10/05/2013 Newsnight


10/05/2013

News stories with Kirsty Wark. Why did Cleveland police force pay out over half a million pounds in damages, America takes Germany to task on austerity and Jay Gatsby 90 years on.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 10/05/2013. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

$:/STARTFEED. Over half a million pounds damages and a complete

:00:12.:00:17.

clearing of his name. Tonight we reveal the story and the outcome of

:00:17.:00:21.

a four-year struggle by a Middlesborough solicitors against

:00:21.:00:25.

Cleveland police force. There is no higher award of exemplary damage

:00:25.:00:29.

that is a court could make. That is the clearest recognition on the

:00:29.:00:34.

Chief Constable's part that the conduct of her officers was utterly

:00:34.:00:40.

indefensible. Also tonight at the G7. The German

:00:40.:00:43.

Finance Minister is warned by the Americans to ease up on European

:00:43.:00:47.

austerity. Is that policy really worsening as and economic crises

:00:47.:00:51.

across the west. We will hear the views from economists working in

:00:51.:00:57.

Germany, Greece and the US. It's gats bee. He was a German spy

:00:57.:01:04.

urgh the war. I heard he killed man. The roaring '20s alive in Baz

:01:04.:01:09.

Luhurmann's The Great Gatsby, and a shrew of musicals and plays.

:01:09.:01:19.
:01:19.:01:20.

Request is F Scott Fitzgerald still a book for our sometimes. Good

:01:20.:01:24.

evening, in 2009 James Watson was one of the most prominent defence

:01:24.:01:28.

solicitors in the north-east of England. Those he defended included

:01:28.:01:32.

some very high-profile criminals, then one morning in June that year

:01:32.:01:36.

his life changed. His family home was raided, his property seized and

:01:37.:01:40.

he faced a major police investigation into perverting the

:01:40.:01:44.

course of justice. Why? That's the question Mr Watson has spent four

:01:44.:01:49.

years trying to answer. Tonight Newsnight can reveal that Cleveland

:01:49.:01:55.

Police force has agreed to pay damages of more than �500,000. They

:01:55.:01:58.

have admitted false imprisonment and there were never any grounds to

:01:58.:02:06.

suspect him of any offence. Every room, every drawer had been

:02:06.:02:11.

turned out. It looked as if we had been burgled, basically. Having to

:02:11.:02:16.

tell my 87-year-old mother I had been arrested, and there is no

:02:16.:02:20.

hiding these things was something probably the worse of it. I could

:02:20.:02:25.

actually hear them laughing. Which was something that it shocked me

:02:25.:02:33.

and angered me. Early one morning in June 209 Cleveland Police came

:02:33.:02:41.

to arrest -- 2009 Cleveland Police came to arrest James Watson. His

:02:41.:02:45.

wife Rita and their two sons were held in one room of the house for

:02:45.:02:49.

more than seven hours. As a mother I have devoted my life to ensure

:02:49.:02:55.

our two sons have a safe and secure home. And Cleveland Police violated

:02:55.:03:05.

that on that day. He was taken to north allen to North Allerton

:03:05.:03:09.

Police Station and questioned for 30 hours. He was requested on

:03:09.:03:13.

perverting the course of justice before being released on bail.

:03:13.:03:17.

James Watson is one of the most prominent defence lawyers in the

:03:17.:03:20.

north-east of England. Cleveland Police began their investigation

:03:20.:03:30.
:03:30.:03:32.

into him after his cliend Bronson Tyers was found guilty of alleged

:03:32.:03:39.

kidnap and then acquitted on a retrial. He was arrested but never

:03:39.:03:43.

charged with any offence over questions about intimidation of

:03:43.:03:46.

witnesses to change their statements. The question is why

:03:46.:03:51.

have they done that, is this one individual officer's sour grapes

:03:51.:03:55.

after losing a provincial high- profile criminal trial. Or were

:03:55.:03:59.

there more important powerful figures in Cleveland who wanted to

:04:00.:04:03.

be rid of me and didn't care how much public money was spent in

:04:03.:04:13.
:04:13.:04:15.

doing so. I can only bounce the question back to you. The police

:04:15.:04:18.

spent two years investigating James Watson. The question is, why? It is

:04:18.:04:23.

hard to know for certain. Cleveland Police had a habit of not writing

:04:23.:04:25.

things down. They were supposed to be taking notes during the

:04:25.:04:29.

investigation of the decisions they made and the rational behind them.

