

or have meaning within a community.

0:26:240:26:28

And this week, she returns to Lewisham to a garden

0:26:280:26:31

that's not only important to the community that it serves,

0:26:310:26:36

but also has real meaning to Flo herself.

0:26:360:26:39

I'm in Lewisham.

0:26:440:26:45

I know it like the back of my hand, I grew up here.

0:26:450:26:47

It's all really familiar, including this place - St Mary's Church.

0:26:470:26:51

But it's round the back of the church

0:26:550:26:58

where things get really interesting for gardeners like me.

0:26:580:27:01

Hello, everyone, thank you for coming again.

0:27:010:27:04

-Good morning, are we all well?

-OTHERS:

-Yes.

-Yeah?

0:27:040:27:08

Earlier this year, I dug the first turf

0:27:080:27:11

to help transform the churchyard into a therapeutic garden

0:27:110:27:14

for the wider community.

0:27:140:27:16

Today, I'm joining them for their fourth day building the garden.

0:27:160:27:22

Flo, it's great to have you back,

0:27:220:27:23

-we've got lots of work for you to do.

-It's great to be back.

0:27:230:27:25

-I'm keen, I'm ready.

-Good stuff. Right, let's get going.

0:27:250:27:29

Gardens like this can be a great place for people to socialise,

0:27:290:27:33

but one regular to the church, Marion Watson,

0:27:330:27:36

realised that this plot could be more than just a communal garden.

0:27:360:27:40

Tell me, where did the vision start?

0:27:400:27:43

Ah, well, I've worshipped at St Mary's Church

0:27:430:27:45

all my adult life.

0:27:450:27:47

And I have walked through this churchyard virtually every day.

0:27:470:27:52

And I've looked at this area,

0:27:520:27:54

it was just rather forlorn and at the same time,

0:27:540:27:58

in the church, we became very aware that people from the Ladywell Unit,

0:27:580:28:04

now that's one of five mental health hospitals

0:28:040:28:07

-which are part of the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust.

-OK.

0:28:070:28:12

And people would come. And it's just next door, over the wall here.

0:28:120:28:16

They would be coming into church and we sort of just knew

0:28:160:28:20

there was probably something more, some other way we might be able

0:28:200:28:23

to help and they said, "Gardening."

0:28:230:28:26

So we designed it to be a therapeutic garden,

0:28:260:28:30

where people can get a terrific sense of mental wellbeing

0:28:300:28:35

through gardening.

0:28:350:28:37

David Lloyd has had the challenge of designing a garden

0:28:430:28:46

in an old churchyard.

0:28:460:28:48

So what were the key elements in the design for this therapeutic garden?

0:28:480:28:53

So we had to make it feel very safe and we had to make people

0:28:530:28:57

feel kind of quite sort of enclosed once they'd got in.

0:28:570:29:00

Another aspect was we wanted a bit of a flow through the garden

0:29:000:29:05

to get the local community in.

0:29:050:29:07

So we've made the woodland area very lush and very green

0:29:070:29:09

and very inviting.

0:29:090:29:11

And then it leads through to the perennial meadow area

0:29:110:29:14

where we've done great big swathes of planting.

0:29:140:29:17

And they lead naturally down into the wild flower meadow

0:29:170:29:20

and that's quite interesting from a mental health recovery view.

0:29:200:29:23

It acts as a bit of a metaphor where during winter, it's dry

0:29:230:29:28

and it's dead and barren

0:29:280:29:29

and then during spring, you get a bit of growth

0:29:290:29:32

and by summer, you've got a blaze of colour.

0:29:320:29:34

And it shows that even if things seem really bleak, there is hope.

0:29:340:29:38

In one corner of the half-acre site,

0:29:520:29:55

they are creating three raised vegetable beds

0:29:550:29:58

which will be used for regular therapy sessions.

0:29:580:30:01

David has introduced a sustainable way of creating compost,

0:30:020:30:06

known as hugelkultur.

0:30:060:30:08

The wood will rot down over quite a few years,

0:30:080:30:11

10 years or so, and it's a little bit like compost.

