04/02/2013 Inside Out Yorkshire and Lincolnshire


04/02/2013

Toby Foster investigates why increasing food prices are fuelling a rural crime wave. Plus, Lucy Hester meets some South Yorkshire locals planning to be frozen when they die.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to Inside Out. This evening, we are in Chevrolet.

:00:26.:00:33.

Marks & Spencer in the firing line. �1 million fine for ASBOs stock --

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for asbestos. It is reasonable to assume that it would have been

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licensed to as best as removal company. The thieves cashing in on

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high food prices and targeting our farmers. It is a combination of

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deer food, economic recession and a relatively soft target. We can set

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-- Storrar whole body so you are going to have four whole body is.

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We meet the people who believe they can be frozen into the future.

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few things the alternative is oblivion, what have you got to

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lose? It was established over a century

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ago in meets now Marks & Spencer is one of our most trusted brands. In

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2011, the company was fined �1 million over health and safety

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breaches when handling asbestos in one of its stores. The judge said

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M&S had turned a blind eye to complaints and could have put

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shoppers at risk. Were these problems confined to just one

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store? We investigate. Richard worked as a joiner and shop

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fitter in the 1960s. A lot of his work was with ASDA stores in Marks

:01:59.:02:08.

& Spencers in the North including Barnsley, Worksop and Hull. When he

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was cutting up the ports and shipping them to size, he describes

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how much asbestos dust was released into the atmosphere. In 2010, he

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died of mesothelioma, a cancer caused by breathing asbestos. His

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former employer paid compensation. M&S says his exposure could have

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come from many sources. It is impossible to say the link to

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working in M&S is the cause because these people work for long time

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over a variety of different projects in many buildings. It is

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unfortunate that many of the people who worked in the building trade at

:02:45.:02:55.
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that time were exposed to asbestos. There are also staff members to its

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claim to developed asbestos related diseases from working at M&S. Peter

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Jackson was a warehouseman at M&S for almost 30 years. Seven years

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ago, he was diagnosed with Jesus and -- mesothelioma. The doctors

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kept saying you must have worked with asbestos. He said, I haven't.

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Them p to record a 12 week period in 1977 when the Ashton store has

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been refurbished. He was breathing dust from some working tiles.

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could see the dust in the air, men doing the work, him boiler suits

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and masks what I wore my ordinary clothes and didn't have any

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protection. The dust contained asbestos. Peter died of

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mesothelioma him to win -- 2008 and was paid compensation by M&S.

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you look back to the 60s, 70s and 80s, it is possible staff were

:03:55.:03:59.

exposed to asbestos in our stores. Society didn't understand the risks

:03:59.:04:04.

back them. It is tragic our staff were affected in this way. Any

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illness relating to asbestos is terrible and we did pay

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compensation which is a right. Our society has learnt and we have

:04:13.:04:18.

learnt and our policies have become industry leading. But retailers

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have stores that contain asbestos. Some have been fined for breaching

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the regulations. They include House of Fraser, the top, Topshop and

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John Lewis. Evidence we have of how Ellis, and some of its come from

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actors handle asbestos in the stores is worrying. It suggests

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that the risks to customers, staff and contractors may not have been

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fully acknowledged. One case in particular is concerning. In 1988,

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M&S refurbishes its store in Marble Arch in London. William Wallace, a

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health and safety officer, is horrified by what he sees. There

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were minefields, asbestos mine fields for want of a better

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expression. You could not have guaranteed the safety of anybody.

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He says he flags up the problems with little effect so he begins

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copy him pages from reports left by the day and night shifts for the

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construction manager. This report from April 1998 says that a shift

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has done it again. Cladding has been stripped with a sledgehammer.

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Asbestos is everywhere. It's the third occasion in a week where

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they've had to clear up after a dangerous occurrence. Somebody has

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to control the day shift if they don't want the store closed and the

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HSE crawling all over them. Horrendous, shocking, scandalous. I

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recommend it that in areas where there was asbestos, it be handed

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over to the licensed asbestos removal company. He rides Everest

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chairman Sir Richard Greenbury and meet senior managers. Come the Met

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says it takes the matter seriously and is taking the appropriate

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action. What action did it take? the face of it, the allegations are

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of worrying but our team thoroughly investigated it on the day, they

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resent -- investigated it three months afterwards, and we could

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find no case whatsoever to say that any member of staff or member of

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public was put at risk. M&S says William Wallace was mistake about

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what materials may have contained asbestos. We understand there was

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not asbestos everywhere. We invited Mr Wallace in. We met him in a

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third party location. His claims were discussed, he went away, we

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think, happy. At the same time, he was not taking this to the agency.