:04:29.:04:34.

Yet they failed to do -- rationale behind them, yet they failed to do

:04:34.:04:38.

so. There isn't even a recording of their interview with James Watson.

:04:38.:04:43.

According to the police, all six tapes and all six back-up tapes

:04:43.:04:47.

failed to record. Newsnight has seen an Independent Police

:04:47.:04:51.

Complaints Commission report, written by a senior officer at West

:04:51.:04:56.

Yorkshire Police, and is highly citl ka of the way Cleveland's --

:04:56.:05:00.

critical of the way Cleveland Police investigated James Watson.

:05:00.:05:04.

It is highly critical of Chief Inspector Anthony Riordan. It says

:05:04.:05:09.

he behaved as if he was hell bent on cornering his quartery. It says

:05:09.:05:16.

his attention had become focused on haultly on James Watson and this

:05:16.:05:19.

had the effect of clouding his judgment. Chief Inspector Riordan

:05:19.:05:24.

came to the Old Bailey to apply for warrants to search James Watson's

:05:24.:05:30.

property. According to the IPCC, much of the evidence he presented

:05:30.:05:34.

today the judge was unsubstantiated. The judge was left with an

:05:34.:05:38.

impression that there were reasonable grounds to suspect James

:05:38.:05:42.

Watson of money laundering. This wasn't true. Event here at the Old

:05:42.:05:46.

Bailey could well explain why the Chief Constable of Cleveland Police

:05:46.:05:52.

cannot defend her officers against the claim that these warrants were

:05:52.:05:58.

maliciously pro-kur cured. The shen -- Procured. The shenan begans at

:05:58.:06:02.

the Old Bailey, appalling as they may be to an outsider looking at

:06:02.:06:05.

them for the first time is the sort of behaviour cloveland Police have

:06:05.:06:10.

been up to in small things and big, for the bulk of my professional

:06:10.:06:15.

career. Chief Inspector Riordan had seized 26 boxes from James Watson.

:06:15.:06:19.

They included highly-sensitive documents, which were covered by

:06:19.:06:24.

legal privilege. The investigating team hoped to find incriminating

:06:24.:06:29.

evidence. Instead the Crown Prosecution Service said that the

:06:29.:06:33.

documents exonerated him. Despite this Cleveland Police kept hold of

:06:33.:06:36.

the files for several more months and continued to treat James Watson

:06:36.:06:41.

as a suspect. There were times when I would worry and think well how

:06:41.:06:44.

far are they prepared to push things here, even though I knew

:06:44.:06:47.

there was nothing there. When you are against people who are prepared

:06:48.:06:54.

to go to the lengths they went to. I think they wanted to ruin us,

:06:54.:06:59.

basically. Newsnight put to Anthony Riordan the criticisms made by the

:06:59.:07:09.
:07:09.:07:41.

IPCC, and James and Rita Watson. He As for the IPCC's comments about

:07:41.:07:45.

evidence at the Old Bailey being unsubstantiated, Mr Riordan says he

:07:45.:07:50.

was reliant on the expertise of others. It has taken James Watson

:07:51.:07:55.

four years to clear his name. For the Chief Constable of Cleveland

:07:55.:07:59.

Police to admit it that there were no reasonable ground to suspect him

:07:59.:08:04.

of any offence. The Chief Constable has also agreed to correct police

:08:04.:08:09.

records to ensure that no vestige of suspicion remains against James

:08:09.:08:14.

Watson, his family or his colleagues. Cleveland Police have

:08:14.:08:19.

agreed to pay more than half a million pounds in damages.

:08:19.:08:23.