0:30:110:30:14

We're putting green stuff in to activate the wood

0:30:140:30:17

and it'll rot down and then the plants will be able to

0:30:170:30:19

-access the nutrients that release from it.

-Brilliant.

0:30:190:30:21

So actually all the cuttings and clippings that you've taken off

0:30:210:30:24

from the garden, you can just recycle?

0:30:240:30:26

Yeah, and these would have been waste otherwise.

0:30:260:30:28

We had a big pile in. We were going to have to get a skip

0:30:280:30:31

-to get them taken away.

-Right.

-So it does a really good

0:30:310:30:33

dual-purpose where we can just dump it all in here,

0:30:330:30:35

forget about it and it will fertilise our veg

0:30:350:30:37

-for a couple of years to come.

-Brilliant, so you can actually

0:30:370:30:40

-do this at home?

-Yeah, you can do it in any sort of raised bed.

0:30:400:30:42

-You can even do it straight into the ground, if you want.

-Ah!

0:30:420:30:45

And you can use wood chippings.

0:30:450:30:47

So you probably wouldn't do it with an annual border,

0:30:470:30:49

but you would do it with veg because you're going to be taking

0:30:490:30:52

a lot of the nutrients out.

0:30:520:30:53

It's just the high nutrient demand stuff that you need to do.

0:30:530:30:56

Ella Perkins has created the planting for the three

0:31:050:31:07

perennial meadows with a sense of wellbeing in mind.

0:31:070:31:10

Where does the therapy come from in terms of the plants and the users?

0:31:120:31:15

So, we've got a limited colour palette just to keep it calm.

0:31:150:31:18

We've got different textures as well, different scents.

0:31:180:31:21

So we've got the geranium at the moment, which is really nice,

0:31:210:31:24

and there's a couple of different geraniums.

0:31:240:31:26

And later on when the grass is established,

0:31:260:31:28

there'll be that sound element as well.

0:31:280:31:31

And quite tactile, you know?

0:31:310:31:32

Often you want to touch grasses when you see them.

0:31:320:31:34

Absolutely, yeah, run your fingers through it.

0:31:340:31:37

So, over the seasons, the bed will change.

0:31:370:31:39

Now we've got the salvia flowering,

0:31:390:31:42

next maybe the verbena will come and the echinops.

0:31:420:31:45

So it evolves and shifts and changes.

0:31:450:31:48

-I guess like people's moods as well.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:31:480:31:51

-Very nice, very pleasing and very calming.

-Yeah.

0:31:510:31:54

Ever since I was in hospital,

0:32:030:32:05

it's been something that's really helped with recovery.

0:32:050:32:07

It's meant that it really focuses me and makes me be here in the moment.

0:32:070:32:10

You don't really understand until you're in it that the

0:32:110:32:15

actual touching of the green leaves and the smelling of the flowers...

0:32:150:32:18

We've a plant over there, a rose bush,

0:32:180:32:20

that smells like old roses and Marilyn Monroe

0:32:200:32:23

and it's just amazing!

0:32:230:32:26

It gives you that sense...

0:32:260:32:27

Some of the earth under your fingers when you go home -

0:32:270:32:30

it just gives you that sense of being connected with something

0:32:300:32:33

again and also, I suppose as you do it for longer,

0:32:330:32:37

you actually make those connections and bonds with your fellow gardeners

0:32:370:32:40

and I never thought I'd describe myself as a gardener.

0:32:400:32:43

I don't know how that's happened!

0:32:430:32:45

-What do you think of the garden?

-It is beautiful.

0:32:560:32:58

Now I retire and my age - what I'll do in the future when it's

0:32:580:33:03

finished, I'll just bring my packed lunch

0:33:030:33:06

-and my drink and my book...

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:08

-..and just come and sit and read and eat.

-Yes.

0:33:080:33:11

-And enjoy my retirement.

-Yes.

-You alone.

-You alone!

0:33:110:33:14

We love it, all of us.

