18/01/2017 BBC News at Ten


18/01/2017

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Tonight at Ten: Boris Johnson under attack for appearing to compare

:00:00.:00:08.

The Foreign Secretary, visiting India, accused some

:00:09.:00:13.

European leaders of wanting to punish the UK for leaving the EU.

:00:14.:00:19.

If Monsieur Hollande wants to administer punishment beatings

:00:20.:00:24.

to anybody who chooses to escape, rather in the manner of some

:00:25.:00:27.

World War Two Movie, then I don't think that is the way forward.

:00:28.:00:34.

But at the European Parliament, the Prime Minister of Malta warned

:00:35.:00:37.

that Britain could not be seen to benefit from any

:00:38.:00:39.

We want a fair deal for the United Kingdom,

:00:40.:00:44.

but that deal necessarily needs to be inferior to membership.

:00:45.:00:53.

We'll have more on the reaction to the Government's Brexit plans

:00:54.:00:56.

as HSBC says it's decided to move a thousand jobs

:00:57.:00:58.

A special report from the ruins of eastern Aleppo on the likely

:00:59.:01:06.

Foreign intervention has transformed this war,

:01:07.:01:14.

and the way it's looking right now, foreigners, not Syrians,

:01:15.:01:18.

Climate scientists declare that 2016 was the warmest year on record.

:01:19.:01:29.

Extra news - how will this new website funded

:01:30.:01:31.

by a millionaire Eurosceptic fit in to the media landscape?

:01:32.:01:38.

And tributes to Rachael Heyhoe-Flint, one of the great

:01:39.:01:41.

Coming up in Sportsday later in the hour on BBC News,

:01:42.:01:48.

we will have the goals from tonight's FA Cup

:01:49.:01:50.

third-round replays, including Liverpool's

:01:51.:01:51.

Boris Johnson, the Foreign Secretary, has once again been

:01:52.:02:19.

criticised for his choice of language after appearing

:02:20.:02:21.

to compare the French government to the Nazis.

:02:22.:02:24.

He said Britain should not be penalised with punishment beatings

:02:25.:02:27.

in the manner of a World War Two movie for wanting to leave

:02:28.:02:30.

During the day, EU leaders have been giving their reactions

:02:31.:02:33.

to Theresa May's speech yesterday outlining her Brexit ambitions.

:02:34.:02:39.

The European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker promised to work

:02:40.:02:41.

for good results in the forthcoming negotiations, as our political

:02:42.:02:44.

Watch out, chaps, I'm worried about you falling over.

:02:45.:02:51.

"Watch out, Foreign Secretary," more like.

:02:52.:02:55.

It is his job to win friends and influence around the world.

:02:56.:02:58.

But as the delicate process of leaving the EU begins,

:02:59.:03:03.

rather indelicate words about our old friends

:03:04.:03:05.

If Monsieur Hollande wants to administer punishment beatings

:03:06.:03:10.

to anybody who chooses to escape, rather in the manner of some

:03:11.:03:16.

World War II movie, I don't think that is the way forward.

:03:17.:03:22.

I think, actually, it is not in the interests of our

:03:23.:03:24.

From thousands of miles away, he was slammed as crass.

:03:25.:03:33.

"Not exactly what you would expect from a Foreign Minister,"

:03:34.:03:35.

Awkward, when back home the Prime Minister is urging

:03:36.:03:39.

The point he made was a reasonable one, but the language has got to be

:03:40.:03:45.

extremely careful in dealing with colleagues and friends.

:03:46.:03:47.

He comes up with these extraordinary phrases

:03:48.:03:50.

Boris Johnson's team says he was just making the point that it

:03:51.:03:55.

makes no sense for the rest of the EU to treat Britain harshly.

:03:56.:03:59.

But only yesterday, Theresa May publicly reminded ministers

:04:00.:04:01.

here at home of the need for discipline and with a difficult

:04:02.:04:05.

deal ahead, Britain needs all the friends it has.

:04:06.:04:10.

Language matters, but it is the words and attitudes of European

:04:11.:04:13.

Yesterday, the Prime Minister appealed to her EU counterparts,

:04:14.:04:20.

urging them to behave as good friends, even as we leave.

:04:21.:04:23.

The arch European Jean-Claude Juncker, who leads the commission

:04:24.:04:26.

that will manage the deal was suing for peace.