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There was a case to answer. Wallace begins working as a safety

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manager added Moss and Spencer store and is horrified again.

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was very little control on various contractors who were being asked to

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work on or with him as a ceiling voids. There were other reports of

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incidents that had occurred as very frightening. By Marina tip-off, the

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Health and Safety Executive swoops on the Reading store. M&S is

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prosecuted. This building worker gave evidence. He fears been

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blacklisted by the industry so we've disguised his identity. He

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described the goal stacking sand wedge packs. You could see the dust

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for him Dail on to this girl. We asked her to move somewhere else.

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But the manager went ballistic at us. He told us not to tell her

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where to go. The gaps in the ceiling are sealed with hardboard.

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These fell Dereham, merrily missing a child. You would have to say that

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trials would have had asbestos fibres am dust. As would the mother

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and everybody else. M&S tried to blame contractors for their

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problems. We will make sure that never happens again. We checked

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Dorothy -- thoroughly the policies and we are clear the policy to date

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is a leading standard in industry and probably in the world.

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firms were switched on the weather was potentially asbestos which

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could have been taken into the rest of the store. This was regrettable.

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The implementation was not good. We are sorry about that and we have

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taken steps to make sure it never happens again. M&S was fined �1

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million and ordered to pay �600,000 in costs. The judge said there had

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been a systemic failure by M&S management. Their response to

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asbestos a year -- complaints was to turn a blind eye because the

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asbestos work was already costings the company too much. To keep

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profits as high as reasonably possible, insufficient time and

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space were allocated to asbestos removal. M&S has never put profit

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before safety. There was no blind eye. Investigations were full and

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thorough. We had a good policy which the judge said was sensible

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and practical. The implementation was not good. We regret that. We

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are disappointed by those judge's comments. The judge said that

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everybody had no right to be anxious about whether they breathed

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about the -- asbestos fibres and what effect that might have about

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their well-being in the future. But M&S disagrees. I think him expert

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testimony in Reading, there was no risk to customers or staff for.

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contractors will also find and the company was a not guilty of

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asbestos breaches in Plymouth and Bournemouth. Every year, more than

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4,000 people die of mesothelioma and asbestos-related lung cancer.

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It can take decades to develop. The pace of the disease means many

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people never know when or where they were exposed to asbestos. Full

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Marks & Spencer and the whole of the retail industry what happened

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10, 20 or 30 years ago may still have an impact today. Any

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suggestion that contractors, shop workers will customers were put at

:10:50.:11:00.
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risk deserves to be re-examined. We meet the people preparing for life

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Now, sheep rustling may be seen as an old-fashioned crime but cases

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have doubled since 2010. It's thought the rise is due to land be

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more expensive so the stolen ship are being sold illegally as food.

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Now it is a battle in the countryside to stay one step ahead

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of the thieves. The north of England boasts miles

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upon miles of stunning countryside. As well as beautiful views, it

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provides a living for those who raise animals and work the land.

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But this vast countryside also provides a great hiding place for

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people who aren't so keen on an honest day's work. The thieves who

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are targeting farmers and their stock. We take our ship away for

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winter grazing. We went back a month later to take more of way and

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we fouled 32 of them stolen. Martin Mitchell is a hill farmer in County

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Durham. All his sheep were insured but the loss of them is more than

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just financial. Not all sheep are the same. The sheep on your land,

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they will stay in the area that you own. So, you can't just go out and

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buy a sheep and put them on your land because they will wander off

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and go. Martin's animals disappeared without trace. He's now

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rebuilding his flock and stepping up security, especially during the

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winter months. Thefts might be easier during long, winter nights

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In the last two years, cases of rustling have more than doubled and

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it's a costly business. And that his �800 of my money that has been

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taken from me. Kevin Wilson knows what's it's like

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to be on the wrong end of the rural crime wave. He farms out of the

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small village of Blubberhouses in North Yorkshire, but rents fields

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all over the county to graze his sheep. We go round on Sunday

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morning, checking stock. I realised that a vehicle had been through a

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gateway. In this field, there were 200 feeding lambs. I gathered the

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lambs up in the field and counted them and realised approximately ten

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had gone missing. Kevin, though, is luckier than

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Martin and amazingly, within a few days, the police had tracked down

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his sheep. It was just in that area between those trees and the river

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where the sheep were recovered. It's less than two miles as the

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crow flies from where they'd gone. Down there, they're well out of

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public view. For me to recognise one of my sheep, at a distance, you

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can see the red mark that is on the side of the animal. Also, the

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Shipard tag, everyone has to be, so they have individual numbers -- the

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animal has a tag. So I can go into a flock of sheep and identify my

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lambs by that. So job done. But what happened to

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the thieves who stole them? They did a flit, they'd gone the

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following morning. Word had got out that we had

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identified the site of interest to All the same, Mark has an idea

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about who stole Kevin's sheep and today, he's making enquiries in the

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Tadcaster area, near York. I am from Knaresborough, just doing some

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inquiries into suspect vehicles. you give us the details, we do it...

:14:59.:15:09.
:15:09.:15:09.

Pay Cichon, which is what we want. So it is time to hit the road again.

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But why have sheep become such a popular target for thieves?

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price of meat is going up, so when you have hard times and the food

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costs going there but you have effectively all of this food in the

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countryside, fairly nightie protected, then you would expect

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the rustling situation to increase -- likely protected.

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Stolen sheep are ending up on our dinner plates, but there's a

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warning for anyone who thinks black market meat is a bargain. Some

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people may be thinking it they get offered cheap meat, it is very

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tempting at the moment, but it has been butchered in the core of a

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field or in the back of a truck, that is the hygiene situation. It

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is not a good a deal as you might think.

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Back in North Yorkshire and the hunt is still on for the rustlers.

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Mark Ayre is off to Clitheroe market to follow up reports of

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sheep thieves trying to do business there. I wondered if you could just

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to check your computer records to see if this individual has carried

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out any transactions. We have won just over the top here.

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Mark compares notes with a colleague from Lancashire police,

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who hit the headlines with their first conviction for sheep rustling

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in 100 years. We traced them to County Durham and

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then we got them on a DNA and traced them back to a small village

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called Chipping. And those sheep belonged to farmer

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Robin Dean, who farms just outside Chipping, near Preston.

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When did you first notice you were missing 55 sheep? I'd gone at seven

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o'clock in the morning to feed them and there were only two left in the

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field. So I immediately knew there was something amiss. So you phoned

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the police. Did you ever think you'd see your sheep again? No, I

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have to admit I didn't, really. Even though they were in lamb, I

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thought they'd be slaughtered and used for meat. If that had happened,

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there'd be no trace of them. And that's where DC Elaine Smalley

:17:04.:17:14.
:17:14.:17:14.

comes in. Officers attended a farm in Durham, where Mr Dean was able

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to identify his sheep. That led to the arrest of two people for the

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theft of them, but one of the people was maintaining that he'd

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bred them. So what we did was we DNAed the sheep and some of the

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parents of the sheep, which proved that they'd been bred at this farm.

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Were you surprised when the police suggested DNA testing? Yes, I was,

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actually. It was quite funny that we had to go to those lengths.

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I initially mentioned it to the victim in this case, I think he

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thought I was bonkers but I explained it was something we had

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to do to get that to court, so that someone would be brought to justice

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as a result of the theft. Over in North Yorkshire, PC Mark

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Ayre has made an unexpected breakthrough.

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While making his enquiries, he's come across a local resident who

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has some useful information. The man wishes to remain anonymous.

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certainly substantiates the sightings of the vehicle in the

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area. And which was what we were trying to set out to do in the

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first place. Mark does make an arrest and a man

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is charged but a few months down the line, the case is dropped at

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court. And neither of the two thieves who

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stole Robin Dean's sheep received custodial sentences either. For

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stealing �15,000 worth of sheep, there'll be some farmers who think

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those sentences are nowhere near stiff enough. That's right. Having

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spoken to some of the farming community, they've said, "Will that

:18:56.:19:02.

deter would-be sheep thieves?". I think not. It is always at the back

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of your mind, we did leave some stock in the field, or you take

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them away, you always think that they be, will they be there when

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you come to load them back up? You just have to keep your fingers

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crossed and hope you are not targeted again.

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Now, for a group of people in South Yorkshire, planning for the future

:19:23.:19:28.

has taken on a whole new meaning. Here in Sheffield is where UK

:19:28.:19:31.

Cryonics has its headquarters. Members want to be frozen when they

:19:31.:19:34.

die, in the hope that they can be brought back to life again in the

:19:34.:19:40.

future. Lucy Hester has been to meet them.

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On a quiet suburban street in Sheffield, in a garage, a small

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group of people are working together to try and cheat death.

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if you bring the arms ban. They're in the resurrection

:19:54.:19:58.

business. It sounds like sci-fi stuff, but they are deadly serious.

:19:59.:20:02.

This dummy is fondly known as Bob, but the procedure these people are

:20:02.:20:05.

practising now will eventually be carried out for real - on one of

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them. They're cryonicists. They want to

:20:10.:20:14.

be frozen when they die in the hope that, at some point in the future,

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the medical technology will exist to bring them back to life again.

:20:17.:20:19.

And this ordinary house in Sheffield is the countrywide

:20:19.:20:22.

headquarters for UK Cryonics - a group of likeminded people who

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promise to help get each other's dead bodies in tip-top condition

:20:25.:20:34.

for the deep freeze. The point of UK Cryonics is to be

:20:34.:20:38.

there when the person dies. As soon as death has been pronounced, we

:20:38.:20:42.

can cool them down, carry out the initial procedures, so they can be

:20:42.:20:44.

shipped to America without any further degradation of the body

:20:44.:20:50.

during the transport period. America and - recently - Russia are

:20:50.:20:52.

the only places where you can be specially stored and frozen

:20:52.:20:55.

indefinitely, so this is a timed trial of the pre-freezing

:20:55.:21:05.
:21:05.:21:05.

preparations. Lopes, wrong one. idea is that if someone's going to

:21:05.:21:09.

live again, they need to preserve the brain as well as they can. So

:21:09.:21:11.

they cool the body, inject a cocktail of preserving chemicals

:21:11.:21:16.

and start mechanical CPR to keep oxygenated blood pumping around.

:21:16.:21:19.

None of these people are medically trained, and there has been no one

:21:19.:21:22.

to practice on for real, because none of their members have died in

:21:22.:21:30.

suitable circumstances. It is one thing to work on a dummy,

:21:30.:21:35.

it is another thing to work on a person that you know. I know, it is

:21:35.:21:39.

quite scary. You just have to say that the best thing you can do for

:21:39.:21:43.

this person is to get them preserved in the best possible way,

:21:43.:21:47.

and then just putted out of your mind and get on with doing the job.

:21:47.:21:52.

That put it out of your mind. you think about that? Yes, it is

:21:52.:21:55.

scary. What's going on in there is really

:21:55.:22:00.

a gamble. Not just a gamble that the technology will ever exist to

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resurrect them, but a gamble that they'll be able to make what they

:22:03.:22:06.

call a good preservation. Ever optimistic, though, parked on

:22:06.:22:13.

the driveway is the cryonicist's so called "ambulance to the future".

:22:13.:22:19.

We have got a ramp at the back for wheeling the patient in on the

:22:19.:22:22.

trolley, and the suspension lowers the so we can get them in quite

:22:22.:22:24.

easily. The ambulance would be despatched

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from Sheffield to the deathbed of one of their members, manned by a

:22:27.:22:30.

team of volunteers ready to start the preservation process

:22:30.:22:33.

immediately that person is pronounced legally dead. And if

:22:33.:22:38.

necessary, we can work on them in the ambulance as we are driving to

:22:38.:22:42.

the undertakers. It sought to strikes me as a bit of a gamble.

:22:42.:22:47.

is a gamble. But if you think, the alternative is a Bolivian, then

:22:47.:22:52.

what have you got to lose? -- oblivion.

:22:52.:22:57.

I've come to the Hunterian Museum in London. It's a kind of temple to

:22:57.:23:00.

mortality and the frailty of the flesh. It's the 18th-century

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collection of one surgeon, full of preserved specimens of human and

:23:03.:23:08.

animal body parts. This is precisely what Garret Smyth wants

:23:08.:23:17.

to transcend by being cryo- preserved. I don't see it as being

:23:17.:23:19.

dead. More like suspended de- animation. An interlude. So you're

:23:20.:23:26.

going to be frozen and shipped off to America? Yes, but just my head.

:23:26.:23:29.

That can make make people think "Ugh". How can you live without a

:23:29.:23:33.

body? You couldn't - they'd have to grow you a new set of limbs and

:23:33.:23:42.

organs. For anybody who is news to cryonics, they would listen to that

:23:42.:23:47.

and say it is fantastical, it is not real. Every step has a

:23:47.:23:51.

scientific basis to it. But it is all on the edge of research, so I

:23:51.:23:57.

can't show it you working now. If you had said to someone before the

:23:57.:24:00.

first heart transplant, "We'll cut your heart out and replace it with

:24:00.:24:06.

one from a dead person", you'd have just been laughed at. I have, as

:24:06.:24:12.

yet, to hear a good argument put forward for being dead.

:24:12.:24:15.

