19/01/2017 BBC News at Ten


19/01/2017

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Tonight at Ten - on the eve of his inauguration,

:00:00.:00:00.

Donald Trump promises immediate action to start fulfilling

:00:00.:00:08.

He flew into the nation's capital less than 24 hours before

:00:09.:00:13.

being sworn in as 45th President of the United States.

:00:14.:00:19.

One of his first official duties - to remember America's fallen,

:00:20.:00:22.

as his deputy promised early action on promises made.

:00:23.:00:27.

We've focused at the President-elect's direction

:00:28.:00:30.

on a day one, a day 100, and a day 200 action plan,

:00:31.:00:34.

for keeping our word to the American people and putting

:00:35.:00:37.

the President-elect's promises into practice.

:00:38.:00:41.

We'll be looking ahead to tomorrow's events in Washington DC,

:00:42.:00:44.

and we'll be asking some Trump voters for their expectations

:00:45.:00:47.

At the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, Theresa May tells

:00:48.:00:54.

business leaders that Britain wants to forge a new role

:00:55.:00:57.

From IRA commander to key figure in Northern Ireland's government -

:00:58.:01:05.

Martin McGuinness retires from front line politics.

:01:06.:01:09.

Dozens are missing, feared dead, after an avalanche engulfed a hotel

:01:10.:01:13.

And a French win in record time in the Vendee Globe Race -

:01:14.:01:21.

one of the world's toughest sporting challenges.

:01:22.:01:26.

And coming up in Sportsday on BBC News: Another series defeat

:01:27.:01:29.

for England's cricketers in India, as they lose by 15 runs

:01:30.:01:32.

Donald Trump is in Washington DC tonight, on the eve

:01:33.:02:00.

of his inauguration as 45th President of the United States.

:02:01.:02:04.

The ceremony, on Capitol Hill, is expected to draw hundreds

:02:05.:02:07.

of thousands of spectators to the nation's capital, as Mr Trump

:02:08.:02:10.

takes the oath of office, before taking up residence

:02:11.:02:12.

His vice-president, Mike Pence, said today that the transition team

:02:13.:02:16.

had been working flat out to ensure they'd be ready to implement

:02:17.:02:19.

Our North America editor Jon Sopel is in Washington tonight.

:02:20.:02:32.

Thank you, and Washington this evening is a city in a city

:02:33.:02:39.

undergoing profound change. Tonight, the Obama is well spent their last

:02:40.:02:42.

night in the White House and just across the street from here it's

:02:43.:02:45.

Blair House, the government guest house, where the Trumps will be

:02:46.:02:51.

staying and midday tomorrow, it's all change.

:02:52.:02:56.

No longer a plane with Trump emblazoned on the side.

:02:57.:03:01.

President-elect arrived in Washington aboard a US military jet,

:03:02.:03:07.

and this is the brand he'll now be promoting, defending and the United

:03:08.:03:12.

States of America. And though not yet Commander-in-Chief, it was the

:03:13.:03:15.

first opportunity to practice his salute, as the base commander

:03:16.:03:18.

greeted him and the future First Lady. Across the city the future

:03:19.:03:24.

vibes president was thanking the current administration for their

:03:25.:03:28.

help in the transition and reflecting on the magnitude of

:03:29.:03:31.

what's about to unfold. A momentous day before a historic day and I'm

:03:32.:03:37.

pleased to have a chance to report to the American people and all of

:03:38.:03:43.

you the progress that we have made at the President-elect's direction.

:03:44.:03:47.

Washington is a city in transition. It's out with the old and in with

:03:48.:03:52.

the new were the Obama is' possessions are loaded up and taken

:03:53.:03:56.

away. Michelle Obama tweeting one last photo from the balcony of her

:03:57.:04:01.

home these past eight years. And a video, one last walk through the

:04:02.:04:08.

house with their dogs. The new tenants pick up the keys tomorrow.

:04:09.:04:13.

Today, they were being sated at a lunch at where else, the Trump

:04:14.:04:17.

