03/07/2014 Newsnight


03/07/2014

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Laura Kuenssberg.


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Tonight, a secret British plan to intervene in Syria. Newsnight can

:00:00.:00:11.

reveal how the British military plan to train and arm 100,000 rebels. We

:00:12.:00:17.

ask the Foreign Office minister at the time if the west missed a chance

:00:18.:00:21.

to defeat Assad? A former Jihadi tells us about cells

:00:22.:00:26.

of insurgents already in Baghdad, waiting to take the city.

:00:27.:00:32.

I have been speaking to a man who knew the secretive leader of ISIS,

:00:33.:00:39.

for on insight into how the group operates.

:00:40.:00:45.

The man in charge of HS 2 sell Uso -- tells us why he and his

:00:46.:00:50.

executives should be paid for than the Prime Minister.

:00:51.:00:53.

Steve Smith has been to Yorkshire for a Tour de France excursion. We

:00:54.:01:02.

have only just met, have you got it the right way round, what is it? My

:01:03.:01:11.

bib shorts. Good evening, Britain did have a plan to intervene in

:01:12.:01:15.

Syria. And a highly-developed ambitious one along with its allies.

:01:16.:01:21.

Training a Syrian rebel army to defeat Assad. More than just an

:01:22.:01:24.

exercise in what might have been, the blueprint for action was

:01:25.:01:28.

designed at the highest levels of the military, and considered by

:01:29.:01:33.

David Cameron and in Washington. Our investigations correspondent has

:01:34.:01:39.

an exclusive report and contains some graphic reminders of the

:01:40.:01:44.

horrors that have unfolded in Syria since 2011.

:01:45.:01:50.

There were never going to be easy solutions to Syria. So much blood

:01:51.:01:57.

has been spilt, and so many lives lost. In a region where the

:01:58.:02:01.

credibility of the west has been shattered since the Iraq War. So it

:02:02.:02:08.

wasn't difficult to see where the west chose to sit this one out. The

:02:09.:02:12.

British military seemed reluctant to get involved. Or so it seemed.

:02:13.:02:22.

Senior defence sources have told Newsnight that Britain did, in fact,

:02:23.:02:26.

have a secret plan for intervening in Syria. It was the brainchild of

:02:27.:02:30.

General David Richard, Britain's most senior officers, who told

:02:31.:02:33.

Downing Street there were only two ways of ending the bloodshed

:02:34.:02:37.

quickly. The first was to let Assad win, the second was to defeat him.

:02:38.:02:45.

To defeat him he recommended and equipping a substantial army of

:02:46.:02:49.

Syrian rebels. The plan was not without risk, but doing nothing, he

:02:50.:02:53.

argued, was the worst of all options.

:02:54.:02:59.

The plan was called Extract Equip Train. 100,000 Syrian rebels would

:03:00.:03:05.

be vetted, recruited and taken out of the country, probably to Jordan

:03:06.:03:09.

and Turkey, for training by western countries, including the UK and gulf

:03:10.:03:15.

allies. Once the army was ready, after around 12 months, it would

:03:16.:03:20.

march on Damascus, the army would do so under western and gulf air power,

:03:21.:03:24.

a shock and awe attack that would allow the Syrians themselves to

:03:25.:03:32.

defeat Assad. Amid Kate I don'ts and carnage, this offered a middle

:03:33.:03:38.

ground between an insurgency, and the politically impossible notion of

:03:39.:03:42.

putting western boots on the ground. A veteran of many conflict, and

:03:43.:03:48.

regarded as an arch pragmatist, General Richards had a team of

:03:49.:03:54.

defence analysts fleshing out his ideas. Newsnight was told the idea

:03:55.:03:57.

was considered by David Cameron and also by counterparts in Washington,

:03:58.:04:03.

including General Martin Demsey, America's most senior officer. Over

:04:04.:04:06.

here the Attorney General was asked to consider the legalities, and the

:04:07.:04:10.

plan was sent to the National Security Council, but not formally

:04:11.:04:14.

discussed. Ultimately Downing Street decided not to support the idea.

:04:15.:04:18.

There was a sense of exhaustion that we don't want to get involved in yet

:04:19.:04:22.

another Middle East conflict coming out of Iraq and Afghanistan, this

:04:23.:04:26.

was not the right time. There is an increasing scepticism in Downing

:04:27.:04:30.

Street to take military advice. There has been a difference between

:04:31.:04:33.

the military and the politician, I have never seen them as far apart as

:04:34.:04:38.

they now seem to be. They don't disagree with each other but they

:04:39.:04:43.

are on different plains in many cases. But if the Richards plan

:04:44.:04:48.

sounds like an extract from the "what if" manual of

:04:49.:04:51.

sounds like an extract from the history, think again, two years on

:04:52.:04:54.

and the arguments are turning full circle. Direct western involvement

:04:55.:05:02.

suddenly seems a possibility. Last week Barack Obama asked Congress to

:05:03.:05:05.

authorise a half billion dollar programme to train an army of

:05:06.:05:12.

hand-picked rebels. As newts night -- Newsnight discovered recently,

:05:13.:05:15.

the President too has been on a journey. I did advocate for limited

:05:16.:05:23.

but focussed action in Syria to try to vet, train and equip moderate

:05:24.:05:27.

opponents of Assad. And you were overruled by the President? I was

:05:28.:05:31.

overruled, in part because of the lessons from Iraq. I think President

:05:32.:05:38.

