30/07/2011 Click


30/07/2011

Guide to the latest gadgets, websites, games and computer industry news. Click gets to grips with 3D printers, and tunes in to French IPTV.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 30/07/2011. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

their turn to take centre stage. Now it is time for Click. There has

:00:15.:00:25.
:00:25.:00:36.

This week we are copying and printing ourselves at a rapid

:00:36.:00:41.

prototyping lab in London. And we ask it creating things from scratch

:00:41.:00:46.

in our own home will be as easy as downloading the design? The net

:00:46.:00:51.

feeding your TV set. We are in France, one of the country's

:00:51.:00:54.

leading the next living room revolution but will it catch on

:00:54.:00:57.

elsewhere? We will also some up the biggest

:00:57.:01:00.

Tech News stories around the world and ask if this website can really

:01:00.:01:10.
:01:10.:01:15.

Welcome. You join me at a very interesting point. I am having my

:01:15.:01:20.

head scanned so that it can be duplicated. Not so the BBC has a

:01:20.:01:24.

spare in case of any accident but because my head is going to be

:01:24.:01:33.

reproduced by that machine over there. A 3D Printer. 3D printing is

:01:33.:01:38.

essentially exactly what it sounds like. Producing a 3D object by

:01:38.:01:43.

printed yet. It is now catching on with those who need to create 3D

:01:43.:01:49.

models quickly and cheaply. Designers who need to test the look

:01:49.:01:55.

and feel of their prototypes can see it in the real world. Artists

:01:55.:01:59.

wanting to bring outrage has designed to life. And architects

:01:59.:02:04.

who need to create precision scale models of their building plans.

:02:04.:02:08.

There has even been talk that in the future, buildings themselves

:02:08.:02:14.

will be printed censure and by section. Recently, the technology

:02:14.:02:19.

has become cheap enough to go mainstream. -- section by section.

:02:19.:02:23.

UK designer models on mine and then get them printed it, packaged and

:02:23.:02:27.

sent straight to you. You can even bring them in colour. The print is

:02:27.:02:32.

not so different to traditional printers. But instead of flat

:02:32.:02:35.

layers of League, these models to spend the layers of plastic,

:02:35.:02:43.

Western or even film. One on top of the other until the work of art is

:02:43.:02:49.

complete. The process starts with a scan and the scanner. He Ritter's.

:02:49.:02:54.

What we have our two lenses up the top that up taking lots of photos

:02:54.:02:59.

every second. -- here it is. The projector projects a grid onto the

:02:59.:03:03.

subject. So I will show you what it looks like on the screen. The greed

:03:03.:03:09.

is collecting geometric data. So 3D data about the subject that is

:03:09.:03:14.

being scanned. -- agreed. That is then fed into the software which

:03:14.:03:18.

essentially stages all of that together. It uses the geometric

:03:18.:03:25.

data to form the 3D model of my head. Which again see on screen

:03:25.:03:33.

here. It does need the human touch. This is why date is here. He built

:03:33.:03:37.

filling the hole in my face. Once he have done that, he adds the

:03:38.:03:42.

texture and colour back onto the head. Prices go and then that

:03:42.:03:47.

information is sent the Print Station. -- presses go. We have a

:03:47.:03:51.

choice of three different types of 3D printers. This one uses a power

:03:52.:03:55.

the substance. If you look there, you can see the powder and you can

:03:55.:03:59.

see what looks like an inkjet printer of. That is because that is

:03:59.:04:04.

what it is. It used as a normal inkjet printer head to pump flew

:04:04.:04:08.

into the powder but only where it needs to set that particular cross

:04:08.:04:14.

section. Then, a whole bed of powder drops down and just the bit

:04:14.:04:17.

for the next cross section is pumped in and said. This is the

:04:17.:04:23.

kind of thing that this powder 3D Printer will produce. -- pumped in

:04:23.:04:27.

and said. Next up, we have something that looks like a

:04:28.:04:33.

microwave oven. That is because it does get very hot in there. This is

:04:33.:04:37.

a 3D printer are using Western. You can see inside again. It is

:04:37.:04:47.
:04:47.:04:47.

building up their -- building up the head of layer by layer. This

:04:47.:04:53.

printing is useful for producing injection-moulded stuff. And also a

:04:53.:04:59.

snap fix kits. Things you would put together afterwards. This is

:04:59.:05:04.

possibly the weird a sprinter in my mind because it actually uses paper.

:05:04.:05:08.

It has a big dream of A4 paper and it loads the paper sheet by sheet

:05:08.:05:13.

onto this bed, lose the previous sheet of paper and then a fine

:05:13.:05:17.

blade cuts out dust the top layer into the shape of a cross section.