Leaving the museum, I'm struck by how much of the cryonicist's plans

:24:15.:24:19.

are built on hopes and dreams - and I wonder if a dead body could ever

:24:19.:24:24.

be brought to life. At the Institute of Nanotechnology in

:24:24.:24:26.

Glasgow, scientists say freezing a brain would be unlike freezing any

:24:26.:24:29.

other human organ. The brain's complexity means any cell damage

:24:29.:24:34.

could be catastrophic. The brain is a complex three-dimensional map of

:24:34.:24:40.

nerve cells that are connected to each other. And you don't have to

:24:40.:24:42.

change much of that to alter someone's personality, memories,

:24:42.:24:49.

behaviour. You just have to see what happens with people who have

:24:49.:24:56.

dementia or who have had strokes. To say you can take all the fluid

:24:56.:25:00.

out and just replace it with cryo- protectant and expect most of it to

:25:00.:25:10.
:25:10.:25:16.

This is Arizona. It's the final destination for most of the UK's

:25:16.:25:21.

cryonicists. In the heat of the desert, they'll be deep frozen at

:25:21.:25:26.

Alcor's life-extension facility. Inside is a gallery - photos of the

:25:26.:25:29.

113 people stored here already, silently waiting to start the

:25:29.:25:38.

second of many life cycles. When the bodies arrive - or in Garret's

:25:38.:25:42.

case, his head - they're brought here to the lab, to be cooled to

:25:42.:25:48.

very low temperatures. We're going to do the separation, take the head,

:25:48.:25:51.

place it into here, tighten it down, and then use the medical grade

:25:51.:25:58.

antifreeze and flush out the head, rather than the entire body. It's

:25:58.:26:02.

also cheaper to have the head - or neuro - option, $80,000. A full

:26:02.:26:05.

body preservation will set you back around $200,000. Most people pay

:26:05.:26:11.

through life insurance. We got a full tour of Alcor. This

:26:11.:26:14.

is where the so-called patients are stored - in a kind of giant thermos

:26:14.:26:24.
:26:24.:26:24.

flask full of liquid nitrogen. The temperature is minus 196

:26:24.:26:30.

Celsius. They are divided into four quadrants. For different sections.

:26:30.:26:38.

In each section, we can store a whole body. If a person chooses a

:26:38.:26:47.

new row, we can actually get 10 containers within the size and

:26:47.:26:53.

space -- a neuro. We also do pets. But we require that the members are

:26:53.:26:57.

also signed up, we won't take a pet and thus their owners are being

:26:57.:27:03.

preserve. For Alcor, it's a waiting game for

:27:03.:27:06.

science to perform a miracle and make it all possible.

:27:06.:27:09.

I really have very little idea of when we will bring back our

:27:09.:27:13.

patients. Of a surprise to be takes more than a century, it may take

:27:13.:27:16.

less. But when we do come back, the people there will well-preserved

:27:16.:27:19.

will come back first. It may not even require highly advanced

:27:19.:27:23.

technology, we just need to fix what killed them, fix the ageing

:27:23.:27:27.

process. For other people, it may be a lot longer but we really have

:27:27.:27:30.

to look into how we can repair damaged parts of the brains, it can

:27:30.:27:35.

be very challenging. And there will be many patients, probably, under

:27:35.:27:43.

none ideal conditions, who we won't be able to bring back. Alcor is no

:27:43.:27:45.

stranger to controversy. In 2009, an ex-employee made gruesome

:27:45.:27:48.

allegations concerning the treatment of bodies in Alcor's care

:27:48.:27:50.

- although he retracted these following court action. Despite

:27:50.:27:55.

that, 1,000 people worldwide are signed up, and counting.

:27:55.:28:05.
:28:05.:28:07.

Back in Sheffield, they're all set for the future. Stored in the

:28:07.:28:10.

garage, Mike shows me the transport box which will be used for their

:28:10.:28:13.

members' final journey to the US. There is space all around which we

:28:13.:28:18.

can fill up with dry ice. This is science fiction. It's not

:28:18.:28:21.

possible to bring a long-dead body back to life. But the cryonicists

:28:21.:28:25.

believe it will be possible in the future - and this represents their

:28:25.:28:32.

best chance yet of living forever. Well, that is it from us for

:28:32.:28:35.

tonight. You can follow us on Twitter and Facebook, the details

:28:35.:28:40.

Toby Foster investigates why the rising price of food is fuelling a rural crime wave. And Lucy Hester meets a group in South Yorkshire who are planning to be frozen when they die.


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