Obama's present plan has echos of what was talked about in 2012, the

:05:39.:05:42.

difference was in 2012 the conditions were more favourable to

:05:43.:05:47.

something like this having a useful influence, if not working

:05:48.:05:50.

completely. Now the plan is probably too little too late and is being

:05:51.:05:55.

enacted in a situation getting worse not better. Western policy makers in

:05:56.:05:59.

a sense have to have the courage to do nothing and to work on what comes

:06:00.:06:06.

after that Civil War. Evidence of chemical weapons attacks in Syria

:06:07.:06:09.

last year, finally persuaded David Cameron to seek Commons authority

:06:10.:06:16.

for military action. He lost. Yesterday saw the final phase of an

:06:17.:06:20.

operation to destroy Syria's chemical weapons. The handover has

:06:21.:06:24.

been a rare success for the international community. Syria

:06:25.:06:29.

remains in chaos. There is deep regret among some Syrian opposition

:06:30.:06:33.

leader who wish the west had intervened long ago and are still

:06:34.:06:38.

urging greater support. The international community did not

:06:39.:06:43.

intervene to prevent those crimes, at the same time also did not

:06:44.:06:49.

actively support the moderate elements on the ground. The huge

:06:50.:06:57.

opportunity was missed and that opportunity could have saved tens of

:06:58.:07:01.

thousands of lives actually, and could have saved also a huge

:07:02.:07:10.

humanitarian catastrophe. In Iraq and Afghanistan, the west intervened

:07:11.:07:14.

aggressively and came to regret it. In Syria, it is done doing very

:07:15.:07:19.

little, the question remain, is that a lesson learned or an opportunity

:07:20.:07:27.

lost. Alastair Burke was the Foreign

:07:28.:07:30.

Office minister with responsibility for the Middle East between 2010 and

:07:31.:07:37.

2013, and in Vienna is the adviser to the moderate opposition to

:07:38.:07:41.

President Assad in Syria. Now we have only just been able to report

:07:42.:07:46.

the existence of this plan this evening, but would it have been a

:07:47.:07:50.

good idea to do something on such a grand scale, training and arming up

:07:51.:07:56.

to 100,000 rebels? I'm not in a position to comment on the report,

:07:57.:08:01.

but I think the report you have just had accurately describes the

:08:02.:08:05.

difficulties of intervention or nonintervention. I think the scale

:08:06.:08:09.

of what you have been reporting would undoubtedly have given the

:08:10.:08:14.

Prime Minister cause for real pause. This was two or three years ago, the

:08:15.:08:18.

atmosphere about Iraq and Afghanistan was even more vibrant

:08:19.:08:22.

than it turned out to be in the vote in August last year, where even

:08:23.:08:28.

after a chemical take parliament was not prepared to authorise support

:08:29.:08:32.

for direct action. The arguments against intervention, well I know

:08:33.:08:36.

they were quite strong at the beginning of the revolt in Syria.

:08:37.:08:40.

Because it did not seem like the right thing to do, where as the

:08:41.:08:44.

right thing to do was to support those moderates who were trying to

:08:45.:08:47.

do the job themselves. Interesting, none the less, that although these

:08:48.:08:52.

details are new, that the military was at least making suggestions,

:08:53.:08:56.

looking at options of something on a much grander scale? Good, you would

:08:57.:08:59.

expect the military to be involved, to think through what options should

:09:00.:09:03.

a British Prime Minister have, and that should comprise all the options

:09:04.:09:07.

from doing nothing to considering whatever action might be appropriate

:09:08.:09:12.

and need to do a particular job. But in every case, and certainly we

:09:13.:09:16.

learned from both Iraq and Afghanistan, getting in is far

:09:17.:09:19.

easier than getting out. I would imagine had the Prime Minister even

:09:20.:09:23.

considered taking that plan to the public and to parliament it would

:09:24.:09:25.

have been very difficult to convince them. Now, of course, in hindsight,

:09:26.:09:30.

the arguments that are being made about could something have been done

:09:31.:09:34.

earlier are very stark. Because we have learned the price of

:09:35.:09:38.

nonintervention, and even more so because of the decision last August

:09:39.:09:41.

when it was much more clear what was happening and we could have and

:09:42.:09:45.

should have done something more then. Do you think that western

:09:46.:09:51.

leaders tried hard enough before we got to this terrible state of

:09:52.:09:56.

affairs in Syria that continues to unfold today? Of course not we have

:09:57.:10:01.

been very grateful to have all the political support from Britain and

:10:02.:10:05.