International hotel. With Republican congressional leaders. I want to

:04:18.:04:24.

thank everybody, you have given such great support in this room. But

:04:25.:04:28.

amidst the gladhanding that is part and parcel of any inauguration,

:04:29.:04:34.

there's solemnity to. The nation's future leaders going to Arlington

:04:35.:04:38.

Cemetery and the tomb of the unknown soldier to pay their respects to

:04:39.:04:41.

those who have made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.

:04:42.:04:52.

Hundreds of thousands are converging on Washington for the inauguration.

:04:53.:04:58.

Tonight, eight make America greater gain concert at one of the nation's

:04:59.:05:03.

most famous monuments, the Lincoln Memorial. Anticipation and

:05:04.:05:07.

expectation are high. Since the day he came down the escalator in Trump

:05:08.:05:12.

Tower, I was on board. I got to sing the national anthem for Mr Trump

:05:13.:05:16.

five different times at his rallies, so I received an invitation in the

:05:17.:05:19.

mail. He has the chance to be the next Ronald Reagan. But not everyone

:05:20.:05:25.

coming to Washington is here to Lord Donald Trump. There will be

:05:26.:05:28.

protesters as well. The inauguration marks the peaceful transfer of power

:05:29.:05:32.

but it doesn't signify a unified nation. We'll be talking to John in

:05:33.:05:38.

a short while again. In his inaugural address tomorrow,

:05:39.:05:41.

Donald Trump is expected to set out his personal vision

:05:42.:05:44.

for America's future in line with his familiar campaign pledge

:05:45.:05:46.

to "make America great again". It was a pledge which made

:05:47.:05:48.

a significant impact in what's called the rust belt -

:05:49.:05:51.

those states in the old Our North America correspondent

:05:52.:05:53.

Nick Bryant considers the view from Pennsylvania,

:05:54.:05:56.

on what voters are now expecting. It's the places of American

:05:57.:06:03.

decline that make sense of Donald Trump's rise,

:06:04.:06:05.

and it wasn't just working class rage that helped him reach

:06:06.:06:08.

the White House, but despondency. We can be just as competitive

:06:09.:06:13.

as other countries... Rick Rowlands supported him

:06:14.:06:16.

precisely because he was a billionaire businessman,

:06:17.:06:18.

and he's been impressed with how the President-elect has fought

:06:19.:06:21.

during the transition to keep car We were a manufacturing

:06:22.:06:24.

powerhouse at one point. When you say we're going to make

:06:25.:06:31.

America great, well, maybe that means we're

:06:32.:06:33.

going to restore that sense of optimism in people, that, yes,

:06:34.:06:36.

tomorrow will be better than today. Well, it remains to be seen,

:06:37.:06:40.

but at least he's talking about it. The neat take on Donald Trump

:06:41.:06:45.

is that critics took him literally but not seriously,

:06:46.:06:48.

and supporters took him They didn't necessarily

:06:49.:06:52.

believe everything he said, but he was talking and listening

:06:53.:06:58.

to them. Which is why in working-class

:06:59.:07:02.

communities expectations are so high that he will create manufacturing

:07:03.:07:06.

jobs and reverse industrial decline. Just flip it on and plant's

:07:07.:07:13.

up and running again. Ron Baraff looks after this derelict

:07:14.:07:22.

old steel plant and jokes about the magic switch that

:07:23.:07:25.

President Trump will flick They're thinking with their

:07:26.:07:28.

hearts, not their heads. It will lead to a lot

:07:29.:07:34.

of disappointment and people being discontent, because it can't

:07:35.:07:39.

happen the way they As much as we would love it,

:07:40.:07:42.

industry just isn't what it was. And look what's happening just up

:07:43.:07:47.

the road in Pittsburgh. Uber is testing out

:07:48.:07:52.

its driverless cars. And research labs are developing

:07:53.:07:55.

robots and drones that will deliver So the irony is during this

:07:56.:07:59.

political season that although Trump has made the claim that it's foreign

:08:00.:08:06.

trade and outsourcing which is killing jobs, really,

:08:07.:08:10.

by a factor of four to one, In this age of disruptive

:08:11.:08:14.

technology, Donald Trump was In these rust belt communities,

:08:15.:08:21.

he'll find it hard to reverse it. As President Trump prepares to take

:08:22.:08:29.

office, there'll be an even sharper focus on his relationship

:08:30.:08:37.

with Russia and with The outgoing president,

:08:38.:08:40.

