08/03/2018 Beyond 100 Days


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08/03/2018

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You're watching Beyond 100 Days.

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The President is showing his mettle

- amid widespread concern

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in Congress, he is pressing ahead

with his tarrifs on

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steel and aluminium.

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There will be exemptions for Canada

and Mexico - maybe Australia.

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The plan is evolving, as it tends

to do with this President.

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The President's in a hurry to put

these tarrifs in place ahead

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of a visit this weekend to the state

that helped him to the White House -

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the Keystone State of Pennsylvania.

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We're going to be very fair,

we're going to be very flexible

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but we are going to protect

the American worker,

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as I said I would do

in our campaign.

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But what about the other

Trump state, Wisconsin,

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where they make the Harley Davidson

- just one of the American

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exports that Europe

is threatening to punish?

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Also on the programme...

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A brazen, reckless act is how

the UK's Home Secretary describes

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the poisoning of the Russian double

agent and his daughter,

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police say 21 people

are being treated for side effects.

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So just what is Russia thinking?

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We have a special report

on Moscow's relations

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With the West and of history can get

any lessons ahead of the election.

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Get in touch with us

using the hashtag #Beyond100Days.

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Hello and welcome -

I'm Christian Fraser in London

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and Jane O'Brien is in Washington.

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A core commitment of the Trump

campaign was to bring

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home the steel jobs.

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And the executives of the metal

industry, invited to the White House

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today, have already responded

to the President's

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commitment on tarrifs.

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In Kentucky and here at Granite City

in Illinois they are firing

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up the blast furnaces,

re-hiring steelworkers

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in anticipation of new orders.

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But during a cabinet meeting

the president dangled the prospect

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of short term exemptions for Mexico

and Canada while Nafta trade

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negotiations continue.

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And he also mentioned Australia,

saying he reserved the right to add

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and drop other countries too.

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That may come as welcome news

to more than a hundred Republican

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congressmen who signed

a letter on Wednesday urging

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the President to change course.

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Mr Trump, though,

defended his position.

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Aluminum, steel they are

the backbone of our nation.

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They are the bedrock

of our defence industrial base.

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Our greatest presidents...

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They protected our country

from outside influence

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and from other coutnries coming

in and stealing our wealth and jobs.

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We're going to be very fair,

we're going to be very flexible

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but we are going to protect

the American worker,

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as I said I would do

in our campaign.

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Someone who agrees with

the President's tariff plan

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is Republican Congressman Tom Reed

from New York.

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I spoke to him earlier.

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Congressman, thank you for joining

us. Why do you support the

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President's plan for tariffs?

You

know, what the President is doing is

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exactly what he promised the

American people. He is going to

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change the trade agenda going

forward, through disruption. Decades

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of status quo policy has left many

American interests behind. What you

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see with the potential imposition of

tariffs is a message that enough is

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enough, we will have free and open

trade with partners across the

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world, as long as American interests

are protected and we have an even

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playing field, enforceable, to keep

everybody on their toes.

But the

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economy is doing well, you have just

passed tax reform, unemployment is

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at all-time low. Why do you need to

shake up the status quo on trade

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now?

Now is an opportunity, enough

is enough. The President was clear

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on the campaign and that is why I

support what he's doing here. He is

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trying to change the dynamic of what

decades of policy has shifted, the

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folks back home from the position of

opportunity, to one where they have

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lost opportunity. That has to end.

We have to put American interests on

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the same field, an uneven playing

field, as the stakeholders across

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the world.

But the EU and other

allies of America are warning that

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this could spark a massive global

trade war. Is it worth it?

I don't

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believe we will have a trade war at

the end of the day. What we will see

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here is a conversation which

recognises that if we play by the

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rules and our trading partners

recognise that the rules need to be

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enforceable, that it is an even

playing field, we are going to

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embrace them. We are going to

embrace the opportunity to compete.

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Country against country, interest

against interest, but as long as the

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playing field is even, this

imposition of any tariff is

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something we can avoid.

What is it

that has convinced you that this is

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the way to go, especially in your

state of New York?

I represent an

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area of New York that is essentially

the rust belt. I have seen

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first-hand, talking to families,

jobs leaving from the manufacturing

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base. I have seen people suffering

from these policies. What we need to

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do is change the policies, change

the agenda, disrupt the status quo.

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At the end of the day, we can all

win. We can all compete. Our trading

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partners, as well as American

interests, in a way that advances

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the course for the residents of

those countries and the people we

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represent in New York.

You are going

against a lot of your fellow party

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members. How big a rift is this

within the Republican party?

You

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know, obviously we are sending a

message that some other folks

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outside of the aisle in the party

are concerned about. I recognise, I

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represent the people that are

suffering from these decades of

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policy. We want to be a voice for

them to say we cannot continue the

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status quo policy of decades before.

What we need to do is go down a new

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path. But the new path comes with an

anxiety and fear that the long-term

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goal we are trying to achieve, and

the President is trying to achieve,

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is good for all of our trading

partners, as well as us here in

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America. That is fair, enforceable

trade, once and for all.

Thank you

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very much for joining us. Thank you

for having me on.

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Soon after President Trump

announced his intention

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to impose these tariffs -

the EU produced a list of those

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American goods on which they would

be imposing tarrifs.

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Tit for tat.

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On the list is American whisky,

peanut butter, blue jeans,

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and Harley Davidson motorcycles.

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The BBC's Barbara Plett Usher

is in Milwuakee, Wisconsin outside

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of the Harley headquarters for us.

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So, the steelworkers are very happy.

What about the workers at

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Harley-Davidson?

Well, I think the

workers at Harley-Davidson will

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suffer a setback if these tariffs,

if the steel and aluminium tariffs

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come through, because costs will

rise in general. Also, the

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retaliatory tariffs that might come

against Harley-Davidson will be

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significant, the company says. There

is concern among the workers. But we

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have been at a club of

Harley-Davidson fans, speaking to

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people there to see what they

thought. By and large, they thought

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Trump should stand up for America,

but that this tariff move was to

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blunt a weapon, and they didn't want

Harley-Davidson caught up in a trade

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war. They didn't think that they

themselves would be effective,

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because they have their bikes

already. They said anybody got

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really wants a Harley-Davidson will

probably get one, the cost will not

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go up much in America. I was

reminded again and again that this

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was about a lifestyle, not just a

motorcycle. There was some concern

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expressed about their friends in

Europe. They thought the cost would

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go up there quite a bit. There was

quite a lot of connection, Europeans

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can hear for events, some members of

the club said they were going to

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Prague for a big anniversary event

later this summer. Not a lot of

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support for tariffs in this

Harley-Davidson crowd, although some

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do think it is just political

manoeuvring at this stage, like this

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biker, Steve Godfrey.

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I think it's a bad thing,

I generally believe in free trade

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and I don't think he's

serious about this.

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I think he's just trying to scare

people into getting some

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concessions, which is how he rolls.

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Barbra, that person does seem to

have a point, we know that the

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President's plan is evolving. What

are they most concerned about?

They

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are most concerned about the

retaliation tariff. Harley-Davidson

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issued a statement saying that if

the steel and aluminium tariffs were

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imposed, costs would go up, as they

would with any company using steel

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and aluminium. A retaliatory,

punitive tariff would have a

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significant impact on sales. You

know, 16% of their sales go to

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Europe. That is important,

especially because domestic sales

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are declining. The baby-boomer

generation is dwindling, millennials

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are not really interested in

motorcycles. We went to a dealership

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and saw how they are trying to

target that market dig market with

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cheaper and smaller bikes, they also

have an electric bike that they are

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hoping they will launch. But they do

feel that it will have an impact.

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"We know what you are doing.

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And you will not succeed",

the Prime Minister's warning

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to Russia back in December.

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But do we know to what

lengths Russia will go?

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The home secretary Amber Rudd

was careful today not to point

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the finger of blame at Moscow.

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But this was a rare type of nerve

agent, not easily acquired,

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not easily transported or stored.

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Which quite obviously

increases the likelihood

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there was some state involvement.

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Police say tonight that 21 people

are still being treated as a result

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of the attack. The Government says

all of the facts must be

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established. But if it is proved

that Russia was involved, Theresa

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May has signalled that it will not

go unanswered. Tom Symons has more.

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Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey is 38

years old, a decorated officer

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with plenty of experience

on the front line of policing.

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He's still in a serious condition

but the good news today

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is he is awake and talking.

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He's a great character.

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He is a huge presence

in Wiltshire Police, well loved

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and massively dedicated officer.

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He is clearly receiving high,

specialist treatment.

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He is well, sat up.

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He is not the Nick I know

but he is receiving

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a high level of treatment.

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The inquiry's not letting up.

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Police began what appeared

to be a major search

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and possible decontamination

of Sergei Skripal's house today.

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For a while, they even taped off

the graves of his wife and son.

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We are committed to doing

all we can to bring

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the perpetrators to justice,

whoever they are and

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wherever they may be.

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The investigation is moving

at pace and this government

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will act without hesitation

as the facts become clearer.

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The BBC's been told the nerve agent

used was not sarin or VX,

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which have been used as weapons

in the past, but rarer.

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Decontamination teams were heavily

protected on Sunday.

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Look at this picture

from earlier that day.

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No respirators or suits.

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These officers could not have known

they were about to deal with the use

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of a chemical weapon in their city.

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I guess it really brings home to us

and the public again

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that we run towards danger

while others walk away.

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Sometimes we run to

something we don't know.

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The risk they face became

obvious today when a bench,

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on which the Skripals were sitting,

was exposed by gusts of wind.

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Just look at the operation needed

to go in and peg it down again,

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four days on from the incident.

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And it wasn't just police

officers who risked being

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exposed that afternoon.

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I've spoken to a doctor

who was there.

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She's asked us not to name her

but she says she came

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across Yulia Skripal slumped over

the bench, unconscious,

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not breathing, vomiting

and having a fit.

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She stepped in.

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She got Yulia onto the floor,

she got her breathing

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and handed her patient

over to paramedics.

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She's concerned about what she's

come into contact with,

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but she feels fine.

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Sergei and Yulia Skripal,

attacked as she came to Britain

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from Russia to visit him,

are not getting better.

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They remain in a critical

condition, as the race

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to find their assailant -

or assailants - continues.

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Tom Symonds, BBC News, Salisbury.

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Well that suggestion

that the Kremlin may have ordered

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this attack has been met

with an angry response in Moscow.

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The state media has

complained of an anti-Russian

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campaign by the West.

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And among ordinary Russians there's

seems to be little sympathy

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for the former double agent,

Sergei Skripal who

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remains seriously ill.

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Our Moscow correspondent

Steve Rosenberg reports.

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Moscow feels a world away

from the drama of Salisbury.

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Relaxed Russians are out

enjoying a public holiday,

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determined not to allow a spy

scandal to spoil their day.

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People here are short

on sympathy for Sergei Skripal.

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TRANSLATION:

The fewer secrets

you sell, the longer you'll live.

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TRANSLATION:

Don't

betray your motherland.

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Then you'll have no problems.

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TRANSLATION:

When he was in prison

in Russia, he was healthy.

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He goes to Britain

and gets poisoned.

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He should have stayed here.

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It's a similar message

from Russian TV.

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The Kremlin-controlled media have

been mocking Boris Johnson

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and making fun of Britain.

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If you're a professional traitor,

he says, my advice,

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don't move to England.

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Something's not right there,

the climate, perhaps.

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But too many bad things go on there,

people are hanged, poisoned,

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helicopter crashes or they fall

out of windows.

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Under Vladimir Putin,

the Kremlin has sent a very clear

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message to the Russian people

that their country is besieged

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fortress, threatened by enemies

abroad and traitors at home.

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That's why is little sympathy

here for Sergei Skripal.

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And if Moscow did target

Sergei Skripal...

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Most Russian people, not me,

of course, most Russian people

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would take pride in it

because there is a very

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black and white world,

it's us against them.

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Putin has brought us

back in a big way.

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Today, the president

delivered a special address.

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No mention of spies.

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He congratulated Russian women

on International Women's Day.

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Moscow knows it's under suspicion

but the Kremlin is acting

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as if it's business as usual.

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Steve Rosenberg, BBC News, Moscow.

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Bill Browder is considered to be one

Vladimir Putin's number one enemies

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and deported from Russia

for exposing corruption there.

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He's been speaking to the BBC's

Victoria Derbyshire programme.

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At the moment nobody has

tried to shoot at me

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or blow me up in a car.

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But this nerve agent stuff

and the fact that they can do this

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in a foreign country and get away

with it is absolutely

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terrifying for me and every

person that is at odds

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with the Russian government.

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How do you protect yourself then?

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Because at any moment, you could be

in a bar or a restaurant,

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your food could be spiked,

your drink could be spiked,

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you could be walking to the train

station and someone drops something

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on your skin and you

could end up in a coma.

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That is the whole purpose

of what they've done.

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It's called terrorism.

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It's to try and create terror

in every one of their enemies.

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And people say "Why did

they do this to this man?"

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The answer is he was probably

one one-thousandth of

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the reason they did it.

0:15:540:15:55

They did it for everyone

else, to say here's

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what we're capable of.

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Well joining us now is Mark Stout,

a former intelligence

0:15:580:16:01

analyst for the CIA.

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Thank you very much for joining us.

The British say they want all of the

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facts before they say who did this.

Who do you think did this?

Well, we

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don't know for certain. But I have a

hard time imagining it was anybody

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other than somebody associated in

some way, shape or form with one of

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the Russian intelligence services.

It's really hard to come up with an

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alternative explanation.

Must be

easier ways to try to assassinate a

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body? This is so dramatic, is it

conceivable that this could be done

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without state involvement?

It is

possible, but hard to imagine. If

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you go back to the 1990s, a Japanese

group created nerve agents,

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theoretically it can be done by a

non-state actor. But then they had

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to have multiple experiments never

got the formula right. There are so

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many ways, if it is not done by a

state, it can go wrong, the

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presumption has to be if it is nerve

agents it was done by a state, even

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if that is not 100%.

I understand

you are the former historian at the

0:16:570:17:02

International spy museum there. How

does this compare with the Cold War?

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Are there goes? Are we going back in

time?

Well, there are some echoes.

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What is interesting to me,

particularly interesting about this

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murder and the rash of suspicious

deaths that there have been in

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Britain in recent years of Russians

and people associated with Russia,

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it really goes back a long way into

the Cold War, right? The last couple

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of decades of the Cold War, with the

interesting and prominent examples

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of the assassination in 77, the last

couple of decades, the Russians were

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not assassinating a lot of people

abroad. There were historical

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precedents, but it tends to go back

to the 50s and even before that.

