International Women's Day Click


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International Women's Day

Click heads to the USA to meet survivors of sexual abuse, plus the creators of a new app where victims can talk openly and share their tragic experiences.


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Now on BBC News,

it is time for Click.

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This week, the app that helps record

and report sexual assault. The AI

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going after cancer. And the man who

wants us all to the four other. --

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live forever.

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As International Women's Day was

marked this week, it brought with it

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further focus on the many issues

still to be faced in bringing about

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true gender equality in all walks of

life. The technology industry, of

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course, has its own issues, as we

will hear later. Silicon Valley's

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culture and its treatment of women

raises a lot of questions. But tech

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can also be a force for good. It has

been just six months or so since the

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Me Too movement gave a voice to so

many women around the world, who

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used social media to expose just how

widespread sexual harassment and

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assault is. Many women feel that

reporting sexual assault can also be

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really traumatic, and the

experiences of some women in Silicon

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Valley had spurred them to create

something that may make that just a

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little bit easier. Our correspondent

has travelled to Stanford University

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to meet survivors of sexual abuse,

and the creators of Callisto. Every

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tattoo tells a story. For this

Stanford University student, the

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story is bittersweet. She was one of

50 sexual assault survivors invited

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to share the stage with Lady Gaga

during the 2016 Oscars.

While we

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were rehearsing, I remember at one

point we were all crying and hugging

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each other, and someone just said we

need to get a tattoo to commemorate

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this and to give us strength.

Something to look at when you are

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feeling down, and you know that

you're alone.

Lin says that a few

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days after she was assaulted by a

friend in 2015, she told the title

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nine office which investigate sexual

misconduct.

I decided to report

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because I didn't want him to do it

to anyone else, and later I did find

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out that he had done a lot of... A

lot of harassment, stalking, and

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also assault on someone else.

What

was that experience like?

It was

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awful. My GPA dropped down, and I

was fighting with the school back

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and forth every single hour of every

single day.

Lin, now an activist,

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wants greater transparency in the

adjudication process.

They are

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trying to cover up the number of

sexual assault that happen on their

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campus, because that makes your

university look safer. It's better

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for your public relations.

Stanford

told Click...

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Stanford changed its title nine

process in 2016, and has begun

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reporting case numbers. In the US,

one in five women is sexually

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assaulted while in college.

I was

sexually assaulted by a friend. Over

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a year after that happened, I

decided to report my assault, and I

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ended up finding the process of

reporting to be more traumatic than

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the event itself. Feeling not

believed by the people who I thought

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were there to protect me was

incredibly destabilising.

Jessica

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Lad's ordeal spurred her to create

Callisto, so survivors would have a

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way of reporting sexual assault.

They can have a timestamp, doesn't

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have to go anywhere if they don't

want to, send it to authorities in

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their school, or three, just say

what happened to them for now but

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report electronically if someone

else makes the same assailant.

You

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can think of it as an international

information as scroat agency.

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Students often report to protect

others. This matching feature helps

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do that by detecting repeat

offenders.

People might use

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different names, they may look

different. How do you make sure you

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have got the right person? We ask

victims to put in not just the name

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of their perpetrator, but also a

series of unique identifiers.

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Currently, Facebook profiles I used

to match. Some students want more

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ways to idea, and Callisto may add

mobile numbers and e-mail addresses

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in the future. 12 US colleges use

Callisto. The University of San

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Francisco was the first.

We knew

students won't reporting. If you

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look at our numbers from once we

first started with Callisto, three

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years ago, to now, there is

definitely an increase in reporting.

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Callisto allows for our students to

write what happened, to write about

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the incident. And sometimes just

riding your perpetrator's name gives

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people power.

Seeing the need for

Callisto, she led an effort to bring

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it to Stanford.

It is just available

24 - seven, and they have seen

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spikes in usage during times like

spring break, when the title nine

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office might not be available, but

students wanted to file a report, or

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during the weekend, when no one is

staffing.