Barack Obama, has underlined that having a constructive relationship

:08:41.:08:44.

with Russia is in the interests Our Moscow correspondent

:08:45.:08:47.

Steve Rosenberg considers the view from Russia,

:08:48.:08:52.

on the Trump-Putin relationship. If Donald Trump redecorates

:08:53.:08:59.

the White House, here's something Artist Nikas Safronov says America's

:09:00.:09:02.

new leader reminds him of Napoleon and a pirate,

:09:03.:09:11.

and although Nikas did have all bases covered, he says he always

:09:12.:09:15.

believed it was Trump who'd create a fresh canvas for

:09:16.:09:19.

US-Russian relations. "The American people made

:09:20.:09:24.

the right choice," he says. But did Moscow do

:09:25.:09:28.

more than just hope? This month, a US intelligence report

:09:29.:09:34.

claimed the Kremlin tried to influence the election for Trump

:09:35.:09:38.

through cyber attacks, Internet The report highlights the role

:09:39.:09:41.

of RT, calling the channel the Kremlin's principal

:09:42.:09:49.

international propaganda outlet. How awful it is to see that

:09:50.:09:52.

such a huge and powerful country relies on such bad,

:09:53.:09:59.

bad, sloppy and just Is RT putting out

:10:00.:10:05.

Kremlin propaganda? It's the same as what they say about

:10:06.:10:11.

the BBC and CNN here in Russia. There are separate allegations -

:10:12.:10:16.

that the Kremlin has been cultivating Donald Trump

:10:17.:10:19.

for at least five years, and that Moscow has

:10:20.:10:23.

managed to compromise him. These claims are unsubstantiated,

:10:24.:10:25.

but potentially explosive. Fake news, say his supporters,

:10:26.:10:30.

and Moscow says the same. But the fact that some people

:10:31.:10:37.

are even suggesting that Russia influenced an American election,

:10:38.:10:40.

that means that Russia will loom And from the Kremlin today,

:10:41.:10:45.

this call for cooperation. We desperately need a good

:10:46.:10:53.

relationship with Washington, And what will be the approach

:10:54.:10:55.

by President Trump, Meanwhile, outside Moscow,

:10:56.:11:01.

at a restaurant called The Trump, they're celebrating the inauguration

:11:02.:11:07.

with a new creation - Like the man himself,

:11:08.:11:10.

it's larger-than-life, and for some, It's a symbol of the high hopes -

:11:11.:11:16.

the very high hopes - Russia has for Trump,

:11:17.:11:22.

and its appetite for Our North America editor

:11:23.:11:24.

Jon Sopel is in Washington. In that first address to America and

:11:25.:11:42.

the world after the ceremony tomorrow, what kind of tone do you

:11:43.:11:46.

think Mr Trump will strike? I don't think it's going to be a long list

:11:47.:11:50.

of detailed policies. I don't think we're going to hear about building a

:11:51.:11:54.

war with Mexico and repealing Obamacare and rewriting trade deals.

:11:55.:11:59.

Instead, we are being told it's going to be more philosophical,

:12:00.:12:03.

sincere, personal, about what it is to be an American, the duty of being

:12:04.:12:07.

a citizen, what government can do for the people. So I think Donald

:12:08.:12:12.