:04:27.:04:30.

We want a fair deal with Britain and a fair deal for Britain,

:04:31.:04:36.

but a fair deal means a fair deal for the European Union.

:04:37.:04:39.

Yet Europe's leaders are in no mood to let Britain divide and conquer.

:04:40.:04:43.

Their goal right now is sticking together.

:04:44.:04:47.

"We now have a clearer idea of what Britain

:04:48.:04:49.

wants," Angela Merkel said, "The most important thing is that

:04:50.:04:51.

And in public and private, here is the reality.

:04:52.:04:58.

Whatever the UK asks for, the rest of the EU will not do

:04:59.:05:01.

a deal where the terms of trade are as cushy outside as in.

:05:02.:05:07.

We want a fair deal for the United Kingdom,

:05:08.:05:10.

but that deal necessarily needs to be inferior to membership.

:05:11.:05:18.

Are you playing hardball, Prime Minister?

:05:19.:05:21.

She may smile, her speech yesterday pleased most of her party,

:05:22.:05:25.

but Theresa May is still under attack for not giving

:05:26.:05:27.

It is not so much the Iron Lady as the Irony Lady.

:05:28.:05:33.

Next Tuesday it is over to the courts, who could force

:05:34.:05:40.

the Government to give detail, much more detail, to Parliament,

:05:41.:05:44.

before the technical process of extricating ourselves

:05:45.:05:46.

In these negotiations it will not always seem that

:05:47.:05:51.

Laura Kuenssberg, BBC News, Westminster.

:05:52.:06:00.

In a moment we'll talk to our business editor Simon Jack,

:06:01.:06:05.

who's at the World Economic Forum in Davos, but first let's talk

:06:06.:06:08.

to our Europe correspondent Damian Grammaticas,

:06:09.:06:09.

What did you make of the responses today? I think two things, Theresa

:06:10.:06:22.

May's plan depends on achieving a far-reaching trade deal with the EU.

:06:23.:06:28.

Their voices in the UK who say we are already in the free market, we

:06:29.:06:32.

have free trade, that should be easy. EU leaders have said

:06:33.:06:37.

consistently that this will be a very, very difficult negotiation

:06:38.:06:42.

because, they say, Theresa May has prioritised a political decision to

:06:43.:06:45.

prevent the freedom of movement of people and so leave the single

:06:46.:06:50.

market. Outside it, they say, access will be much more limited. They say

:06:51.:06:54.

it is not punishing the UK, it is the consequence of decisions taken

:06:55.:07:01.

by the UK. Few here think the time frame of two

:07:02.:07:03.

years is really achievable. The reason for that, I think, is they

:07:04.:07:07.

say there is the expert negotiation to agree first, then the question of

:07:08.:07:12.

the future trade deal. The Maltese Prime Minister said EU leaders have

:07:13.:07:15.

not decided if they will let the UK start talking about trade deals

:07:16.:07:19.

straightaway until it are settled the terms of Exeter, including,

:07:20.:07:24.

possibly, a bill for billions and billions of pounds.

:07:25.:07:26.

Simon isn't Davos. Rash is in Davos. Simon, Theresa May has

:07:27.:07:33.

arrived in Davos tonight, but there's some unwelcome news

:07:34.:07:35.

from HSBC? The guilt she will arrive to the

:07:36.:07:40.

news that HSBC was not bluffing when it said it would move 1000 of its

:07:41.:07:45.

highly paid bankers from London to Paris if the UK let the single

:07:46.:07:49.

market. They have made it clear that that will happen, they will take 20%

:07:50.:07:55.

of the UK banking revenue with them. The chairman of UBS told me they

:07:56.:07:59.

could move up to 1000 workers from London to, probably, from third.

:08:00.:08:05.

Some people would say, so what? But there are two important messages.

:08:06.:08:09.

Two big banks have decided that London, outside the single market,

:08:10.:08:14.

is -- is not the optimal place to provide services to European

:08:15.:08:19.

clients. These are very highly paid people. Whether you like it or not,

:08:20.:08:22.

they are paid hundreds of thousands of pounds each and they pay a lot of

:08:23.:08:26.

income tax. With the revenue from the bank they are taking MBA can tax

:08:27.:08:31.

being taken away, there will be a hit to the Exchequer.