France and the United States, that goes without saying, but this

:10:06.:10:11.

political support was married with inaction which the Assad regime

:10:12.:10:15.

correctly interpreted as a green light to keep on doing what it has

:10:16.:10:19.

been doing. Which is a war on the civilian population. This is what we

:10:20.:10:26.

have to remember. The initial plans to arm these so called rebels, I

:10:27.:10:31.

remind you that the rebels were for the vast majority officers and

:10:32.:10:35.

soldiers who had defected from the Syrian army. It would have been a

:10:36.:10:41.

lot easier to make sure that they were a cohesive unit, that they had

:10:42.:10:45.

their uniforms and training and that they had salaries to form a true

:10:46.:10:50.

army to go and fight the Assad regime. I remind you today that the

:10:51.:10:55.

Free Syrian Army, without the actual help from any of the western

:10:56.:10:59.

Governments is fighting, not only the Assad regime but the extremist

:11:00.:11:05.

groups of ISIS and Al-Qaeda. We have had this even without any actual

:11:06.:11:09.

weapons or training, imagine what could have been done and how many

:11:10.:11:13.

lives would have been saved. What kind of difference would 100,000

:11:14.:11:21.

trained troops have made? You Alone they wouldn't have made a difference

:11:22.:11:26.

without the weaponry. We have to be realistic and look at the situation

:11:27.:11:30.

on the ground today. The Assad regime continues to bomb every day,

:11:31.:11:34.

with barrel bombs and air strikes, it is impossible to achieve anything

:11:35.:11:39.

on the ground in Syria without the appropriate weapons to neutralise

:11:40.:11:43.

the air force of the Assad regime. This is one thing that has to be

:11:44.:11:47.

clear. Of course the training of the rebels alone wouldn't have been

:11:48.:11:49.

enough. What the Syrian opposition has been asking for, repeatedly, for

:11:50.:11:54.

the past three years the right to defend itself and defend the people

:11:55.:12:00.

of Syria. Weir' not asking for... . You worked very hard as a minister

:12:01.:12:04.

on this, you travelled around the world trying to knit together some

:12:05.:12:09.

kind of action. As you see now insurgency from Syria spilling over

:12:10.:12:12.

in a terrible way to Iraq, is it matter of regret to you that we did

:12:13.:12:20.

not do much more then? If it was a plan to intervene three years ago,

:12:21.:12:24.

you would have had me in the studio night after night asking why is

:12:25.:12:27.

Britain intervening, now it is clear. Nonintervention is as much a

:12:28.:12:32.

decision as intervention. We can see the consequences. What we now have

:12:33.:12:38.

to do is find those moderate FSA fighters, they are fight ISIS as

:12:39.:12:44.

well Ascarate sad. We should give -- as Assad. But it is a long way from

:12:45.:12:50.

the sort of intervention that we led the programme with.

:12:51.:12:55.

The rapid and brutal advances of Sunni insurgents in Iraq took the

:12:56.:12:58.

Government there by surprise. ISIS, who have now declared an Islamic

:12:59.:13:03.

state in the areas they have seized appeared not just suddenly, but well

:13:04.:13:07.

armed and well organised. Tonight we can reveal just how well prepared

:13:08.:13:12.

they were, with a network of safe houses, precisely designed plans for

:13:13.:13:17.

their attacks, and how they intend to proceed to Baghdad. We have been

:13:18.:13:23.

speaking to a former Jihadist who has been advising the Government.

:13:24.:13:31.

Today the Iraqi Government said there were up to 2,500 members of

:13:32.:13:35.

what they called sleeper cells, ISIS militants already in and around the

:13:36.:13:39.

capital, waiting for the word from their leader to begin an assault on

:13:40.:13:44.

Baghdad. Thatalies with some of what our colleagues in the north in

:13:45.:13:48.

Kurdistan have been hearing from Kurdish intelligence, italies with

:13:49.:13:55.

what I have been hearing -- tallies with an interview I had a little

:13:56.:13:59.

later. That is part of ISIS's tactic, to spread fear and

:14:00.:14:02.

confusion, the Government says it has arrested some of the cells, we

:14:03.:14:08.

have also heard reports of Shia militia allied to the Government and

:14:09.:14:11.

going around and arresting them and some of whom disappear. Very little

:14:12.:14:19.

is known about Abu Baka Baghdadi, the man who leads ISIS. I met a man

:14:20.:14:23.

who can give insight, a senior adviser to the Government, a former

:14:24.:14:27.

militant himself, who has given up the path of Jihad. He has been given

:14:28.:14:33.

access to some very high-level Iraqi intelligence on ISIS, he has been

:14:34.:14:38.

sharing his I re insights. In Baghdad they are waiting for what

:14:39.:14:42.

they call zero hour, when ISIS sleeper cells will try to take

:14:43.:14:47.

control of the city. The group's leader is known as "the invisible

:14:48.:14:53.