Trump will be trying to paint with a very broad brush, but also very

:12:13.:12:16.

conscious alike he said when he got elected, that he was here to unify

:12:17.:12:20.

the American people, because what we are also going to see over this

:12:21.:12:23.

weekend the inauguration and not just the parties and the balls, but

:12:24.:12:29.

also the protests as well. Because many, many Americans are still not

:12:30.:12:34.

reconciled to the idea of a Trump presidency. Let's talk about

:12:35.:12:39.

expectations as we look ahead to the next four years. The report there

:12:40.:12:43.

from Pennsylvania, lots of people with very, very high expectations of

:12:44.:12:47.

this presidency. What is your sense of that and the risks involved there

:12:48.:12:51.

for Mr Trump? Talking to the people who are converging on Washington

:12:52.:12:55.

today to support Donald Trump, they genuinely do believe he's going to

:12:56.:12:59.

make America greater gain. Just like eight years ago, when Barack Obama

:13:00.:13:04.

had that word hope around his neck, well, Donald Trump has got make

:13:05.:13:08.

America greater gain. He's going to have to deliver on jobs, on trade

:13:09.:13:12.

deals, and I think we are going to see him wanting to act very quickly

:13:13.:13:15.

on all of those things. But with some of the jobs, they haven't just

:13:16.:13:19.

gone to cheap labour from Mexico or the Philippines. They've gone to

:13:20.:13:23.

non-passport carrying robots. That's an issue. But he can set up an

:13:24.:13:28.

infrastructure bill, which could funnel billions of dollars into the

:13:29.:13:33.

US economy, desperately needed, and that will create jobs. So I think he

:13:34.:13:40.

will turn the taps on on spending, so he can deliver on that promise to

:13:41.:13:43.

create those jobs. We'll talk again tomorrow, but thanks very much, Jon

:13:44.:13:45.

Sopel at the White House. The Prime Minister says she's held

:13:46.:13:49.

positive discussions with leading banks after a number of them warned

:13:50.:13:51.

they might relocate jobs Theresa May was speaking

:13:52.:13:54.

at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland, where she also told

:13:55.:13:58.

business leaders that global companies needed to change

:13:59.:14:00.

to regain public trust, as our economics editor

:14:01.:14:04.

Kamal Ahmed reports. Wrapped up warmly, whisked

:14:05.:14:10.

from private meetings with bankers to private meetings

:14:11.:14:13.

with billionaire It's frankly hard to come to Davos

:14:14.:14:15.

and not look like a member But although the Prime Minister

:14:16.:14:20.

was here to insist that Britain was open for business,

:14:21.:14:25.

she was also here with a warning. Talk of greater globalisation can

:14:26.:14:29.

make people fearful. For many, it means their jobs being

:14:30.:14:35.

outsourced, and wages undercut. It means having to sit back

:14:36.:14:39.

as they watch their communities And in their minds, it means

:14:40.:14:42.

watching as those who prosper seem Theresa May came to the World

:14:43.:14:48.

Economic Forum in Davos not so much Yes, she backs globalisation,

:14:49.:14:58.

she backs free trade, she backs But she had another message for this

:14:59.:15:04.

rather privileged audience - do more to make globalisation

:15:05.:15:09.

work for everyone. And if you don't, she will be quite

:15:10.:15:13.

willing to intervene to ensure It was sunny here today, yes -

:15:14.:15:16.

but the Prime Minister's visit to Davos was overshadowed,

:15:17.:15:23.

as a number of international banks, including Goldman Sachs and JP

:15:24.:15:26.

Morgan, said they were reducing investment or planning to cut jobs

:15:27.:15:29.

as Britain planned for Brexit. But many reflect that

:15:30.:15:35.

the City is a big place, For Barclays, London

:15:36.:15:37.

is still the leader. I think the UK will continue to be

:15:38.:15:43.

the financial lungs for Europe. We may have to move

:15:44.:15:46.

certain activities. We may have to change the legal

:15:47.:15:50.

structure that we use But I think it's going

:15:51.:15:53.

to be at the margin, I caught up with the

:15:54.:15:59.

Prime Minister later. What have the banks

:16:00.:16:03.

said to you about why I've had a very good,

:16:04.:16:06.

positive discussion with banks about the benefits of the City

:16:07.:16:09.

of London, about what it is that has brought them to the City of London,

:16:10.:16:13.

and how we can continue to build And there are huge benefits

:16:14.:16:16.

for investment in the UK. We have a fundamentally

:16:17.:16:24.

very strong economy. We have a service sector

:16:25.:16:26.

that is very important to us, I believe that truly global Britain

:16:27.:16:29.

can bring jobs and prosperity to the UK across-the-board,

:16:30.:16:34.

including in financial services. It is time, she says,

:16:35.:16:37.

to look at the wider horizon. But will the world's business

:16:38.:16:40.

leaders enjoy the view? This man employs over 112,000 people

:16:41.:16:42.

from India to Britain. Frankly, the UK will have to spend

:16:43.:16:48.

a lot more time explaining what their positions in this

:16:49.:16:53.

global world means. The reality is, it is no longer

:16:54.:16:55.

a block of nations that Theresa May has admitted the journey

:16:56.:16:58.

ahead will be uncertain, but she claims a bright future,

:16:59.:17:12.

and says free-trade deals are being But, just as with the EU,

:17:13.:17:16.

discussions are just that - the hard negotiations

:17:17.:17:24.

are yet to come. Martin McGuinness, the former IRA

:17:25.:17:26.

commander who became a pivotal figure in the political

:17:27.:17:33.

establishment in Northern Ireland, is to retire

:17:34.:17:36.

from front line politics. He said he would not

:17:37.:17:40.

be capable of fighting the forthcoming election campaign

:17:41.:17:42.

because of serious health problems. Mr McGuinness's political opponents

:17:43.:17:45.

have paid tribute today, to his commitment to providing

:17:46.:17:48.

stable government for Northern Ireland even

:17:49.:17:51.

when it meant sharing power Our chief correspondent

:17:52.:17:53.

Gavin Hewitt has the story. Martin McGuinness is one of the most

:17:54.:17:57.

controversial leaders A central figure in both Northern

:17:58.:18:00.

Ireland's pain and its peace. Now he is standing

:18:01.:18:05.

down due to illness. I will have to be very

:18:06.:18:10.

honest with myself. The question I ask myself

:18:11.:18:16.

is, are you capable? Are you physically

:18:17.:18:18.

capable of fighting this election with the intensity

:18:19.:18:20.

that elections need to be fought? And the honest answer is that I am

:18:21.:18:23.

not physically capable. His background lay

:18:24.:18:29.

in the civil rights riots in Londonderry,

:18:30.:18:33.

but Martin McGuinness By the age of 21 he was second

:18:34.:18:34.

in command of the IRA in Derry, Can you say whether the bombing

:18:35.:18:43.

is likely to stop in the near future Well, we will always take

:18:44.:18:48.

on the considerations and the feelings of the people of

:18:49.:18:51.

Derry. These feelings will be passed

:18:52.:18:55.

onto our HQ in Dublin, you know? He served two prison

:18:56.:18:58.

sentences in the He was also convicted

:18:59.:19:00.

of IRA membership. He denied that he

:19:01.:19:02.

was the IRA chief of staff but said he regarded

:19:03.:19:07.

it as a condiment. staff but said he regarded

:19:08.:19:12.

it as a compliment. We don't believe that winning

:19:13.:19:15.

elections and winning any amount of votes will bring

:19:16.:19:17.

freedom in Ireland. At the end of the day it will be

:19:18.:19:19.

the cutting edge of the IRA Today he was asked

:19:20.:19:23.

whether he had any regrets Well, I think people have

:19:24.:19:26.

to consider the circumstances that existed in this city when I did

:19:27.:19:29.

join the IRA. We had a city where people

:19:30.:19:32.

were being murdered by the RUC, where they were being murdered

:19:33.:19:35.

wholesale, as it were, on bloody Sunday by the Parachute Regiment,

:19:36.:19:40.

and the fact that many young people like myself, supported by many

:19:41.:19:43.

thousands of people in the city, I'm not saying they were the majority,

:19:44.:19:47.

decided to fight back. But he was one of the IRA

:19:48.:19:50.

leaders who recognised that continued violence would not

:19:51.:19:59.

bring further political gains. It laid the foundation

:20:00.:20:02.

for peace talks. Sinn Fein nominated him as its chief

:20:03.:20:07.

negotiator, leading to the Good Friday Agreement and

:20:08.:20:10.

eventually power-sharing. Bitter foes sat alongside each

:20:11.:20:14.

other in a new assembly. I've been over 25 years working

:20:15.:20:18.

on building the peace. I believe that you know the names

:20:19.:20:23.

of the killers of my father. And I want you to

:20:24.:20:37.

tell me who they are. But the man who had fought

:20:38.:20:40.

the British state eventually won There you go.

:20:41.:20:44.

Are you well. Thank you very much.

:20:45.:20:51.

I'm still alive. Martin McGuinness's departure

:20:52.:20:53.

from politics comes at a sensitive It's power-sharing

:20:54.:20:56.

assembly has collapsed and Brexit poses difficult

:20:57.:20:58.

questions about the future Many people struggle to forgive

:20:59.:21:00.

a leader so steeped in the violence of the past but he earned

:21:01.:21:14.

grudging respect for his The gunman who turned politician had

:21:15.:21:16.

the authority to make compromises. Joining me from Belfast

:21:17.:21:20.

is our Northern lreland political Let's talk about Mr McGuinness's

:21:21.:21:36.

legacy, how do you see it? Relatives of IRA victims may say good riddance

:21:37.:21:39.

to Martin McGuinness because as Gavin made clear he was an IRA

:21:40.:21:43.

leader at the time the organisation carried out attack after attack and

:21:44.:21:47.

even stooping to tactics like sending hostages to their sudden

:21:48.:21:50.

deaths in car bombs detonated before they could get out of them. At the

:21:51.:21:55.

same time he was a key influence in removing the IRA from war to peace

:21:56.:21:59.

and it was the fact people knew he had been there at the sharp end I

:22:00.:22:02.

gave him the authority to convince other Irish republicans to come with

:22:03.:22:06.

him and to denounce those who still clung to the gun as traitors to the

:22:07.:22:11.

Ireland of Ireland. The next generation that comes will not have

:22:12.:22:15.

the same authority. They won't have the international recognition of

:22:16.:22:19.

Martin McGuinness. They face challenges struggling with the

:22:20.:22:21.

collapse of the power-sharing executive in Northern Ireland. But

:22:22.:22:25.

hopefully they will not face the same kind of conflict of which

:22:26.:22:28.

Martin McGuinness was both part of the problem and part of the

:22:29.:22:33.

solution. Mark Davenport, thank you for your thoughts on the Martin

:22:34.:22:35.

McGuinness decision today. The political crisis

:22:36.:22:36.

in Gambia has intensified, with troops from neighbouring

:22:37.:22:38.

Senegal entering the country in support

:22:39.:22:40.

of its newly-elected president. Adama Barrow has been unable to take

:22:41.:22:44.

office because the country's longstanding leader,

:22:45.:22:47.

Yahya Jammeh, is refusing to step The Foreign Office is

:22:48.:22:49.

advising against all Six Britons have been killed

:22:50.:22:53.

in a minibus crash in Saudi Arabia. The group had been

:22:54.:23:01.

on a pilgrimage to Mecca. The victims included four members

:23:02.:23:03.

of one family - including a baby. Dozens of people are feared dead

:23:04.:23:06.

after an avalanche destroyed a hotel At least three people

:23:07.:23:18.

are known to have died. Rescue teams are searching for up

:23:19.:23:23.

to 35 people still trapped. The avalanche happened yesterday,

:23:24.:23:26.

after a series of powerful earthquakes struck the area

:23:27.:23:28.

of Abruzzo, around Our correspondent James

:23:29.:23:30.

Reynolds sent this report. At night the quickest

:23:31.:23:39.

way through the wall These rescuers are among the most

:23:40.:23:41.

experienced in Europe. Step-by-step they shovelled their

:23:42.:23:50.

way up towards the Rigopiano Hotel. They went further in and came

:23:51.:24:00.

to where the avalanche hit. A six-foot-high wall

:24:01.:24:25.

of snow and rock Several miles away a father

:24:26.:24:27.

waited for news of his Straight after yesterday's

:24:28.:24:33.

earthquakes they text each other. "Calm?"

:24:34.:24:38.

"That's hard," she replied. "I think that the worst has already

:24:39.:24:46.

happened," he reassured her. His daughter and many other

:24:47.:24:48.

people may be trapped These pictures filmed after daybreak

:24:49.:24:56.

show the Rigopiano hotel swept away Do you think it's possible

:24:57.:25:03.

to find more people alive? For sure, yes.

:25:04.:25:12.

For sure, yes. In the past we've found

:25:13.:25:16.

people after three days, or something like this,

:25:17.:25:18.

and especially in this case there could be some

:25:19.:25:20.

room under the snow. Tonight conditions

:25:21.:25:29.

here have improved. We haven't felt any

:25:30.:25:33.

more earthquakes or tremors, and rescue workers will

:25:34.:25:37.

want the snow to hold off to allow Italy's Prime Minister has

:25:38.:25:40.

said that the entire James Reynolds, BBC

:25:41.:25:47.

News, Penne, central Italy. The latest crime figures for England

:25:48.:25:54.

and Wales reveal there were more than five million offences of fraud

:25:55.:25:57.

and computer crime in It's the first time figures

:25:58.:25:59.

for those crimes have been included, and it's seen the total number

:26:00.:26:06.

of offences jump People are now twice as likely to be

:26:07.:26:08.

a victim of credit card or online fraud as they are a victim

:26:09.:26:15.

of vehicle theft. Surrey County Council, which is run

:26:16.:26:19.

by a Conservative administration, is to hold a referendum

:26:20.:26:21.

on whether to increase council tax by 15% to sustain

:26:22.:26:24.

its social care service. The council says there's a "huge

:26:25.:26:29.

gap" in its budget and blames cuts imposed by Conservative

:26:30.:26:32.

ministers at Westminster. The area includes the constituencies

:26:33.:26:36.

of Chancellor Philip Hammond and Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt,

:26:37.:26:39.

as our deputy political editor You don't get a choice about getting

:26:40.:26:41.

old, but how to pay the huge bills Councils pay most and one's had

:26:42.:26:47.

enough of government cuts, Surrey's asking council

:26:48.:26:54.

taxpayers yes or no I think it's important that

:26:55.:27:00.

politicians stand up and tell the truth and be honest

:27:01.:27:09.

with the residents, and tell them It's not easy finding people

:27:10.:27:12.

here who are keen to pay what will be nearly ?200 a year

:27:13.:27:22.

more on an average home, though no Hi there.

:27:23.:27:26.

Good afternoon. So I believe, I heard it

:27:27.:27:28.

on the One O'Clock News today. How about some more of that money

:27:29.:27:36.

for council for social care? Certainly not.

:27:37.:27:38.

That's totally obscene. There's lots of money in Surrey

:27:39.:27:40.

but that doesn't mean that, you know, we're going to accept

:27:41.:27:43.

a 15% rate increase. I can't afford to pay

:27:44.:27:45.

because my pension is frozen. More council tax to

:27:46.:27:53.

pay for social care. Do you fancy that?

:27:54.:27:58.

Yes or no? I think we live in a

:27:59.:28:01.

very affluent area, I think we can all afford it and there

:28:02.:28:06.

are lots of people around who need The sign of a civilised

:28:07.:28:10.

society is one that looks after and cares for its older

:28:11.:28:16.

people responsibly. And I think it's a problem

:28:17.:28:18.

that's going to escalate It's not going to go away

:28:19.:28:20.

and we have to address it. The Labour leader also agrees

:28:21.:28:24.

all taxpayers should bear the rising It's not right that we should

:28:25.:28:27.

thrust the social care crisis on local authorities,

:28:28.:28:37.

all of whom have different levels of and the central government should

:28:38.:28:39.

face up to its responsibility. Local voters have been

:28:40.:28:46.

asked to vote on a council tax rise just once

:28:47.:28:48.

in England in the last five years. The local MPs here include

:28:49.:28:51.

the Health Secretary and the this local referendum very, very

:28:52.:28:55.

carefully. If Surrey votes no to this council

:28:56.:28:59.

tax rise it could mean But it could also force

:29:00.:29:01.

ministers to confront a tough and perhaps unpopular set of

:29:02.:29:10.

decisions on the future funding of social care that many say government

:29:11.:29:12.

after government have avoided for John Pienaar, BBC News,

:29:13.:29:15.

Esher, in Surrey. One of the world's toughest

:29:16.:29:19.

sporting challenges, the Vendee Globe round-the-world

:29:20.:29:22.

yacht race, has yet again This time it's Armel Le Cleac'h,

:29:23.:29:24.

who crossed the finishing line off the west coast of France in a record

:29:25.:29:30.

time of 74 days. The Welsh sailor Alex Thomson,

:29:31.:29:33.

who recovered from a poor start, Our sports correspondent

:29:34.:29:36.

Natalie Pirks reports After ten unpredictable

:29:37.:29:39.

weeks in the world's most dangerous seas,

:29:40.:29:49.

a Frenchman celebrating victory What wasn't was the Hampshire

:29:50.:29:52.

yachtsmen who gave him For three months Alex

:29:53.:30:00.

Thomson has battled everything the ocean's

:30:01.:30:03.

thrown at him, eaten only freeze dried noodles,

:30:04.:30:05.

and survived on as little At stake was his lifelong obsession

:30:06.:30:07.

of becoming the first Briton to win Dame Ellen MacArthur also

:30:08.:30:12.

came second in 2001. When you've been at sea

:30:13.:30:16.

for that long and you know you're not going to win

:30:17.:30:19.

the race, and you're absolutely exhausted I think

:30:20.:30:22.

that's pretty brutal. So hopefully he'll have a smile

:30:23.:30:23.

at the finish line but it will Thomson set off from here,

:30:24.:30:26.

Les Sables-d'Olonne, on 6th November heading out of this case

:30:27.:30:30.

down to the equator He headed around Antarctica, under

:30:31.:30:34.

the Cape of Good Hope, and passed round Australasia, crossed

:30:35.:30:44.

the South Pacific where he passed Point Nemo, the furthest place

:30:45.:30:46.

from civilisation on Earth before heading

:30:47.:30:48.

round Cape Horn, back up the Atlantic and negotiating

:30:49.:30:52.

the equator once more. When he arrives back

:30:53.:30:54.

here at Les Sables early tomorrow morning he'll have notched up

:30:55.:30:57.

somewhere between 25,000 For Alex there have

:30:58.:30:59.

been good moments. It's a good day in

:31:00.:31:03.

the Southern Ocean and And moments over Christmas

:31:04.:31:05.

where his family worried he was # Jingle bells, Alex sails,

:31:06.:31:15.

Round the world he goes # His wife is simply

:31:16.:31:21.

desperate to get him home. Yeah, I have spoken

:31:22.:31:23.

to him, I have been in contact but actually seeing him

:31:24.:31:32.

is just totally different. Just two weeks into the race his

:31:33.:31:34.

boat got badly damaged, which Despite this, though,

:31:35.:31:39.

Thomson still caught up to within 34 miles

:31:40.:31:43.

of the winner, and also smashed the world

:31:44.:31:47.

record for the greatest distance But what is perhaps better

:31:48.:31:50.

than a world record His team have promised

:31:51.:31:54.

to have on hand a hot Newsnight is about to begin on BBC

:31:55.:32:11.

Two. Here is MLE. Tonight we're live in Washington on

:32:12.:32:16.

the eve of a seminal moment for America. There is a nervous

:32:17.:32:19.

excitement in this city, the streets are starting to fill up, but are

:32:20.:32:22.

they Trump supporters who have travelled across the land, or Trump

:32:23.:32:28.

protesters marching against this inexorable chapter of history? Join

:32:29.:32:31.

me now on BBC Two. That's Newsnight with Emily in

:32:32.:32:32.

Washington.

:32:33.:32:34.

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