05/04/2014 Click


05/04/2014

Gadgets, websites, games and computer industry news. Click talks to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and looks at how advertising is using technology to target customers.


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are expected to appeal against the sentence. That's it from me. Lots

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more at the top of the ally. Here on BBC News, it is time for Click.

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Military mistakes, public surveillance, national security. Can

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you keep a secret? This week on Click, hero or villain?

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We chat to one of the most divisive figures of the web. What do you get

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if you cross our taser with a drone? Well, a taser`drone of course. We

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asked the question, why? We go behind the screens with the

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advertising tax that is planning to take over the world. And, flight

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delays got you down? We will show you how to survive the longer than

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expected airport stay in Webscape. Back welcome to Click. We've spent a

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lot of time talking about one person, and this person is one of

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the most controversial in the world and he helped facilitate one of the

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biggest security leaks in history. We've never had the chance to talk

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to him directly or ask him any questions. That is, until now.

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That's because, this week I've been able to over satellite to Julian

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Assange, founder of the website Wikileaks. Assange has been based in

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the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012, following a British

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court ruling that he should be extradited to Sweden for questioning

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over allegations of sexual assault. Former hacker, in April 2010,

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Assange and wiki leaks blamed notoriety releasing footage of US

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soldiers shooting dead 18 civilians from a helicopter in a rut. Millions

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of other classified documents followed. `` Iraq. For supporters,

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he is an advocate of free speech, shining a light on the murky

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activities of governments around the world. His detractors say he is a

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harmful and unpredictable figure, endangering countless lives by

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exposing sensitive and classified information to the public. Whatever

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you think of him, his influence on the world of tech is undeniable.

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Inspiring people like Edward Snowden and, for good or bad, changing the

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way we view and street information. `` view and treat. You have been in

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the embassy for two years, what is life like for you smack it is a

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difficult environment. `` life for you? There is eight million dollars

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of admitted surveillance of the embassy in the last 18 months.

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Snowden documents reveal the GCHQ has been spiring on a operation

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since 2`on`212. `` spying `` 2012. Edward Snowden has revealed that a

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lot of our communications are snooped, are being tapped,

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collected. The people in the middle are those that host the date and run

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the infrastructure. Do you think they are at risk? Edward Snowden

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demonstrates conclusively something that has been known by word of mouth

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within the internet services industry for a long time, that the

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NSA, GCHQ, and allied agencies in countries like Sweden, have been in

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the business of targeting employees of major hosting companies. System

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administrators and so on, for computer hacking. It has been

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suggested that different countries or continents set up their own

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internet. Angela Merkel suggested an internet for Europe. Do you think

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that is workable? And, would we be better off than the internet in at

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the moment? The impulse to do it is important and would lead

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two good things. The devil is in the detail in terms of how this

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operates. `` Europe is like a telecommunications company. It is

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penetrated and compromised and engages in dirty deals with the US

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government, especially the UK and Sweden. Who should be in charge of

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deciding what stays secret for good reason and what gets published? We

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can't publish everything, surely? Wiki leaks has a seven year

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publishing history and we have never got it wrong. `` Wikileaks. We've

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never publish material in a form that has led to the physical harm of

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a single person. The US admits that. Any claim otherwise is simply spend.

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Are you asking the world to trust you? For an organisation to be

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accountable, the buck has to stop with someone. In publishing

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organisations, the buck stops with the publisher or the editor. I

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wonder if you think it is possible to have completely private data in

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2014, or whether that is a fantasy? The question is whether a stake

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intelligence Alliance, principally the UK and the US, can spy upon the

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entire world at once `` state. On a constant basis, every person,

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mapping out a community structure, finding out who is connected to

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whom. It is not about making sure that a single person cannot be spied

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upon all the communications between two people is always private. The

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real battle is to ensure it is hard to intercept everyone at once.

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Julian Assange, thank you very much for joining us. You're welcome.

