03/08/2012 Newsnight


03/08/2012

Will Boris Johnson's Olympic performance take him all the way? Plus, a look at the austerity Games of 1948 and why London 2012 is costing so much. With Eddie Mair.


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Transcript


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One week in, we have the measure of the games.

:00:17.:00:24.

Look at the time, it's a new world record. Huge viewing figures, a

:00:24.:00:29.

feel-good factor, and a Boris bounce. Gold medal. If any other

:00:29.:00:34.

politician anywhere in the world got stuck on a zip wire, it was

:00:34.:00:37.

disastrous, for Boris it will be an absolute triumph. Will any of it

:00:38.:00:42.

last, or will it fade from memory, like the 1948 games. I said, how

:00:42.:00:47.

did you train? He said, train, I just stubbed out my cigarette and

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ran! We will discuss that with three

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British olympian, and this man, who went to the Olympic Park this week

:00:55.:01:05.
:01:05.:01:07.

and had a sausage McMuffin. This time last week, while you and I

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were watching Newsnight, literally everybody else was watching the

:01:10.:01:13.

Olympic Opening Ceremony. We have learned an important lesson from,

:01:13.:01:17.

that and tonight's programme is devoted to the games. What their

:01:17.:01:22.

success says about Britain, whether it's laughable to think of them as

:01:22.:01:28.

austerity games, and first, whether London 2012 will be a springboard

:01:28.:01:32.

for Boris 20125 he didn't secure the Olympics for London, and yet

:01:32.:01:37.

the public closely associates him with the event. He has instant name

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recognition which is way better than whoever the hell I am. And the

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polls say if he became Tory leader his party would be neck and neck

:01:45.:01:53.

with Labour. Forget Boris for London, why not Boris for Britain.

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August, and that most august tradition of journalism, the silly

:01:58.:02:02.

season. And this year, the silly contender. Boris Johnson for Prime

:02:02.:02:09.

Minister, very funny, but everywhere Londoners look up, they

:02:09.:02:13.

see, not David Cameron, but another man on the wire.

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This man made it across his wire, and despite those dangling legs,

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this one might do too, it is not very silly at all. People are

:02:24.:02:27.

coming from around the world, and they are seeing us and the greatest

:02:27.:02:31.

city on earth. To a politician 60,000 people chanting your name is

:02:31.:02:41.
:02:41.:02:41.

far from silly. The geiger counter of Olympomaina will go zoink.

:02:41.:02:47.

then the zoink has gone zonk off the scale. So much so David Cameron

:02:47.:02:51.

just took his hat off to his London mayor. If any other politician,

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anywhere in the world, got stuck on a zip wire, it would be disastrous,

:02:56.:03:05.

for Boris, it will be an absolute triumph. Even Johnson's biographer

:03:05.:03:11.

has been taken aback. I have been rung by Americans, Swiss, the

:03:11.:03:14.

Swedes want to know about him, everyone wants to know who this

:03:14.:03:19.

astonishing figure is. He has used with amazing acumen to show that he

:03:19.:03:23.

is a leader of a world city, and he can perform on the world stage.

:03:23.:03:28.

This is, of course, raising him as a much more serious figure, or much

:03:29.:03:32.

more serious contender to David Cameron, because he is the one,

:03:33.:03:38.

well known story, who is not actually found -- Tory, who is not

:03:38.:03:41.

actually bound into the not very popular decisions taken at

:03:41.:03:47.

Westminster. The numbers bear this out, a nearby

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I don't knowic Olympic bounce A Tory Party led by David Cameron --

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bionic bounce, a Tory Party led by David Cameron, as usual in mid-term,

:03:59.:04:05.

with Boris Johnson as leader, the gap narrows. The road is not

:04:05.:04:09.

straight ahead. D'oh to see Boris going to be leader of the party,

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you have to do as many Olympics as Boris does in a sentence. Does he

:04:14.:04:18.

want it? No question about. That consider this, there is no vacancy

:04:18.:04:22.

for the top role, David Cameron is not universally adored by MPs, but

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he's not going anywhere. What if the Tories lose the next election,

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when Boris would have to bail early from being Mayor of London. That is

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something he has promised Londoners he wouldn't do. He could style it

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out. Many think his next chance is before the next election, that they

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choose him in a pre-election panic. The country is enjoying the games,