Including �80,000 in exemplary damages. They admit to falsely

:08:24.:08:28.

imprisoning James Watson and his family. To trespass and to wrongful

:08:28.:08:32.

interference with his belongings. They also cannot defend claims that

:08:32.:08:37.

the search warrants were maliciously procured, or that

:08:37.:08:43.

officers' behaviour amounted to misfeasance and there was an abuse

:08:43.:08:48.

of power. The sum offered and accepted for exemplary damages was

:08:48.:08:51.

at the absolute maximum, there is no higher award a court could make

:08:51.:08:54.

for those damages. That is the clearest recognition on the Chief

:08:54.:08:58.

Constable's part that the conduct of her officers was utterly

:08:58.:09:07.

indefensible. The IPCC recommended that Cleveland Police consider

:09:07.:09:10.

suspending Chief Inspector Riordan, instead he was retired on a full

:09:10.:09:14.

pension. The man responsible for that decision was Assistant Chief

:09:14.:09:17.

Constable Sean White he was on the police sailing team with Riordan.

:09:18.:09:22.

The IPCC has said that the decision not to suspend him sent out

:09:22.:09:27.

completely the wrong message. It was a time to be seen to be doing

:09:27.:09:32.

the right thing. What certainly sticks in my throat is that

:09:32.:09:38.

millions of pounds have been wasted of tax-payers' money at a time of

:09:38.:09:43.

supposed austerity when public services are closing down hand over

:09:43.:09:49.

fist in Middlesborough. Millions of pounds wasted and not one police

:09:49.:09:57.

officer held to account. The Chief Constable of Cleveland Police, has

:09:57.:10:07.
:10:07.:10:20.

For the last few years Cleveland Police has been at the centre of a

:10:20.:10:23.

separate wide-ranging corruption inquiry. The Chief Constable and

:10:23.:10:27.

Deputy Chief Constable have been sacked for gross misconduct. The

:10:27.:10:32.

head of finance suspended. James Watson hopes that his case will

:10:32.:10:37.

lead to a change of culture at Cleveland Police which now has a

:10:37.:10:42.

new Chief Constable. But he's not confident that his reputation will

:10:42.:10:46.

ever recover. The best I can hope for is to be regarded as having a

:10:46.:10:51.

checkered and controversial reputation. You can't come through

:10:51.:10:57.

a scandal like this and expect absolutely everyone to believe that

:10:57.:11:02.

you have been vindicated. Some will say no smoke without fire, some

:11:02.:11:06.

will say this is a testament to how good my lawyers were rather than

:11:06.:11:10.

how honest I was. But the value of the payout is important, it

:11:10.:11:15.

reflects the fact that something must be done to reform Cleveland

:11:15.:11:20.

Police. It cannot be allowed to stagger on for another 20 years in

:11:20.:11:26.

the way that it has for the last 20 years.

:11:26.:11:29.

Is German austerity cast ago shadow across the whole of the west? That

:11:29.:11:35.

seems to be the fear the US Treasury who today met German and

:11:35.:11:39.

other finance ministers for a G7 meeting in Buckinghamshire. Ahead

:11:39.:11:42.

of the meeting US officials briefed journalist that is they would call

:11:42.:11:46.

on Berlin to relax stringent austerity policies and boost

:11:46.:11:49.

domestic demand because of the dangers they pose, not just to

:11:49.:11:53.

Europe, but growth across the world. We will discuss this in a moment,

:11:53.:11:57.

but first here is Paul Mason. They are meeting amid the English

:11:57.:12:01.

greenery, but the backdrop to the G7 meeting is the sea of red and

:12:01.:12:06.

black across the streets of Europe. The eurozone economy is flatlining,

:12:06.:12:10.

and there is a chorus of demands on Germany to stop insisting on

:12:10.:12:17.

austerity and ease up a little. driver for economic growth will be

:12:17.:12:21.

consumer demand. Policies that would help to encourage consumer

:12:21.:12:27.

demand in countries that have the capacity would be helpful. Roughly

:12:27.:12:31.

translated that was the Americans telling the Germans to start

:12:31.:12:35.

boosting their economy and borrowing more to make up for the

:12:35.:12:39.

social catastrophe that is sweeping southern Europe. The Americans come

:12:39.:12:43.

armed not just with arguments but facts. In the two years after the

:12:43.:12:50.

crisis hit the USA launched a fiscal stimulus worth 5% of GDP.