:05:17.:05:23.

Then the whole thing goes down and wallpaper is added. You can get

:05:23.:05:27.

some really bizarre creations like this which is made of paper but

:05:27.:05:30.

there is no other way of coming up with something like this if you are

:05:30.:05:35.

just making it out of paper. The data we saw that makes up my head

:05:35.:05:39.

is sent to the computer attachment in these printers and each one will

:05:39.:05:42.

process it in a different way because of the way it is printed.

:05:42.:05:47.

The powder Printer only needs the model to be broken up -- broken up

:05:47.:05:51.

into cross-sections. But there was an printer need extra information

:05:51.:05:55.

so it can work out where to put support to keep it in the right

:05:55.:06:01.

shape before the race and has set in the heat. More on 3D printing in

:06:01.:06:04.

a minute and we can see the final result before we finished the

:06:04.:06:08.

programme. Next is this week's Tech News.

:06:08.:06:13.

The hacking group Anonymous has started to release secret documents

:06:13.:06:17.

stolen from an Italian cyber crime unit. The files were allegedly

:06:17.:06:22.

taken from a department which oversees Italy's critical IT

:06:22.:06:27.

infrastructure. It was supposed to be in retaliation to the arrest of

:06:27.:06:31.

the group Anonymous. It is threatening further attacks against

:06:31.:06:41.
:06:41.:06:53.

pay power and E Bay. -- PayPal. The company wants to break the

:06:53.:06:57.

stranglehold of proprietary technologies over the mobile world.

:06:57.:07:03.

Although gecko is using the Google android operating system as the

:07:03.:07:08.

starting point. And finally, five fake apple stores are being found

:07:08.:07:12.

in China. The retell impostors were discovered in a seedy after an

:07:12.:07:16.

American bloggers spotted the shops complete with staff wearing Apple

:07:16.:07:21.

branded T-shirts. At least two of the stores have been closed but the

:07:21.:07:25.

fight goes on with reports of other fakes stores popping up in

:07:25.:07:34.

Venezuela and Croatia. My head has been scanned and has

:07:34.:07:40.

been tidied up and is busy been printed. Meanwhile, let's talk to

:07:40.:07:47.

the course director here. Welcome to Click. 3D Printing, is there

:07:47.:07:53.

anything you cannot use to print quest mac there are many different

:07:53.:08:00.

technologies out there. You can boil it down to two. Additives, so

:08:00.:08:04.

attractive and others. You are working with an additive process we

:08:04.:08:09.

print in 3D, you are building up layers using a liquid or powder. It

:08:10.:08:14.

comes in materials you can use depending on the subject that you

:08:14.:08:21.

are printing. There is a fantastic machine called the Candy Fab

:08:21.:08:25.

Printer. You can imagine pouring kilos of sugar into a printer and

:08:25.:08:31.

producing something that is very sustainable. And tasty? Yes.

:08:31.:08:38.

Dissolves in the rain. Or you may be printing with titanium powder.

:08:38.:08:46.

So that would imply that you might be making a hip-replacement joint.

:08:46.:08:51.

Or you may need to make replacement parts for your car. They could be

:08:51.:08:57.

printed with cobalt, for example. Subtracted technologies is the

:08:57.:09:02.

reverse. You are taking a solid block and you are removing material

:09:02.:09:11.

from it. So you may be working with a laser, a laved, it will, and more

:09:11.:09:16.

and more larger projects are using powerful water jets to look remove

:09:16.:09:23.

these blocks. -- a drill. There are cheaper alternatives aren't there?

:09:23.:09:27.

Yes. The notion of the factory on the desktop is rising it has been

:09:27.:09:37.
:09:37.:09:37.

for some time. There is a concept which a doctor at Bath University

:09:37.:09:41.

has been working on. The machine replicates itself so you can log on

:09:41.:09:44.

to the website and learn how to build your own prototype that will

:09:44.:09:48.

then intern build another one and another one. That is the stuff that

:09:49.:09:56.

nightmares are made of. How to visit to build that? I would

:09:56.:10:00.

imagine you could do that for a couple of hundred pounds. So you

:10:00.:10:06.

are talking about making a prototype yourself instead of

:10:06.:10:10.

spending a lot of money getting it made. And you are talking about

:10:10.:10:14.

people halfway around the world printing the part they need. What

:10:14.:10:18.

will that do to the manufactoring industry? It is revolutionising it.

:10:18.:10:24.

A lot of people are out of work perhaps but essentially what you

:10:24.:10:34.
:10:34.:10:37.

are looking at is the ability to set up factories at a lower cost.

:10:37.:10:41.

You can make slight adjustments to prototypes once you have made the

:10:41.:10:48.

initial ones. And the other FX, what about the freight industry?