0:33:160:33:17

-As I said, we're one big community.

-Yeah.

0:33:170:33:20

-Yeah. And we look after each other.

-Absolutely.

0:33:200:33:23

-It's important.

-Yeah, we do.

-it's important.

0:33:230:33:25

I've had a great day working with this wonderful community.

0:33:250:33:29

And what could be more therapeutic than that?

0:33:290:33:32

There's no question that gardening is a great healer.

0:33:410:33:44

It heals physically, mentally and also socially.

0:33:440:33:49

It binds communities.

0:33:490:33:51

And long may that last.

0:33:510:33:54

Now, Carol is celebrating her plant of the month.

0:33:540:33:58

The month of June sees our gardens awash with glorious perennials.

0:34:050:34:11

It's really difficult to choose a favourite,

0:34:110:34:14

but perhaps the star of the show is the geranium.

0:34:140:34:17

The geranium family is large and varied.

0:34:230:34:26

Most come from the northern hemisphere,

0:34:260:34:29

where they're found in almost every kind of habitat.

0:34:290:34:33

The great majority of them are completely hardy.

0:34:330:34:37

There are certain characteristics that all geraniums have in common.

0:34:370:34:41

The most obvious, perhaps, is their leaves.

0:34:410:34:45

They're always palmate, just like your hand, made up of five lobes.

0:34:450:34:50

And then there are the flowers -

0:34:500:34:52

they all have five petals.

0:34:520:34:55

And those petals are not joined at the base,

0:34:550:34:58

they're completely separate.

0:34:580:35:00

And the colour range within geraniums is right the way

0:35:000:35:03

from white, to pinks, magentas, blues,

0:35:030:35:06

but it doesn't contain any of those fiery colours.

0:35:060:35:09

Geraniums take their name from geranos,

0:35:090:35:12

the Greek for a crane, and you can see why.

0:35:120:35:16

If you look at the seed pod

0:35:160:35:18

with this great extended rostrum here,

0:35:180:35:21

it looks just like that bird's head.

0:35:210:35:24

This is in fact a really clever device for distributing seed.

0:35:240:35:29

And at its base, are clustered five seeds right the way round it.

0:35:290:35:35

Those seeds are green at the moment but eventually they ripen to brown.

0:35:350:35:39

At this stage, this rostrum divides into five separate pieces

0:35:390:35:44

and each one curls up with its seed contained within it, and it thrusts

0:35:440:35:50

the seeds into the air, catapults them here and there and all around.

0:35:500:35:55

So they come up as new plants. It's a really brilliant mechanism.

0:35:550:36:00

Flowering from late spring through to autumn, hardy geraniums have got

0:36:030:36:08

to be some of the most hard-working plants in our gardens.

0:36:080:36:12

They're a doddle to grow,

0:36:120:36:13

not usually fussy about where they put down roots,

0:36:130:36:17

but it's worth adding organic matter when you're planting,

0:36:170:36:21

and perhaps some grit as well if your soil's on the heavy side.

0:36:210:36:24

There are several different methods to make more geraniums.

0:36:260:36:29

Probably the easiest of them is from seed.

0:36:290:36:33

There are a few geraniums that are sterile and just don't produce

0:36:330:36:36

any seed, but the great majority do.

0:36:360:36:40

And these are some that I collected from

0:36:400:36:42

Geranium pratense, the meadow cranesbill.

0:36:420:36:44

When you're collecting your seed, take your cue from Mother Nature.

0:36:440:36:48

Keep a watchful eye on them and when you see those seed pods

0:36:480:36:51

starting to turn brown and the first ones beginning to catapult,

0:36:510:36:56

here, there and everywhere, move in with your paper bags.

0:36:560:36:59

You can actually put the paper bag over the top and tie it round with

0:36:590:37:03

a bit of string and wait for them to explode in the bag.

0:37:030:37:06

These have been stored since last year.

0:37:060:37:09

But they last for quite a long time. They're quite big seeds.

0:37:110:37:16

So if you've got a half seed tray like this,

0:37:160:37:19

you can actually station sow them.