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Julian Assange, he is a controversial figure. You might feel

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strongly about some of the things he said. If you do, device your

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thoughts. `` give us your thoughts. If you are concerned about the level

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of surveillance and the threats that comes with that, this will not be

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good news. Because, yes, this is a small drone. It has one minor

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modification for most other drones. It happens to be fitted with a

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taser. To be more accurate, a stun gun capable of delivering 80,000

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volts of electricity via a wire diet. The hybrid is the rain child

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of Texas design firm Chaotic Moon who tried out the prototype for

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Click on these capable dummy. This. `` the invention is called the

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chaotic unmanned in personal internet drone or, keep it to get

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its more romantic sounding title. CUPID. `` why does the world need a

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taser`drone? This is the same thing you see in the video games these

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days. You see them in sci`fi movies. We want to take this concept and

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make it real, show it can be built and show it can work, to raise the

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question of technology and humanity and start an open discussion. What

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do you do if you have taste every dummy in the office? You get the

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office in turn to volunteer. `` intern. Witness Darren literally

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taking one for the team. We should point out that he was unhurt after

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being struck by CUPID's taser and needless to say, please don't try

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this at home. Now you know how the boss motivates the team. Next up, a

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look at the tech news for the week. Amazon has launched its own internet

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connected TV set`top box. Built to compete against Apple and Google, it

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will allow customers to stream content from Amazon's library and

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other on demand services, direct to the televisions. Dubbed, Amazon Fire

:08:59.:09:04.

TV, users can play online games and it has gone on sale in the US for

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$99. One of the largest ever Earth observation programmes took off this

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week with the launch of the Sentinel satellite, which will be followed by

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a fleet of other satellites that will return data and measurements of

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the state of the planet. It is hoped the project will provide information

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on climate change and help monitor and respond to natural disasters.

:09:27.:09:30.

Let the voice battle commence, Microsoft has unveiled more time,

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its answer to Siri, for its Windows phone handset. The assistant is

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named after the AI in the Halo games and uses Microsofts `` Microsoft's

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being website. It makes recommendations to carry out tights

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`` tasks. They have announced the Windows 8.1 update will be offered

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as a free upgrade from eight April. Forget the millions of pixels on

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your TV, meet the Pixelbots, the 75 strong swarm can create simple

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coloured images and animations on tabletops and whiteboards. While we

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might fear the inevitable bull `` inevitable robo`pocalypse, at least

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it will look nice. In the age of big data, the

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corporate world is getting better at which `` knowing which buttons to

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press to get reactions from us, when it comes to advertising

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particularly. Look at these attractive people. The more you know

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the troops and techniques, doesn't this generic ad remind you of a

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certain fruit `based tech company Rice the mort of a turnoff

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advertising can be. `` the more. Almost as boring as waiting for a

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bus. LJ Rich has been finding out. This isn't the inevitable robot

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uprising, instead you are looking at something that has been part of an

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elaborate advertising campaign. What's happening here is you are

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mixing video from camera on the back of this part of the bus stop with

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preprepared special effects. Get the perspective and the lighting right

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and you've got an ad that got 4.7 million views on YouTube in less

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than a week. For this to work, everything the camera sees has to

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line up directly with this grid. Exact measurements are important

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because the graphic designers need to know exactly where to put their

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visuals. The installation itself is quite simple. Along with a camera,

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there is a 65 inch screen inside the shelter, connected to a single

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computer running Windows seven. All the hard calculations for the

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scenarios have been done in advance and that took around three months

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``Windows seven. We've taken some shots of Oxford Street and have re`

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version that into a 3`D world and the content we have created when

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that space uses the environment specifically for that bus stop. If

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we were going to roll that out across 1500 bus stops around the

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country, we would have to do that exact same process with all of them

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and that is where the challenge is. We worked with Unilever on one of

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their deodorant brand is to make angels appear like they were falling

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from the sky, landing on the station concourse around a user. First time

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that augmented reality has been used on a large`scale format. They had to

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make videos work in different lighting scenarios, for example,

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nighttime or here, dusk. It is a painstaking and elaborate process.

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As consumers get more savvy about Rand interaction, ads will get more

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sophisticated. After all, sharing engaging and interesting videos with

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other is fuel for a social status updating habit ``brand. If the

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content is sponsored or not, that's comes second to whether it is any

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good. On second thoughts, I might walk. Need to promote a product?

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Service? Or a thing? You need to advertise. It is delicious! Here at

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the Museum of brands, packaging and advertising, visitors are surrounded

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by product and commercials from a time when social networking meant

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attending a debutante ball. Advertisers are finding it

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increasingly difficult to attract the attention of audiences. More and

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more TV users are watching on demand streaming services or enjoying TV

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box sets in great big ad free golds. As more and more TV users are void

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advertisements modern day madman are designing ways to make products seem

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desirable. While the practice of product placement has gone on for

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decades, developers are trying to use technology originally designed

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for Hollywood block busters to allow them to change things post editing.

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It allows us to change things that gets distributed to 200 different

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markets, different brands can be placed in the show as it airs. The

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good example of that is in Brazil, where we place a Mitsubishi in place

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of a Bentley in one scene. Some people say it should have been the

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other way round. The Mitsubishi were specifically being launched in

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Brazil at the time that the show was airing. In order to add an object

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after it has been filmed, you had to understand how the camera has moved

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in 3`D space. Our brains are variable about this, but a computer

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on its own is a flat in meaningless collection of colours. The

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techniques pioneered here help computers to automatically

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understand what is going on in a particular shot, so they know how

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the camera is moving. Once you know that, you can put the new object in

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with exactly the right orientation and lighting. Product placement is

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an example of a hidden method of persuasion. However, in some

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quarters, more overt tactics are preferred. Online advertising can be

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very specific and targeted. Advertisers can track what sites

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users have searched for and visited, tailoring ads as a result of the

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data gathered. TV is starting to imitate what the online world is

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doing, and they always say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

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We must be doing something right in the online world, because TV is

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starting to go towards making ads more targeted and more personalised.

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Historically, advertising has a work kept pace with the latest advances

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in technology, whether that is paintball pixels, in order to sell

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stuff. The manner of delivery may change, but the message remains the

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same. If you want to get noticed in the

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tech world, San Francisco is the place to be. It is teeming with

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young hopefuls, all vying for interest in their latest invention.

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There are regular events designed to help them show off their wares,

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whether it be the latest must have at Ory giant surveillance robot. ``

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latest must have application. Technology dream seekers class of

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2014. 300 companies with inventions ranging from the wacky to the

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downright outrageous. This RoboCop surveillance, called the

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Knightscope, might look like R2`D2's little brother, but if

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anything, he is using public spaces to prevent and predict crime. We

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have cameras for surveillance, biological sensors, things that can

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monitor the weather, we have numberplate recognition, facial

:17:57.:18:00.

recognition and also gestural recognition. If someone is waving

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their hands or laying on the ground where they shouldn't be, those are

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things that can pick up on and send queues and alert someone. Other

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surveillance hardware on show was more cuddly, like this remind camera

:18:13.:18:19.

equipped dog feeder. Perhaps more useful, a new twist on

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teleconferencing, giving participants more control over their

:18:23.:18:26.

remote proceedings. Inventions on the show floor for the most part are

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microcosm of the tech world at large, from 3`D printed would to

:18:32.:18:36.

virtual currency scratch cards. If you want to go into a retail setting

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today and by bitcoin is there is pretty much know where you can go.

:18:42.:18:44.

Our product allows you to buy it from a regular score, like a liquor

:18:45.:18:48.

store Ory discount store, get a gift card, and be able to then get the

:18:49.:18:57.

bitcoin is online. The watchword was mobile. Many applications reflected

:18:58.:19:01.

wider trends from sharing professions to personal health

:19:02.:19:07.

check. This allows people to use smart phones to scan for skin

:19:08.:19:11.

cancer, uploading photographs of possible lesions to experts. San

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Francisco is startup Central, and those who have made the trek to the

:19:17.:19:20.

West Coast were in little doubt it was worth it.

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First, drones fitted with taser is, now a giant surveillance robot,

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surely someone will start complaining about this soon.

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Technology may be watching us, but we are pretty good at keeping an eye

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on it as well. He comes Webscape. If you travel a lot, you have

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probably spent a lot of time walking around airports, hopelessly lost.

:19:49.:19:56.

GateGuru is a stress busting application, showing the way to all

:19:57.:19:59.

the features and amenities in thousands of airports around the

:20:00.:20:05.

world. You can also get real`time information about your travel

:20:06.:20:07.

itinerary, such as flight times, weather and other important details.

:20:08.:20:16.

Finding your way around a foreign airport can be a nightmare. Even if

:20:17.:20:19.

it is just yourself you have to worry about. Add small children to

:20:20.:20:24.

that equation, and it is a recipe for stress that could offset any of

:20:25.:20:28.

the benefits of going on holiday in the first place. NCT baby change

:20:29.:20:39.

offers parents relief by instantly finding the closest baby changing

:20:40.:20:43.

facilities using GPS. It is mainly focused on the UK right now, but

:20:44.:20:47.

users outside the UK can also add new facilities to grow the database

:20:48.:20:49.

through the power of the crowd. Another great location resource I

:20:50.:21:08.

found recently is The Gap Abel Road. It helps disabled people find the

:21:09.:21:20.

best facilities so they can enjoy the best places. Whether you are

:21:21.:21:26.

looking for a car rental firm or a restaurant, all the businesses

:21:27.:21:30.

listed in this directory are reviewed and rated by visitors to

:21:31.:21:34.

the site. Those with disabilities, their friends, families and carers,

:21:35.:21:38.

said it you can be confident you know what to expect. Like all good

:21:39.:21:43.

location `based information services there are free applications for iOS

:21:44.:21:48.

and Android, so you can find accessible places while you are out

:21:49.:21:52.

and about. Again, you can add your own locations and reviews to help

:21:53.:21:53.

fellow users. Video conferencing has really

:21:54.:22:06.

evolved over the past decade, as communications platforms like Skype,

:22:07.:22:12.

Google Hangouts and GoToMeeting, compete for our attention. One thing

:22:13.:22:16.

all these platforms have in common is the need to register for the

:22:17.:22:19.

service, and often download a piece of software. Appear.in is rebooting

:22:20.:22:30.

the genre with a free bow `` browser `based application. It is so easy to

:22:31.:22:38.

use, it almost hurts. Because this platform uses a new technology based

:22:39.:22:49.

on HTML five, it mirror `` there are no browser software is to install.

:22:50.:22:53.

You just fire up your website and share a link to invite up to eight

:22:54.:22:58.

people to conference with you. It works in Google Chrome, Firefox and

:22:59.:23:03.

Opera. The quality is pretty good, in fact, I found the quality was

:23:04.:23:10.

smoother than on Skype, which has a tendency to start when the

:23:11.:23:13.

connection is under stress. As well as sharing audio, you can share your

:23:14.:23:17.

screen activity, just like the other popular platforms.

:23:18.:23:25.

Kate Russell's Webscape. You will find all of those links on our

:23:26.:23:30.

website, along with a regularly updated feed of the latest

:23:31.:23:33.

technology news. If you would like to comment on everything you have

:23:34.:23:40.

seen, tweak us or e`mail us `` Tweet. We will see you next time.

:23:41.:24:03.

We have seen pollution levels falling in the past 24 hours or so.

:24:04.:24:09.

Through the weekend, we will maintain this Atlantic feed of air

:24:10.:24:13.

blowing in cleaner air and

:24:14.:24:14.

Click talks to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange and looks at how the world of advertising is using technology to target customers.


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