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but has the mayor ensured it is also making money? Boris Johnson

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warned of gridlock, some shop floors have grown tumbleweed, he

:04:53.:04:58.

gets the jokes of competition, but is he competent. One thing about

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Boris is he's a real detalisman, he really studies his brief. He loves

:05:03.:05:07.

chairing meetings and chairs a lot of really detailed negotiating

:05:07.:05:11.

meetings and so on. He's also unbelievably hard working, contrary

:05:11.:05:16.

to what a lot of people expect. He starts early and leaves late and

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works weekends. His staff are concerned he works too hard. Can he

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be Prime Minister? There isn't a vacancy, but he has defied

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expectations before in terms of possibilities, and no reason why

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that shouldn't carry on. The Mayor of London office has relatively few

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powers, has hard for him to do things, -- it is hard for him to do

:05:40.:05:47.

things that will capitalise on the Olympic bounce. But one thing he

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could do would be to push through the driverless train, but it could

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be a ruckus. A ruckus in London, what about elsewhere, we know he's

:05:54.:05:59.

not that popular in Liverpool, he city he offended so much he was

:05:59.:06:03.

sent to apologise in person. Those figures on the right of the screen

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show Boris Johnson is more popular as a leader in almost every part of

:06:06.:06:09.

the country. But when asked who would make the better Prime

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Minister, that changes. David Cameron polls ahead, and in some

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places by quite a way. Never say never with Boris Johnson,

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but even his closest associates admit he doesn't yet know how to

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get where he wants to get. The wire is ready, and he can walk on it,

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but it is not yet hooked up to Westminster.

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You said the zoike has gone zonk? It is easy when there is not much

:06:43.:06:46.

going on in Westminster. Is Boris making headway because there is not

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much going on? There are things going on, there is a big thing

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going on today with Lords reform. Before we go on to that. It is

:06:52.:06:57.

fairly serious, it is summer, it is quiet, but equally, and this is his

:06:57.:07:02.

home turf. But he has been astute in how he is playing these messages,

:07:02.:07:05.

he's doing well. He's hogging the limelight, and other politicians

:07:05.:07:09.

are letting him. They have, however, made a fairly, they haven't

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officially announced it, the signs are that Lords reform has died in

:07:15.:07:18.

its massive 100-year history, and will have to spend a few more years

:07:18.:07:21.

waiting to get on to the statute books, today it seems clear they

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won't go ahead with, that after incredibly bullish signs from both

:07:26.:07:30.

naerts they will have to try to come up with a compromise. It is a

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big development on what is supposed to be the silly season. The BBC is

:07:34.:07:38.

covering every Olympic sport, from every angle, all the time. If you

:07:38.:07:42.

are a bit busy, the Newsnight guide to the day, will help you keep your

:07:42.:07:52.
:07:52.:08:04.

Ever since the hugely successful Opening Ceremony, and all that

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Olympic standard waving, 30 Mary Poppinses have been working day and

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night to transform the stadium into a venue where athletes can run,

:08:13.:08:23.
:08:23.:08:23.

jump and throw. Britain's big gold medal hope in

:08:23.:08:30.

the heptathlon, Jessica Ennis, roared out of her first event, the

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100m hurdles, at this speed she would have won gold in Beijing

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against the world's specialist. Katherine Grainger and Anna Watson

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have three sets of silver medals from Athens, Sydney and Beijing,

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but something happened to them today, oh, what's the word? Was it

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fulfilment, like some thunder boat had hit you, and -- thunder bolt

:08:54.:08:59.

had hit you. What is the word? word is "finally"!

:08:59.:09:02.

A clear victory for Britain, then, while in the sailing, well this

:09:02.:09:08.

drama in the fin class speaks for itself. In the velodrome, an

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explanation of why Gavin isn't here tonight. And more success for

:09:15.:09:25.
:09:25.:09:26.

Britain's men and women. Well Greg Searle is here, he won bronze this

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week in the men's eight rowing, a full 20 years after his first

:09:31.:09:35.

Olympic appearance in Barcelona, where he won a gold medal. I know

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you have come from the Olympic Park, how are the games for you?