0:37:190:37:22

You can see where each of those seeds is going and you can

0:37:220:37:26

space them out properly.

0:37:260:37:28

And I'm not going to push them down, press them in or anything.

0:37:280:37:31

All I'm going to do is cover them with grit.

0:37:310:37:35

And they should germinate in a matter of weeks.

0:37:350:37:39

You don't need any extra heat,

0:37:390:37:40

you don't need to put them in a propagator or anything,

0:37:400:37:44

just on a greenhouse bench, or even just outside.

0:37:440:37:48

There's another way of propagating some geraniums.

0:38:000:38:03

This works particularly well for forms of Geranium sanguineum -

0:38:030:38:08

the bloody cranesbill.

0:38:080:38:10

These geraniums live often in very sandy soils

0:38:100:38:13

just below the surface of the soil.

0:38:130:38:16

Thick roots run around

0:38:160:38:17

and you can exploit that by digging a few of them up,

0:38:170:38:22

chopping them up in chunks and turning them into root cuttings.

0:38:220:38:27

I've got a couple of nice, hefty pieces here.

0:38:270:38:30

Now, you'd normally do this during the dormant season from, sort of,

0:38:300:38:35

November right the way through to March,

0:38:350:38:38

but it will work at any time of year.

0:38:380:38:40

The thing is, you don't really want to disturb your plants but if

0:38:400:38:43

I just take a couple of these pieces off like this, and if you

0:38:430:38:47

look at this, it's got nodules all the way along the surface.

0:38:470:38:52

And each one of those is capable of making

0:38:520:38:55

a new shoot and producing new roots to keep it going.

0:38:550:38:59

So you just chop it up in chunks, probably a couple of inches,

0:38:590:39:03

five centimetres or so along and then you lay those chunks

0:39:030:39:08

on top of a seed tray or a pot full of gritty compost,

0:39:080:39:13

a bit of grit on the top of them to weight them down.

0:39:130:39:16

Although it looks like three little bits of root now,

0:39:160:39:19

that's potentially three new geraniums.

0:39:190:39:22

There's no more dependable or useful all rounder in the garden

0:39:260:39:29

than a geranium.

0:39:290:39:31

One of the most widely used of all cranesbills

0:39:310:39:35

are forms of Geranium oxonianum.

0:39:350:39:38

Invariably, their flowers are some shade of mouthwatering pink.

0:39:380:39:42

This cranesbill, Geranium Anne Thomson,

0:39:470:39:50

spreads out to make a healthy mound, about a metre across.

0:39:500:39:55

Because it's a sterile hybrid, there's no reason

0:39:550:39:58

for it to stop flowering and it produces its gorgeous

0:39:580:40:02

magenta flowers, with distinctive black eyes, for months on end.

0:40:020:40:06

There was a time when geraniums fell out of fashion,

0:40:110:40:15

upstaged by the latest trendy plants.

0:40:150:40:19

But you can't keep a good classic down.

0:40:190:40:22

Geraniums are back and this is their time - June.

0:40:220:40:27

Well, now certainly is the time to see most geraniums at their best,

0:40:390:40:43

but there is one here in the Jewel Garden which is past its best.

0:40:430:40:48

This is Geranium phaeum.

0:40:480:40:49

It's a British native, very good in shade.

0:40:490:40:52

It's perfect moment is the end of May, the very beginning of June.

0:40:520:40:56

Now, it's rapidly setting to seed and if I cut it back hard,

0:40:560:41:00

that will A, allow room to put other planting in -

0:41:000:41:03

which I wouldn't be able to fit in amongst all the foliage -

0:41:030:41:06

and B, give it a chance to regrow later in summer.

0:41:060:41:09

It seems harsh, but you do need to cut right back to the ground.

0:41:110:41:14

You can see it has got long stems and these can flock and spread.

0:41:220:41:27

As Carol said, June is the month when most geraniums

0:41:300:41:35

are at their best, and I've got a new one that I want to plant

0:41:350:41:38

not here in the Jewel Garden, but to add to the Cottage Garden.