Sheikh". Only two confirmed photographs of him exist. We have

:14:54.:14:58.

spoken to man who says they knew him when they were both religious

:14:59.:15:01.

scolars in the 1990s. ISIS has enjoyed a spectacular and

:15:02.:15:56.

rapid rise to dominance. As it swept through the city of Mosul last

:15:57.:15:59.

month, the army simply through the city of Mosul last

:16:00.:16:04.

Just days before they were driven out of the city, Iraqi security

:16:05.:16:09.

forces unearthed some crucial out of the city, Iraqi security

:16:10.:16:14.

information. During a raid on a safe house they seized a number of

:16:15.:16:14.

computer memory sticks containing house they seized a number of

:16:15.:16:17.

treasure trove of information on the house they seized a number of

:16:18.:16:19.

group's organisation and assets. There has been a study of the data

:16:20.:16:26.

and a meticulous inventory of weapons and fighters.

:16:27.:16:45.

You have seen the contents of these memory sticks, what was the most

:16:46.:16:57.

valuable information? The leader of ISIS now has his sites

:16:58.:18:04.

on the capital. It is estimated ISIS has put in place hundreds of sleeper

:18:05.:18:08.

cells in the belt around Baghdad, with more inside the city itself.

:18:09.:18:12.

They are waiting for a sign, he says, "zero hour".

:18:13.:18:42.

Just like they did in Mosul? Yes. With revenue streams from smuggled

:18:43.:18:53.

antiquities, to gun running, to captured oil wells, the ISIS leader

:18:54.:18:59.

no longer has to rely on foreign money, it is morphing into a

:19:00.:19:08.

conventional army. To the horror of the English

:19:09.:19:57.

shiress, tracks will be ploughed through the English countryside to

:19:58.:20:01.

knock 20 minutes or so off the journey from London to Birmingham.

:20:02.:20:06.

And in an attempt to spread the wealth from the south to the rest of

:20:07.:20:10.

the country. On top of the enormous price tag, the boss of the project

:20:11.:20:14.

told Newsnight he's asking the Government for permission to pay his

:20:15.:20:21.

top executives top dollar too. Expensive, late, overcrowded, the

:20:22.:20:26.

complaints are familiar. Even though three million of us use a train

:20:27.:20:31.

every single day. There have been shiny upgrades to station, attempts

:20:32.:20:35.

to deal with demand, but as more of us want to travel this way, space is

:20:36.:20:44.

running out. HS2 is meant to be the big solution, but protests,

:20:45.:20:48.

petitions and a ?50 billion price tag stand in its way. MPs have

:20:49.:20:53.

signed off the superfast link between London and Birmingham for

:20:54.:20:56.

now. The group that wants to build it today feels confident enough to

:20:57.:21:00.

start discussing the actual design. But can it be worth it? I asked the

:21:01.:21:05.

man who has the job of making sure it is. Today you are starting a

:21:06.:21:11.

discussion about the design, but are you confident that in 100 years time

:21:12.:21:15.

people will be looking at HS2 in the way we sit here and look at the

:21:16.:21:19.

grand surroundings, is there that kind of vision? We are very

:21:20.:21:23.

privileged in St Pancras, it is a masterpiece, as is King's Cross

:21:24.:21:26.

which blends old and new. What today is all about with the design panel,

:21:27.:21:30.

is having that discussion, how do we get the project to stand the test of

:21:31.:21:34.

time. That is the real challenge. The problem with that is it comes

:21:35.:21:40.

with a very hefty price tag, can you guarantee the project won't go over

:21:41.:21:44.

budget? I can't guarantee anything personally what I can do is put in

:21:45.:21:47.

place the decision-making process and the right people to make sure we

:21:48.:21:52.

make the right decisions and we can properly and adequately manage the

:21:53.:21:56.

budget. When members of the public hear it might cost as much as ?50

:21:57.:22:00.

billion and you can't guarantee it won't be more than that, there is a

:22:01.:22:03.

real fear that people are being asked to sign up to a blank cheque

:22:04.:22:08.

to a project that won't deliver for several decades? Projects take a

:22:09.:22:12.

long time. But the most important thing is to understand why you are

:22:13.:22:16.

doing it and stick to the vision. Why are you doing it? Why is it

:22:17.:22:20.

worth that price tag? It is nothing about railways, and it is nothing

:22:21.:22:24.

about trains. It is nothing about trains? It is nothing about trains,

:22:25.:22:28.

it is all about people, it is about what we are seeing is a growing

:22:29.:22:34.

disparity in wealth and jobs and opportunities between a city in

:22:35.:22:37.

London which is globally competitive and separating away from the rest of

:22:38.:22:41.

the UK. Ten million more people come into the UK in the next 20 years, a

:22:42.:22:46.

million new homes in London, it is feeding a beast. Because this is

:22:47.:22:50.

where all the best jobs are. You can't keep doing that because London

:22:51.:22:53.

will never be the London we want it to be, if that pressure cooker

:22:54.:22:57.

environment continues. So this new railway, the first one in 100 years,

:22:58.:23:03.

north of London, will then allow business and wealth to distribute

:23:04.:23:06.

across a nation. You know as well as I do the evidence on that is

:23:07.:23:12.

decidedly mixed. Some economists believe HS2 would spread health

:23:13.:23:16.

around the country, some believe the opposite. It would suck it all into

:23:17.:23:21.

London? It will do both, make motoring of the north accessible for

:23:22.:23:26.

commuters, there is no doubt about it, but it will also facilitate

:23:27.:23:35.

businesses moving north. Do you ever get up of grumpy bits being a bit

:23:36.:23:40.

glass half empty about this? No, I believe we constantly have to make

:23:41.:23:45.

the case. The Olympics were seen as overbudget, irrelevant and a

:23:46.:23:48.

complete waste of public money. And right up to a few weeks before the

:23:49.:23:52.

games. And the first three or four years constant criticism in the

:23:53.:23:56.

press. In the end everyone was very proud of what the UK could do. Do

:23:57.:23:59.

you get fed up with politicians appearing to be a bit uncertain

:24:00.:24:04.

about backing HS2, they appear to be rather fond of, not quite changing

:24:05.:24:08.

their mind, but blowing hot and cold? We have to win both public

:24:09.:24:13.

acceptance and acceptance of both parties. I have been consistently

:24:14.:24:18.

saying we don't work for one particular party we are here to

:24:19.:24:21.

convince parliament. How much would you pay to get the right people on

:24:22.:24:27.

the project? The worst money you can save is skimping on hiring the best

:24:28.:24:31.

people. I'm determined we hire the west people. We can't pay over the

:24:32.:24:36.

odds we can't even pay what the private sector can pay, there is

:24:37.:24:41.

some attraction in working on the biggest infrastructure in the

:24:42.:24:43.

country. We have to have the flexibility to hire the right people

:24:44.:24:48.

now, rather than when it gets into trouble in years to come. As a

:24:49.:24:52.

public sector project you will have to ask permission from the

:24:53.:24:55.

Government to employ people from those kinds of salaries? That is

:24:56.:25:00.

right. We are hiring project people who will be held accountable for

:25:01.:25:04.

their performance, Thesee don't per-- if they don't perform they

:25:05.:25:11.

will go. They will not be on long-term tenure, if they survive it

:25:12.:25:16.

will be on performance. How much are you going to pay them? You are

:25:17.:25:20.

talking at senior level people above the Prime Minister's salary. In the

:25:21.:25:25.

next six months we neat 20-30 of these at least to do a project of

:25:26.:25:30.

this size. Just out of interest, you commute on the train every day as I

:25:31.:25:34.

understand it, do you get much work done on the train? I come in on

:25:35.:25:37.

western line, I think what was recorded as the most coned train in

:25:38.:25:42.

the UK. Why is that? That is because CrossRail is 20 years late. That is

:25:43.:25:48.

because at the crucial times people blinked and decided it wasn't value

:25:49.:25:52.

for money and we are desperately trying to deliver it. Every time we

:25:53.:25:57.

go on the central line and get hot and bothered it reminds us to make

:25:58.:26:05.

the decisions at the right time. Even the biggest companies in the

:26:06.:26:08.

world don't have the power to protect themselves of scandal. Not

:26:09.:26:12.

least when they are accused by one of the biggest companies countries

:26:13.:26:22.

in the world. GlaxoSmithKline are finding themselves in a lot of

:26:23.:26:25.

trouble after allegations were laid at the door of the Chinese arm. We

:26:26.:26:30.

have uncovered some of the trail of e-mails that has put GSK under such

:26:31.:26:41.

pressure. GlaxoSmithKline is one of Britain's

:26:42.:26:46.

biggest companies, and a major pharmaceutical player worldwide. In

:26:47.:26:49.

January last year executives in London began receiving a series of

:26:50.:26:53.

anonymous e-mail about its Chinese operations. Now its China boss faces

:26:54.:26:59.

the threat of prison and a sex tape scandal and London faces questions

:27:00.:27:04.

about GSK's very survival in the Chinese market.

:27:05.:27:13.

The e-mails were sent from someone called "GSK whistleblower", this

:27:14.:27:19.

person alleges in hospitals across China GSK bribed doctors and

:27:20.:27:21.

managers to buy their drugs, and to buy them at inflated prices. They

:27:22.:27:27.

alleged that GSK used travel agents to pay bribes. Chinese police

:27:28.:27:33.

believe they may total ?300 million. It seems the whistleblower had the

:27:34.:27:40.

ear of the Chinese authorities. The British chief of the GSK's China

:27:41.:27:46.

operation, Mark Rielly has been detained, along with several

:27:47.:27:49.

colleagues. Their fate unknown. British companies are subject to the

:27:50.:27:52.

bribingry act and Chinese legislation. As I mentioned foreign

:27:53.:27:57.

companies don't benefit from cover, they don't benefit from connections,

:27:58.:28:02.

they rarely, if ever will have that sort of thing to protect them. They

:28:03.:28:09.

are exposed. GIENDing the identity of the -- finding the identity of

:28:10.:28:14.

the GSK whistleblower became a priority for GSK. We managed to get

:28:15.:28:19.

hold of some of the e-mails. It appears to be a person with a solid

:28:20.:28:24.

grasp of English and the GSK operation. They are striking in

:28:25.:28:28.

their detail. The e-mails alleged that GSK China was running a

:28:29.:28:32.

pevasive cash advance bribery scheme, they said the sales

:28:33.:28:36.

personnel identified key decision makers, they attempt to build a

:28:37.:28:39.

relationship with that decision maker, first taking the person to

:28:40.:28:44.

expensive lunches and dinners, and then giving them nice gifts. When

:28:45.:28:48.

the relationship has been established and both sides trust

:28:49.:28:52.

each other the cells' employees will start to give doctors cash to win

:28:53.:28:59.

business. Payment, it is alleged can come in other forms, foreign

:29:00.:29:05.

holidays disguised as conferences. But perhaps the most damning

:29:06.:29:08.

allegation in all of these e-mails is one sent on January 16th 2013.

:29:09.:29:17.

Bribery, in some form, is involved in almost every sale that GSK makes

:29:18.:29:26.

in chine. -- China. In response we have this statement from GSK:

:29:27.:29:57.

In April 2013 GSK China hired a local private investigator, a former

:29:58.:30:06.

Reuters journalist, called Peter Humphrey, to try to find the

:30:07.:30:11.

whistleblower. Glaxo briefed Humphrey that they suspected it was

:30:12.:30:15.

a former Glaxo executive who had left the company in 2012. Humphrey

:30:16.:30:21.

suspected her too and focussed his inquiries on her but found no hard

:30:22.:30:25.

evidence. All our attempts to contact her have failed. But she has

:30:26.:30:31.

denied being the whistleblower. Within days of Humphrey delivering

:30:32.:30:38.

his report on Shu, he and his wife were arrested. They were put on

:30:39.:30:44.

Chinese state television, their faces blurred and Peter made what

:30:45.:30:50.

was purportedly a confession. They are to have be charged on charges of

:30:51.:30:56.

breaking privacy. I think both are held in small cell, about the size

:30:57.:31:02.

of the kitchen over there. And each cell consists of seven to eight

:31:03.:31:08.

inmates. Through the consulate. Peter's son Harvey hasn't seen his

:31:09.:31:12.

parents for a year. He his they have been left high and dry and in the

:31:13.:31:16.

meantime his father, especially, is suffering.

:31:17.:31:21.

Both mental and physical health have taken a huge downturn. But now he

:31:22.:31:26.

has been kept in such a cramped condition for so long his arthritis

:31:27.:31:32.

has gotten a lot worse and he's suffering from major mental

:31:33.:31:37.

condition such as memory loss, sleep deprivation. Peter Humphrey's office

:31:38.:31:43.

in Shanghai has been closed down. We managed to locate an e-mail, which

:31:44.:31:48.

he wrote after he had finally seen the GcmK whistleblower e-mails with

:31:49.:31:52.

his own eyes. What he had been told was a smear campaign he now believes

:31:53.:31:57.

it was the truth. But nothing yet has been proved. And

:31:58.:32:15.

GSK does seem to be the target of attempts to discredit the company.

:32:16.:32:21.

This flat belongs to Mark Rielly, someone hit a camera in his bedroom,

:32:22.:32:26.

filming him and his partner having sex and then sent the film to

:32:27.:32:31.

company HQ in London. But it is the corruption allegations that will

:32:32.:32:36.

most trouble the board in the UK. Some reports suggest GSK's license

:32:37.:32:40.

to operate in China may be under threat. GSK's chief executive faces

:32:41.:32:45.

something of a crisis in the country. Prosecutors are preparing a

:32:46.:32:52.

case against Mark Rielly and other senior executives, they could face

:32:53.:32:58.

years in prison, here in London the Serious Fraud Office has opened up

:32:59.:33:07.

an investigation into GSK and in Washington the state department is

:33:08.:33:10.

asking questions. The company is in trouble, China is one of the

:33:11.:33:16.

fastest-growing markets for pharmaceuticals, but for GSK China

:33:17.:33:22.

is the biggest headache. Not cop tent with cycling smiles and smiles

:33:23.:33:30.

throughout the alps, with lycra burn and God knows what else. The

:33:31.:33:36.

competitors in the Tour de France decided this year going up and down

:33:37.:33:41.

the Yorkshire Dales would make it more special. The Opening Ceremony

:33:42.:33:45.

was there this evening, and Smith no stranger to cycling shorts himself,

:33:46.:33:49.

went earlier this week to have a go at the course.

:33:50.:34:07.

The excitement is amazing, people are getting into it. Every single

:34:08.:34:12.

house on the roof had a bike stuck to the fends and ban -- fence and

:34:13.:34:19.

banners everywhere. And pork pies in the shape of Bradley Wiggins side

:34:20.:34:25.

burns. I would love to try one of those. Everyone is getting in the

:34:26.:34:32.

mood for the Tour de France Yorkshire, or bikes and tights for

:34:33.:34:38.

short. It is a great national event of France coming to Yorkshire, one

:34:39.:34:44.

noted for its cuisine and people who can be a bit chauvinist, and the

:34:45.:34:47.

other is France. We have only just met, this is Indian Wells mit, but

:34:48.:34:50.

have you got it on the right way around? Yeah, yeah. What is it

:34:51.:34:59.

exactly? My bib and shorts, fastening everything together. I

:35:00.:35:04.

couldn't help but notice you applying something to legs? It is

:35:05.:35:06.

lubrication to loosen the legs applying something to legs? It is

:35:07.:35:12.

before the start. What has happened to cycling in the past few years,

:35:13.:35:16.

are we right in I think it has enjoyed something of a boom? Yeah,

:35:17.:35:20.

it is exploding I would say. We started at our club two years ago

:35:21.:35:32.

and it has grown to 170 mens members in two years. It is great. My young

:35:33.:35:37.

lad has started racing and a bike of ?300 has got him into racing and

:35:38.:35:42.

last him two or three years. Maybe not ?4. # 9 for a football, but it

:35:43.:35:46.

is not the most expensive sport in the world. We have been on the

:35:47.:35:52.

lookout for like where widows whose husbands spent their weekends packed

:35:53.:35:59.

into tight clothes and cycling. Not my husband. Chance would be a fine

:36:00.:36:12.

thing? Yes! Robinson wins a stage in the Tour de France, something no

:36:13.:36:19.

British rider has done before. It is almost 60 years since Bryan Robinson

:36:20.:36:24.

became the first Brit to finish the tour. Now 83 he still gets on his

:36:25.:36:28.

bike. Nowadays he fires up an electric motor for the steep bits

:36:29.:36:32.

around his home outside Huddersfield. It isn't a poor man's

:36:33.:36:38.

sport any longer. When I came into it you bought a secondhand bike or

:36:39.:36:42.

you managed to get a new frame and put the secondhand bits on it. You

:36:43.:36:45.

just had the one bike really. And when you went to race you took the

:36:46.:36:51.

mud guards off, raced and put them back on again and came home. It is a

:36:52.:36:56.

lot different. Going to my grandson's garage now and he has a

:36:57.:37:00.

bike for this day and that day, he's amazing, and clothing galore. And

:37:01.:37:08.

that clothing is worth millions. This is called a Shammy! Not only

:37:09.:37:15.

the one-piece racers with intergrel cod piece, but also this cunningly

:37:16.:37:20.

adapted work jacket for the cyclist on his way to the meeting. Is this

:37:21.:37:30.

firm catering to the called "mammals", middle-aged men in lycra.

:37:31.:37:37.

There is a new group of people coming to the sport. It is viewed in

:37:38.:37:42.

isolation, it is a little bit reductive, because cycling in the UK

:37:43.:37:46.

has a history going back 150 years, it started as a mode of

:37:47.:37:51.

transportation that was then popularised. It just feels like we

:37:52.:37:56.

have had since the early 1990s almost a re-focus on the athletic

:37:57.:38:01.

side of the sport. Writer Tim kitted out like an old time continental

:38:02.:38:07.

racer, and bottles for water and red wine. Hello, handsome beast, talking

:38:08.:38:16.

about the bike of course! Underneath the wool jersey he's all mammal! It

:38:17.:38:21.

could be a lot worse, in terms of mid-life crisis, the more

:38:22.:38:24.

traditional demonstration of it mid-life crisis, the more

:38:25.:38:27.

would not be good for your health and look more silly. You mean a red

:38:28.:38:32.

sports car and younger wife and that kind of thing? Very much, dying the

:38:33.:38:41.

hair and adopting idiotic fashion, as opposed to this. On the eve of

:38:42.:38:46.

the tour coming to Yorkshire, it is a departure for the old race and for

:38:47.:38:51.

onlookers of a certain age, a big moment in their life cycle.

:38:52.:38:58.

We have a guest presenter of the Cycle Show, otherwise known as Lady

:38:59.:39:09.

Velo, and Daniel Nolls has talked about the psychology behind it. We

:39:10.:39:15.

are seeing a boom or a buzz around cycling. What is it really all

:39:16.:39:19.

about. Has it got a bit of an image problem if it is all middle-aged

:39:20.:39:25.

lycra house? There is a real thing in British cycling, and there has

:39:26.:39:28.

been a growth in the number of people cycling. But if you dig down

:39:29.:39:35.

deep into it you have middle-aged white men well off. If you look at

:39:36.:39:40.

where people cycle it is where they live, Cambridge, Hackney, that,

:39:41.:39:45.

yeah, that I think adds to a sort of image problem. Is it a problem

:39:46.:39:50.

because some people, myself cycling in London, you sometimes see people

:39:51.:39:56.

behaving pretty badly. Boarish people cutting people up, scaring

:39:57.:40:01.

grannies on pavements, has the culture become too aggressive? You

:40:02.:40:05.

see a lot of people in the morning. I cycle to work, you see 20-minute

:40:06.:40:14.

cycle work in full lycra gear, cycling shoes on. Every traffic is a

:40:15.:40:20.

pitstop to charge away. It is unsettling for people who just want

:40:21.:40:26.

to cycle to work. Is that fair, you are fond of your bike? I am fond of

:40:27.:40:31.

my bike, I don't think that is a fair representation of the cycling

:40:32.:40:34.

demographic and culture in Britain at all. I appreciate what you are

:40:35.:40:42.

saying about called "mamales" middle-aged men in lycra, and they

:40:43.:40:47.

might be the ones cycling, I would be the antithesis of that with the

:40:48.:40:53.

cycling that I do. But on the other side I have a road bike so I'm

:40:54.:40:58.

getting into road cycling. It is such a complex mix, it is such a

:40:59.:41:01.

diverse mix of cyclists within Britain, there is so many different

:41:02.:41:05.

scenes as well, I appreciate what you are saying about it being

:41:06.:41:15.

aggressive. I think is this a cycling scene, people say the

:41:16.:41:17.

cyclist. The scene, it is a fashion

:41:18.:41:21.

statement? In a lot of countries we ought to emulate, Holland and

:41:22.:41:25.

Denmark, places where a lot of people cycling, cycling isn't

:41:26.:41:29.

something that you are, it is just what you do. You wouldn't say that

:41:30.:41:34.

you are a trained commuter if you get the train to work. We have this

:41:35.:41:39.

thing with cycling. I'm all for recreational cycling but it clouds

:41:40.:41:43.

out the getting around aspect of thing. If there is a cycling scene,

:41:44.:41:48.

whether there is a East London or whether it is Charlton in Manchester

:41:49.:41:53.

or Cambridge. It is about something else, it is about making a personal

:41:54.:42:00.

statement, not just getting from A-to-B, is it not just weird? Not at

:42:01.:42:08.

all, I don't seem to think there has to be different sets and scenes,

:42:09.:42:11.

then it is devisive and talking about it in that sense, you are the

:42:12.:42:18.

roady or the MTB or computer. What is an MTB? The mountain bike! We all

:42:19.:42:25.

learned something here. It should be inclusive and we should encourage

:42:26.:42:31.

people to cycle and embrace it. My personal opinion is cycling is

:42:32.:42:37.

growing in Britain. And the Olympic legacy will have motivated people

:42:38.:42:41.

and it is aspirational seeing that. Is it being captured by the

:42:42.:42:47.

middle-aged man spending more than ?1,000 on a bike. It is like golf,

:42:48.:42:56.

if you want to buy a bicycle in some countries it is hard to get hold of

:42:57.:42:59.

a decent second hand one. There are places we have a cycling culture

:43:00.:43:03.

that work, Cambridge is one of these places. A lot of the country it is

:43:04.:43:08.

this niche thing and expensive. Why say it is difficult to get a hold of

:43:09.:43:13.

a decent secondhand bike, or there are safes available to you even if

:43:14.:43:23.

you wanted to get a decent bike. Will you cycle home? I am actually!

:43:24.:43:28.

Thank you both very much indeed. Time for a look at the papers, the

:43:29.:43:32.

front page of the Telegraph tomorrow:

:43:33.:43:54.

That's it for the front pages. Finally, 50 years ago some BEEP-er

:43:55.:44:04.

decided they had the God given right to BEEP everything up for people

:44:05.:44:09.

like me who just wanted to make decent, interesting -- TV, they were

:44:10.:44:15.

worried about upsetting the kids at home little BEEP-eres, so they came

:44:16.:44:22.

up with the ideas of the watershed, before 9.00 you got super BEEP like

:44:23.:44:32.

quiz shows swearing no sex. After 9.00 you can get BEEP more, we are

:44:33.:44:37.

well after the watershed, before you complain. Here is a pile of the good

:44:38.:44:41.

stuff the TV police didn't want you to see. It is by today's standards

:44:42.:44:51.

weak, so don't be BEEP-ing offended. We saw a programme at 6. 35 and it

:44:52.:44:59.

was the dirtiest programme. You dirty Fukofuka-er. What a BEEP-er

:45:00.:45:04.

rotter. It was the hottest day of the year

:45:05.:45:29.

so far in the south-east corner, it looks as if we could see a similar

:45:30.:45:34.

story for Friday, sunshine and different story for the west. Cloud,

:45:35.:45:39.

rain and wind gathers, and some of that rain tense as it pushings in

:45:40.:45:47.

across the western side of Scotland. 16 or 17 degrees the high, it will

:45:48.:45:51.

feel disappointing, heavier pulses of rain across the Lake District as

:45:52.:45:56.

well, clouding over the north of England into the Midland. East

:45:57.:45:59.

Anglia, much of the south-east corner could see temperatures into

:46:00.:46:05.

the high 20s, that is the low 80s Fahrenheit. A promising day. As we

:46:06.:46:10.

push to the west of the Isle of Wight, across to Devon, the cloud,

:46:11.:46:13.

rain and wind remain a

:46:14.:46:14.