:12:50.:12:54.

The eurozone equivalent was 2%, after that came austerity. In the

:12:54.:12:58.

USA the Central Bank has President Clintoned more than $2 trillion in

:12:58.:13:02.

the form of quanative easing. The European Central Bank has not done

:13:02.:13:06.

money printing. It seems to be working, growth has recovered in

:13:06.:13:09.

the USA, while in the eurozone not so much. I think there is a real

:13:09.:13:18.

view here in the US that there has been a bit of a sea change in the

:13:18.:13:22.

ideolgical arguments and the political debate around the world

:13:22.:13:27.

about austerity in a recession. I think the Americans feel that

:13:27.:13:30.

actual economic performance has vindicated the US approach. They

:13:31.:13:34.

did have a stimulus programme at the beginning and they feel that

:13:34.:13:39.

the fact that the US economy is growing more strongly than European

:13:39.:13:42.

economies really is a vindication of that approach. All through

:13:42.:13:46.

spring event have come thick and fast to undermine the strategy of

:13:46.:13:49.

austerity. The collapse of technocratic rule in Italy, with

:13:49.:13:56.

25% for a party led by a comedian. Spain badly missed its borrowing

:13:56.:14:00.

target and Europe simply shrugged. Meanwhile the French President had

:14:00.:14:05.

begun a counter strike against what, despite the smiles, his officials

:14:05.:14:09.

had called a right-wing kabal, led by Germany. One of the most

:14:09.:14:11.

startling impacts of austerity in Europe has been youth unemployment,

:14:11.:14:19.

in Greece it stands at 64%. In Spain at 57%. In Portugal and Italy

:14:19.:14:25.

38%. Even France, which is opposed to austerity is seeing 22% of its

:14:25.:14:30.

young people jobless. Meanwhile, in the USA it is just 16%, and the

:14:30.:14:36.

White House sees figures like this as a problem of geopolitics, not

:14:36.:14:39.

just economics. It is important to understand this is an

:14:39.:14:43.

administration which, starting with the President, is really focused on

:14:43.:14:48.

the middle-class and the lower middle-class and opportunity. And I

:14:48.:14:52.

think they are very concerned about what they are seeing in Europe and

:14:52.:14:56.

they are very worried about a lost generation and what the political

:14:56.:15:00.

impact of that might be. Particularly in the European

:15:00.:15:03.

countries where austerity is really squeezing a lot of people very,

:15:03.:15:08.

very hard. The truth is, this is no longer about economics it is about

:15:08.:15:12.

politics. All across Europe we have seen big votes against the

:15:12.:15:15.

political mainstream, whether it is for fascists and far leftists, as

:15:15.:15:20.

in Greece, or as in Italy, for parties simply defined by their

:15:20.:15:26.

opposition to the old elite. That is what America is worried about.

:15:26.:15:29.

As for Germany, commentators who know it well believe public opinion

:15:29.:15:34.

there will take a lot of shifting. They don't translate what the facts

:15:34.:15:40.

and figures tell you about what happens around you into their own

:15:40.:15:44.

live expeerence. Which is still pretty comfortable, thank you very

:15:44.:15:51.

much. So the point has yet to come where the austerity around Germany

:15:52.:15:56.

and the adjacent countries will begin to affect its own

:15:56.:16:02.

manufacturing prowess, which is the pillar of Germany's wealth and

:16:02.:16:10.

success. When that moment comes I think they will wake up and think

:16:10.:16:16.

of different ways. While he's schmoozeing with the G7 George

:16:16.:16:22.

Osborne is all too well aware that the IMF economists will deliver

:16:22.:16:28.

their own decision which is enough austerity, aimed at him.

:16:28.:16:36.

Our guests are here, Artur Fischer, and in Athens former Greek MP and

:16:36.:16:39.

world economist, Elena Panaritis, and assistant editor of the

:16:39.:16:42.