0:41:380:41:43

Coming, Nige? Yeah, good boy.

0:41:430:41:45

I've done a bit of clearing in the Cottage Garden already,

0:42:090:42:11

so I've got some space to add Geranium 'Rozanne'.

0:42:110:42:14

Now, this was an accidental hybrid and its great virtue

0:42:140:42:19

is these lovely flowers that go on and on from now

0:42:190:42:24

right through to the autumn.

0:42:240:42:26

And the colour is perfect for this soft mix that we've got here

0:42:260:42:31

in the Cottage Garden.

0:42:310:42:32

So, I'm going to put three of them,

0:42:320:42:34

one in there and one there and one there, and they will form an

0:42:340:42:38

understory which will match against the yellows and

0:42:380:42:41

the pinks around them.

0:42:410:42:43

One of the joys of hardy geraniums is that they are unbelievably

0:42:500:42:55

easy to grow.

0:42:550:42:57

They're just not too demanding, but give back a huge amount.

0:42:570:43:03

And this will make a mound about three-foot high and three-foot wide.

0:43:030:43:07

When you're buying plants like this from a garden centre,

0:43:110:43:15

don't be seduced by the ones that are covered with flower,

0:43:150:43:19

because that means they put out a lot of energy.

0:43:190:43:22

It's just as good to have a plant like this, that doesn't have

0:43:220:43:25

any flower on it, so when it grows in your garden,

0:43:250:43:27

then it will produce the flowers for you.

0:43:270:43:31

Just look for a nice, strong plant.

0:43:310:43:34

And again, don't be frightened to take it out of its pot and

0:43:340:43:37

have a look at the roots.

0:43:370:43:38

And this is a really nice plant.

0:43:380:43:39

It got a good root system, it's not rootbound,

0:43:390:43:42

plenty of top growth -

0:43:420:43:43

an excellent plant.

0:43:430:43:45

And, as we've seen, if it does get too big or too intrusive,

0:43:470:43:52

geraniums will take any amount of cutting back.

0:43:520:43:55

They want to be convenient,

0:43:570:43:59

they want to do well for you.

0:43:590:44:01

Right, there is Rozanne in place.

0:44:020:44:05

Give them a water and there's nothing else I'm going to

0:44:050:44:08

have to do to these until the end of the season.

0:44:080:44:11

Now, Rozanne is sterile, so it won't set seed, but, as Carol showed

0:44:220:44:27

I'll be able to take root cuttings later on in the year.

0:44:270:44:30

And, I always defer to Carol, because there is nobody that knows

0:44:300:44:35

more about herbaceous perennials than she does.

0:44:350:44:37

It's fantastic having her knowledge.

0:44:370:44:39

And, on the other side of the coin,

0:44:390:44:41

we've got the design knowledge of Joe and Adam.

0:44:410:44:45

This week, Adam is visiting a private garden in London that's

0:44:450:44:49

long and narrow, and deconstructing the secrets of its design

0:44:490:44:54

so that we can apply them to our own gardens.

0:44:540:44:57

Do you know, as a garden designer I'm always looking for ideas

0:45:050:45:08

and inspiration, and I say to people, "Do you know what?

0:45:080:45:11

"It's all around you, you just have to look."

0:45:110:45:14

It might be a piece of architecture or a piece of art,

0:45:140:45:17

but the one thing I really love doing is looking around

0:45:170:45:20

gardens that have been created by amateurs, because those are

0:45:200:45:23

the ones that I think you see those sort of cracking design ideas in.

0:45:230:45:26

The garden of this terrace house is a little bit of paradise in

0:45:330:45:37

a really busy South London suburb.

0:45:370:45:40

It's well planted,

0:45:400:45:41

but also has this wonderful array of pots and architectural elements.

0:45:410:45:45

It's the brainchild of antiques dealer Will Fisher.

0:45:480:45:51

He moved here ten years ago and knew that designing the garden,

0:45:510:45:55

which is just 25 feet wide and 125 feet long,

0:45:550:45:58

would be a real challenge.