:09:39.:09:47.

games are unfolding beautifully. There was a slightly low -- slow

:09:47.:09:50.

start, we were nervous about the home team. Now the medals are

:09:50.:09:53.

coming in. People seem to have smiles on their faces across town

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and across the country, around the Olympic Park. Hopefully people are

:09:56.:10:00.

beginning to get into the games and start to feel proud of the British

:10:00.:10:03.

team. As a participant, do you really notice the different cities

:10:03.:10:07.

and what they bring, or when you are in the middle of it you could

:10:07.:10:11.

be anywhere? It is very different for me, each of the different

:10:11.:10:14.

experiences. In Barcelona in 1992 everyone loved it, every street you

:10:14.:10:18.

walked down, there were flags and people excited about the games.

:10:18.:10:22.

When I went to the Atlanta Olympics, it was very different, a very dry

:10:22.:10:25.

experience, they were probably as interested in the baseball as the

:10:25.:10:30.

games. That cast a shadow over it. In terms of the enthusiasm from the

:10:30.:10:35.

home crowd. What about this British rowing success? The British rowing

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success has been marvellous. We're strong sport in this country, we

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have heritage and history that we are good at row, we have had Steve

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Redgrave as aman, from years gone by, we have pick -- tailsman from

:10:52.:10:57.

years gone by, we have picked it up and carried on. Colin Moynihan from

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the Birtish Olympic Association, essentially saying, he didn't use

:10:59.:11:04.

the terms, but saying a lot of sports are sports for posh boys and

:11:04.:11:09.

girls, certainly where we win medals? That is where we need to

:11:09.:11:12.

drive diversity, more people into sport. Rowing, as an example, you

:11:12.:11:16.

said why are we good at it. We were good at it, because we used to have

:11:16.:11:19.

posh boys and a few people were able to do sport. Now we have

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talent identification programme, we have cast the net wider, so more

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than Haher the rowers went to state schools not private schools,

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because they have had opportunity to do the sport,, it has had

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exposure. More fun doing it and more success from it T women's

:11:37.:11:41.

rowing has had huge success and two gold medals from British women

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rowers, that is the first time we have won gold in British women's

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rowing. There is talk about legacy, sustainability, and whether they

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are different. Do you think simply seeing British women and men win at

:11:55.:11:58.

rowing, will be enough to entice people to take up the sport for the

:11:58.:12:01.

first time? I think you look at the Steve Redgrave story that I have

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told, in the past people weren't rowing, then we had success in

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Sydney, that was a big one, where Steve won the five golds. Now you

:12:08.:12:13.

look at the result of that, 12 years on, we're a hugely successful

:12:13.:12:17.

team. Cycling, exactly the same thing is happening. Sailing,

:12:17.:12:20.

exactly the same thing is happening. These are not the mainstream sports,

:12:21.:12:24.

this is getting people away from following football. Getting out,

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getting a broader interest, finding things we are good at, activities

:12:28.:12:32.

people can get fit doing. People having the team work experiences,

:12:32.:12:36.

so we get more people into sport. Surely that is a great thing.

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will talk more about this later, thank you, that is Greg Searle,

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whose personal Olympic experience dates back 20 years. We will delve

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back further now. To the London Games of 1948. Which came in, on

:12:48.:12:51.

time, under budget, and in black and white.

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We have been considering what we might learn now from then.

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Could it be that there was a different spirit abroad then.

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Afterall, we had just come through a war. People had got used to

:13:09.:13:16.

making do, and not making a fuss. Take the man who brought the torch

:13:16.:13:20.

to Wembley Stadium, to inaugurate the games. Did it bother him that

:13:21.:13:27.

it was shedding hot gouts of poet it is a yum everywhere? Of course

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it didn't, any more than the spectator, they hadn't felt warmth

:13:30.:13:35.

like that in years. Excitement was at fever pitch. Times were so hard,

:13:35.:13:42.

that the cyclists had to share bikes. But they drew the crowds to

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Herne Hill, velodrome in south London. You know they make all this

:13:50.:13:55.

fuss about this Wiggins fella! Newsnight is pitting itself against

:13:55.:13:59.

Herne Hill's notorious wall of death, together with author, Janie

:13:59.:14:06.