:08:32.:08:35.

These are not contingency plans any more, they are plans that are

:08:36.:08:41.

becoming a reality. Simon and Damian, thank you both.

:08:42.:08:43.

The United Nations says it believes 40,000 people have returned

:08:44.:08:46.

to their homes in eastern Aleppo, the city devastated

:08:47.:08:48.

Most are living on aid in very difficult conditions.

:08:49.:08:52.

It became a major battle ground in the summer of 2012.

:08:53.:08:57.

As recently as August last year this was the picture -

:08:58.:09:00.

a city divided with regime forces in the west rebels in the east.

:09:01.:09:06.

But Government forces cut off the rebels' supply lines and in just

:09:07.:09:09.

a few months they were able to take full control.

:09:10.:09:13.

Our Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen has been to east Aleppo,

:09:14.:09:16.

The final battle for Aleppo swept through the city like a man-made

:09:17.:09:28.

All sides in this war were prepared to destroy

:09:29.:09:32.

In the end, the firepower of the regime and its

:09:33.:09:38.

Russian and Ukrainian allies was too much for the fractious rebel

:09:39.:09:41.

coalition that controlled east Aleppo.

:09:42.:09:48.

This city is the key to northern Syria.

:09:49.:09:50.

Right across the country, rebels who are still

:09:51.:09:52.

The battle for Aleppo lasted four years.

:09:53.:10:08.

More than 200,000 civilians were trapped in the heat of the fight.

:10:09.:10:15.

Attacks on civilians by any side in the war are crimes if it can be

:10:16.:10:20.

Zakaria Mohammed Juma lost his leg in East

:10:21.:10:28.

At a clinic run by the International Committee

:10:29.:10:34.

of the Red Cross, he is being measured for a prosthesis.

:10:35.:10:37.

When you can't walk, supporting a family is

:10:38.:10:43.

It will take years and billions to rebuild.

:10:44.:10:56.

The east side of Aleppo and much of the old city in

:10:57.:10:59.

With a photo of his clothes shop, Salah stood in front of where

:11:00.:11:03.

I've seen this much damage elsewhere in Syria, but never

:11:04.:11:08.

Abu Mahmoud is one of the first to return to his

:11:09.:11:15.

If only they'd take away the rubble, he said, all the

:11:16.:11:20.

This corpse was still lying on the road a

:11:21.:11:31.

More are certain to be buried in collapsed

:11:32.:11:34.

Abu Mohammed, collecting firewood, showed where a mortar

:11:35.:11:40.

Look, he said, they took out my spleen, kidney, and

:11:41.:11:46.

In every queue for emergency aid there are tragedies.

:11:47.:11:58.

This child, who is 12, has seen more than anyone

:11:59.:12:01.

Her grandmother is using all the strength

:12:02.:12:07.

she has left to care for

:12:08.:12:09.

TRANSLATION: My daughter's 15-year-old girl and her son, who

:12:10.:12:18.

My son's three-year-old daughter lost a leg.

:12:19.:12:23.

Another grandson, aged seven, lost a hand.

:12:24.:12:26.

My family's houses were all destroyed.

:12:27.:12:35.

We don't know what's hidden in our future.

:12:36.:12:38.

I saw with my own eyes my other cousin, his intestines were

:12:39.:12:45.

President Assad's resurgence in Aleppo means talk

:12:46.:12:57.

about forcing him out sounds more hollow than ever.

:12:58.:13:01.

He is the strongest he's been since the war

:13:02.:13:03.

The empty, ruined, silent streets on the former front lines

:13:04.:13:14.

That is a home-made mortar, designed and built

:13:15.:13:26.

But it is nothing compared to the power of the Russian

:13:27.:13:34.

air force and the military know-how of the Iranians and their Lebanese

:13:35.:13:37.

Foreign intervention has transformed this war.

:13:38.:13:47.

And the way it's looking right now, foreigners,

:13:48.:13:50.

not Syrians, will dictate the way the war ends.

:13:51.:13:59.

The sun sets in Aleppo on a dark, cold and broken place.

:14:00.:14:06.

It feels like a post-war city, but this

:14:07.:14:08.

For the first time, the president and his

:14:09.:14:16.

A glimpse of life in eastern Aleppo with our Middle East correspondent,

:14:17.:14:36.