0:45:580:46:00

So, give us an idea, actually, how it started?

0:46:000:46:02

So I started off doing the landscaping, really.

0:46:020:46:05

The pond was the foundation of it.

0:46:050:46:07

This was a sort of lost space, in a way, out here.

0:46:070:46:09

And I wanted to just create something that made sense

0:46:090:46:12

of this area.

0:46:120:46:13

So, we started by digging this pond and the rest

0:46:130:46:15

just sort of spread from here.

0:46:150:46:16

You need a journey here, so how did you work it back towards the house?

0:46:160:46:20

I think it started to make sense when the wall went in.

0:46:200:46:23

You sort of got a feeling that it could be breaking it into

0:46:230:46:26

distinctly different areas, like room settings.

0:46:260:46:29

-Because, before, it was just like a very long landing strip.

-Yeah.

0:46:290:46:33

-Inspiration for borders...

-Yeah.

0:46:330:46:35

..because you've actually linked colours together really nicely.

0:46:350:46:39

-That was the first trip I ever did to a flower show...

-Right.

0:46:390:46:42

..which was a massive eye-opener and inspiration.

0:46:420:46:45

I, literally, didn't know what an allium was before going there.

0:46:450:46:48

Didn't know when the bulbs should go in, tried to buy them then,

0:46:480:46:51

was told, "No, you can't buy them now, you've got to wait till..."

0:46:510:46:54

You know, it was that sort of learning curve.

0:46:540:46:56

And others, just going to garden centres and it being as simple as,

0:46:560:47:00

"I like that, I like that, I like that," and trying to muddle them

0:47:000:47:04

together, but knowing nothing about soil, nothing about how big

0:47:040:47:07

they grew - just that I had a sort of vision in mind of colour scheme.

0:47:070:47:12

So, where's your favourite place in the garden to be?

0:47:120:47:15

-It has to be here.

-Yeah?

0:47:150:47:17

I absolutely love it.

0:47:170:47:18

Which, I know there's less plants, and things like the moss growing

0:47:180:47:21

on there, it just...

0:47:210:47:23

It's a dream, you know. I mean, it really is.

0:47:230:47:25

There are so many design ideas in this garden,

0:47:370:47:39

and I really like Will's approach.

0:47:390:47:41

The obvious thing would have been to plant buxus all the way down here,

0:47:460:47:49

but this is sarcococca, which has got beautiful winter scent.

0:47:490:47:53

And I always say to people, if you're going to plant winter scent,

0:47:530:47:56

put it near the house, because you're not going to walk

0:47:560:47:58

to the end of your garden in the middle of winter just to smell something.

0:47:580:48:01

And I actually think the scent would hold in this area

0:48:010:48:03

for so much of the winter.

0:48:030:48:05

Just a great little idea.

0:48:050:48:06

Do you know, when Will actually got here, he just had a long,

0:48:090:48:12

thin garden and all he's done actually, in reality,

0:48:120:48:15

is break it into a series of rectangles.

0:48:150:48:17

So, you come up into the first space, it's nice, it's intimate.

0:48:170:48:21

There's a big block of planting,

0:48:210:48:22

so that instantly makes us feel comfortable.

0:48:220:48:24

But then, there's a seat here.

0:48:250:48:27

And what's nice is, actually, the moment I sit on the seat,

0:48:270:48:31

I've got a fantastic stone trough, that I don't see coming up,

0:48:310:48:34

planted with ferns and it's lovely.

0:48:340:48:36

But, as I sit down, it feels secluded,

0:48:360:48:38

because what's happened is the planting in this border

0:48:380:48:41

has really brought it in and made it feel comfortable.

0:48:410:48:43

The clever bit is the depth of the border.

0:48:430:48:46

It's got fantastic structure and it's got life with the alliums

0:48:460:48:49

and the cirsium.

0:48:490:48:51

But it's the structural planting that interests me,

0:48:510:48:53

because we start with the prunus. Clipped and tight.