Hampton, who has written about the' 48 games. There was food rationing,

:14:06.:14:10.

petrol rationing, clothes rationing, it was incredibly difficult to get

:14:10.:14:16.

hold of any building materials. Hence the austerity nickname for

:14:16.:14:19.

the games? The only labour available was German prisoners of

:14:19.:14:25.

war. Did they build this? They didn't build any special arenas for

:14:25.:14:32.

the Olympics. In the pastoral beauty of Richmond Park, with

:14:33.:14:39.

ancient trees and grazing deer, a temporary home for visitors. Today,

:14:39.:14:45.

that is to G4S, soldiers have moved in with the athletes. Back in 1948,

:14:45.:14:49.

the reverse was true, athletes moved into what was a convalesce

:14:49.:14:54.

sant hospital for soldiers. It was a different story for the high-ups

:14:54.:15:03.

of the Olympic family, who enjoyed Britain's first infinity pool! John

:15:03.:15:11.

Mann won a silver medal for Great Britain. -- Dorothy Manley won a

:15:11.:15:16.

silver medal for Britain, Dorothy, a shorthand typist, could do the

:15:16.:15:24.

100ms in 12.2 seconds, and 100 words perminute. Was she on a high-

:15:24.:15:29.

performance diet like today's elite runners? Kind of. The only thing I

:15:29.:15:33.

remember was having steak, my mother and father could have t they

:15:33.:15:41.

could buy it, I was able to have it. That was rather nice. What about

:15:41.:15:47.

high altitude training, practically de rigueur today, not so much. John

:15:47.:15:51.

and her future husband, John, also a runner, got into the zone of

:15:51.:15:59.

London 1948, with a gruelling stay at Butlin's Clacton. It was not an

:15:59.:16:04.

exacting schedule, we were keen to run, and we had good basic food, we

:16:04.:16:06.

didn't have all the rubbish they are fed as youngsters. I think that

:16:06.:16:13.

is why we are living to the age we live to. Who was the scientific

:16:13.:16:19.

genius behind special diets for John, authorisity and the rest of

:16:19.:16:26.

the -- Dorothy and the rest of the great British team? # Blinding me

:16:26.:16:32.

with science That's right, it was windmill-armed

:16:32.:16:38.

BBC doctor, Magnus Pike, long before he appeared in pop videos,

:16:38.:16:43.

he was a scientist. He said olympians can't train on 2,500

:16:43.:16:46.

calories a day, which is what adults were allowed. They should be

:16:46.:16:56.
:16:56.:16:57.

allowed the same as a coal miner, which was 3,500 a day.

:16:57.:17:01.

competitors struggled to master the new food rations. A cyclist accuses

:17:01.:17:08.

a rival of testing positive for potted tongue! But while athletes

:17:08.:17:13.

splurged at the butchers, the national mood was distinctly frugal.

:17:13.:17:18.

The initial budget for the 2012 games was �2.4 billion, it is

:17:18.:17:24.

likely to be �9 billion. Although the Commons committee has estimated

:17:24.:17:28.

security costs will push it to �11 billion. By contrast, three

:17:28.:17:32.

quarters of a million pounds, the equivalent of �20 million today,

:17:32.:17:38.

was set ased side for The Austerity Olympics. They came in at a thrifty

:17:38.:17:45.

�76 2,000, and ticket sales 76 2,000, meaning the games turned a

:17:45.:17:52.

small profit of �30,000. Everybody was happy, everybody was cheering.

:17:52.:17:57.

Everybody was looking forward to it. Dorothy Tyler, a high-jumping

:17:57.:18:03.

mother of two from south London took silver in a tensely-fought

:18:03.:18:10.

contest. It was a wonderful atmosphere. It was packed every day.

:18:10.:18:14.

They all stayed on, the king and the Queen stayed on to watch me

:18:14.:18:21.

jump. We broke the Olympic record. We might think we have it tough in

:18:21.:18:24.

today's recession, it was hardly a picnic in 1948, back then the

:18:24.:18:28.

British olympians were amateurs who did it all for the love of sport.

:18:28.:18:34.