With Callisto, survivors

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recount what happened at the own

pace, privately.

Often victims

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including in-person interviews what

is incredible, so they want to fill

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in the details and tell a wonderful

story arc. At that is not how memory

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works, and that is particularly not

how memory works in the event of

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trauma. So being able to allow

somebody to say I don't know the

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centre, I am not sure that, and only

record think that they are sure of,

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is really essential to make sure

that that time stamped record isn't

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later used against them.

Students

must create a username, password and

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pass phrase that be recovered. Not

quite a one click sign up. That

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deters some users. For Callisto, it

ensures drivers see.

Because then we

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would have to be storing the

password, which means that we could

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potentially decrypt the data, and we

want to make sure that even we can't

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view it.

Since students choose

whether to report assaults, some

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records are never seen by schools.

They are still useful.

We provide

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our institutions with at an

aggregate data report that gives

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them a better sense of what is

happening in that record, what type

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of years are assault reporting, what

classy as are involved?

Others are

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also working to make reporting less

daunting. The spot app creates a

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record from the user's conversation

with a chat bot, while all will let

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them report electronically. Lin is

in short electronic reporting would

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have changed her was handled, but

she see the potential.

What I think

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Callisto is great for is to track

perpetrators, if they decide to

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apply for grad school or transfer

schools, I think that is where this

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can really come in and have a very

powerful effect.

as we grow, we want

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to create one system, one database

that allows us to track any

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perpetrator, even as they move

through space and time. Which would

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give survivors away to find out if

there are seven is a repeat

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offender, something Jessica Ladd

says she wonders to this day. That

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was Sumi Das, at Stanford

University. Now, while Callisto was

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created a team of mostly women, that

is rare. Even right here in Silicon

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Valley. Whenever I have been to

visit, I have found it all too easy

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to think of the valley as sharing

the Progressive values of San

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Francisco, where all colours and

genders seem welcome. But the people

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I have met, those in charge of the

start-ups and attack giants, have

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been mainly men. It is quite obvious

to us that women are

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underrepresented here, and there are

those who feel that Silicon Valley

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is just as full of sexism and

masculine culture as anywhere else.

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It is the social challenge...

Emily

Chang is a San Francisco journalist,

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and a host of Bloomberg Technology.

And in her new book, Brotopia, she

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has written about the industry that

has always self-selected for men.

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First came the antisocial nerd who

suddenly became part of the ruling

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class, and now she says it is the

time of the cocky, self-confident

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risk taker, the bro.

Silicon Valley

is the heart of the most powerful

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industry in the world, and that is

the technology industry. This is a

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world that is controlling what we

see, what we read, how we shop, how

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we communicate, how we get around.

The reality is, the exclusion from

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this incredible and aggressive

industry was not inevitable. It

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didn't have to be this way. I think

of all the women out there who might

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have started the next Facebook or

the next Google or the next Apple,

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but never got the chance because

they didn't look the part. And that

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is something that needs to change.

Women hold just 25% of jobs across

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the computing industry. They account

for 7% of investors. Women led

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companies get just 2% of venture

capital funding. The most important

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thing that we need to do is to

acknowledge that Silicon Valley has

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become toxic for women. So what is

bro culture? Well, it is exactly

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what it sounds like. Fratty parties,

beer, behaviour that is alienating

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towards women. I had 12 women over

at my home most them engineers who

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work at companies like Uber and

Google and the Uber engineers told

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me they would often be invited to

strip clubs and bondage clubs in the

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middle of the day, and so much of

the working culture gets done

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outside of the office, so at the

bar, at the conference, in a hotel

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lobby, and they are stuck in sort of

an impossible Catch-22. If they

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attend, they are disrespected and

discredited. If they don't, they are

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shut out of important business and

networking opportunities, because

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very powerful people, very powerful

men, are at these parties. So many

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female entrepreneurs that I have

spoken to have not just one story,

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but several stories to tell about

how an investor has crossed a line.

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You know, one of the most sort of

egregious examples that I have found

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is an investor who... A very

prominent investor in countries to

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make companies like Twitter and Uber

who often hosted hot tub parties at

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his home. Well, what female driven

wants to get in a hot tub and future

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business while wearing a bikini and

drinking beer? These are the kinds

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of activities that have been very

alienating the women, and

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unfortunately have created a very

unlevel playing field in Silicon

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Valley. I think about how different

the world might be if women had been

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at the creation of some of these

companies from the start. I sat down

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with Twitter co-founder Ed Williams,

and I asked him, F women had been

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involved in the founding of Twitter,

would online harassment and trolling

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be such a problem? And he said he

doesn't think so. They were thinking

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about that when they were building

Twitter. They were thinking about

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all the wonderful and amazing things

that can be done with Twitter, they

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won't thinking about how it can be

used to send death threats or rape

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threats. And as a result, online

harassment is one of the biggest

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problems plaguing internet today. If

women had been more involved in

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building these products, and

building these services, maybe

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online harassment and trolling

wouldn't be such a problem. I fully

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believe that the people who have

already changed the world in so many

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wondrous ways, the people who are

taking us to Mars, the people who

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are building self driving cars, the

people who have given us right at

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the push of a button, if they can do

all that, they can change this too.

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Hello, and welcome to the week

intact. It was the week that Sony

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blocked the videogame Super Seducer

for being released on the

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PlayStation 4. It has been

criticised as too sleazy and for

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promoting toxic behaviour. Dyson

announced they will not be making

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plug-in vacuum cleaners any more,

they will be working on their

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cordless range. The dating app

Bumble has been band uses from

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posing with guns, though an

exception has been made for military

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and law enforcement. And a robot

managed to solve a Rubik 's cube

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under a second. Link you will miss

it. Here it is in slow mode. It was

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the week that mobile companies Three

and Vodafone came under

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investigation over the way they

handle data on their network. Com is

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looking at whether they are

intentionally slowing down internet

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speeds while customers are abroad.

Internet others invaded New York's

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Museum of modern Art, transforming

the Jackson Pollock room into their

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own augmented reality gallery

without the museum's permission. The

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project was called hello, we are

from the internet. And finally,

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Flippy the robot has been working at

a restaurant in Los Angeles. Their

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job, as you guessed it, is to flip

burgers. Using imaging and heat

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sensing to flip, Flippy is being

installed at 50 locations, but it is

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not cheap, at $60,000 a robot. Hope

those burgers taste good.

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The idea of personalised or

precision medicine is really gaining

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ground, and in the not too distant

future, every single time we're

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prescribed something, exactly what

that is could be dependent on our

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height, weight, sex and even our

genetic make up.

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Personalising your medication

doesn't always need complex

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biomedical data to be beneficial,

though. What I have here is the Beta

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version of the app. You input your

data first, your height, your

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weight, your sex and details of any

other medication you're taking,

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because that could have an affect.

After you've done that you can put

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in information on what drug you're

about to take. And this is how you

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do it. So this is paracetamol. Now,

I would probably take two 500 mg

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tablets, so let's see the effect

that would be likely to have. It's

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going to last about four hours,

which is pretty much what I would

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have expected, but where this dark

blue is showing it shows I could be

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ever so slightly overdosing, so

someone of my height and weight

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maybe doesn't need to be taking to

tablets in one go. While the dark

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blue may represent a little more

than needed, when you're clearly

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taking too much the dial will turn

fully read.

With a simple

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questionnaire on you, on your

environment, on your body, with

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something like five or six seconds

we can cover something like 90% of

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the questions and for the ten

remaining % we need complimentary

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information, like RUH smoker or not,

which kind of regimented you have,

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of course genetics. Weitering

pharmacists in the future Strood

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have an important role to play in

this ecosystem that we think. Not

0:15:500:15:54

only by selling drugs but by selling

the exact drugs and the exact dose

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for the patients.

Artificial

intelligence is at the forefront of

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this revolution, analysing massive

quantities of biomedical data that

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could transform treatment.

Well,

imagine you're a scientist and you

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could read every piece of

information that had ever been

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written about biomedicine. You could

store that information and then you

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could use it to make new discoveries

in diseases.

There are billions of

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potential combinations of genes,

diseases and drugs and here hugely

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powerful algorithms are at work to

establish the best combinations.

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Genetics will also play a central

role in personalising what you're

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prescribed in future. Astrazeneca

are analysing genomes from over 2

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million people, and this data could

soon be at your GP's fingertips.

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Patients will actually be at the

point where maybe they'll be able to

0:16:530:16:56

go into the clinic, go into your

local GP, and have that information

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already available. The doctor will

then be able to look up not only the

0:17:020:17:07

type of genotyping but also your

individual Jelic I, and match that

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to the best medicine for you. Some

people are even talking about doing

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this at birth so when you develop a

disease, the Doctor's already got

0:17:160:17:23

your DNA.

So any one size fits all

approach to medicine could soon

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become a thing of the past, with

your prescription always being

0:17:280:17:32

specific to your needs. That was

Lara looking at the very special

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techniques that may soon treat the

diseases none of us want to face.

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But there are those who are going

further, they're not just trying to

0:17:470:17:52

treat, manage and queue up life

shortening diseases, they're

0:17:520:17:55

actually trying to lengthen the

human lifespan. In and I'm assuming

0:17:550:18:01

research facility in Silicon Valley,

I met Aubrey De Gray, who is

0:18:010:18:08

treating a project that treats

ageing itself as a disease which can

0:18:080:18:12

be cured. And he's made some

seemingly quite outlandish claims in

0:18:120:18:16

the past. Am I right you are the guy

that said the world's verse 1000

0:18:160:18:22

-year-old has already been born?

I

always make clear that I think it's

0:18:220:18:29

credible. I do think it is credible.

If we look at the care, it is very

0:18:290:18:36

straightforward, the risk of dying

in your 20s is low. If you get to

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your 26th birthday your chance of

reaching your 27th birthday is very

0:18:400:18:45

high. The only reason that people

don't live to 1000 already is

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because of ageing, because their

probability of death in the coming

0:18:520:18:56

year goes up. It happens to go up by

10% each year.

10% each year?

10%

0:18:560:19:05

more likely to die at the age of 63

than you are at the age of 62 and so

0:19:050:19:10

on.

That's quite high.

But if we can

fix this damage that doesn't happen

0:19:100:19:14

any more, the probability of dying

stays only being limited by the

0:19:140:19:18

probability of things that don't

have to do with how long ago you

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were born.

What you're saying is

within the lifetime of someone who

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has just been born you will learn

how to effectively cancel out

0:19:260:19:30

ageing?

We've developed ways at the

molecular and cellular level to

0:19:300:19:34

repair the damage the body does to

itself throughout life. This is

0:19:340:19:40

called the longevity escape

velocity. We're not talking about

0:19:400:19:44

massively lengthening human life,

we're talking about massively

0:19:440:19:47

lengthening people's healthy lives.

If people can stay healthy for

0:19:470:19:54

longer then there would generally be

improvements in society.

What do you

0:19:540:19:59

see society being like if everyone

had massively extended lifespan is?

0:19:590:20:06

That's not what I focus on, what I

get out of bed for is I don't like

0:20:060:20:11

people getting sick. I don't like

the fact 100,000 people a day die of

0:20:110:20:16

ageing. I would like to hasten the

defeat of that problem. Also you got

0:20:160:20:21

to take into account people are only

going to get older one year per

0:20:210:20:25

year. We're not going to have any

1000 -year-old people or at least

0:20:250:20:29

900 years whatever happens, and

that's quite a long time to figure

0:20:290:20:33

out what to do about it.

The

enigmatic Aubrey De Grey. Can you

0:20:330:20:38

imagine living in a world where we

all might live to be more than 1000?

0:20:380:20:42

That would be strange. Mind you,

first we all have to get past the

0:20:420:20:46

year 2049, which according to the

recent Blade Runner movie, is a

0:20:460:20:50

pretty bleak time. That film won the

Oscar for Best visual effects last

0:20:500:20:54

weekend and to celebrate we thought

we would bring you a bit of extra

0:20:540:20:59

behind-the-scenes science that went

into making that world.

I think you

0:20:590:21:02

found him.

That's not possible. If

this gets out... We've bought

0:21:020:21:09

ourselves a war.

There's obviously a huge

0:21:090:21:14

responsibility to deliver something

for the audience of Blade Runner for

0:21:140:21:18

the first one. The expectation

visually making everything look cool

0:21:180:21:21

is on our mind every day.

The

demands of Vegas and the expectation

0:21:210:21:26

of making something that was based

on what we know Vegas now but what

0:21:260:21:30

it would be in the future, so we

started with the US Geo data, the

0:21:300:21:36

Vegas Valley and the city itself.

So

a simple model in the computer.

0:21:360:21:42

David Gassner, the art director of

the film, add a simple model of

0:21:420:21:46

Vegas with buildings placed around

and so forth, we took those two and

0:21:460:21:51

smashed them together initially. We

look for ways very subtly of how to

0:21:510:21:55

bring in the human element into the

shots, how to sell that scale,

0:21:550:22:02

analysing the work and how to use

graphics on the face of the

0:22:020:22:06

buildings, how here in a lot of his

paintings used human scale

0:22:060:22:10

futuristic items. We build all that

stuff and placed it around the city

0:22:100:22:14

in an organised way to make it look

like people were there at one time,

0:22:140:22:18

even though we see no one, and

that's what made it look real or

0:22:180:22:21

looked like a place people could

have been in. To build trash may

0:22:210:22:25

soak was based on the idea that

everyone had moved to the city and

0:22:250:22:30

all the structures are outside the

city had been pretty much abandoned.

0:22:300:22:35

No power, no water outside to the

trash is generated for the city was

0:22:350:22:39

dumped on the buildings outside the

city. Again, we're trying to based

0:22:390:22:44

things, as much reality as we could

so we started with the landscape of

0:22:440:22:48

current day California from Los

Angeles versus San Diego and we

0:22:480:22:54

determined Icelander was the place

to photograph the ground skate and

0:22:540:22:58

the beach. So through aerial

photography of that we placed in the

0:22:580:23:02

two on top of each other and then

the sequence of the ships was based

0:23:020:23:06

on the Bangladesh ship harvesting

yard where they recapture all the

0:23:060:23:10

metal and so forth that happens now.

A lot of the ships and the pieces of

0:23:100:23:15

the ships and the idea of these

little tiny human beings working on

0:23:150:23:19

these massive structures sort of

growth that look through the middle

0:23:190:23:22

of that sequence. So it's a matter

of grabbing all these components

0:23:220:23:28

that were based on today's reality,

scaling them so did have this sort

0:23:280:23:32

of massive relationship between Kay

and his little spinner in this

0:23:320:23:38

enormous landscape and these huge

amounts of trash. It was a matter of

0:23:380:23:42

pulling off that scale and distance,

which was just a massive

0:23:420:23:48

pulling off that scale and distance,

which was just a massive, the

0:23:480:23:48

undertaking in terms of the amount

of data and assets we had to build

0:23:480:23:52

and things we had to manage in

itself to pull that off.

The future

0:23:520:23:57

of the species is finally unearthed.

It is a brilliant film, absolutely

0:23:570:24:03

superb. Blade Runner 2049, a

well-deserved Oscar winner there.

0:24:030:24:09

That's it from us for this week.

Don't forget we live on Twitter and

0:24:090:24:13

Facebook. Thank you very much for

watching and we will see you soon.

0:24:130:24:18