0:48:530:48:56

And then the holly sits in the background and it actually

0:48:560:48:59

picks up the spire.

0:48:590:49:00

Then, as I get up, and I go through,

0:49:040:49:07

there's lovely little stepping stones,

0:49:070:49:09

they lead me through into another space.

0:49:090:49:11

At the moment, it's a nice piece of rectangular lawn, which is great.

0:49:160:49:20

The kids play here at the moment, but, actually, with time,

0:49:200:49:22

as the family evolves and changes, this area can change,

0:49:220:49:25

and I think that's a really important and clever thing to do.

0:49:250:49:28

But, all the time I'm in here, I'm getting that little glimpse,

0:49:280:49:31

and I'm getting pulled through into the next room.

0:49:310:49:34

Wow. This is something special.

0:49:480:49:50

To be drawn to the end of your garden and arrive here is fantastic.

0:49:500:49:55

It's a really brave piece of design, because you would not have

0:49:550:49:58

thought of putting a water feature this big in this space.

0:49:580:50:00

What he's done is used the landscape that sits outside

0:50:040:50:07

the garden, we designers call it the borrowed landscape,

0:50:070:50:10

and he's got this church, which is that fantastic focal point,

0:50:100:50:14

but it's the way that he's connected this with that church.

0:50:140:50:18

It's a simple, rendered block wall at the back of the garden,

0:50:180:50:23

not that expensive to build, but the way that it's been detailed

0:50:230:50:26

and painted, it connects with the church.

0:50:260:50:28

And then, you look at the boundaries and he's gone big, he's gone bold.

0:50:330:50:36

They're heavily planted, so that you can't see fences,

0:50:360:50:39

you can't see walls, and it makes the whole place feel bigger.

0:50:390:50:42

You don't quite know where this garden finishes.

0:50:440:50:46

What I really like about this garden is, yeah,

0:50:570:50:59

it deals well with space and it's a nice piece of design,

0:50:590:51:02

but it's the antique detail that works all the way through.

0:51:020:51:06

That adds a real charm and it reflects Will's personality.

0:51:060:51:09

And, for me, that's what gardens should be about.

0:51:090:51:12

They should be about you and your personality.

0:51:120:51:15

I certainly believe in the very basic but incredibly

0:51:280:51:33

effective trick of dividing long gardens into squares and rectangles.

0:51:330:51:39

Barriers across them always make them more interesting -

0:51:390:51:43

and they seem bigger, too.

0:51:430:51:45

But you need plenty of space if you're going to grow pumpkins

0:51:450:51:48

and squashes. So, this year, I'm going to grow them up supports.

0:51:480:51:53

I have tried that before and it sort of worked,

0:51:530:51:56

but I think I can crack it this time.

0:51:560:51:57

But, however grow them, whether you grow them laterally or vertically,

0:51:570:52:01

they do need a really good start in life.

0:52:010:52:04

These are greedy, hungry plants.

0:52:040:52:06

They need warmth, they need water and they need food.

0:52:060:52:09

Now, this soil is good, but not good enough.

0:52:130:52:16

So, into that...

0:52:170:52:18

Now, the compost is providing nourishment, but also,

0:52:300:52:33

equally important, it will help the soil hold moisture -

0:52:330:52:37

and that is absolutely vital.

0:52:370:52:40

The first I'm going to put in is a variety called Musquee de Provence.

0:52:400:52:44

Lovely, slightly glaucous-blue pumpkin.

0:52:450:52:49

And it's quite small now, but it will get substantially bigger.

0:52:510:52:55

Now, the last few years,

0:52:550:52:56

pumpkins and squashes have suffered from lack of heat in July.

0:52:560:53:02

Whereas courgettes, which are also members of the cucurbit family,

0:53:020:53:06

have done really well.

0:53:060:53:07

Courgettes are much better if it's colder.

0:53:070:53:10

I plant pumpkins and squashes in a saucer,

0:53:160:53:20

so that when you water them, all the water focuses in on the roots.

0:53:200:53:24

That means that they are going to get the drink

0:53:240:53:26

that they absolutely need.

0:53:260:53:28

You need to leave at least a yard between plants,

0:53:330:53:37

because they need to spread.

0:53:370:53:39

And, I'll put in good, strong supports in a week or so,

0:53:390:53:43

but they'll be OK until they really start growing.

0:53:430:53:46

Now, it's hard to imagine,

0:53:500:53:52

but there might be somebody out there who doesn't want to

0:53:520:53:54

grow a pumpkin, so here are some other jobs you can do this weekend.

0:53:540:53:58

Morello cherries should be pruned now, before the fruit is ripe.

0:54:120:54:15

This is because next year's crop will be produced

0:54:160:54:20

on this year's shoots.

0:54:200:54:23

So, prune away anything that you don't want,

0:54:230:54:25

tying in those stems that you want to keep.

0:54:250:54:28

What you should have left is a good framework,

0:54:290:54:32

ready to carry next year's harvest.

0:54:320:54:34

It's time to start planning for next year's display of wallflowers.

0:54:410:54:45

Sprinkle the seed thinly on a seed tray of compost,

0:54:450:54:49

cover them with some grit and either water them from above,

0:54:490:54:53

or soak them for about half an hour,

0:54:530:54:55

and then they can be put to one side to germinate.

0:54:550:54:58

When you have wet, warm weather,

0:55:020:55:05

it's not at all uncommon for roses to become trapped within an

0:55:050:55:09

outer shell of dried petals, and this is known as balling.

0:55:090:55:12

You can often retrieve the situation by gently prising apart

0:55:130:55:18

these outer petals to release the flower within.

0:55:180:55:21

And don't worry if occasionally the whole thing falls off -

0:55:210:55:25

just deadhead it and a new flower will grow in its place.

0:55:250:55:28

This new area is being planted up with officinalis plants,

0:55:350:55:40

and it's already acquiring a sort of sense of place

0:55:400:55:42

and nice to come and sit and have a cup of tea out here -

0:55:420:55:45

although I have to say, the weather has been a bit variable.

0:55:450:55:49

Not an awful lot of sitting outside has gone on,

0:55:490:55:51

so let's see what is in store for us gardeners this weekend.

0:55:510:55:55

I'm removing the thalictrum from the box hedges.

0:57:100:57:14

Now, thalictrum is handsome plant, it's good lovely, glaucous leaves.

0:57:140:57:19

Sometimes has a chocolaty colour to the stem

0:57:190:57:23

and topped with this lemon fluffy flower.

0:57:230:57:26

You might think I would be extremely glad to have it.

0:57:260:57:30

And in the right place, I am.

0:57:300:57:31

I've got it elsewhere in the garden and it's a welcome visitor.

0:57:310:57:35

But here, it's the wrong colour and it's too far in the front.

0:57:350:57:40

It's forming a screen.

0:57:400:57:41

And there is no question that the right plant in the wrong place

0:57:410:57:46

can become simply the wrong plant, and has to go.

0:57:460:57:50

However, I am cutting them back,

0:57:500:57:52

and so they will return next year.

0:57:520:57:55

But that's it for today.

0:57:550:57:57

Now, next week, we are back on our normal day of Friday,

0:57:570:58:03

but there's a new time of nine o'clock.

0:58:030:58:05

So I'll see you back here at Longmeadow

0:58:050:58:07

next Friday at 9pm.

0:58:070:58:08

Until then, bye-bye.

0:58:080:58:11

Monty Don adds a touch of the exotic to the damp garden by planting a tree fern and protects his new soft fruit garden from feathered predators with netting.

Carol Klein selects hardy geraniums as her June Plant of the Month, Flo Headlam visits a church garden in Lewisham that feeds both the mind and body, while Nick Bailey gets a fascinating insight into parasitoid wasps and their positive impact on our gardens.

Adam Frost continues to explore the intricacies of innovative garden design by looking at a small town garden in London, and we meet the husband-and-wife team behind the glorious, 25-year-long restoration of West Dean Gardens in Sussex.