Street/Clarkson Heir Hunters


Street/Clarkson

Series following the work of probate researchers. The competition is on as Heir Hunters tackle a case just in on the government's Bona Vacantia list.


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Transcript


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Today...

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We need someone. It's urgent.

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Heir hunters race the competition to find beneficiaries

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to an unclaimed estate.

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It's quite a considerable sum of money, so time is of the essence.

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Family members hope to be reunited...

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It would be lovely to see her again.

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That would be one of my last wishes.

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Glass... I think that says bottle-maker.

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..while others are shocked to find new family.

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My first thought was, "Wow! Is this real?"

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Look for him, because we can't find the family in the 1911 census.

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-Yeah, I've done that.

-Maybe just stick to marriages, 1911 up.

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It's 10.45AM

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and London heir-hunting firm Finders are working on

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a brand-new case from the government's Bona Vacantia list.

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This is a case that's just come into us.

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It's the estate of Shirley Diane Street.

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There's just three ads on the list today,

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so I would anticipate this one's going to be quite competitive.

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Thank you, bye.

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Shirley passed away, aged 83, on the 23rd of September, 2015,

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without leaving a will.

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Born in the north-east of England, she worked in London,

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before retiring to the beautiful seaside town of Folkestone in Kent.

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A lot of people move to Folkestone,

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especially people from London are known to move to Folkestone.

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Weather's always very good here and there's lots of places

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for the elderly to walk along. Some really beautiful places.

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In Shirley's 23 years of being here, she would have seen a very warm

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and friendly town. We all get on very well.

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It's a lovely, friendly, happy place to be.

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In the office, the heir hunters have some initial clues,

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which mean they need to check

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carefully, to see if Shirley had any close family.

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Shirley was married to a gentleman called

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Patrick Dennis Collins-Street.

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He passed away in 1994, so they'll find that,

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when she married Patrick, whether they had any children together.

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Shirley's case also has an extra level of urgency.

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We've roughly valued the estate at £200,000.

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It's quite a considerable sum of money, time is of the essence.

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-Pulling this up?

-Yeah.

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With Bona Vacantia cases, we have to work very quickly.

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Not only to find out whether there's any competition that maybe

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would have reached the beneficiaries before we do,

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we also find it helps generally to make initial contact with

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the beneficiaries before anybody else who may be working on the case.

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Ryan needs help, to work the case fast,

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so pulls in case manager Amy Cox.

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-I've got the parents...

-OK.

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-..and I know that she's an only child.

-OK.

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Amy has discovered that Shirley's parents were Clarice Wintersgill

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and Herbert Charnock, who married in May 1929.

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And with no siblings of Shirley to inherit,

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the team need to now go back a generation

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and look at her grandparents on her mother's and father's side,

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to find her aunts and uncles or their children,

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who would be her heirs.

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Means we've got Charnock on the paternal side

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and Wintersgill on the maternal side,

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so I'll be nice and let Coxy choose

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whichever side she wants, and then we'll see

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how big each side of the family is and then we'll devise stems.

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-Um, I'll take that.

-OK.

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-All right.

-Thanks.

-Good luck.

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With Amy researching Shirley's mother's family,

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she quickly discovers Shirley's grandparents were

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John Wintersgill and Hannah Smith.

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And when she finds them on the census with their children, it looks

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like they might have a mountain to climb, in terms of research.

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-The maternal side's quite big.

-Is it? How's it looking?

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Eight... Well, seven stems.

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With a large family looming and seven maternal aunts and uncles

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of Shirley to find, Ryan steps in to help.

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OK.

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-14...

-OK, so what're we going to do, how should we split this?

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-Shall I take Suzanne and you take Camilla?

-OK.

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It's always good for us in the office to have a few people

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onboard when we're researching a case, when a family tree does

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get a bit out of hand, and we can divide it amongst people in the

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office and also if you're stuck on a bit of research, there's someone

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else that can just cast fresh eyes

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over the research that you've undertaken.

