10/08/2013 Click


10/08/2013

Why learn a language when you could just download one? Plus, unlocking your phone and home using your jewellery. Includes tech news and Webscape.


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last year. Much more as always on the website, now it is time for

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click. I am Spencer Kelly. I am that the big cheese. This week, click

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takes a look at the latest translation technology. But is it

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time to in the technologies or is the hard lesson here to stay stop we

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also try out an accessory that gives you full access. All that and the

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latest technology news and a sleep over in Europe. Welcome to click.

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Technology is making the world a very small place. Not least because

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it is breaking down barriers between economies and cultures. Yet

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something things still to get lost in translation. Websites are

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constantly upping their game when it comes to translators, but how close

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are we to a speedy and portable solution? We get stuck into a good

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look. London. One of the most linguistically diverse cities in the

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world. With more than 8 million citizens, every single day over 100

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different languages can be heard here. If distance becomes an

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inconvenience rather than an insurmountable obstacle,

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globalisation means communicating in only one language is just not good

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enough. In this hive of activity, hundreds of people spend hours each

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day in learning languages the traditional way. You will not find a

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translation application in these classrooms. But as accuracy

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improves, maybe they should not bother. Are the applications up to

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the job? There is one way to find out. Let's put these apps to the

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test. This woman is going to speak Turkish into the Google trends in

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what -- in translation. And this man will speak Italian. TRANSLATION:

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let's have lunch together today. Do you have a nice Italian restaurant?

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Do you know a nice Italian restaurant? If there is a

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restaurant, making a pizza right with neighbourhood. It did not go so

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smoothly but hopefully they will turn up at the same place stop type

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the word you are translated, and instead you'll get a better result.

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So inadequacies in voice recognition must shoulder some of the blame.

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has two recognise the words you are saying. That is independent of

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translation. You have to hard problems. What seems obvious for

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people, recognising words out of a sound scape, putting them together

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in sentences and translating them into another language if you know

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it, it is very hard. It is very hard for computers. Grasping a phone as

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you chat is hardly natural. So maybe there could be some wearable tech to

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the rescue. This is Google glass which is basically a kinetic and few

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-- computer on your face. It has a built in microphone, speaker and

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everything you need for translation. When I put this on I may feel silly,

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but it looks like I can see a screen over there on the other side of the

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room. What you are looking at is a piece of glass, but this is a better

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idea of what I can see. You may have heard about the camera features but

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what we are interested in now is the translation. If I want to do a basic

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translation, this is what I do. Google, how are you in France. Via

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the Speaker I can hear how to say it and it is written on my screen.

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Pretty cool, and that is just a prototype. Many translation

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applications need to be online to work. That data could be problematic

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when you are abroad and likely to need translation the most. Here are

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a few applications that could solve the problem. The San Sung as for

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Keynes -- comes packaged with its own translation at. It also comes

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with an off-line phrasebook. It has categories in eight languages. You

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can add your own favourite phrases to the next. So you've going to the

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Arctic tree on, you can put that in. If you are going for something more

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flexible, Google translate now has an off-line mode as well. It should

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be up to translate anything you think of. It comes with a 160

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megabytes download, so you will need a hit of storage free if you are

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planning a world tour. What about if you cannot even read the language?

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Well you might want to try this. This can translate roadsigns and

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other text. So you have got your device to understand it, and it is

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translating when you need it to, but even in this perfect scenario you

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might still be a little disappointed with what comes out. Odds are you'll

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get the gist of it, but why can we not have a natural conversation?

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When you translate from one language to another, you need to make all

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sorts of decisions stop in your own language and inulin which are going

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into. If you do not make them properly, they will produce garbage.

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they would translate it into a lane which in an translated back. The

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spirit is willing but the flesh is weak, that is the sentence. What

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they got back from the Russian was, the media is good but the vodka is

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rotten. If you want to learn a few basic languages, you start with

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rules. Computers are not different except that computers do not look at

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language books, they look at the entire Internet. They look at early

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in the documents that have already been translated by languages --

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humans into different languages. United Nations documents, bilingual

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websites, and others. All that government -- all that information

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together and you can start to spot patterns about how and which works

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at how it to other languages. The more of these patterns you know, the

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more accurate your translation should get. The problem is, some

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lane which combinations do not have much data to go on. So translating

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English to German is going to be much better than in which to swat

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Healy. -- English to swat Healy. smarter we are at understand the

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patterns between that data, the better off we are going to be.