Financial Times, Gillian Tett in the studio. Gillian Tett, you are

:16:42.:16:46.

just back from Washington, is your sense that the Americans are

:16:46.:16:50.

worried more about the politics than the economics? There is a bit

:16:50.:16:54.

of both, the Americans are very worried about the fact that the US

:16:54.:16:57.

economy is not expanding as fast as they thought it should be. They

:16:57.:17:01.

think it is partly because of the slow global growth and the problems

:17:01.:17:04.

in the eurozone. They are also concerned about the general

:17:04.:17:08.

prospect of a lost generation in Europe and the possibility of

:17:08.:17:12.

political turmoil. But last of all there is also a feeling that

:17:12.:17:17.

actually America has learned some lessons of the last five years that,

:17:17.:17:21.

frankly, could be copied in Europe. Whether it is about trying to take

:17:21.:17:24.

more active measures to recapitalise banks or get the

:17:24.:17:27.

economy going the Americans do think they have something to tell

:17:27.:17:31.

the Europeans about what they could do instead of the current mess.

:17:31.:17:36.

it helpful to you that the Americans are singing this song?

:17:36.:17:41.

Does it actually make a difference? Will it give European countries

:17:41.:17:50.

confidence to ease off austerity? Frankly, I think we have completely

:17:51.:17:58.

misdiagnosed this European crisis. We have based all our growth on a

:17:58.:18:04.

solution which was completely based on austerity. But European

:18:04.:18:13.

economies are very bureaucratic, very high transaction costs, and

:18:13.:18:17.

they need serious deregulation, starting with my economy, Greece.

:18:18.:18:20.

Unfortunately we haven't really focused too much on that because

:18:20.:18:25.

there are a lot of vested interests around those bureaucratic steps and

:18:25.:18:32.

if we don't ease those ones up we will not have growth, we will not

:18:32.:18:38.

have employment, especially in the youth. We will not have any exit

:18:38.:18:43.

from these lost generation. When you look at the figures for youth

:18:43.:18:50.

unemployment, Greece 64%, Spain 56%, Portugal 40%. Is this a

:18:50.:18:53.

generational problem if these young people don't get the skills or

:18:53.:18:59.

motivation or feel part of the fabric of society? You are

:18:59.:19:09.
:19:09.:19:10.

absolutely right. But I'm afraid that we have, as I said, completely

:19:10.:19:14.

misdyingios -- misdiagnosed it. We were barking up the wrong tree. We

:19:14.:19:17.

completely focused on the overexpenditure of those countries,

:19:17.:19:21.

that is correct. We didn't look further into the actual roots which

:19:21.:19:26.

were the fact that we are overspending because it is very

:19:26.:19:33.

hard for youngsters to actually innovate, to create new ideas, to

:19:33.:19:36.

define new technologies or to create a new sector of economy as

:19:36.:19:40.

we do in the United States of America. Let me put that to Artur

:19:40.:19:45.

Fischer, is there another way, perhaps austerity isn't the

:19:45.:19:51.

medicine that Europe needs? Well obviously there is a combination of

:19:51.:19:56.

things. I'm speaking to you Artur Fischer indeed in Miami? Is

:19:56.:20:02.

austerity the only way? Obviously there are a number of things one

:20:02.:20:04.

can do. Austerity is a major building block. If you take a look

:20:05.:20:09.

at it you need to sort out your own house. You need to be able to

:20:09.:20:13.

actually manage your costs in a responsible way, at the same time

:20:13.:20:17.

those measures indeed cause huge problems. I believe Europe has

:20:17.:20:21.

something to offer here. If we have mobility, if we have structural

:20:21.:20:27.

reforms then we can actually generate growth by allowing in the

:20:27.:20:33.

EU unemployment people in Greece to work elsewhere and by implementing

:20:33.:20:36.

structural reforms we can incentivise investors to provide

:20:36.:20:41.

jobs in Greece, in Spain and elsewhere. We have to look at this

:20:41.:20:45.

whole process whereby we started this austerity and we will now, I

:20:45.:20:51.

believe, enter into structural reforms, enter into increase of

:20:51.:20:57.

demand and by doing that hopefully we will go through this problem.

:20:57.:21:05.

Fischer, 64% youth unemployment, where will they get jobs? That is a

:21:05.:21:10.

very good question. All I can say is the jobs most likely will not be

:21:10.:21:14.

available in Greece. Will they come to Germany? They will come to

:21:14.:21:19.

Germany, they will come to England. They will come to everywhere in

:21:19.:21:23.

Europe where jobs are available. They probably will have to reduce

:21:23.:21:27.

the standards of living. They will probably have to work in jobs they

:21:27.:21:35.

haven't learned in the past. It will be a quite a change. Basically

:21:35.:21:42.

young Greeks have to leave the country? Well, frankly, we have to

:21:42.:21:47.

really think about the economics 101. We are talking about white

:21:47.:21:53.

collar workers here, well educated individuals with over 2-3 foreign

:21:53.:21:58.

languages and usually one or two masters degrees. They do not move

:21:58.:22:04.

out of Greece to go to continental Europe, because continental Europe

:22:04.:22:09.

is suffocating. It is full of bureaucratic and administrative

:22:09.:22:13.

burdens. So the majority of Greeks are flying out of the country and

:22:13.:22:18.

they go to the United Kingdom and the United States, Canada, a lot of

:22:18.:22:23.

them are going to Latin America, believe it or not. Many of them to

:22:23.:22:30.

the gulf countries. So let me put that to Gillian. Actually the

:22:30.:22:33.

Americas are the best hope for a lot of these people. They see

:22:33.:22:38.

America doing better in this recovery?. It is rather ironic that

:22:38.:22:44.

Mr Fischer is in Miami. If the eurozone was a functioning reformed,

:22:44.:22:47.

liberal economic area, the Americans would be having holidays

:22:47.:22:51.

in Greece spending their money there. That would help Greece?

:22:51.:22:54.

German tourist trips to Greece over the last year have fallen 5-10%.

:22:54.:22:58.

That is a real problem, you need to find ways to replicate what America

:22:58.:23:02.

has had and turn Greece into Florida, if you like for the

:23:02.:23:05.

eurozone where wealthy middle-class people from the north go down in

:23:05.:23:10.

the summer. There is also going to be, perhaps, a different atmosphere,

:23:10.:23:13.

post-German election or not do you think? It is very unclear. One

:23:13.:23:17.

hopes that the new Government will have the competence to be a bit

:23:17.:23:23.

bolder and perhaps try to take some Morriss. Do you think post-election

:23:23.:23:27.

there may be a change, even if Angela Merkel returns to power,

:23:27.:23:33.

actually there may be a loosening of the austerity? I think there

:23:33.:23:40.

will be a shift. We can already see that coming. Take a look, in

:23:40.:23:45.

Germany we had salary increases of 5%. About two years ago that was

:23:45.:23:51.

unthinkable that would happen. So Lagard, he's demand that we have

:23:51.:23:54.

higher spending in Germany already takes place. When you take a look

:23:54.:23:58.

at the Social Democrats who currently propose quite drastic tax

:23:58.:24:02.

increases, I believe that the Conservatives, if they stay in

:24:02.:24:08.

power, they will obviously try to ease austerity programmes in a way

:24:08.:24:15.

that the results don't suffocate German output and demand on German

:24:15.:24:19.

goods outside Germany. Thank you all very much indeed.

:24:19.:24:23.

Well on Wednesday the The Great Gatsby opens the Cannes Film

:24:23.:24:28.

Festival, directed by Baz Luhurmann, soundtrack curated by Jay-Z,

:24:28.:24:35.

starring Marco Capuano and Carey Mulligan, if the trailers are --

:24:35.:24:39.