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You can find this one, then, because I couldn't find her.

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Everyone gets roped into researching one of the seven maternal

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aunts or uncles on Shirley's mother's side of the family.

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Josh, I'm going to leave this with you.

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This is the main tree, this is the other stem.

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-Yeah, I'm thinking, leave that page up and open a new one.

-Yeah.

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Just started doing the first stem of the Wintersgill family, which is

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a John Wintersgill. He died in 1964. He had two children.

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John's two children were Sidney and Kathleen.

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And when they check the military records,

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the team discovered something interesting about Sidney.

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In 1941, as Britain was about to feel the full force

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of Germany on her own territory, Sidney was an RAF pilot.

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This was a very much still in the early stages of World War II.

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We'd been through the Battle of Britain,

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but the country was now coming under prolonged aerial assault

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from the Luftwaffe.

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It was the Blitz.

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As RAF crew in a bomber squadron, Sidney's role was vital.

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The Bomber Command Offensive was really the only way that we

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could strike back at the heart of Germany.

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So there would have been a real sense that Britain

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was fighting back,

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we weren't just sitting and soaking up the punishment.

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Sidney was the co-pilot in a Wellington bomber.

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Sidney's job would be very demanding.

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Many nights, he would be getting into his aeroplane with his crew

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and flying off to raid German ports and German shipping.

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He would have been physically very tired, there would have

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been the constant threat of German anti-aircraft guns and the

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German night fighters,

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so you're constantly worrying about being shot at.

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And also, when you get back to base, every time you return,

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probably some of your squadron mates haven't come back.

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Of course, over a long period of time, it is going to

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take a psychological toll.

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After facing danger so many times, one summer evening,

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Sidney's luck ran out.

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On the 12th August, 1941, his squadron set out from his RAF base

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in Suffolk to bomb German ports.

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It's very difficult to know exactly what happened that evening,

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but fundamentally, the aircraft didn't come back.

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The strong likelihood is that it was shot down by flak,

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by anti-aircraft guns, or maybe shot down by a German night fighter.

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Sidney's entire crew perished that night,

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but their bravery has not been forgotten.

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Sidney could be proud of the contribution he made.

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He gave his life as one of 56,000 Bomber Command aircrew

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who also died in that conflict.

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And for much of the war, Bomber Command was the only way that

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Britain could take the fight to the enemy.

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Back in the office, Amy is checking if Sidney had any children

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before he was killed in action.

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This is Sidney's death record. That he was the son of the Reverend

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John Wintersgill and Ethel A Wintersgill of Lancashire,

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so we're going to take from that that he never married,

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because if he had a wife, then it would have her listed there.

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With Sidney's trail appearing to run to a dead end,

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Suzanne's been working up the line of another uncle, Leonard.

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So, we found that he passed away, married,

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and that he had two children and I've just found addresses

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for them and possible telephone numbers,

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so I need to give them a call.

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-Have you found any heirs yet?

-Suzanne has.

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Suzanne makes a call to the first potential heirs,

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children of Leonard Wintersgill.

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Yeah, he had brothers and sisters, didn't he?

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I managed to speak to one of the beneficiary's husbands,

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and he confirms that it was the correct family.

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So, I've organised for one of our representatives to go round

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and see them about 4pm today.

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Meanwhile, Ryan is researching Shirley's father's

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side of the family.

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Her father was Herbert Arthur Charnock,

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born in 1900, who Ryan thinks he's found on the 1911 census,

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living with his parents and siblings.

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We are left with six children on the paternal side living in 1911,

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and one of those is the deceased's father, obviously.

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Then, we're looking at five stems on the paternal side.

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So, it is not too bad.

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We just need to find out exactly what happened to each of them.

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The 1911 census is one of the key census records we look at.

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It has some extra information that the previous ones don't

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and also, it gives us how many children the couple have had

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and how many have subsequently passed away.

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So, it's a snapshot of the family, but, for us, we can go and fill

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in some of the gaps on the family tree just by taking a look at it.

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Camilla, I might need you to just send a line for me.

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But with five potential aunts and uncles of Shirley's to find,

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Ryan recruits researcher Camilla to help.

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Camilla's looking into the line of Jane Charnock.

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Jane is not such a common first name as John, that I'm looking into.

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But we're working around it.

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Quite often for us, it's better if you have at least one middle name,

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so we know who you are!

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And something is troubling Ryan about the middle names.

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I just need to go back to what we know,

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because the dad was Herbert Arthur H Charnock.

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I need to just figure out we've got the right census.

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It would be unusual for no-one else to have middle names

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and then for him to have two middle names.

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-If you can go back to stage one...

-OK.

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..just make sure you've definitely got the right census.

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Ryan suspects they might have been

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looking at the wrong family entirely.

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-I'll have a look as well and see if we can see anything else.

-OK.

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Camilla has discovered another Herbert Charnock

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on a different census.

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Have we got them in 1911?

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This Herbert Charnock matches Shirley's father perfectly

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as he has the correct two middle names.

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We just found a different census entry for the deceased's father.

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It's a much smaller family.

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The deceased's father was one of three, instead of one of six.

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We now know we're on the right track

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and it should be a lot easier for us.

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From the census,

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they can see Shirley's grandparents were actually William Charnock

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and Elizabeth Jones.

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As well as Shirley's own father, Herbert Charnock,

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they had two other children, Marion and Rhoda.

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With precious time lost on the wrong family,

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Camilla and Ryan will have split the research.

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-Camilla, who do you want to look into?

-I like Rhoda.

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Ryan makes short work of finding Marion Charnock.

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She married Horace Hall. They had a child called Horace.

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He was born in 1925, and I think he is still living.

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I found out, actually, his address is sheltered accommodation

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for senior citizens, so I can give them a call.

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The gentleman I spoke to confirmed

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that, actually, Horace has passed away.

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He couldn't confirm exactly when, but he did confirm that Horace

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has a son, so we need to now trace that son.

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And Ryan quickly tracks down Horace's son, John Hall,

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who would be Shirley's first cousin, once removed.

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Hello, is that John? Hiya.

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Oh, really?

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OK. There's usually a couple of companies

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that look into these things.

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Essentially, it will be down to you...

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It appears another company has called John minutes before Ryan has.

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Thanks, bye-bye.

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It would be the first whiff of competition we've had in this case.

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So, now it's really urgent for us

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to try and get some people out to see the beneficiaries.

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We need someone. It's urgent.

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I don't mind sending someone if they're just a couple of hours away.

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Yeah, I get that, as well.

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We send out a representative to visit the person.

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If someone's on holiday, we can know straightaway.

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If they've recently moved, again, we can know straightaway.

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OK, cool.

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Ryan finally gets visits booked in and he can breathe a sigh of relief.

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We had a slight panic, because we couldn't get

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anybody in Lancashire, but we're just sending someone

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from a bit further afield

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and everybody that's due a visit, will get a visit.

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And we've made first contact with everyone

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we've spoken to and we've completed

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the majority of work into the family tree.

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So, it's all been a really good team effort today.

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All in all, the team identified ten heirs

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on Shirley's mother's side of the family.

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But John Hall, Shirley's cousin once removed, is the sole heir

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to Shirley's estate on her father's side,

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and he was shocked to find out

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his small family was larger than he thought.

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The day that the heir hunters got in touch with me,

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it was an absolute, complete surprise.

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Shirley Street is a bit of a mystery to me.

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Everything that I've learnt about Shirley Street

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has come from the heir hunters.

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And, indeed, I wasn't even aware

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that my grandmother Marion had a brother,

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who Shirley is descended from.

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And John is still dazed by the revelations.

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The whole experience in the last

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three weeks has been quite bizarre.

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To think I could be inheriting some money

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from someone I didn't even know existed.

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And while they didn't sign all the heirs to the estate,

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Brian is happy to have helped John Hall receive his inheritance.

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Given that he's the sole paternal heir,

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and he's due a fifth of the estate,

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it's not too bad, and we'll now move forward with that information,

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to ensure that everybody who's entitled will receive their share.

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Thank you so much for letting me know. Bye.

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In terms of research on family history,

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I've not done any, whatsoever,

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so I haven't actually quite got my head round it yet.

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So, the more that emerges,

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I think, the more fascinating the whole thing will get.

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When heir hunters look into family trees,

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they can uncover distressing cases of loss and separation,

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tempered with heart-warming stories of generations united

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by a skilled but forgotten trade.

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The case of George Douglas Clarkson proved to be one such case.

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He was born on the 21st of July, 1926, in Castleford, West Yorkshire,

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but lived for many years in London

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before retiring to Honiton, in Devon.

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George Clarkson would have enjoyed living in the area.

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It's a beautiful place to be.

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Devon itself has the rolling hills, and it's a lovely green area.

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His next-door neighbour would have been on hand, all the local people,

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the farmers and the community there would have been there

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to help with anything he needed.

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George passed away on the 24th of November, 2004,

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without a will.

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But it was almost a decade until his estate was advertised

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by the government as being unclaimed.

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Hi, that's OK. Are you free to talk?

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Case manager Richard Fryer, from heir hunting firm Hoopers,

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picked up his case.

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It's not unusual for a fair amount of time to lapse

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between the person passing away and their estate being advertised

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by the Treasury Solicitor.

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It should arrive today, hopefully. OK.

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But in George's case, there was an unusual circumstance

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which led to his estate being advertised so long after his death.

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The team discovered he'd shared his property

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with a female companion.

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There was no romantic involvement,

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they just, we think, enjoyed each other's company.

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This carried on until George's death in 2004, after which

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we understand that the lady was allowed to

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live in the property, as long as she maintained its upkeep.

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And it was only upon her death some years later that the matter then

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had to be referred to the Treasury Solicitor,

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as the property was empty.

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George had fully owned the property,

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so there would be a substantial sum for potential heirs to inherit.

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Richard got stuck into working out George's

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circumstances in the later years of his life.

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Although we'd had indications early on that he was a bachelor,

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nevertheless, we had to check the marriage records thoroughly

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and we found no trace that the deceased had ever married.

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-Yeah.

-Right, OK.

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The team couldn't find any children of George's, either.

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So with no immediate family to inherit, the team would now need

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to find George's parents from his birth certificate,

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in order to work out if he had any siblings.

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George's parents were Thomas Clarkson and Alice Gilfoyle

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who married on Christmas Eve, 1921, in Pontefract.

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The team called in Jonathan Wright to help, one of their most

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experienced researchers, who's been an heir hunter most of his life.

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Fairly early on, we identified in the birth records

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a brother of George Clarkson,

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Johnny Clarkson, but he didn't actually survive infancy.

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So, of course, it meant that chances are,

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we would be looking further afield, to more distant,

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extended family members.

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Today, Jonathan is visiting a registry office, to pick up

0:18:140:18:17

records of George's grandparents

0:18:170:18:19

which will help them to find any aunts or uncles

0:18:190:18:21

who would be in line to inherit.

0:18:210:18:23

We found out that the maternal grandparents were

0:18:280:18:31

Thomas Arthur Gilfoyle, who married an Ellen in Ireland.

0:18:310:18:34

According to the census records,

0:18:360:18:38

the Gilfoyle family came over to England in the early 1900s.

0:18:380:18:43

Quite typically, Irish families at that particular period of time

0:18:430:18:47

do tend to be more likely to be on the large side.

0:18:470:18:51

It turned out our original assumptions were correct.

0:18:520:18:55

The family was sizeable, to say the least.

0:18:550:18:59

Thomas and Ellen Gilfoyle had a total of 11 children.

0:18:590:19:04

We knew at this stage that there would be a lot of work ahead of us,

0:19:040:19:07

so everyone every last one, however many,

0:19:070:19:10

would need to be found and accounted for.

0:19:100:19:12

Case manager Abigail Rising

0:19:140:19:16

was drafted in to help research the case.

0:19:160:19:19

This is one of the biggest family trees that I've ever had to work on.

0:19:190:19:24

This culminated in many, many hours of research for us.

0:19:240:19:30

-Is there anyone else outstanding?

-I don't think so.

0:19:300:19:33

As the team tackled the huge job of contacting heirs,

0:19:330:19:36

they looked at one of George's cousins, Catherine Taylor.

0:19:360:19:39

Catherine Taylor herself had been married.

0:19:390:19:41

She married a Denis Evans in 1936

0:19:410:19:44

and, in turn, had three children of her own.

0:19:440:19:47

Catherine passed away in 1987,

0:19:480:19:51

meaning her three daughters were now beneficiaries.

0:19:510:19:54

As the team tried to locate the three potential heirs,

0:19:540:19:57

their research revealed that one of them, Kathleen Evans,

0:19:570:20:01

had a glamorous job in the 1960s,

0:20:010:20:03

as a private chauffeur of luxury cars.

0:20:030:20:05

Kathleen and her sisters would be George's cousins, once removed,

0:20:060:20:10

and, therefore, heirs to his estate.

0:20:100:20:12

But the heir hunters couldn't find any trace of Kathleen,

0:20:120:20:15

and when they located her estranged sister, Marion,

0:20:150:20:18

they discovered a second astonishing fact about this unusual woman.

0:20:180:20:22

Kathleen was about 30

0:20:220:20:25

when I last saw her

0:20:250:20:27

and she telephoned me to say, where did my parents live?

0:20:270:20:31

I always remember because she said, "Where do YOUR parents live now?"

0:20:310:20:35

Not "our parents", which seemed a funny thing at the time.

0:20:350:20:39

Because they moved and I told her

0:20:390:20:41

and I think she stayed overnight that night

0:20:410:20:44

and the next morning, I saw her at my parents' house,

0:20:440:20:47

and that was the last time I ever saw her.

0:20:470:20:51

When you hear from a family member that someone hasn't been

0:20:510:20:53

seen for that long, then your heart does start to sink

0:20:530:20:56

and you wonder how difficult it will be to find them.

0:20:560:20:59

I would love to find her.

0:20:590:21:01

I would love to see her. I would love to contact her.

0:21:010:21:05

Marion and the heir hunters are hoping someone with

0:21:090:21:11

information about Kathleen will someday come forward.

0:21:110:21:14

Until then, her inheritance will remain in trust.

0:21:140:21:18

Right, and as far as we know, she's the only one.

0:21:210:21:23

-Yes.

-Right, OK.

0:21:230:21:25

Other than Kathleen and her sisters,

0:21:250:21:27

the team had found an incredible 74 heirs to George's £230,000 estate

0:21:270:21:32

on his mother's side alone.

0:21:320:21:35

The heir hunters started looking at George's

0:21:360:21:38

grandparents on his father's side,

0:21:380:21:41

to look for George's aunts and uncles,

0:21:410:21:43

with fingers crossed for a small family.

0:21:430:21:45

Moving over to the deceased's paternal family,

0:21:450:21:48

we identified the birth entry

0:21:480:21:51

for his father, Thomas Clarkson, in 1893.

0:21:510:21:55

Thomas Clarkson was the son

0:21:550:21:57

of Edward Israel Clarkson and Ada Smith.

0:21:570:22:01

But the heir hunters' hopes were drastically misplaced.

0:22:010:22:04

In total, including the deceased's father, they had nine children.

0:22:040:22:08

This is one of these rare cases where all nine children, in fact,

0:22:090:22:13

did live well into adulthood.

0:22:130:22:15

So, it looked very likely that Thomas Clarkson's eight siblings

0:22:150:22:21

potentially could all have married and had descendants.

0:22:210:22:25

And when they found the census record for George's grandfather

0:22:250:22:29

and uncles, the team came across a fascinating family occupation.

0:22:290:22:34

The 1911 census showed us that the deceased's paternal uncle,

0:22:340:22:38

John Clarkson, as well as his father, Thomas,

0:22:380:22:40

all worked in the local glassworks in Castleford.

0:22:400:22:43

Further discoveries on the census also revealed that

0:22:440:22:47

one of George's glass-making uncles had gone on to have a family.

0:22:470:22:51

The deceased's paternal uncle, Richard Clarkson,

0:22:530:22:56

was married to a Mary Shepherd.

0:22:560:22:59

They had a son, Richard Roland Clarkson,

0:22:590:23:02

who was married to an Olive Liversedge,

0:23:020:23:05

and they, in turn, had four children of their own,

0:23:050:23:07

who would be cousins, once removed, of the deceased.

0:23:070:23:11

One of them, Richard John Clarkson, passed away in 2001,

0:23:110:23:15

but he had three children, who would be heirs to George's estate.

0:23:150:23:20

Oh, nice!

0:23:200:23:22

Susan McAuley is George's first cousin, twice removed,

0:23:220:23:26

who was shocked when she got the call from the heir hunters.

0:23:260:23:29

My first thought was, "Wow! Is this real?"

0:23:290:23:33

Other family members had had similar phone calls.

0:23:330:23:37

The accents of the people who were down in London

0:23:370:23:39

and the phone call matched with everything, so I had no doubts

0:23:390:23:42

it was genuine and it was just really quite exciting.

0:23:420:23:46

Obviously, the first thing you tend to think of is, which you do, is,

0:23:470:23:51

"Ooh, how much money am I going to get?"

0:23:510:23:54

After that, your thought are that this relative was living

0:23:540:23:57

so far away, that I didn't know existed.

0:23:570:23:59

George Douglas was an unusual name and it got me

0:24:010:24:04

really interested in tracing the ancestry of the family.

0:24:040:24:08

The census 1911, where Edward Israel Clarkson was

0:24:080:24:11

eight on one of those, he's now 49.

0:24:110:24:14

And after some investigating,

0:24:150:24:17

Susan and her family have discovered a link to George's past.

0:24:170:24:21

Her father also worked in the glassworks of Castleford

0:24:210:24:24

and appears to have been the fourth generation of Clarksons to do so.

0:24:240:24:28

Glass founder. So we know that comes way back into our history.

0:24:290:24:34

His children. Glass... I think that says bottle maker.

0:24:340:24:38

The resemblance of the family just goes... I mean, he could be him.

0:24:380:24:42

-Dad could be him.

-Yeah.

0:24:420:24:44

Castleford in West Yorkshire was one of the pioneering

0:24:460:24:49

areas of glass bottle production in the late 19th century,

0:24:490:24:53

which George's father, uncle and grandfather were all involved in.

0:24:530:24:57

Today, Susan, her sister and mother

0:25:020:25:04

are visiting a glassworks run by Kate Jones...

0:25:040:25:07

How are you doing? Welcome!

0:25:070:25:09

..which still follows the traditional method

0:25:090:25:11

Susan's great, great grandfather,

0:25:110:25:13

Edward Clarkson, would have recognised.

0:25:130:25:15

Well, we've been here 20 years

0:25:150:25:17

and we've been blowing glass all that time.

0:25:170:25:19

And we blow glass as it was made pretty much before

0:25:190:25:21

the Industrial Revolution.

0:25:210:25:23

How long does it take you to produce something like this?

0:25:230:25:25

Something like this?

0:25:250:25:27

About... Just over an hour.

0:25:270:25:29

Maybe more, maybe less, depending on how well things go.

0:25:290:25:33

Because glass-blowing, like any other process,

0:25:330:25:35

once you've started, you can't stop and have a cup of tea.

0:25:350:25:38

You've got to see it right the way through.

0:25:380:25:40

And now, they can actually see a glass bowl made

0:25:410:25:44

in the traditional method.

0:25:440:25:46

You can feel the heat in here, can't you?

0:25:470:25:49

You can feel how warm it is in here.

0:25:490:25:50

The glass-makers have got to make sure

0:25:500:25:52

they've got enough water on board.

0:25:520:25:54

They're wearing quite light, minimal clothing,

0:25:540:25:56

to keep their bodies cool.

0:25:560:25:58

You get a tolerance, you know. You do get a tolerance.

0:25:580:26:01

Basically, if you go to a dinner party,

0:26:010:26:03

the glass-makers could hand all the dishes round.

0:26:030:26:05

You go to a restaurant, they say the plate's hot,

0:26:050:26:07

and we're like, "Give it here!"

0:26:070:26:09

Yeah, Stephen's blowing a bowl.

0:26:100:26:12

This is the first stages of making a bowl.

0:26:120:26:14

-He's starting again.

-He's starting again.

0:26:140:26:16

The colour's on the blowing iron

0:26:160:26:17

and he's just gathered the glass from the furnace.

0:26:170:26:20

He's blocking it and shaping it with paper, to cool the outside,

0:26:200:26:23

so when he blows, there's some resistance

0:26:230:26:25

and it's cooler at the bottom of the bubble.

0:26:250:26:27

So when he blows, the bubble will be thicker at the bottom

0:26:270:26:30

and thinner at the sides,

0:26:300:26:31

which is where you want it for the structure of your bowl later on.

0:26:310:26:35

And, of course, there's one way to get it right,

0:26:350:26:37

and there's 1,000 ways to get it wrong.

0:26:370:26:39

Twiddling it round, all the time, isn't he?

0:26:440:26:46

Got to turn it all the time.

0:26:460:26:47

If you stop turning, gravity will do its thing.

0:26:470:26:49

-Make the sides go.

-It will just run to earth.

0:26:490:26:52

Reconnecting with her family's past

0:26:520:26:54

could open a new chapter in Susan's life.

0:26:540:26:57

What a rewarding day, coming to see glass being made as it was made

0:26:570:27:01

hundreds and hundreds of years ago.

0:27:010:27:03

To actually see it going into a furnace,

0:27:030:27:05

coming out of the furnace, molten on the end of a rod,

0:27:050:27:08

seeing it cooled and seeing them actually blowing the glass,

0:27:080:27:11

it's been absolutely amazing.

0:27:110:27:13

I would love to have my own furnace and blow some glass.

0:27:130:27:16

You never know!

0:27:160:27:17

Susan's also thankful for the inheritance

0:27:190:27:21

she's receiving from George.

0:27:210:27:23

I would have loved to have known

0:27:230:27:24

more about George Douglas Clarkson and his life.

0:27:240:27:27

We've actually found a photograph on the internet

0:27:270:27:30

of the house that he lived in

0:27:300:27:31

and I would love to visit that house,

0:27:310:27:34

to actually try to get a feeling for the person that he was.

0:27:340:27:37

Back in the office, the paternal side of George Clarkson's tree

0:27:380:27:42

was being wrapped up.

0:27:420:27:43

Upon finishing the paternal side of the family,

0:27:430:27:46

we found the total beneficiaries numbered to 16.

0:27:460:27:50

This meant the whole case had over 90 beneficiaries in total.

0:27:500:27:54

There's still the outstanding case of Kathleen Evans,

0:27:560:27:59

George's cousin, once removed.

0:27:590:28:01

For now, the search for Kathleen continues.

0:28:010:28:04

The competition is on as Heir Hunters tackle a case just in on the government's Bona Vacantia list. As the family tree develops, the search widens to Lancashire and uncovers a family hero who flew illustrious Wellington bombers during WWII raids.

In London, another firm tackle a tricky case, on hold for almost seven years while a personal agreement was honoured. Uncovering a huge family, the team also stumble across a mysterious family disappearance in the swinging sixties and an heir discovers more about her family's trade in the artisan world of glass blowing.


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