Jeremy Bowen. Thousands of British holiday-makers

:14:37.:14:41.

are being flown home from the Gambia after a state

:14:42.:14:42.

of emergency was declared. The Foreign Office is advising

:14:43.:14:45.

people to avoid all but essential travel to the country

:14:46.:14:48.

because of a risk of unrest. President Yayha Jammeh is refusing

:14:49.:14:50.

to accept the result of last month's presidential elections

:14:51.:14:53.

in which he was defeated. His elected successor Adama Barrow

:14:54.:14:54.

is due to be inaugurated tomorrow. Senegal has said its military forces

:14:55.:15:13.

will enforce the handover, if necessary.

:15:14.:15:17.

Our correspondent Umaru Fofana reports

:15:18.:15:18.

Not as they came, not as they had anticipated.

:15:19.:15:23.

Thousands of European tourists, mostly from the UK, being flown back

:15:24.:15:25.

Some had been here for only a couple of days,

:15:26.:15:29.

But I understand that we need to do it.

:15:30.:15:43.

To me, it feels stupid because this will

:15:44.:15:47.

all be over within 24 hours, 48 hours.

:15:48.:15:49.

Thousands of Gambians are also streaming out.

:15:50.:15:53.

They fear a West African military intervention

:15:54.:15:59.

Troops are said to be massing on the border.

:16:00.:16:03.

The African union says, effective tomorrow, it will not

:16:04.:16:15.

recognise Jammeh as this country's leader.

:16:16.:16:16.

Ahead of the anticipated military action and the planned

:16:17.:16:19.

inauguration of Adama Barrow, president Yahya Jammeh declared a

:16:20.:16:21.

Behind me here is the National Stadium of the

:16:22.:16:24.

Gambia, the planned venue for the inauguration on Thursday

:16:25.:16:26.

of Adama Barrow as the country's next president.

:16:27.:16:32.

He has tweeted defiantly from neighbouring Senegal,

:16:33.:16:34.

where he is expected to come from, that he will be here tomorrow for

:16:35.:16:38.

Jammeh withdrew from the British Commonwealth in

:16:39.:16:41.

He has now ruled this country for 22 years,

:16:42.:16:46.

controversially winning four elections.

:16:47.:16:51.

It took a coalition of seven political parties led by Adama

:16:52.:16:53.

Barrow to defeat him in December, but he insists those elections were

:16:54.:16:56.

We advise the President to cooperate.

:16:57.:17:07.

However this pans out, this tiny West African

:17:08.:17:19.

Many people have been killed, jailed or

:17:20.:17:22.

Their families are calling for justice.

:17:23.:17:25.

Responding to such demands could determine how this crisis is

:17:26.:17:27.

Unemployment has fallen to its lowest level

:17:28.:17:38.

Official figures show the number of people out of work in the UK

:17:39.:17:43.

in the three months to November was down by 52,000 to 1.6 million.

:17:44.:17:46.

Average earnings rose by 2.7% compared with

:17:47.:17:48.

But the figures also show that since July the total number

:17:49.:17:56.

of people in work in the UK has stopped growing.

:17:57.:17:59.

In his final news conference at the White House before he leaves

:18:00.:18:03.

office in two days' time, President Obama has underlined

:18:04.:18:06.

the importance of accountability and freedom of the press

:18:07.:18:08.

President-elect Trump has signalled he's considering changes

:18:09.:18:13.

to the traditional White House news briefings, prompting

:18:14.:18:17.

concern that accountability might be more limited.

:18:18.:18:20.

Our North America editor Jon Sopel was at the news conference

:18:21.:18:22.

For one last time Barack Obama came to the White House briefing room

:18:23.:18:29.

But amid reports that his successor wants to limit access

:18:30.:18:37.

and regularly accuses journalists of being dishonest and liars,

:18:38.:18:39.

the outgoing President spoke of the importance of a strong

:18:40.:18:41.

You are not supposed to be sycophantics,

:18:42.:18:54.

You are not supposed to be sycophants, you are

:18:55.:18:56.

You are supposed to ask me tough questions.

:18:57.:18:59.

You are not supposed to be complimentary but you are supposed

:19:00.:19:01.

to cast a critical eye on folks who hold enormous power.

:19:02.:19:04.

This picture was released today of Donald Trump

:19:05.:19:06.