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This is really a dramatic turn if

this is what it appears to be and it

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is a throwback to the very worst

periods, I would argue, of Soviet

0:17:510:17:56

history.

Doesn't have implications

for the United States? I am slightly

0:17:560:18:00

surprised. I've been following the

coverage in the United States and it

0:18:000:18:03

has not been picked up as widely as

you might imagine?

There are a lot

0:18:030:18:08

of other things going on in the

United States. We have a President

0:18:080:18:14

allegedly sleeping with a pawn star.

As Lou Reed as it is, it has serious

0:18:140:18:18

competition here, it has had media

attention but it has not generally

0:18:180:18:21

been on the front pages, just

because we have had a lot of things

0:18:210:18:24

going on here. -- as luird.

How

worried should former spies be?

0:18:240:18:36

Unless they are given personal,

direct protection by Scotland Yard

0:18:360:18:41

or private bodyguards, they would

potentially happen to be... It would

0:18:410:18:44

be wise for them to be worried if

they are not in hiding. Ultimately,

0:18:440:18:49

does not take much, whether it is to

give you a nerve agent, shoot you in

0:18:490:18:53

the head, that does not take much

interaction. It takes a lot of

0:18:530:18:56

intelligence collection of fronts to

find out where you live, your

0:18:560:19:00

pattern of life, how to get it to

you, it takes a lot of planning. But

0:19:000:19:04

the actual execution, when you know

you need to be right there, my

0:19:040:19:07

target will be there, it is pretty

trivial, really. If I were one of

0:19:070:19:11

these folks that had been swapped

with Skripal, I would be looking at

0:19:110:19:20

security.

It was Anna Chapman, the

spy returned from the United States

0:19:200:19:24

from New York back to Russia. As I

understand it, there is a rule of

0:19:240:19:29

ethics when you are swapping spies.

Why do you think Skripal might have

0:19:290:19:33

been targeted now?

Yes, well, if we

assume it is the Russians, and I do,

0:19:330:19:38

there are a couple of possibilities.

First off

0:19:380:19:42

there are a couple of possibilities.

First off, Skripal and the others

0:19:420:19:45

that were pardoned, that was a brief

four year period when Putin was

0:19:450:19:51

Prime Minister. It is possible that

Putin thinks it was a horrible idea

0:19:510:19:56

and has reversed it. The other

possibility is that there have been

0:19:560:19:59

lower level changes in leadership in

the Russian intelligence services by

0:19:590:20:01

people that don't necessarily feel

themselves bound by old promises and

0:20:010:20:04

are vengeful. A third possibility,

it seems to me, is that the Russians

0:20:040:20:10

that might have recently learned

that maybe Skripal's espionage was

0:20:100:20:16

moored deeper and damaging than they

knew when they prosecuted him and

0:20:160:20:18

swapped him, now they are saying,

well, you didn't come clean, the

0:20:180:20:21

dealers off. We don't know. I

wouldn't be surprised if it was

0:20:210:20:25

something along one of those three

scenarios.

Fascinating stuff.

0:20:250:20:30

A Danish inventor accused

of murdering a Swedish journalist

0:20:300:20:32

on his submarine last August has

gone on trial in Copenhagen.

0:20:320:20:35

Peter Madsen has admitted

dismembering Kim Wall's body

0:20:350:20:38

and disposing of it at sea,

but denies murder.

0:20:380:20:41

He says her death was an accident

and that she died of carbon

0:20:410:20:45

monoxide poisoning.

0:20:450:20:46

Ms Wall was working on a story

about Madsen when she went

0:20:460:20:48

missing last August.

0:20:490:20:50

The US Secretary of State Rex

Tillerson is currently on a tour

0:20:500:20:53

of Africa and was today

speaking in Ethiopia.

0:20:530:20:57

He did miss a chance to mention

North Korea.

0:20:580:21:01

At the event he warned

that despite progress,

0:21:010:21:03

the prospect of talks

with North Korea is still some way

0:21:030:21:06

off, despite President Trump

indicating potentially positive

0:21:060:21:07

signals coming from North Korea

by way of the South.

0:21:070:21:16

Russia's relations with the West

have cooled dramatically over

0:21:160:21:18

Vladimir Putin's 18 years in power.

0:21:180:21:20

But it's his most recent term that's

marked the low point -

0:21:200:21:23

including the annexation

of Crimea and war in Ukraine.

0:21:230:21:27

With President Putin

set to win re-election

0:21:270:21:30

by a landslide next week,

our Moscow correspondent,

0:21:300:21:32

Sarah Rainsford, has travelled

to Rostov to explore the depth

0:21:320:21:34

of the East-West divide.

0:21:340:21:37

They see themselves

as born warriors.

0:21:380:21:41

The Cossacks, defenders of

the country through the centuries.

0:21:430:21:46

It's a past they are fiercely proud

of, replayed in the muddy

0:21:500:21:53

borderlands of southern Russia.

0:21:530:21:57

These days, the Cossacks' brand

of patriotism is on the rise.

0:21:570:21:58

TRANSLATION:

Cossacks

want to serve their country

0:21:590:22:01

and protect their land.

0:22:010:22:02

I think that's important.

0:22:020:22:10

And to raise our

children as defenders.

0:22:100:22:11

It was that impulse that sent many

other Cossacks to fight in Ukraine

0:22:110:22:14

just across the border.

0:22:140:22:15

Alexander went, too.

0:22:150:22:18

One of thousands of volunteer

fighters from across the country

0:22:180:22:21

who claimed Ukraine's Russian

speakers were in danger.

0:22:210:22:23

He paints the uprising in Kiev

as a coup backed by the West,

0:22:290:22:32

views that sound radical

are now mainstream here.

0:22:320:22:38

TRANSLATION:

Volunteer fighters felt

they had to take part in the war,

0:22:380:22:41

because if they didn't,

their cities will be shelled next.

0:22:410:22:43

Ukraine was just beginning.

0:22:430:22:44

We know who this is done by.

0:22:440:22:47

It's the West that wants

to divide up our country.

0:22:470:22:50

In Rostov, there is a memorial to

those who died fighting in Ukraine.

0:22:500:22:53

Despite all the evidence, Russia

still denies sending soldiers there.

0:22:530:22:56

Russia's relations with the West

have been cooling for some time,

0:22:560:22:59

but it was the war in Ukraine that

really marked a breaking point.

0:22:590:23:06

While to many here those who fought

are seen as patriots and as heroes.

0:23:060:23:09

For the West, this was the moment

that marked Russia as an aggressor.

0:23:090:23:14

The West imposed sanctions,

but Russia didn't buckle.

0:23:140:23:16

It retaliated.

0:23:160:23:19

It banned fresh meat from Europe,

among other things.

0:23:190:23:22

So no-one here is too

flustered by sanctions.

0:23:220:23:25

They've boosted local production

and staff think western

0:23:260:23:27

firms would struggle

to recapture the market.

0:23:270:23:32

We're ready for the

competition, Dmitri says.

0:23:330:23:36

Russia today looks more

Western than ever,

0:23:380:23:40

with similar tastes and styles.