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the problem of encoding the totality of human knowledge about the world,

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and about the way language interacts with it. That is how to represent

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human intelligence. Will we ever solve it? That is the same as asking

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if we will understand how the human mind. For conversation at least, is

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going to be a little while replaces one of these -- before a phone

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replaces one of these. Next up, a walk -- look at technology news. The

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South Korean city has become the electrical roads. They are fuelled

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by a power strip on the road. The strip admits magnetic fields which

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he buses convert into electricity as they drive. The electromagnetic

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fields are safer humans and egg eliminates the need for buses to

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recharge their batteries. Popular messaging servers has announced the

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ad addition of voice messages. The Apple Corps Jeep makes -- the

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application makes its money by charging.... It brings it into

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Facebook messenger and other messaging services which offer

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similar features. Amazon founder and CEO has ought the Washington Post

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newspaper. He may be $250 million purchase himself, not on behalf of

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Amazon on. However the acquisition suggest that the Washington post may

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start innovating digitally. When asked about its future the CEO said

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he wanted it to invent an experiment. When you spend three and

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a half thousand pounds on a luxury toilet, the last being you expect it

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is to be hacked. This is a luxury toilet that is being controlled by

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an application. A hacker managed to access it. Because of limited

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Bluetooth range, anyone wanted to carrying out such an attack would

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need to be close by. One technology that is definitely been a long time

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coming as something called near field communications. The ability to

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touch two data is -- two devices together and data to flow together.

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It is very slowly made its way to the west. Getting more traction

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along the way we a thriving younger population is more eager to try out

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stop so eager in fact, that when we visited Turkey two years ago, I came

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across this device. He is a funny thing, as low -- although it is

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established in Turkey it is the mobile phone industry trying to play

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catch up. There are hardly any mobile phones on the market that had

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it built in. In order to kick-start that technology in Turkey you can

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retrofit any old mobile phone with a computer chip. What you do is you

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get this adapter and you feed it behind the scene card into your

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phone. You can see that here is the radio antenna and on the adapter

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there is a little bit of software that adds a menu function to your

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phone. For example, I have a pretty basic phone, it does not have a

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built in, you can see it is -- has got the adapter wrapped in an

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immediate you go into the menu and scroll down to functions, you can

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see you can make a payment to any other the cards you have linked to

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your account. Nowadays, more people carry around these credit cards

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allowing to make small payments quickly in many stores. The

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technology is quickly moving beyond small financial transaction. At this

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year 's consumer Electronics show, Sony showed off a raft of new

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features. Here they are used to create a quick Bluetooth connection

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between two devices. No need to use fiddle with the settings. These

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could tag your... What is more personal than your password? This

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ring think that you should no longer have to type it in. Where better to

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store it on something that you can easily carry around with you at all

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times. The body of the ring is made of metal. In between the two rims

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that is based for the electronics in here. This is a ring of two halves,

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you can see they have been colour-coded lack and white stop the

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white side is supposed to face outwards, that contains your public

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information. Your contact details. On the inside, the black half

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contains your private details. Something you would not want to

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share with anyone else. Why not use it to unlock your front door. First

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you had to use this digital lock. Not something he would wear to make

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a design statement but we are yet to see wearable technology that takes

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that locks. Former -- for now, it is strictly function over fashion. Less

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than a month into its kick-start funding pledge, the ring has been

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backed by 4,000 people raising �100,000. John McLear is the

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inventor of the ring. He joined us. You have part funded this project

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through kick-start, depending on how much you give you get a different --

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different amount of ring technology. One of the options is to enable any

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contributors to 3-D print the ring at home? Tell us about that. We were

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thinking that people may want to make there own designs. We thought,

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we will deliver the technology inside the ring and they print the

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act will ring themselves and put it together. One of the questions that

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struck me, you have a private and a public side to the ring. My ring, is

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spending around all the time. What is to stop you having the ring the

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wrong way around and giving someone private information instead of

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public. The private side of the ring does not have intents. They pass

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things out which would cause someone to do something. Your phone has to

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ask for a piece of information from the private side and then it will

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respond. If you use the private side, it will not tell the phone or

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other device what to do. If you have the ring halfway spun round, there

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is a metal bar between the private and public that at as a screen. It

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blocks the struggle -- signal from the side that is not meant to be

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presented. If someone stole the ring they could unlock most parts of my

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life, both -- there is no more authentication required. How do you

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solve that problem queuemac if you lose the ring, you set the reset

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button. With the phone, do you can log in with an e-mail address and a

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password. It makes the checks to see you are who you say you are. With

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the digital door, there is a pen and use it the reset arson. The

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advantages, if you lose the ring as opposed to losing your normal key

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that you lose now, you do not have too replace the entire door lock.

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There are cost savings long-term. This is one of the most practical

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uses of wearable technology. We have been talking about this for years.