Leonardo depap Rio and Carey Mulligan. It is expected take

:24:39.:24:44.

millions in the states this weekend, but reviews will be lukewarm. It is

:24:44.:24:50.

the theatrical book about the novel and a novel about Zelda, why all

:24:50.:24:56.

the razzmatazz? I have all these things for her and now she just

:24:56.:25:03.

wants to run away. She wants to leave that. Jay, you can't repeat

:25:03.:25:08.

the past. You can't repeat the past? No. Of course you can. Of

:25:08.:25:15.

course you can. With me now is the author Philip Hensher and Sarah

:25:15.:25:23.

Churchwell, author of Careless People Murder Mayhem and the

:25:23.:25:27.

Invention of the The Great Gatsby. People say this is a wonderful book,

:25:27.:25:32.

what do you think? It is not that good a book looked at coldly. But

:25:32.:25:36.

it becomes more and more relevent, fascinatingly relevant as time goes

:25:37.:25:41.

on. Ten or 15 years ago we would have said maybe the time has passed

:25:41.:25:46.

for this. Who wants to become an English gentleman like Gatsby. But

:25:46.:25:50.

now with Russian oligarchs sending their children to terrible English

:25:50.:25:53.

public schools, it is becoming more and more relevent. Also from the

:25:53.:25:59.

point of view of a recession. I think it becomes a much more

:25:59.:26:05.

important and speaking book to us. Sarah, is it a good book?

:26:05.:26:08.

Absolutely I think it is a masterpiece. It is exactly that, it

:26:08.:26:11.

is a book that keeps coming back. It is a book that never dies. It as

:26:11.:26:16.

book in 1925 readers didn't get. As Philip says 15 years ago we didn't

:26:16.:26:20.

get it but now we get it again. What that registers is not if it is

:26:20.:26:23.

a good or bad book, but how prophetic it is, it says something

:26:23.:26:26.

good and last beg the society we have created about capitalism,

:26:26.:26:31.

about materialism, about greed. But also about hope and aspiration, our

:26:31.:26:34.

need to search for something better. But the fact that keeps letting us

:26:34.:26:38.

down and disappointment and disillusion as well. The film is

:26:38.:26:44.

all razzle dazzle we hear? It is, it is all razzle dazzle. For me it

:26:44.:26:49.

is a book about emptiness which has an emptiness at its heart. It is

:26:49.:26:53.

not quite aware of its own emptiness. I think that is

:26:53.:26:57.

condescending. It is totally aware that have, agree that is what it is

:26:57.:27:03.

about. The thing it doesn't quite seem to be aware of is how

:27:03.:27:10.

insufferable the narrator is. The way he's so patient troising to

:27:10.:27:17.

everybody. He is the flaw. depends as if you see him as

:27:17.:27:21.

Fitzgerald's error or the character's error. Is it that we

:27:21.:27:27.

can't trust his opinions that he's a prigg or patronising or

:27:27.:27:31.

Fitzgerald's mistake. That is for people like me makes it interesting,

:27:31.:27:34.

there are lots of questions. There is lots of stuff going around. You

:27:35.:27:38.

were saying in recessionary times you have written your own academic

:27:38.:27:44.

book about it? It is not that academic. There is this enduring

:27:44.:27:48.

interest in Fitzgerald and The Great Gatsby. Why? I agree with

:27:48.:27:54.

Philip but I go further. It hits our ambivalence about this question

:27:54.:27:58.

about class, status and luxury and hedonism, we want to chase the

:27:58.:28:02.

pleasure, what Zelda Fitzgerald calls the Green Light, the symbol

:28:02.:28:06.

for everything we want. Let yet we know, we have learned the hard way,

:28:06.:28:12.

as the last segment showed the hollowness and how toxic it is at

:28:12.:28:17.

its heart. We repeat the same mistakes? That is what the novel is

:28:17.:28:27.
:28:27.:28:30.

about, the famous last line, "and so we are born ceaselessly again ".

:28:30.:28:39.

The last one was 1974 with Mia Farrw and the OPEC oil crisis, the

:28:39.:28:46.

previous version with Shelley Winters, that is suddenly a movie

:28:46.:28:50.

about American imperialism. If you look at what was talked about

:28:50.:28:55.