Barack Obama was asked what advice he would give his successor?

:19:07.:19:13.

On this, he steered a diplomatic course.

:19:14.:19:15.

This is a job of such magnitude that you can't do it by yourself.

:19:16.:19:19.

You are enormously reliant on a team, that's probably

:19:20.:19:21.

the most useful advice, the most constructive advice that

:19:22.:19:29.

Then the final question, come on, Mr President,

:19:30.:19:34.

are you really as sanquine as you are saying publicly

:19:35.:19:36.

This is not just a matter of no drama Obama.

:19:37.:19:42.

It is true that behind closed doors I curse more than I do in public.

:19:43.:19:49.

Sometimes I get mad and frustrated like everybody else does.

:19:50.:19:53.

But at my core I think we're going to be OK.

:19:54.:19:59.

Thank you very much, press corps. Good luck.

:20:00.:20:02.

Barack Obama will spend the next year writing and being around more

:20:03.:20:05.

He says he won't be a back seat driver.

:20:06.:20:09.

But he's given this warning, if he sees things that he really

:20:10.:20:15.

doesn't like, then he will speak out.

:20:16.:20:17.

It seems that Friday won't be the last we see of Barack Obama.

:20:18.:20:20.

But in the meantime, there is a new home to get ready.

:20:21.:20:23.

Moving house is said to be one of life's most

:20:24.:20:25.

But when you have been President for eight years making

:20:26.:20:33.

and death decisions, where to hang your favourite picture

:20:34.:20:36.

is probably unlikely to keep you awake at night.

:20:37.:20:38.

Scientists at the American space agency NASA say 2016 was the hottest

:20:39.:20:44.

year since records began over a century ago.

:20:45.:20:47.

Average global temperatures edged ahead of 2015

:20:48.:20:49.

and are now 1.1 degrees higher than pre-industrial levels.

:20:50.:20:54.

It's the third consecutive year that the record has been

:20:55.:20:57.

Scientists believe that the El Nino weather phenomenon played a role

:20:58.:21:04.

but increasing levels of greenhouse gases were the main factor

:21:05.:21:08.

in driving up temperatures, as our science correspondent

:21:09.:21:11.

Our planet is warming, fast, and the latest data suggests that

:21:12.:21:17.

This winter, parts of the Arctic have had a heatwave,

:21:18.:21:23.

temperatures were above freezing, when they should

:21:24.:21:25.

While Australia's Great Barrier Reef was transformed to this.

:21:26.:21:34.

Vast swathes of coral were killed off, as the waters warmed.

:21:35.:21:37.

2015 was the warmest year on record up until now,

:21:38.:21:44.

It's beaten it by about 0.1, 0.12 degrees Celsius.

:21:45.:21:48.

Which doesn't seem like a lot, but in terms of the yearly

:21:49.:21:51.

Part of this rise was caused by an El Nino event,

:21:52.:21:56.

a warm ocean current that disrupts the world's weather.

:21:57.:21:59.

But scientists say greenhouse gases were the main driver.

:22:00.:22:02.

This shows how global temperatures have increased

:22:03.:22:05.

The bigger the circle, the hotter the year.

:22:06.:22:12.

And the latest data, collected by Nasa and meteorological

:22:13.:22:15.

agencies around the world, suggest 2016 is the third year

:22:16.:22:18.

The global temperature is edging ever closer

:22:19.:22:24.

Scientists say a rise of two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels

:22:25.:22:30.

could lead to dangerous impacts around the world.

:22:31.:22:33.

So a lower limit of 1.5 Celsius was set by the Paris Climate Agreement,

:22:34.:22:39.

a global deal that came into force last year.

:22:40.:22:42.

But with carbon dioxide at record levels, scientists say this

:22:43.:22:46.

is a temperature threshold we are on course to surpass.

:22:47.:22:50.

To tackle global warming, the world is being urged

:22:51.:22:53.

to move away from fossil fuels, like coal.

:22:54.:23:00.

But in the US, Donald Trump has said he wants to revive the industry,

:23:01.:23:03.

and has threatened to pull America out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

:23:04.:23:07.

The woman who brokered the deal is concerned.

:23:08.:23:11.

If the US chooses to exit the road and the path that is being pursued

:23:12.:23:17.

by every other country in the world, it is only going to damage

:23:18.:23:20.

itself, because it will become less competitive.

:23:21.:23:24.

We are moving toward a de-carbonised society.

:23:25.:23:27.

All eyes will now be on this year's data.

:23:28.:23:30.

Already, scientists forecast that 2017 won't be as warm,

:23:31.:23:33.

But they say longer term, unless action is taken,

:23:34.:23:39.

A disabled man has won his case at the Supreme Court after a dispute

:23:40.:23:50.

It means bus drivers will have to do more

:23:51.:23:57.

Doug Paulley brought his case after he was refused entry

:23:58.:24:04.

to a First Group bus in 2012 when a mother with a pushchair

:24:05.:24:07.

Our disability affairs correspondent Nikki Fox has the story.

:24:08.:24:10.

It has taken almost five years of legal battles

:24:11.:24:12.

But finally, Doug Paulley had his day in the highest

:24:13.:24:29.

All seven judges agreed the bus company's policy of requesting,

:24:30.:24:32.

and not requiring, a person to vacate the wheelchair

:24:33.:24:35.

But it is not quite as clear-cut, because the judgment does go as far

:24:36.:24:40.

as insisting someone move from the space.

:24:41.:24:42.

I am aware some people won't be pleased.

:24:43.:24:49.

It has not gone as far as some people would like or it has gone too

:24:50.:24:52.

In the end, this is about disabled people's right to access,

:24:53.:24:57.

to travel on the bus, and, hopefully, today has

:24:58.:25:01.

been at least a step in the right direction.

:25:02.:25:04.

It began in 2012 when Doug was unable to catch a bus

:25:05.:25:08.

because the space for wheelchairs was occupied by a mum

:25:09.:25:10.

She refused to move which meant Doug could not get on.

:25:11.:25:18.

The bus operter First Group admit that following the verdict,

:25:19.:25:20.

they may have to amend training they provide staff, but are pleased

:25:21.:25:23.

drivers will not have to force people off the bus.

:25:24.:25:27.

We really welcome the fact the court confirmed that a driver is not

:25:28.:25:30.

required to remove a passenger from a bus if they refuse

:25:31.:25:32.

to move from the space, which is important for drivers

:25:33.:25:35.

The impact of the judgment will have much wider implications that span

:25:36.:25:43.

Any service provider or company that has a dedicated space

:25:44.:25:49.

for disabled people, which could be a supermarket

:25:50.:25:52.

disabled bay, or an accessible toilet in a restaurant,

:25:53.:25:54.

they will have to make sure wheelchair users get priority.

:25:55.:25:57.

I will not go on the bus and take the woman with the pram...

:25:58.:26:06.

I am disabled, but I am still a man and this just feels not right.

:26:07.:26:12.

It is not quite as simple as wheelchairs versus pushchairs.

:26:13.:26:18.

It is better to remain a grey area for people

:26:19.:26:20.

However nuanced, today's Supreme Court ruling paves the way

:26:21.:26:25.

for a closer look at legislation when it comes to prioritising access

:26:26.:26:28.

Aaron Banks, the millionaire who financed the campaign

:26:29.:26:37.

to leave the European Union, is now turning his

:26:38.:26:39.

Tomorrow, he'll be launching a news website called Westmonster.com,

:26:40.:26:46.

owned jointly by a former press officer to Nigel Farage.

:26:47.:26:49.

They say they will by-pass the traditional media and speak

:26:50.:26:52.

directly to voters concerned with issues such as immigration.

:26:53.:26:54.

Our media editor Amol Rajan has this exclusive report.

:26:55.:26:58.

A screaming failure, screaming weakness!

:26:59.:27:07.

Alternative news is watched by millions of Americans.

:27:08.:27:14.

Fuelled by social media, some of these websites have a bigger

:27:15.:27:16.

Donald Trump openly courted this new media to energise his voter base

:27:17.:27:26.

I am not going to give you a question.

:27:27.:27:29.

Arron Banks, the man who bankrolled the Leave campaign was one

:27:30.:27:36.

of the first Brits to meet Mr Trump after his win.

:27:37.:27:40.

That's the total amount of money we have sent

:27:41.:27:44.

Mr Banks put nearly ?7 million into last year's referendum.

:27:45.:27:48.

Thought to be the biggest political donation in modern British history.

:27:49.:27:52.

Now Britain's newest media baron is launching

:27:53.:27:54.

I think the internet and social media has changed the world

:27:55.:28:00.

and that the mainstream media, however you want to describe that,

:28:01.:28:05.

is lagging a long way behind the way you communicate and I think

:28:06.:28:08.

Called Westmonster, the site is co-owned

:28:09.:28:14.

Nigel Farage's former spin doctor wants to bring the viral energy that

:28:15.:28:24.

What you have seen obviously is a multitude of different

:28:25.:28:28.

right-wing sites be set up, they've had tremendous success.

:28:29.:28:30.

It shows there is clearly a demand and we want to be

:28:31.:28:33.

We want to be there speaking to people in a language

:28:34.:28:38.

they understand and in a way they understand about

:28:39.:28:40.

Three years ago, nearly 60% of us got our news

:28:41.:28:43.

And meanwhile, social media has risen from less

:28:44.:28:48.

than a quarter and is poised to overtake newspapers.

:28:49.:28:54.

Before the digital era most of us got our news from a few generally

:28:55.:28:57.

But these days we get our information from wildly different

:28:58.:29:02.

Nowadays you can find your own facts to suit your own opinions

:29:03.:29:08.

and for some that's a threat to all of us.

:29:09.:29:10.

She believes some new forms of media could undermine democracy.

:29:11.:29:21.

I think citizens need good information to make

:29:22.:29:23.

and to help them understand the kind of world they're in and perhaps

:29:24.:29:29.

to help them build the kind of world they want to live

:29:30.:29:32.

in and without good information, without facts and without public

:29:33.:29:34.

interest journalism that's just much harder to find.

:29:35.:29:36.

An alternative news eco-system is heading to Britain.

:29:37.:29:38.

But in the digital age the truth is vulnerable.

:29:39.:29:43.

The news once aimed to unite us, perhaps thanks to technology,

:29:44.:29:47.

Rachael Heyhoe-Flint, a pioneer in the world of women's cricket,

:29:48.:29:58.

The former England captain was the first woman elected

:29:59.:30:04.

to the MCC's full committee and became the first female sports

:30:05.:30:07.

As our correspondent Katherine Downes reports,

:30:08.:30:12.

her life and career were marked by a series of notable achievements.

:30:13.:30:18.

Women's cricket as it was when Rachael Heyhoe-Flint

:30:19.:30:20.

was captain of England just setting out on her campaign for change.

:30:21.:30:22.

Even before her playing days were over, she was a pioneer,

:30:23.:30:26.

organising the first women's World Cup in 1973 and then in 1976

:30:27.:30:29.

leading England out to face Australia in the first ever women's

:30:30.:30:33.

I think there was a sort of reticence and nervousness that

:30:34.:30:44.

perhaps the women might take over altogether and there might be rape

:30:45.:30:47.

and pillage of the members in the luncheon intervals

:30:48.:30:49.

We might not present an acceptable face of cricket.

:30:50.:30:53.

I actually cried as I walked out on to the pitch and it was the most

:30:54.:30:57.

After 12 years as England captain, Rachael Heyhoe-Flint went

:30:58.:31:05.

on to become one of the MCC's first female honorary life members,

:31:06.:31:08.

a member of the ECB board, and she was made a Baroness.

:31:09.:31:12.

She used her influence and celebrity to give women's cricket

:31:13.:31:14.

I have got messages coming in from members of the current

:31:15.:31:20.

England women's team, the opportunities they have now

:31:21.:31:23.

as professional sportswomen don't come by chance.

:31:24.:31:26.

They come through years of devoted, tireless work

:31:27.:31:30.

In later life, she became vice-President of Wolverhampton

:31:31.:31:38.

Wanderers, pouring her energy into the football club's

:31:39.:31:40.

work in the communities around her home town.

:31:41.:31:42.

But cricket remained her first love and the field in which she shone

:31:43.:31:46.

Rachael Heyhoe-Flint, who has died at the age of 77.

:31:47.:31:59.

Here on BBC One it's time for the news where you are.

:32:00.:32:05.

Tonight the verdict on the Prime Minister's exit Strang. Join me now

:32:06.:32:12.

on BBC Two. Here on BBC One it's time

:32:13.:32:14.

for the news where you are.

:32:15.:32:17.

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