0:23:400:23:43

The crowd in this bar see

the country as European, culturally.

0:23:440:23:47

The young owner would like to be

closer politically, too.

0:23:470:23:53

But the climate has

cooled dramatically.

0:23:530:23:55

Maria also has a fashion label

and big plans for the future,

0:23:550:23:58

including expanding sales

to the West.

0:23:580:24:02

But under Vladimir Putin,

she fears Russia will only

0:24:020:24:04

increase its isolation,

with assertive policies

0:24:040:24:07

sold to the public by

a powerful state-run media.

0:24:070:24:11

TRANSLATION:

Instead

of talking about problems

0:24:130:24:15

we have inside the country,

they talk about how

0:24:150:24:17

we are surrounded by enemies

who all want the worst for us.

0:24:170:24:22

It's really scary, because it

works everything up,

0:24:220:24:26

then people think they need to push

back, otherwise we will be

0:24:260:24:29

overrun and destroyed.

0:24:290:24:36

That siege mentality is growing

here, as is the sense that Russia

0:24:360:24:39

has chosen a deliberate path away

from the West, with no sign

0:24:390:24:42

that it plans to turn back.

0:24:420:24:47

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have

been visiting Birmingham in the UK,

0:24:500:24:53

to launch a project to mark

International Women's Day,

0:24:530:24:57

aimed at inspiring female

students to take up careers

0:24:570:24:59

in science, technology

and engineering industries.

0:24:590:25:03

The royal couple spoke

to crowds outside the event -

0:25:060:25:08

some of whom had waited for several

hours to see them on the latest leg

0:25:080:25:12

of their tour of the country,

in advance of their wedding in May.

0:25:120:25:14

She is really rather good at this,

isn't she?

She slotted into it very

0:25:180:25:23

well, she looks very at ease. She

has a slightly easier role than Kate

0:25:230:25:27

Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge,

because she is not the first couple,

0:25:270:25:32

if you will, not the direct air to

the throne. She can be a bit more

0:25:320:25:38

relaxed. But she has adapted very

well. The wedding is made a 19th, at

0:25:380:25:46

St George's Chapel.

0:25:460:25:48

This is Beyond 100

Days from the BBC.

0:25:480:25:50

Coming up for viewers

on the BBC News Channel

0:25:500:25:52

and BBC World News -

we'll have more on International

0:25:520:25:54

Women's Day, from protests with pots

and pans to new boxing-inspired

0:25:540:25:57

Barbies.

0:25:570:25:58

Good evening. We say goodbye to most

of the snow as we head towards the

0:26:080:26:13

weekend, because we are about to say

hello to some higher temperatures.

0:26:130:26:19

Snow cause some disruption across

parts of northern England though,

0:26:190:26:21

bringing beautiful scenes as well.

For many more places today, it is

0:26:210:26:25

turning into a sunny one. That

weather watcher picture came from

0:26:250:26:28

Wiltshire, where we have had the

sunny skies by date and we will have

0:26:280:26:32

clear skies by night. That will

allow temperatures drop away.

0:26:320:26:36

Showers feeding across the North

West of Scotland. Still wintry

0:26:360:26:39

across the high ground. A bit more

the far south-west. Not as cold

0:26:390:26:43

here, four degrees in Plymouth. Most

other areas will get down below

0:26:430:26:46

freezing. A widespread frost,

perhaps icy stretches and the odd

0:26:460:26:51

mist patch to take us do tomorrow

morning. Through tomorrow, after any

0:26:510:26:55

early mist has cleared, the majority

will see large amount of sunshine.

0:26:550:26:59

These showers are still feeding in

across the western side of Scotland,

0:26:590:27:02

with some over high ground. All the

while, southern part of a learned

0:27:020:27:07

and a good part of Wales will cloud

over without breaks of rain

0:27:070:27:10

beginning to splash in by the middle

part of the afternoon. Friday's

0:27:100:27:14

rush-hour looks like a pretty soggy

one from Plymouth to Cardiff, to

0:27:140:27:18

London, as the outbreaks of rain

push northwards. Much of the rain

0:27:180:27:21

will be light and patchy initially,

but it could turn heavier as we get

0:27:210:27:25

deeper into the evening. That rain,

courtesy of this frontal system

0:27:250:27:28

which will be working its way

northwards, all driven by an area of

0:27:280:27:32

low pressure sitting down to the

south-west. The positioning of this

0:27:320:27:36

low pressure means that as we get

into the weekend, we are going to be

0:27:360:27:39

bringing southerly wind across the

country, feeding in some very mild

0:27:390:27:43

air indeed. I think mild as the big

theme for the weekend forecast.

0:27:430:27:46

There will be some rain at times,

but not all the time. Certainly some

0:27:460:27:50

rain to start on Saturday, part of

the Midlands, northern England and

0:27:500:27:55

Northern Ireland, the heavy burst.

As that drift into Scotland it could

0:27:550:27:58

give some snow over the high ground.

At low levels we are expecting this

0:27:580:28:01

to be falling as rain. All the while

we will see milder air pumping up

0:28:010:28:06

from the south, 14 or 15, maybe 16

degrees of things brighten up to the

0:28:060:28:13

south-east. South-eastern areas may

get a glancing blow from this area

0:28:130:28:16

of rain on Sunday. Generally,

southern parts will see some

0:28:160:28:19

showers. Further north, after any

early fog has cleared, it might take

0:28:190:28:23

time to do so and we should see some

spells of sunshine. Temperatures,

0:28:230:28:26

for most, in double figures.

0:28:260:28:28

This is Beyond 100 Days,

0:30:060:30:08

with me Christian Fraser in London

and Jane O'Brien in Washington.

0:30:080:30:11

Our top stories -

0:30:110:30:13

Ignoring divisions

within his own party,

0:30:130:30:15

President Trump pledges to push

through with tariffs on steel

0:30:150:30:17

and aluminium imports -

0:30:170:30:19

one Republican told us

they're long overdue.

0:30:190:30:25

And what you see here with the

0:30:260:30:28

And what you see here with the

potential position of tariffs is a

0:30:280:30:30

message that enough is enough.

0:30:300:30:32

The attempted murder of a former

Russian spy was brazen

0:30:320:30:35

and reckless says the UK Government,

0:30:350:30:36

as investigations continue

into who was behind it.

0:30:360:30:38

Coming up in the next half hour:

0:30:380:30:40

I sit down with a senior American

official who tells me why

0:30:400:30:43

keeping up with Russia is every bit

the challenge for the West.

0:30:430:30:46

We are in a situation of playing

whack-a-mole, basically.

0:30:460:30:49

We have to stay one

step ahead of where the

0:30:490:30:52

Russians are on this.

0:30:520:30:59

The super ages. How these long

distant cyclists, some of them in

0:30:590:31:03

their 80s, have the immune system of

a 20-year-old. Let us know your

0:31:030:31:07

thoughts using the hashtag...

0:31:070:31:11

Who does the President listen

to when it comes to foreign policy?

0:31:160:31:20

The Secretary of State Rex Tillerson

reportedly speaks to him every day.

0:31:200:31:24

But the general feeling

here in Washington is that the

0:31:240:31:27

wider role of the State department

has been downgraded

0:31:270:31:29

under President Trump.

0:31:290:31:31

In embassies around the world,

there are still key posts

0:31:310:31:33

that remain unfilled,

0:31:330:31:35

and more than once the President has

overruled his closest advisors.

0:31:350:31:41

It is no longer

straightforward interpreting

0:31:410:31:42

where American foreign policy

is headed, so its useful to sit

0:31:420:31:46

where American foreign policy

is headed, so it's useful to sit

0:31:460:31:49

down with a man who works

with Rex Tillerson every day.

0:31:490:31:52

Steve Goldstein is the US

Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy

0:31:520:31:54

and Public Affairs.

0:31:540:31:55

I have been asking him what he makes

of the current debate on tarrifs,

0:31:550:31:59

the poisoning of Sergei Skripal,

and of course the links that

0:31:590:32:01

are being drawn with Russia.

0:32:010:32:02

In the three days I've been here,

I've heard quite a lot about this

0:32:020:32:07

and I talked to a number of people

in the UK Government to have

0:32:070:32:10

and I talked to a number of people

in the UK Government who have

0:32:100:32:13

mentioned this episode to me

and it is very

0:32:130:32:15

concerning and we respect

the work of the British

0:32:150:32:18

investigators in trying to get

to the bottom of this.

0:32:180:32:20

But people look at what the State

Department is doing.

0:32:200:32:22

There was a story this week

in the American papers that

0:32:220:32:25

you were granted $120 million

to fight Russian meddling

0:32:250:32:27

and the State Department

has spent nothing.

0:32:270:32:29

So people naturally worry

that you are not taking

0:32:290:32:32

the Russian threat seriously.

0:32:320:32:33

Well, we take the Russian

threat very seriously.

0:32:330:32:35

At my own hearing, I talked

about the fact that the Russians had

0:32:350:32:38

interfered in the 2016 elections.

0:32:380:32:41

The Secretary of State indicated

in an interview that he did

0:32:410:32:44

in South America that he understood

that that interference

0:32:440:32:46

would continue likely in 2018.

0:32:460:32:49

Does the boss take it seriously?

0:32:490:32:53

I think we all take it seriously

and we are doing a lot of work.

0:32:530:32:57

The Department itself has spent

over $1 billion trying

0:32:570:32:59

to work on these issues.

0:32:590:33:00

40 million is being allocated

specifically

0:33:000:33:02

to fight disinformation,

but to be very clear,

0:33:020:33:04

this is a specific and ongoing

0:33:040:33:06

problem and we are in a situation

of playing whack-a-mole, basically.

0:33:060:33:10

We have to stay one step ahead

of where the Russians are a mess

0:33:100:33:14

We have to stay one step ahead

of where the Russians are on this

0:33:140:33:17

and it's not just the Russians.

0:33:180:33:19

The Chinese and many other

countries are trying

0:33:190:33:21

to participate in disinformation.

0:33:210:33:24

And just with specific

reference to the nerve agent,

0:33:240:33:26

if it was proven that there

was a link to the Kremlin,

0:33:260:33:29

would the United States,

as a close ally of the UK,

0:33:290:33:31

be doing something about that?

0:33:310:33:33

I think we would be very

supportive of whatever

0:33:330:33:35

decision that United Kingdom

would decide to make.

0:33:350:33:37

OK.

0:33:370:33:38

You are here building

relationships...

0:33:380:33:39

Yes.

0:33:390:33:40

Do tariffs, and we are expecting

an announcement from Donald Trump

0:33:400:33:43

today on steel and aluminium,

does that make your

0:33:430:33:45

job more difficult?

0:33:450:33:46

We understand the concern

of our allies regarding that issue

0:33:460:33:49

and Boris Johnson and others have

spoken with the Secretary of State.

0:33:490:33:53

I can tell you that the secretary

has passed that information

0:33:530:33:55

on to Secretary Ross and others

within the administration and has

0:33:550:34:00

expressed concerns people have,

but we also have to look

0:34:000:34:02

at this more broadly

0:34:020:34:03

and that's

what we're trying to do.

0:34:030:34:07

But we do understand the concerns

expressed by the United Kingdom.

0:34:070:34:09

Theresa May has spoken

of a deep concern.

0:34:090:34:11

If Canada and Mexico were exempted,

then surely your closest ally

0:34:110:34:14

would be exempted as well?

0:34:140:34:17

Well, that's a decision that

would be made by the President

0:34:170:34:19

but you are our closest ally,

there's no question about that.

0:34:190:34:22

I think the Foreign Minister,

who has a very close

0:34:220:34:24

relationship with the Secretary,

they like each other quite a bit,

0:34:240:34:29

has made that point and I think

the Secretary has passed that along.

0:34:290:34:32

OK.

0:34:320:34:33

Let's turn to North Korea.

0:34:330:34:35

They have said they will sit down

for talks with the United States.

0:34:350:34:38

Do you think the President's tough

rhetoric is working?

0:34:380:34:40

I do think the tough

rhetoric is working.

0:34:400:34:43

I think the President is very

serious on what we are trying

0:34:430:34:46

to achieve here and we are welcoming

that, but whatever North Korea comes

0:34:460:34:51

to the table with, it has to be

verifiable and irreversible.

0:34:510:34:56

Because we had the former

ambassador Christopher Hill

0:34:560:34:59

on the programme yesterday.

0:34:590:35:01

He said you can't do

diplomacy without diplomats.

0:35:010:35:04

You've lost your top man in Seoul,

the ambassador has left.

0:35:040:35:09

The incoming ambassador has

withdrawn his application.

0:35:090:35:11

You don't have a senior diplomat

in Seoul at the moment.

0:35:110:35:16

Well, that is not the case,

0:35:160:35:23

we have a charges de mission,

0:35:230:35:24

who is in charge of the entity

that we have within South Korea.

0:35:240:35:28

We also have Susan Thornton,

who has been nominated to be

0:35:280:35:30

assistant secretary and is an expert

in this area.

0:35:300:35:32

In addition to that,

we have other people

0:35:320:35:34

within the department and outside

who can come in as negotiators.

0:35:340:35:37

I think people should

understand that at the point

0:35:370:35:39

that they are ready to negotiate

under the standards

0:35:390:35:41

that the President has set

and the Secretary has set,

0:35:410:35:44

we will have an appropriate

negotiator at the table.

0:35:440:35:46

But you know there is

a wider issue here.

0:35:460:35:48

The last count, 41 of 188 embassies

around the world still don't

0:35:480:35:51

have a US Ambassador.

0:35:510:35:52

There is a misnomer in believing

that most of these embassies

0:35:520:35:54

are staffed with political people.

0:35:550:35:56

That is not the case.

0:35:560:36:02

Most of them are staffed with very

experienced career and foreign

0:36:020:36:05

service representatives.

0:36:050:36:06

While we don't have ambassadors

at some embassies who are political,

0:36:060:36:09

we do have very qualified

and competent people

0:36:090:36:10

who are doing an excellent job.

0:36:110:36:13

Did they have an ambassador before

this administration came

0:36:130:36:15

in, these embassies?

0:36:150:36:16

They did, but as each

administration begins,

0:36:160:36:19

frequently the ambassadors resign

and new ambassadors are appointed,

0:36:190:36:22

that's how our system operates.

0:36:220:36:24

OK.

0:36:240:36:25

But you look at Mexico and you've

just lost Roberta Jacobsen there,

0:36:250:36:29

three decades of experience in Latin

America.