They had to. You had to go and work in your factory or office. One of

:18:34.:18:43.

the British team, who was in the 100m final, Alastair McCorkadale. I

:18:43.:18:49.

asked him how he trained, he said he just stubbed out his cigarette

:18:49.:18:54.

and ran. Wheeze it softly, but he nearly bagged a medal on his regime

:18:54.:19:01.

of John Players, just being edged into fourth in this early instance

:19:01.:19:09.

of a photo finish. The back up for the Brits might

:19:09.:19:14.

have been a bit thin back then, but there was nothing thread bare about

:19:14.:19:18.

their undergarments, a free pair of drawers for every male competitor

:19:18.:19:23.

was the promise of the pantsman here. Would our veterans swap

:19:23.:19:26.

places with today's olympians. wouldn't, because I wouldn't like

:19:26.:19:30.

it to be the bee all and end all. My aim in life was to get married

:19:30.:19:34.

and have a family, that's what, luckily, I was able to do. I

:19:34.:19:40.

couldn't have put all that aside just to run. No. I couldn't have

:19:40.:19:46.

stood all the regime. I ran because it was fun. If there's one last

:19:46.:19:51.

thing the present games are lacking, it is a rousing specially-penned

:19:51.:19:56.

anthem, like the one they sang 64 years ago.

:19:56.:20:03.

# If all the lands # Could run with all the others

:20:03.:20:09.

# And work as sweetly # As the young men play

:20:09.:20:14.

# Moves with a laugh # And battle as brothers

:20:14.:20:20.

# Loving to win # But not win every day

:20:20.:20:24.

Greg Searle is still with us, we are joined by two of the 1948

:20:24.:20:29.

olympians from Steve's report, Dorothy and John Parlett, and

:20:29.:20:32.

Matthew Taylor, part of the Downing Street team when the games were

:20:32.:20:35.

secured, and Giles Coren, who, for the Times this week, has been

:20:35.:20:39.

playing close attention to the buns at McDonalds and the women's beach

:20:39.:20:42.

volley ball. We hoped to be joined by the Olympic secretary, Jeremy

:20:42.:20:47.

Hunt who told us he would be with us live in the studio,

:20:47.:20:51.

but...Sometimes the best laid plans don't work out.

:20:51.:20:55.

John and Dorothy, thank you for joining us in the studio. What do

:20:55.:21:03.

you think the 2012 games could learn from 1948? I was looking at

:21:03.:21:08.

the official report before we came here, and they had a problem with

:21:08.:21:14.

tickets. They had allocated tickets for the foreign countries that were

:21:14.:21:19.

coming here, and at a fairly late stage, these countries decided they

:21:19.:21:25.

didn't want the tickets. So they had a problem. And there was a

:21:25.:21:30.

comment that those who are organising further games should

:21:30.:21:36.

look at these comments and do something about it. But some how,

:21:36.:21:41.

somebody somewhere didn't. You talked, Dorothy, about you wouldn't

:21:41.:21:46.

want to be part of the athletics now, it wouldn't be your scene, but

:21:46.:21:50.

in terms of how big the games have become, do you think they are too

:21:50.:21:58.

big? Do think they are too big, I think there are too many events

:21:58.:22:02.

nowadays. Putting football, tennis in, which have got things in their

:22:02.:22:07.

own right, haven't they, that they can look up to. From your joint

:22:07.:22:11.

experience, obviously taking part in the 1948 games, do you think

:22:11.:22:18.

Britain are now more swept up in the games than they were then?

:22:18.:22:23.

seem to be. But, quite honestly, I can't really remember, it was 64

:22:23.:22:31.

years ago, you know. I know there was 80,000, virtually the same

:22:31.:22:36.

amount of people watching. quickly did people forget the 1948

:22:36.:22:42.

games? I know it has taken you 60 years, did people remember in 1949

:22:42.:22:47.

what happened? I don't know. What did happen was that there was,

:22:47.:22:52.

as far as the athletics was concerned, they set up a national

:22:52.:23:00.

coaching scheme to train people in the clubs to be coaches so they

:23:00.:23:06.

could bring youngsters on, by 1950, at the European Championships,

:23:06.:23:10.

there were two young women that ran very well, that hadn't run in the

:23:10.:23:16.

Olympics, they had come up. I think they had gained a lot through this

:23:16.:23:20.

scheme that was going. So clubs were getting more involved.

:23:20.:23:25.

Matthew, I know you are a bit worried about the size of the games.

:23:25.:23:29.

Of itn't quite what you expected? think the games are -- it isn't

:23:29.:23:34.

quite what you expected? I think the games are fantastic, it is

:23:34.:23:38.

great to see the excitement running across the country. We have to be

:23:38.:23:41.

realistic about the knock-on effects of the Olympics. I heard

:23:41.:23:45.

John Major saying today this will be a massive boost for Britain and

:23:45.:23:49.

get us back on track. I'm not sure that is the case. I think the

:23:49.:23:52.

Olympics are great. And it is a great sporting event. You want them

:23:52.:23:56.

to be smaller and cheaper, that is what you were expecting? Everybody

:23:56.:23:59.

knows when you set the Olympic budget, it is likely to end up more

:23:59.:24:03.

than it was. In terms of the organisation. The strength of this

:24:03.:24:06.

Olympics has been the organisation, it is extremely good, you look at

:24:06.:24:10.

the number of people going to all the event. The legacy planning is

:24:10.:24:14.

better than other Olympics, it couldn't be much worse. If there is

:24:14.:24:20.

a problem, we want these Olympic on grounds of diversity and inclusion.

:24:20.:24:23.

-- Olympics on grounds of diversity and inclusion. That story isn't as

:24:23.:24:28.

strong. It is not quite as clear to me what the core message of the

:24:28.:24:33.

Olympics are, what are we trying to say about Britain, other than we

:24:33.:24:38.

are good at organising major events. You have been at the Olympic Park,

:24:38.:24:42.

what is the message? I think it is a poor look when John Major says

:24:42.:24:46.

everything will be OK. I have enjoyed myself, I have a Willy

:24:46.:24:51.

Wonka golden ticket I can go to everything, being low on the roster

:24:51.:24:55.

of experts, that usually means the trampolining and the live goat

:24:55.:24:59.

racing. But it is basically it is enormous, far too large. I have

:24:59.:25:02.

been writing it from the Opening Ceremony, right up close, face

:25:02.:25:05.

pressed against the window. You can't begin to comprehend it.

:25:05.:25:08.

Whatever you are at there is something better happening down the

:25:08.:25:13.

road T might be an hour across London or out at Eton Dorney, there

:25:13.:25:18.

is 17 different athletics tracks in the one park. 1948 sounds like it

:25:18.:25:22.

was comprehensible, you had fit, strong young people running around

:25:22.:25:27.

in circles and you gave medals to the best ones. Now I spend a couple

:25:27.:25:32.

of days in the McDonalds, why it would be the main sponsor,

:25:32.:25:37.

McDonalds, Coca-Cola and Heineken, the three dietry supplements you

:25:37.:25:42.

need to be an athlete, and then you have the busiest McDonalds in the

:25:42.:25:45.

world at the centre of it, it sounds bogus. Kids we are talking

:25:45.:25:49.

about, will sit down, watch television and emulate this, they

:25:49.:25:54.

will go out and eat Hamburgers. There was another attempt, apart

:25:54.:25:58.

from inclusion and diversity to give these Olympics a distinct feel,

:25:58.:26:04.

that is when Boris in Beijing did his bumling brilliance that they

:26:04.:26:08.

would be more humane and generous, because of corporate sponsorship,

:26:08.:26:11.

security and high-tech, we haven't been able to to that either. What

:26:11.:26:15.

is the legacy from that? interested in this point about

:26:15.:26:21.

London, and what London is like in 1948 and in 2012. To me, London is

:26:21.:26:26.

a proud, diverse, multicultural city now, with so many nations, so

:26:26.:26:29.

many different cultures coming together, living shoulder-to-

:26:29.:26:32.

shoulder with each other, that is what London is about to me. And we

:26:33.:26:36.

have the games. You don't want these countries to come to London

:26:36.:26:39.

and be supported by people who support all that diversity, all

:26:39.:26:42.

those countries coming together, and everyone has someone who wants

:26:42.:26:51.

to support those nations and to see the Sculler from Niger competing at

:26:51.:26:56.

rowing with support. It is sur priegs you don't want that. What is

:26:56.:27:01.

the legacy of these games, in if a year's time, what will we remember?

:27:01.:27:04.

People will have memories for the rest of their memories. What is

:27:04.:27:09.

life, other than fantastic memories. It is a snapshot or photograph?

:27:09.:27:13.

don't think it is an enormous amount more than. That the most

:27:13.:27:18.

disappointing thing is our hopes this would increase sporting

:27:18.:27:22.

participation, especially for disadvantage groups, has not been

:27:22.:27:25.

fulfilled and next year we will see cuts in school sports. We will have

:27:25.:27:30.

to fight hard to keep that. I have an 11-year-old daughter, I want

:27:30.:27:34.

sports available my daughter can play. I totally agree we don't need

:27:35.:27:38.

more football and tennis, what about handball, and the women's

:27:38.:27:42.

football team. What about the women rowers winning today, what about

:27:42.:27:51.

the women psyche cysts all the -- cyclists, all the female role

:27:51.:27:56.

models. So my daughter has someone to look up to as an 11-year-old,

:27:56.:28:04.

and think, I won't sit and watch Disney channel and X Factor, but to

:28:04.:28:10.

go out and get a good heart and lungs. Did it have to happen here

:28:10.:28:13.

and Britain spend the countless billions? Yes, because we wouldn't

:28:13.:28:19.

have invested in those sports, and have a home entry for sports like

:28:19.:28:24.

handball or volley ball, those role models wouldn't be there.

:28:24.:28:28.

should we pretend we will make money out of it and get �9 billion

:28:28.:28:34.

out. Why not say it is a gift, we are putting it on for the world,

:28:34.:28:38.

come back and have fun. It is hard to measure how much money you make

:28:38.:28:41.

from something. We should just give it away. I don't think the goal of

:28:41.:28:46.

the Olympic Games was to say, let's put it on and make money. The goal

:28:46.:28:50.

was to create the greatest show on earth and show what a beautiful

:28:50.:28:55.

city London is to the world. legacy planning in East London is

:28:55.:29:02.

good, the thing we can be hopeful that we won't see stories about

:29:02.:29:04.

derelict sites. I think they have done everything they can to

:29:04.:29:11.

mitigate that possibility. When you walk through the Olympic Park now,

:29:11.:29:17.

it is easy to imagine tumbleweed. If you look at other Olympics, if

:29:17.:29:21.

nations improve their performance and the Olympics after that and

:29:21.:29:26.

that their performance dips, there isn't really a strategy to build on

:29:26.:29:30.

sporting participation on what is achieved at the Olympics.

:29:30.:29:34.

disagree, look at the creation of role models in the sports I have

:29:34.:29:42.

mentioned. The effect of a successful games we had in Sydney,

:29:42.:29:48.

we have gone from one Olympic medal in 1996, Great Britain, then we had

:29:48.:29:52.

a National Lottery, people put money into sport, we have invested

:29:52.:29:57.

in sport, and now we win 19 gold medals in the Beijing Olympics.

:29:57.:30:00.

Thank you for bringing in the medals and thank you for. That they

:30:00.:30:05.

are getting bigger as the years go on. Nice it see you all. That's all

:30:05.:30:15.
:30:15.:30:18.

from Newsnight, Kirsty here on from Newsnight, Kirsty here on

:30:18.:30:20.

Monday, have a good weekend. It looks like Saturday will be

:30:20.:30:23.

another day of sunny spells, and also some heavy showers, the

:30:23.:30:27.

showers, initially of the lighter variety, but come the afternoon

:30:27.:30:30.

they will be turning heavy across parts of northern England in

:30:30.:30:33.

particular, a focal point for some thunder, lightning and rain in a

:30:33.:30:37.

short space of time. As you get towards the south eastern corner,

:30:37.:30:41.

leading something of a charmed life, the showers few and far between,

:30:41.:30:45.

that is good news for most of the Olympic venues, it is dryer than

:30:45.:30:49.

elsewhere in the UK. Lots of heavy showers in parts of the south-west

:30:49.:30:53.

of England. The east of Wales a focal point for heavy showers, as

:30:53.:30:56.

the Midlands, the further west you are decent spells of sunshine

:30:56.:31:00.

coming and going, the odd light shower as well. Northern Ireland,

:31:00.:31:03.

well sunshine here from time to time, but equally the cloud will

:31:03.:31:07.

thicken up and produce some showers. Temperatures never getting out of

:31:07.:31:11.

the high teens, similar temperatures in Scotland. 19 or so

:31:11.:31:14.

in Glasgow. It is south of Glasgow where most of the heaviest showers

:31:14.:31:17.

are likely to be. Through the evening a lot of those showers tend

:31:17.:31:21.

to fade away, they will be back again on Sunday. Meanwhile, if you

:31:21.:31:24.

are heading off into northern Europe, an unsettled look for

:31:24.:31:28.

things for Amsterdam, Paris and Berlin, with showers through the

:31:28.:31:31.

weekend, meanwhile further south through the Mediterranean, it is

:31:31.:31:35.

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