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Do you see this functionality being introduced into other things in the

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future. Every part of your body has a different physical attribute it is

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useful for. With the ring, we decided unlocking things as a

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sensible thing. You might have public information you want to share

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on your wrist, something where you unlock the phone when you hold it to

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your air if you have an enabled airing. There are lots of practical

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applications, the -- we are used to -- we are looking forward to the

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community looking forward to it and exploring the applications. Good

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luck. Now it is time for Webscape. Most of us are familiar with the

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concept of taking a lodger to help pay the rent, the idea of peer

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rentals have taken that to a new level. You will not make a huge

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amount of money by renting out the spare room but it may help to pay

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the gas or Alec Christie Bell. Here is Kate Russell with the latest site

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to move into the area. -- electricity bill. The rental trend

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is booming online. We looked at a few examples already on Webscape

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like and ParkatmyHouse, there is another promising newcomer to the

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market, Alterkeys. It has a young interface but is due to being a

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social experience for the host and visitor. As well as being a

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cost-effective alternative to booking a hotel, one of the reasons

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I like to travel this way is the connection you get to local

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knowledge. Picking the brains of your host for the best faces to

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visit. I have made some good friends through peer-to-peer renting who

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remain on my friends list today. With over 50,000 properties around

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Europe, it is free to list a broom and a secure payment system holds

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the amount in escrow once a booking is made to avoid any embarrassment

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asking for payment. It offers thorough insurance although it there

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is a processing fee. As with anything financial, read the terms

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and conditions to check you are fully covered. Remember, the people

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themselves have not been vetted, make sure you are happy with your

:19:09.:19:18.
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post before booking. With your room booked, you may need a flight. Which

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airline is a new service which searches 100,000 Brits looking for

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the best bang for your buck. That does not necessarily mean the lowest

:19:31.:19:41.
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possible airfare. -- sites. When you are travelling long haul, the

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cheapest journey is not always the best value. You need to consider

:19:49.:19:54.

journey time and stopovers. Spending 15 hours at an airport departure

:19:54.:20:00.

lounge can be an expensive proposition in its own right. Which

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airline offers an elegant solution with a virtual results page making

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it much easier to compare options. Choose your country from the

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drop-down menu and fill in the search box is to explore. There are

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free iPhone and android applications as well. Smart phones are great for

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recording video, what are you supposed to do with all the random

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clip is. -- clips? VideofyMe has a good idea, a free application for

:20:37.:20:41.

iPhone and android that it is to edit together clips from your rear

:20:41.:20:44.

reel with a couple of swipes and tapes to make finished films which

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can be stored on your phone or shared with friends or popular

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blogging platforms. There are lots of video applications doing the

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rounds for your smart phone but I like that this application lets you

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edit a cool high light meal of your life complete with a backing track

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and visual effects, all created and shared straight from your handset.

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-- highlight reel. The video effects are only available if you are

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recording live through the application but you can stitch them

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altogether from your camera reel after saving them one at a time. As

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well as integrated sharing, you can build a network of followers with an

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application to experience the latest highlights from their lives every

:21:34.:21:44.
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time you start it up. Disappearing content, like Snapchat is all the

:21:46.:21:49.

rage online right now. One interesting social experiment that

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has hit the web this week as Blinklink, it lets users post a

:21:53.:21:58.

photo to be shared on Twitter with a limited number of views, unless

:21:58.:22:06.

someone she is the link on again, which adds another block of views.

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-- she is the link. An interesting experiment with a reward dynamic on

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sharing I can see giving rewards to marketers. I am struggling to see a

:22:17.:22:27.
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more widespread for the everyday person on the web. This week to mark

:22:34.:22:39.

the 6th of August anniversary of pop art Legion Andy Warhol's birthday,

:22:39.:22:45.

the museum in his honour has launched a live 24 hours webcam beat

:22:45.:22:48.

of four whole's grave. In his hometown of Pittsburgh,

:22:48.:22:54.

Pennsylvania. Was a popular place for fans to go and pay respects, and

:22:54.:22:57.

right now as he would have celebrated his 85th birthday, a

:22:57.:23:01.

fitting tribute to a man was known for doing things differently.

:23:01.:23:11.
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Although, there is not much to see at night. While we're waiting for

:23:14.:23:18.

Pittsburgh to wake up, point your browser at another set of feats

:23:18.:23:24.

which went live tonight iPanda, these animals are wide-awake. The

:23:24.:23:28.

site delivers round the clock video from 28 hide definition cameras

:23:28.:23:34.

inside a giant panda reading research base in China. Here are 80

:23:34.:23:37.

giant pandas go about their incredibly cute daily business for

:23:37.:23:47.
:23:47.:24:02.

all to see. It is goodbye our Webscape -- website. If anything

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