0:36:290:36:32

Hugely experienced person,

helped set up the embassy in Cuba.

0:36:320:36:37

Can the State Department really

lose talent like that?

0:36:370:36:41

Well, Roberta Jacobsen's retiring

and that is surely within her right.

0:36:410:36:44

Most of the people that

are retiring have been

0:36:440:36:47

with the Department for over 30

years and they have a right to have

0:36:470:36:52

a life after the State Department

but we will be naming

0:36:520:36:54

a new ambassador to Mexico very

soon, I know that something

0:36:540:36:57

that the White House is working on,

along with the Department

0:36:570:37:02

and Roberta Jacobsen has agreed

to stay through May to help

0:37:020:37:04

with that early transition.

0:37:040:37:06

with that orderly transition.

0:37:060:37:07

The reason I am pushing

you on it is because there

0:37:070:37:10

is a general concern,

the President says, look,

0:37:100:37:12

it is not chaotic, there is huge

energy the White House,

0:37:120:37:14

it is not chaotic, there is huge

energy in the White House,

0:37:140:37:17

but there's a lot of people

leaving the administration.

0:37:170:37:19

39 people have left key posts

in this administration.

0:37:190:37:22

The concern is if you are building

relationships, how can your allies

0:37:220:37:25

depend that secretary Tillotson

is going to be there,

0:37:250:37:27

that they are going to follow

through the stewardship

0:37:270:37:29

of many of the policies

you are trying to set out.

0:37:290:37:31

Well, the Secretary

of State will be here.

0:37:310:37:33

As a matter of fact,

I know there was a period of time

0:37:330:37:37

last year where some people

euphemistically referred

0:37:370:37:38

to the Secretary of State as Rexit,

a take-off on Brexit

0:37:380:37:41

and with the belief

that he was leaving.

0:37:410:37:43

He was never leaving that post,

he serves at the pleasure

0:37:430:37:45

of the President and I think I'd

like to put that part

0:37:450:37:48

to bed and let people know

he is the Secretary of State.

0:37:480:37:51

And he is staying.

0:37:510:37:53

How are you adapting to the job?

0:37:530:37:58

Because it is tough, isn't it?

0:37:580:37:59

You told me a little earlier that

you get up at five in the morning.

0:37:590:38:03

How do you cope?

0:38:030:38:04

It is a little tougher

than I realised and I'm trying

0:38:040:38:07

to figure out how to operate

with much less sleep than I used

0:38:070:38:10

to get beforehand and to not be

quite as stressed when reporters

0:38:100:38:13

and other people call me...

0:38:130:38:14

People like me come calling!

0:38:140:38:15

They say they need

an answer right away.

0:38:150:38:17

But it's an honour to serve

the President of the United States

0:38:170:38:23

and Secretary.

0:38:230:38:24

It's a great pleasure

to have you here in London.

0:38:240:38:26

Thank you very much

were talking to us.

0:38:260:38:28

Thank you for having

me, I appreciated it.

0:38:280:38:30

Steve Goldstein, the undersecretary

of state, fascinating talking to him

0:38:300:38:33

today. I am going to call in the

phrase Rexit, because a lot of

0:38:330:38:39

people thought the Secretary of

State would be out of there before

0:38:390:38:43

Hope Hicks Gary Cohn or the rest,

but he is still hanging in there.

0:38:430:38:46

What sort of power does he have, do

you think?

It is very interesting

0:38:460:38:52

relationship because he does get

sent out as America's top diplomat

0:38:520:38:55

but then he is often undermined by

President Trump. We have seen this

0:38:550:39:01

in instances across a variety of

issues, North Korea being one. Rex

0:39:010:39:05

Tillerson says America may be open

to direct negotiations with the

0:39:050:39:10

North Korean regime and President

Trump says, no we're not. So the

0:39:100:39:15

problem is for diplomats in other

countries wondering who it is they

0:39:150:39:19

are actually talking to, who does

hold the reins here and when Rex

0:39:190:39:23

Tillerson says something, can they

actually believe it? So it makes it

0:39:230:39:28

very difficult for diplomatic

relationships in a lot of cases.

He

0:39:280:39:33

is meticulous, Rex Tillerson. Steve

Goldstein was making this point that

0:39:330:39:37

he is fastidious about certain

things and will keep going back to

0:39:370:39:39

the White House, even though he gets

the brush up, and keep pushing for

0:39:390:39:43

those things he believes in. One

other interesting titbit he told me,

0:39:430:39:47

over here Boris Johnson gets a lot

of bad press from time to time and

0:39:470:39:51

as been getting some more this week

that he said if you put these two

0:39:510:39:54

figures together, Johnson and Rex

Tillerson, you would think they

0:39:540:39:58

don't get on. Quite the reverse, he

says and they speak practically

0:39:580:40:02

every week and he does listen to

Boris Johnson. So you have the Prime

0:40:020:40:06

Minister and the president, who have

had their issues of late and the

0:40:060:40:10

special relationship has been under

a bit strained but the channels

0:40:100:40:13

between the Foreign & Commonwealth

Office and the State Department very

0:40:130:40:15

much alive very useful to both sides

of the party. So it is worth hearing

0:40:150:40:20

things like that from people who

work with Boris Johnson day-to-day.

0:40:200:40:25

Donald Trump's former campaign

manager Paul Manna Ford has pleaded

0:40:250:40:31

not guilty to charges filed against

him by the Special Counsel Robert

0:40:310:40:34

Mueller. He will appear before a

federal judge before July the 10th,

0:40:340:40:39

we are reading.

Mr Manna Ford is accused of 23

0:40:390:40:46

offences, including preparing,

filing and subscribing to Sachs

0:40:460:40:48

could lead false tax returns and

bank fraud.

0:40:480:40:58

The Irish Parliament -

known as the Dail -

0:40:580:41:00

is this evening debating a bill

for the planned abortion referendum.

0:41:000:41:03

The Irish Government has published

legislation for the planned abortion

0:41:030:41:05

referendum, paving the way

for the voters to decide

0:41:050:41:07

whether to liberalise

the country's abortion laws.

0:41:070:41:09

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar met

with his Cabinet this morning

0:41:090:41:11

to finalise the wording

of the referendum bill,

0:41:110:41:13

which would formally establish

a referendum commission.

0:41:130:41:15

The vote will be held

at the end of May.

0:41:150:41:18

Chris Page reports from Dublin.

0:41:180:41:18

This is a nation which was once seen

as the most socially

0:41:200:41:23

conservative in western Europe,

but it feels like

0:41:230:41:25

change has been swift.

0:41:250:41:30

In the next few months, Ireland

will make a defining decision.

0:41:300:41:36

Tens of thousands of Irish women

have travelled to other

0:41:360:41:38

countries to have abortions.

0:41:380:41:41

Gaye Edward's baby,

who she and her husband

0:41:410:41:44

named Joshua, had a fatal

condition called anencephaly.

0:41:440:41:47

She says having to go away

to end her pregnancy

0:41:470:41:49

magnified her grief.

0:41:490:41:53

While I knew that I had come

to the right decision for me,

0:41:530:41:58

it made me feel that society

viewed my decision as

0:41:580:42:01

being somehow wrong.

0:42:010:42:03

When you really need to be taken

care of you feel like you're just...

0:42:030:42:08

Pushed aside and into a corner.

0:42:080:42:13

Stories like Gaye's have helped

to bring about the referendum.

0:42:130:42:17

Voters will decide whether to remove

the Eighth Amendment

0:42:170:42:20

of the Irish Constitution,

which gives an unborn child

0:42:200:42:23

and a pregnant woman

an equal right-to-life.

0:42:230:42:26

These canvassers are campaigning

to repeal the Eighth.

0:42:260:42:30

Abortions are happening in Ireland,

they're happening dangerously

0:42:300:42:32

and they're happening illegally.

0:42:320:42:34

We are on the shoulders

of generations of women who have

0:42:340:42:37

been organising and working

for this shift forward.

0:42:370:42:43

If the change to the Constitution

is approved in the referendum,

0:42:430:42:45

the Parliament in Dublin

will determine how available

0:42:450:42:47

terminations will be.

0:42:480:42:51

Ministers want to allow

abortions up to 12 weeks

0:42:510:42:54

into a pregnancy and in some

limited circumstances afterwards.

0:42:540:42:57

But the Government does

haven't a majority.

0:42:570:43:02

But the Government

doesn't have a majority.

0:43:020:43:04

The two main parties

are divided on the issue.

0:43:040:43:06

The Catholic Church's strongly

defending the Eighth Amendment.

0:43:060:43:11

Its power has diminished,

but it certainly hasn't disappeared.

0:43:110:43:13

Life begins at conception and ends

and death and we have

0:43:130:43:16

Life begins at conception and ends

at death and we have

0:43:160:43:18

to protect all life.

0:43:180:43:19

If it's repealed, all the rights

are gone from the baby.

0:43:190:43:22

Women who support the current

law are speaking about

0:43:220:43:24

their experiences too.

0:43:240:43:26

Vicky's daughter, Liandan,

was still-born at 32 weeks.

0:43:260:43:29

She recalls what happened

when a doctor told her he didn't

0:43:290:43:32

expect her baby to live.

0:43:320:43:35

He said that my only option

was to pop to England -

0:43:350:43:38

insinuating an abortion.

0:43:380:43:41

That was never going

to be an option.

0:43:410:43:44

We spent the summer

just being with her.

0:43:440:43:48

The Eighth Amendment

showed to me that not

0:43:480:43:51

only did we value her,

but our country

0:43:510:43:52

valued her like that.

0:43:530:43:56

For people on both sides,

the referendum's about what sort

0:43:560:43:58

of society they want to live in.

0:43:580:44:03

It is a personal,

passionate, emotive debate.

0:44:030:44:04

Chris Page, BBC News, Dublin.

0:44:040:44:12

The International Red Cross has

postponed an aid convoy due to

0:44:120:44:14

travel

0:44:140:44:22

to the

0:44:220:44:25

Syrian rebel-held

enclave of Eastern Ghouta, saying

0:44:250:44:27

it's too dangerous to go there.

0:44:270:44:28

Fighting is intensifying

in the region near Damascus,

0:44:280:44:30

as government forces advance.

0:44:300:44:31

An estimated 400,000 people

are trapped in the area.

0:44:310:44:34

The Irish Prime Minister has

demanded more details

0:44:340:44:35

from the British Government on how

it plans to avoid border checks

0:44:350:44:38

between Northern Ireland

and the Republic once the UK

0:44:380:44:40

leaves the EU.

0:44:400:44:41

Leo Varadkar said Northern

Ireland should stay part

0:44:410:44:43

of the European Single Market

if the UK can't find

0:44:430:44:45

a solution to the problem.

0:44:450:44:49

a second winter storm in a week will

continue to dump heavy snow in

0:44:490:44:57

England and in the north-east. The

230 centimetres of snow are expected

0:44:570:45:05

from eastern New York through

northern Maine after the storm

0:45:050:45:08

slammed the region on Wednesday.

0:45:080:45:11

This is Beyond 100 Days.

0:45:110:45:12

Still to come...

0:45:120:45:15

CACKLING

0:45:150:45:20

Alex Lowe, please stop laughing.

While Amazon's digital assistant is

0:45:200:45:26

bursting into fits of laughter...

That is still to come.

0:45:260:45:31

Here, a jury at the

Old Bailey has seen

0:45:310:45:33

the moment a bomb partially exploded

on a tube in south-west London.

0:45:330:45:36

Some of the passengers on board have

been describing how their hair

0:45:360:45:39

and clothes caught fire when it went

off in a packed carriage

0:45:390:45:42

last September.

0:45:420:45:43

30 people were injured in the

incident at Parsons Green station.

0:45:430:45:46

18-year-old Ahmed Hassan

denies attempted murder.

0:45:460:45:47

From the Old Bailey,

here's June Kelly.

0:45:470:45:52

This was a day of dramatic

and distressing evidence

0:45:520:45:55

as the court heard from those

who work on the train under attack.

0:45:550:45:59

as the court heard from those

who were on the train under attack.

0:45:590:46:02

A bomb had been left in a bag.

0:46:020:46:05

It failed to fully go off but it

created a ball of flame

0:46:050:46:10

which terrified scores of early

morning commuters as it

0:46:100:46:12

rolled down the carriage.

0:46:120:46:13

One, Amy Coalville,

described to the courthouse

0:46:130:46:15

how her hair caught fire.

0:46:150:46:17

She said she'd heard a loud bang

and seen a wall of glass.

0:46:170:46:21

A flame came over

her right hand side.

0:46:210:46:25

Earlier the evidence focused

on the movements that

0:46:250:46:27

morning of Ahmed Hassan,

the teenager on trial

0:46:270:46:29

for the attack.

0:46:290:46:34

Here setting off on his journey

with his bomb in a Lidl bag,

0:46:340:46:37

the court's been told.

0:46:370:46:38

One passenger, Victoria Holloway,

told the jury there was a whooshing

0:46:380:46:41

sound as if someone had lit Bunsen

burner she said the flames

0:46:410:46:44

sound as if someone had lit Bunsen

burner and she said the flames

0:46:440:46:47

were touching her legs

and wrapping around her skin.

0:46:470:46:49

In his evidence, an Army explosives

expert, Craig Palmer,

0:46:490:46:52

who was further down the train,

went to the scene of the blast.

0:46:520:46:55

He said...

0:46:550:46:56

Two of the passengers were in tears

as they gave their evidence.

0:47:070:47:11

They testified from behind

a screen and could be

0:47:110:47:13

seen by only the judge,

jury and lawyers.

0:47:130:47:17

One of them, known only as Miss S,

described how on that

0:47:170:47:20

morning her coat was burning

and her tights were melting.

0:47:200:47:25

She has been left scarred after

burns to her hands, legs and face.

0:47:250:47:34

You're watching Beyond 100 Days.

0:47:370:47:39

From trade to freedom

of religious expression,

0:47:390:47:42

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince has

quite the agenda as he meets

0:47:420:47:45

with the most senior

figures in Britain

0:47:450:47:54

as part of his UK charm offensive.

0:47:540:47:55

Today, Mohammed bin Salman met

with the Archbishop of Canterbury,

0:47:550:47:58

Justin Welby, to promote

Saudi Arabia as a tolerant kingdom.

0:47:580:48:00

The leader of the Church of England

did raise concerns -

0:48:000:48:03

like the freedom of Christian

expression in Saudi Arabia,

0:48:030:48:05

and the dire humanitarian

situation in Yemen,

0:48:050:48:07

where a Saudi-led coalition

is fighting rebels.

0:48:070:48:11

Many haven't warmed to this visit,

0:48:110:48:13

with pockets of protests

across London,

0:48:130:48:15

but they've not

swayed the Prime Minister.

0:48:150:48:18

The Crown Prince met with

Theresa May on Wednesday, with talks

0:48:180:48:21

of a $90 billion trade deal.

0:48:210:48:23

No doubt that will be a key

topic when the pair meet

0:48:240:48:27

at the PM's official country house

tonight, Chequers, where she's

0:48:270:48:29

hosting a private dinner.

0:48:290:48:32

Well, it's all about modernising

0:48:320:48:35

It is International Women's Day and

there have been strikes across the

0:48:400:48:42

globe as women and men campaign for

gender equality and an end to

0:48:420:48:49

discrimination.

We have been tracking some noisy

0:48:490:48:51

street protests and the more unusual

ways that companies around the world

0:48:510:48:55

have responded. One famous brand was

quite literally turned on its head.

0:48:550:48:59

Take a look.

0:48:590:49:01

THEY CHANT

0:49:150:49:17

Some of the protests there around

the world. Outside the BBC in

0:50:000:50:05

London, staff gathered to demand

equal pay. They chose they -- said

0:50:050:50:10

they chose to stand at 4:22pm, nine

to represent the 9% discrepancy.

0:50:100:50:26

Carrie Gracie was there, who

resigned earlier this year as the

0:50:260:50:30

China editor. Now, running a

marathon or long-distance cycling,

0:50:300:50:34

how often you hear older people

saying such sports are just for the

0:50:340:50:38

young. Well, it seems it is not the

case. Researchers have been

0:50:380:50:42

following a big group of older

cyclists, some in their who have

0:50:420:50:46

remained active. Some of the results

are surprising, as Fergus Falls has

0:50:460:50:50

been finding out.

I have arranged a

60 mile ride through the Surrey

0:50:500:50:53

Hills.

This is what healthy ageing looks

0:50:530:50:57

like. The cyclists, aged 64-82,

think nothing of spending five hours

0:50:570:51:03

or more in the saddle.

Room for one

more?

I do it for reasons, for

0:51:030:51:12

health, because I enjoyed, because

it is sociable, it is just a

0:51:120:51:15

wonderful life.

They have all been

examined as part of a trial which is

0:51:150:51:18

challenging perceptions of ageing.

One of the first result I got from

0:51:180:51:22

the medical study was I was told my

body fat was comparable to that of a

0:51:220:51:30

19-year-old.

Leading the peloton is

professor Norman Lazarus. At 82, a

0:51:300:51:36

prime example of healthy ageing.

If

exercise was a pill, everybody in

0:51:360:51:41

the world would be taking an

exercise pill.

He not only took part

0:51:410:51:47

in the study, but helped lead the

research. This test shows his

0:51:470:51:53

excellent lung function.

Last little

bit, keep pushing.

An MRI scan gives

0:51:530:51:59

another indication of how well

Norman is ageing. These are his

0:51:590:52:03

thighs. Now compare Norman's

muscular legs on the right with that

0:52:030:52:10

they said and tree 50-year-old on

the left, which is mostly fat. If

0:52:100:52:16

more of us could do the recommended

150 minutes of moderate physical

0:52:160:52:23

activity each week, it would pay

huge dividends.

Across a whole come

0:52:230:52:29

at of different levels, what

exercise is doing in older

0:52:290:52:32

individuals is giving them higher

levels of function and better

0:52:320:52:35

quality of life -- across the whole

gamut.

The most remarkable findings

0:52:350:52:40

came when scientists in Birmingham

examined blood samples from the

0:52:400:52:44

cyclists. They found their immune

system, which normally declines with

0:52:440:52:49

age, was still as strong as a young

person's.

The immune system is

0:52:490:52:53

really key in the body, it has

several roles. It protects us from

0:52:530:53:05

infections but it also helps us to

fight things like cancer, so the

0:53:050:53:07

fact that the cyclists have the

immune system of a 20-year-old and

0:53:070:53:10

not a 70 or 80-year-old means they

are protected from infections and

0:53:100:53:12

cancer potentially.

The advantages,

then, of exercise in later life are

0:53:120:53:17

profound. So if cycling is not your

thing, try another sport. What about

0:53:170:53:23

dancing? Gardening? Even brisk

walking. Most of the health benefits

0:53:230:53:28

of these super agers are easily

achievable if we just did a bit more

0:53:280:53:32

physical activity.

0:53:320:53:36

Isn't that fascinating? I mean, it

is really confirming what we all do

0:53:370:53:43

know, that exercise is good for us

but I was saying this a few weeks

0:53:430:53:46

ago, my grandad used to walk

regularly and when he stopped

0:53:460:53:50

walking, things started to go

downhill but he just couldn't walk

0:53:500:53:54

anymore because his legs seized upon

his back seized up and he is nearly

0:53:540:53:59

94, but still, the moment that the

exercise finished, that is the point

0:53:590:54:02

where he started to go downhill, so

there is a lesson there for all of

0:54:020:54:09

us, isn't there?

And it is a lesson

that, as you say, we know, they say

0:54:090:54:12

use it or lose it and it's nice to

see that science is finally

0:54:120:54:16

confirming our innate knowledge on

that.

Get back on the bike, get

0:54:160:54:19

moving. And I say that because we

are going to seamlessly move into

0:54:190:54:22

something that I have in my house

which means I don't move very much,

0:54:220:54:27

I don't move off the couch because I

have Amazon Alexa and some say there

0:54:270:54:31

device has been letting out an

unprompted creepy cackle.

0:54:310:54:40

CREEPY CACKLE

0:54:400:54:45

Some people have described it as a

sort of witchlike cackle. It is

0:54:450:54:50

reported to happen even without the

device being given the wake-up

0:54:500:54:53

command, so you say at Alexa and you

give it a command. What really

0:54:530:54:58

concerns me is that mine is in my

bedroom so if I was in my bedroom

0:54:580:55:03

getting dressed in the morning and I

heard that, I would develop a bit of

0:55:030:55:05

a complex.

I think it is very

worrying first of all virtue can't

0:55:050:55:09

get up and use a switch like

everybody else, including me, and

0:55:090:55:13

that you would have one of these

things in your bedroom. What does

0:55:130:55:17

happen when she suddenly switches on

and start cackling?

All of my

0:55:170:55:21

friends are dumping them because

they are always listing and they are

0:55:210:55:24

terrified they are listening in on

their secrets but I have one

0:55:240:55:28

upstairs and one downstairs and

because I am an early adopter, I had

0:55:280:55:31

one downstairs that turns on my

lights so I don't even have to get

0:55:310:55:36

up to turn them off for Ron.

This is

totally alien to me because I am the

0:55:360:55:42

sort of person that puts a sticky

tape over the camera lens of my

0:55:420:55:45

computer because I'm so worried

about technology.

Then you appear on

0:55:450:55:49

television and tell everybody your

secrets! I don't know, I am an open

0:55:490:55:53

book. I am here all week. We will be

back for the same time on Monday,

0:55:530:55:57

thank you to Jane for her company.

Caddy will be

0:55:570:56:00