Gatsby, and his assertion he has been to Oxford, and they said you

:28:55.:28:58.

couldn't have been to Oxford because you are wearing a pink

:28:58.:29:04.

shirt. There are tropes, you talk about the Russian oligarchs giving

:29:04.:29:08.

their children an English education, big articles in the papers this

:29:08.:29:14.

week. Can people by dint of their wealth slip into society more

:29:14.:29:19.

easily than Gatsby could? Well, I don't know. I have never really

:29:19.:29:26.

witnessed that level of society. I suspect the thing that is slightly

:29:26.:29:31.

problematic in Gatsby the novel is people think that actually you know

:29:31.:29:35.

an English Duke at Oxford would be able to tell much difference

:29:35.:29:42.

between Nick Carroway and the Buchanans and The Great Gatsby, I

:29:42.:29:45.

don't think they could. What about America? You can sneer at the class

:29:45.:29:52.

system, but within the class system of America it matters a lot, and

:29:52.:29:56.

Buchanan represents that money class, and he wears a pink suit and

:29:56.:30:01.

he Downing Street he went to Oxford. What is interesting to me,

:30:01.:30:05.

Fitzgerald's prophetic insight that what he saw was this world coming

:30:05.:30:12.

that being rich and classy there would cease to be a distinction,

:30:12.:30:14.

Gatsby's problem doesn't understand that, he thinks getting rich is

:30:14.:30:19.

enough, but it is not enough to get him Daysy. In today's world it

:30:19.:30:25.

probably would be enough, what do I know, I don't travel in those

:30:25.:30:29.

circles. My sense is the distinction is more and more

:30:29.:30:32.

disappearing. Who wants to be a gentleman or Daisy, she's a strange

:30:32.:30:36.

empty kind of name in the novel. We don't know what Daisy is like. She

:30:36.:30:40.

is just followed around. Because it is a novel about desie, the whole

:30:40.:30:43.

point is Gatsby's romance with possibility, aspiration, wanting

:30:43.:30:47.

something t might be Dicey, a mansion, wealth, what do we want?

:30:47.:30:51.

You have talked us right out to the front pages. That is all for this

:30:51.:30:57.

week. We leave you with pictures of Dhaka and Bangladesh, 17 days ago

:30:57.:31:01.

an eight storey clothing factory collapsed claiming more than 1,000

:31:01.:31:05.

lives, today a young woman was found alive in the rubble, it is

:31:05.:31:15.
:31:15.:31:47.

Hello, last weekend's weather was about increasing warmth this

:31:47.:31:51.

Saturday not. A spell of rain moving out of Northern Ireland into

:31:51.:31:53.

Scotland and the Midland. It turns showery for the afternoon. Sunshine

:31:53.:31:57.

and showers just about to cross the board, mental to go give a longer

:31:57.:32:03.

spell of rain for the south west of Scotland. The wind are lighter in

:32:03.:32:05.

northern Scotland compared with elsewhere and elsewhere the showers

:32:05.:32:11.

will move along quickly on the brisk and rather cool westerly wind.

:32:11.:32:14.

You may catch a heavy and possibly thundery downpour into the

:32:14.:32:18.

afternoon. It shouldn't last too long and the sun should make an

:32:18.:32:21.

appearence before the next shower comes along. You will notice the

:32:21.:32:26.

temperatures mid-to low teens, some getting to 15, most not. It will

:32:26.:32:30.

feel cooler in the breeze. Whenever it is raining also. It is a similar

:32:30.:32:32.

picture, sunshine and showers into Wales. Heading through Saturday

:32:32.:32:36.

evening could see a spell of wet and windy weather for a time in

:32:36.:32:40.

North West England, then moving to Midland and the south-east later in

:32:40.:32:44.

the night. Heading further afield this weekend, the northern half of

:32:44.:32:48.

Europe is looking rather showery too. So if you want the best of the

:32:48.:32:52.

sunshine head south, although it may well see some occasional rain

:32:53.:32:55.

Why did Cleveland police force have to pay out over half a million pounds in damages? America takes Germany to task over austerity. And Jay Gatsby 90 years on.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS