23/01/2016 Click


23/01/2016

A comprehensive guide to all the latest gadgets, games and computer industry news. Click visits San Francisco and looks at how 3D printing could be about to change our lives.


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Transcript


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an omission that they have avoided paying tax in the past. You can join

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me for more news at the top of the hour. It is time to click now.

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This week we bring you the impossible things. The pain, and the

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anaesthetic. Think 3-D printing and you might

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think of weird trinkets like these. But did you know that 3-D printing

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can also be done on one of these. Welcome to Autodesk. Is a company

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known for computer design and 3-D graphic software. But here in San

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Francisco, it is home to the creative workshop. The place where

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researchers and artists are invited to test the software on 3-D printers

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of all shapes and sizes. From conventional printers to giant five

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axis machine. All faithfully reproducing the models as they

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appear on screen. A resolution of the latest 3-D printers is now high

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enough to produce some really intricate models. In fact, it is so

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high, that if you want, print a record. It does not sound brilliant,

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but the bombs and cruise give a recognisable sound -- the bumps and

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grooves. One of the artists is recreating artefacts that have been

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destroyed by the so-called Islamic State. Because she has not been able

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to 3-D scanned them, she has had to use reference photographs to build

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within 3-D modelling software. She was an artefact that was outside the

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museum that was destroyed. It was life-size and way bigger than this.

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Why did you feel that you wanted to do this? As an artist I'm interested

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in ways in which you can work with historians and archaeologists and

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how 3-D printers can go beyond just beyond the technical tool and think

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about 3-D printing as a tool for archiving. You can think about as a

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personal, political and poetic and emotional ways. Some serious and

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some not so serious. What is universally amazing to me is the

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materials that one can 3-D printed in these days. Your good wall

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sculpture anyone? Some 3-D printers can print in different materials in

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the same run and that has opened up even more possibilities. If you

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would asked me half-an-hour if you could 3-D print a system of moving

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parts all in one go I would have said no. Europe to 3-D print the

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individual parts. But this is a 3-D printed system of moving parts. It

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came out of a machine like this. It gets washed away as it comes out of

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the printer. It allows the parts to move independently which is

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seriously cool. Some of these moving objects could not be manufactured in

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any other way. Try building these impossible keys within two years and

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you will see the problem. It is things that cannot be made in other

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ways. Picture and -- an engine block. That could not be cast that

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way. But you could 3-D printed. We 3-D print a lot of prototypes. That

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is another great addition of 3-D printing. Maybe it will change over

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time and will have to be cast in every way that you do it. Every year

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that you grow they need a new prosthetic. Those are the Times we

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see it to be the most groundbreaking. Is printers here

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have been made especially. They are able to do things in micron level

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detail. They don't just create little beautiful things like this.

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They are capable of printing things much more important. They have been

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fighting out more in the wet lab just down there. Imagine a future

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where instead of taking bones out of your body for a transplant, you

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could build your own new bones with the help of a 3-D printer. This is a

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company that uses software and 3-D fabrication to bring this idea

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closer to reality. In a series of relatively simple steps. Hersi they

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take a CT scan that needs the bone replacement -- firstly. A crater

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scaffold of bone tissue from a cow that has been stripped of all of its

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cellular material. Than a small sample of stem cells is taken from

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the fact tissue. The structure is housed in a buyer reactor where it

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grows for three weeks -- bio. You could have your own living bone. We

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ask how we can get the cells to live inside here? We engineered a system

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that goes around it and you can see that there is space for a scaffold

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to live inside of it. Each buyer reactor that we engineer is

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perfectly matched to each of these different shapes that you would have

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here. We cultivate the bone inside of you with sales and deliver the

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growth factors and the environmental conditioning that the cells need to

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then turn that into bone -- cells. With approval, it could be implanted

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into clinical trials into humans in the next couple of years and

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commercially available next few years. The focus now is on small

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bones for facial reconstruction but could one day move to more, located

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bones. Could you actually grow bones is somebody lost a limb? If you

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think into the far field where this is going just growing bones. During

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my Ph.D. We a groin muscle and heart tissue. When you think about a limb

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you think about the different parts involved -- we were growing muscle.

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What do they need in those environments, it is it difficult to

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medic that in a lab. It is moving towards being able to grow pieces of

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tissue in the same place. But you can imagine for a limb it gets

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exponentially more difficult. But you can see the world moving in that

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way. 3-D printing sounds absolutely incredible when applied to

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specialist areas like that. But I can't help wondering whether in the

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home, at least, it will ever be more than a curiosity. A novelty being

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out to knock up a few items and then never used again. It changes as

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technology changes. With spoken about that as we speak about the new

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materials being involved. At professional and there is research

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that is paying off already. That trickles down into the consumer

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stuff and I think there will be that materials for people to use it. As

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we have been saying it is a tool and a platform to make things. All that

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happened for a 20 dollar machine that sits on my dining room table? I

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do not know. Is really about how this will affect things are larger

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level to the things I touch every day in my life. And they don't just

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make stuff that humans design. The software can create things that we

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might never have thought of. What is this? If you look at this bicycle,

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these are things that you have seen before, except for this. A resident

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was looking to design a different type of bike stem. It takes the

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information that the design gives it an nose has it take to wake of a

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bike rider's hands but then it figures that everything in between

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sleep and optimise the strength, wait and that you will use it. It

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figures out a form that is unlike with anybody else would ever come up

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with because it is a computer. In theory you could do a better job the

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humans design is because it is doing the maths -- big mathematics. We

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have people working on all kinds of interesting problems. With that jet

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flying over it will use less fuel. This is the kind of place that runs

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on creativity where residents are encouraged to push the software to

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the limits with seemingly crazy ideas. And that seems to be the

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reason that one employee has built this machine. The sole purpose of

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which is to brew the perfect Manhattan cocktail. Cheers. While

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Spain in -- what the input joy is a well-deserved drink. Twitter has

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gone down with people being unable to express themselves in 40

:10:48.:10:50.

characters of less. If only there was another method to communicate

:10:51.:10:57.

with one another. It is definitely not going to be friends reunited

:10:58.:11:00.

which this week died a very quiet death. It also gave us a new level

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of doom from the original designer. And space X successfully delivered

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an ocean monitoring satellite to all but. The landing, however, did not

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go so well. It was also the week that a drone managed to land on the

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roof of a moving car on its's own. -- it's. It follows a moving target

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and decide precisely when two touchdown. In this case, on a moving

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car fitted with a net travelling at almost 50 mph. That is not the only

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thing the drugs had been up to this week. Students at the University of

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Oslo has set a new Guinness book world record for the heaviest

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payload lifted by a remote controlled multi- copter. It

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successfully carried weight of over 61 kg. The students hope that soon

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they will be able to strap a person onto it. Have you ever watched a

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game of American football? It is brutal. The impact that the players

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experience are frightening. In fact, recently some people have been

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calling for the sport to be banned because of the head injuries that

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the players can suffer. We have been checking out some of the research

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that is designed to detect early signs of these injuries and make the

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sport, generally, safer. Weights or you get down here and you will

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realise how hard these players hit each other. It is relentless all the

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way through the game. They may be playing the ten or 15 years in their

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career, but the research is really warning about what is happening to

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these players. The facts are quite horrifying. Almost a quarter of

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professional football players are expected to develop Alzheimer's.

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That is double compared to the general population. But shocking

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discovery is the subject of concussion, a new film starring Will

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Smith. Repetitive head trauma chokes the brain. He discovers the real

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damage caused to American football is -- footballers. After intense

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pressure, and the multimillion dollar lawsuits, the league is

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finally starting to take the threat seriously. Is down here were all the

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players medical staff and players are keeping an eye on the action. In

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a small room up there there are two experts with my Nokia is watching to

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see if there is a possible head injury. If they spot in the looks

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troubling, that player has to be removed whether they like it or

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not. It is here at Stanford University were some groundbreaking

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technology is being tested. A project funded by the Department of

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defence aims to detect when a player is concussed almost immediately.

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After a heated ahead of brain get scrambled and we can't pay

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attention. That is the keeper around the. Had you measure the tension? We

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use eye tracking as a method of how the. Had you measure the tension? We

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use eye tracking as a method of much you pay attention. Is part of the

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protocol to assess athletes for possible concussion and reuse the

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eye tracking. We use it on the sideline because it is great it is

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you can value people right away. This is an Oculus Rift basically

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with cameras inside of it that can track and follow the quality of eye

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movements that we're seeing right from the sidelines. What we do is we

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have them place it over their face like this and they should be able to

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see the red dot which is the beginning of the test and we are

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looking for nice fluid tracing of that circle. As you can see, it is

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not fluid, it is slightly abnormal and this is in line with what you

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see with someone with mild impairment. Players are faster and

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bigger but we have to focus on protective gear. We need to get away

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from the helmet designed into more of a helmet torso and neck design of

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technology. The issue shows no signs of going away and it is hoped a

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research like this. The sport -- will prevent the sport gambling with

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the lives of its players. The 49ers are the biggest players here and a

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few have ever wondered what technology goes into a massive

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stadium like this, we've been taking a tour -- the biggest team here. It

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is game day at Levi's Stadium, home to is the 49ers and host of the

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Super Bowl this year. Fans come for the excitement of live football but

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they often experience crowds. But here technology helps fans handle

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the hassles at one of the most wired arenas in the US. We certainly need

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the capability to have 70,000 people on their phones at the same time in

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a small space. At the supercharged Stadium 400 miles of cable are

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distributed to boost cell coverage, Wi-Fi hots pots, charging stations

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and an Internet pipe, a first for stadiums. The stadium also has its

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own free app. I know the fastest way to get my parking zone, and once I

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am here, I know which date to go into to get to my seat the fastest.

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The ticket sensors help manage crowd flow. We look at all the things that

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happened come all kinds of data points, where you scan your ticket,

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which date, which helped us move our staff and make sure that the gates

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are adequately staffed up by traffic is also monitored. We use drone

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video technology or parking scans to see how people are getting to the

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game. We're making real-time changes based on video footage we are seeing

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postgame. If you ask me, the feature that makes the app worthwhile is

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delivery to your seat. Place an order and ten minutes later, someone

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brings it to you. Similar apps do exist but ordering food has never

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been so easy. Or haps to easy. That's for me. Thank you. Yes

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please. For visitors, a convenience, for 49ers, a data GoldMine --

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perhaps. We have really been able to understand point of our information

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like hot dogs, we know how many we sell and when and we can make

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changes depending on the event. Another fan favourite is

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wayfinding. 1700 Bluetooth begins enable the app to offer turn by turn

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directions back to your parking space, the closest snack stand or

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even the toilet. Pro tip, check along the lines are beforehand happy

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these people oversee everything from food and beverage menus to instant

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replays. This fellow right here is keeping a close eye on the game.

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When play begins, he hits a start on his android tablet and when it is

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over he hits end and that appears on the app 's puppy while some users

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complained that it is slow and a battery killer, the app does save

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you from waiting and having to leave your seat. And isn't that why you

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came to the game? It is nearly time to leave San Francisco but before we

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go, I wanted to find out more about something I have heard being touted

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as the secret of success here. This is our conference room. Wow. Michael

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works for Math Crunch, a startup but I'm not here to find out what he

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does, I am here to find out about something he says makes him work

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harder, think clearer and possibly beat the other startups to that

:20:12.:20:16.

billion-dollar deal. For me, it is all about doing whatever I need to

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do to do what I do everyday. To say, I am young, I'm 26 and we have this

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awesome product and we want to bring it to the whole world. I need

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whatever advantage I can get. TUC this kind of thing as the advantage

:20:31.:20:40.

-- do you see? Yes. Someone sent it to me as a present year ago, a

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friend and I tried it once or twice. Next thing I knew, I was

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ordering more. It is cheaper than coffee, it is a dollar a pill and

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that is what I was looking for. Something that is more affordable

:20:52.:20:59.

and leaves me less shaky, just confident and comfortable. Welcome

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to the world of new -- stuff you can take to improve your cognitive

:21:11.:21:13.

functions. The idea has been around since the 70s but it is no surprise

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that here, in high-performing Silicon Valley, is seeing a

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resurgence. I'm off to meet the guys at the startup which surprised

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supplies totally legal and totally regulated substances -- supplies.

:21:29.:21:35.

What do you think? I think it is going to be sweet, but it isn't, it

:21:36.:21:42.

taste like coffee. It's not candy, it's a performance product. So what

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is going to happen to me when I have some of these? Think of an espresso

:21:49.:21:55.

drink, you get that kick of energy, but you also get that sense of

:21:56.:21:59.

focus. How long should the state to work? In 30- 45 minutes, you'll

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start feeling a little bit zippy and a lot more focused. So you have

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other products here. Dare I ask what this does? This is our daily

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supplement. It is some can you take chronically everyday. Compounds have

:22:19.:22:23.

been shown to increase memory capacity, it increases your

:22:24.:22:27.

resilience to stress and antifatigue properties. The thing that worries

:22:28.:22:32.

me is, although these are all regulated and perfectly legal, we're

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looking at the culture here where people need these, they feel they

:22:37.:22:42.

need them in order to perform. You suddenly have people who are

:22:43.:22:44.

psychologically addicted to these kind of products because they're

:22:45.:22:50.

convinced they work? Sure. And in this day and age there is going to

:22:51.:22:56.

be demand for them, other paths to get ahead, let's offer it in a way

:22:57.:23:00.

that is responsible and safe. How do you offer these responsibly and

:23:01.:23:05.

safely? We have the best active forms of different compounds. When

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we first started the business, a lot of the vendors out there weren't

:23:12.:23:17.

following the strictest FDA regulations around the types of

:23:18.:23:19.

compounds they were putting into products, or the safety

:23:20.:23:23.

manufacturing processes. We want to do this right from the first stop

:23:24.:23:30.

light I may have felt a little bit of a buzz but I'm going to take them

:23:31.:23:38.

away to do a longer-term test. I certainly noticed an improvement in

:23:39.:23:41.

my table tennis skills straight afterwards, although that might have

:23:42.:23:45.

just been a special effect. That is it from San Francisco. A fine trip.

:23:46.:23:52.

I have to learn how those pills are working out in the next few weeks.

:23:53.:23:59.

Plenty of fun and backstage pictures on Twitter and we will see you back

:24:00.:24:04.

in London. The weather is making headlines

:24:05.:24:27.

in the north-east of the US. But as far as our neck of

:24:28.:24:30.

the woods is concerned it is quiet.

:24:31.:24:34.

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