:10:48.:10:51.

You no longer have to ship a component part right across the

:10:51.:10:56.

world, you can printed right here and now we wanted. That is a very

:10:56.:11:04.

green bean to be doing. -- green thing. If you can scan on to it,

:11:04.:11:11.

you can copy objects as well? are right. The music industry has

:11:11.:11:15.

been in that it severely by that during the last decade. Yes, what

:11:15.:11:20.

we have is a situation where a digital file can be shared and

:11:20.:11:23.

copyright infringement can occur. So that will be a big issue for the

:11:23.:11:28.

lawyers and have to be worked out. It has not been resolved yet.

:11:28.:11:34.

you for your time. Your thoughts would be welcome on this. It is a

:11:34.:11:39.

fascinating subject. E-mail us or tweed asked. Later, I will be

:11:39.:11:49.
:11:49.:11:50.

Apparently one day all TV will be received over the internet. There

:11:50.:11:56.

is currently a Battle Royal raging over how that's going to happen.

:11:56.:12:01.

First, there's the all-singing all- dancing I P C D that promises to be

:12:01.:12:06.

the future of television. And then there's internet TV, which also

:12:06.:12:12.

promises to be the future of television. So how do we work this

:12:12.:12:16.

one out? David Reed reports from France where at least one of these

:12:16.:12:24.

formats is already making itself at This family here in common with

:12:24.:12:30.

millions of other French households get their daily dose of telly from

:12:30.:12:35.

I P t be. They get seemingly limitless channels, can hire videos,

:12:35.:12:40.

which saves a trip to the shop, and you can play video games.

:12:40.:12:45.

Particularly popular with Julie. Internet protocol TV is based on

:12:45.:12:50.

the same technology as the internet, but uses a more reliable managed

:12:50.:12:55.

network. It is called on in France partly because I P TV has been

:12:55.:13:00.

cleverly bundled together with the internet and telephone for a modest

:13:00.:13:06.

monthly subscription. TRANSLATION: In the end, it will replace all

:13:06.:13:12.

other forms of television delivery. It is not strictly just down to us

:13:12.:13:15.

as there is a global growth and that is very strong. EUR4 million

:13:15.:13:21.

our service in France and more than 10 million use it. We have an

:13:21.:13:28.

exclusive service that didn't exist ten years ago with strong growth.

:13:28.:13:32.

So,' is he right? Is this French Revolution poised to spread

:13:32.:13:38.

elsewhere? Well, it could be, but it all depends on how it copes with

:13:38.:13:42.

the competition from internet television. Now, you will be

:13:42.:13:48.

familiar with services already, and there's also internet TV from

:13:48.:13:58.
:13:58.:13:59.

broadcasters like the BBC or While internet TV is often free, it

:13:59.:14:03.

is not always reliable. That's because the TV show you are

:14:03.:14:08.

watching has to compete with the other traffic on the net. It means

:14:08.:14:15.

that from time to time, it does this... I P t beyond the other hand

:14:15.:14:20.

comes to you down a managed network. It means that it has a dedicated

:14:21.:14:27.

fast lane. No buffering issues, more like this. It is a matter of

:14:27.:14:31.

the reliability of reception of the programmes. That is a big advantage

:14:31.:14:36.

but of course it comes with the cost. If you reserve a seat on a

:14:36.:14:42.

train, you have got to pay an extra cost for preserving that seat. You

:14:42.:14:47.

have to pay a subscription for I P TV, but not with open internet,

:14:47.:14:54.

which you get via your normal internet service provider. Internet

:14:54.:14:59.

TV is looking to consolidate in the future with initiatives like you

:14:59.:15:03.

view, an online platform for British broadcasters. It is worth

:15:03.:15:08.

bearing in mind that advertisers like both I P TV and internet TV,

:15:08.:15:14.

both can gather data on Dewar's, both can deliver targeted at its --

:15:15.:15:21.

viewers -- at its. TRANSLATION: What we do this is commit consumer

:15:21.:15:28.

by consumer, subscriber by subscriber, to deliver targeted and

:15:28.:15:31.

revising -- advertising. In Lyon are able to live advertising

:15:31.:15:36.

relevant to what is around you. We can deliver adverts relevant to

:15:36.:15:41.

each subscriber, rather than everyone. So there is an important

:15:41.:15:46.

distinction between broadcasting and cable castings. You send out

:15:46.:15:50.

all of the programme's at the same time and the viewer picks what he

:15:50.:15:55.

wants anonymously. Systems based on internet protocol. Open internet,

:15:55.:15:59.

and I P TV, in this case your addresses on the front of the

:15:59.:16:03.

programme so somebody somewhere knows what you're watching all the

:16:03.:16:07.

time. This information, is an advertiser or a programme company

:16:07.:16:13.

can get it, can be used to help shape advertising, within what kind

:16:13.:16:19.

of programmes you are watching, for how long and when you watch them.

:16:19.:16:23.

This is the fact of life associated with IEP delivery services, they

:16:23.:16:29.

are addressed. Somebody knows who is watching when and where. Perhaps

:16:29.:16:34.

there are some future ethical issues in this area as well. Do we

:16:34.:16:39.

want a society where this happens? Or, would we prefer a broadcast

:16:40.:16:44.

environments that we can watch something anonymously. That is a

:16:44.:16:49.

question for the future, I'm sure. It looks like there will be a role

:16:49.:16:54.

in this new era of television for both I P t and internet TV. Once

:16:55.:16:59.

again with new technology the downside of incredible choice is

:16:59.:17:09.
:17:09.:17:11.

creepy intrusion and uninvited David Reid on the difference

:17:11.:17:16.

between internet TV and internet protocol TV. Got it? Good. Now, one

:17:16.:17:20.

of the UK's leading newspapers publish as a famous rich list

:17:20.:17:23.

containing the names of all those people we love to hate... because

:17:23.:17:28.

they've got too much money. Working for the BBC are pretty sure I will

:17:28.:17:33.

never make it. But, there's a good a list published by the same

:17:33.:17:36.

newspaper that people like you and I may stand a chance of featuring

:17:36.:17:42.

on as long as we're sociable. Kate Russell explains. I might not have

:17:42.:17:46.

much in my savings account but there's one place I'm pretty sure

:17:46.:17:56.

of my value, the social Web. And here, I can find out for short by

:17:56.:18:01.

connecting my social networking accounts and let the website take

:18:01.:18:11.

care of the rest. Being at the top of this list isn't just about

:18:11.:18:16.

spamming your networks with drivel, shocking I know. It a value weights

:18:16.:18:20.

the interest generated by your posts, giving you a much clearer

:18:20.:18:30.

indication of Yorweth to the crowd. You connect with various websites,

:18:30.:18:34.

covering the vast majority of Social media activities. Europe is

:18:34.:18:39.

updated daily and you have to be in it to win it -- your rank. You

:18:39.:18:44.

won't be included if you haven't signed in it. So come on, what are

:18:44.:18:49.

you worth? Maybe your social contacts will be more valuable to

:18:49.:18:57.

you than you are to them. That's life, I guess. And with hash Abol

:18:57.:19:07.
:19:07.:19:12.

.com, you can keep track of all your meaningful connections. So if

:19:12.:19:22.
:19:22.:19:22.

you're meeting with a friend, you Then the website will put it in

:19:22.:19:27.

your records. They then aggregates all the cash tanks used by you and

:19:27.:19:32.

your inner circle. So you can see who's doing what, where and with

:19:32.:19:38.

whom. It might sound a bit trivial to some, or even perhaps a little

:19:38.:19:43.

invasive, but you locked in with the relevant hash tag at having the

:19:43.:19:46.

history available through the site could come in handy if your

:19:46.:19:56.
:19:56.:20:03.

business is all about connections - I have a very musical thumb, don't

:20:03.:20:12.

believe me? Well check out this app. It's not free, but I think it's

:20:12.:20:16.

worth every penny if you fancy yourself a bit of a digital

:20:16.:20:23.

composer. The idea is that you record looks of difference some

:20:23.:20:27.

poor old instruments, stacking them on top of each other until you get

:20:27.:20:36.

a composition you're proud of. Oh... you might want to use your

:20:36.:20:43.

headphones to, not everybody appreciates a musical genius. There

:20:43.:20:48.

are loads of pre-installed samples and you can download more or even

:20:48.:20:52.

record your own. Effects can be added and you can even control them

:20:52.:21:00.

using the phone's accessories. Like adding pitched bend with tilt. Or,

:21:00.:21:07.

shaking it. So creating your thumb Jan is easy and you can use the

:21:07.:21:12.

copy and paste unction to record a session in two lots of compatible

:21:12.:21:18.

apps. -- pace function. I still can't get it to work, though, but

:21:18.:21:24.

the makers to assure me that the next update Pool six various issues.

:21:24.:21:34.
:21:34.:21:38.

If you would like to submit a website or a app e-mail us -- next

:21:38.:21:48.
:21:48.:21:51.

This week, the team gets an inside view on a new project by the

:21:51.:21:57.

musician, York. Find out why her new album is violently Happy. Just

:21:57.:22:04.

one more thing to do and that is to introduce you to my little head.

:22:04.:22:11.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS