03/08/2016 Newsnight


03/08/2016

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Emily Maitlis.


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The Games of the 30th Olympiad in 2012 are awarded

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Our principle is to deliver a lasting, sporting legacy.

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Our Olympics will give the East End of London the huge regenerative

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It's a job creator, it's a growth generator.

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Our aim is to inspire young people across Britain

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and the world to take up sport.

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The stadium will be a purpose-built home for athletics

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I would say the legacy is a success on every level.

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Two days to go until the Rio Olympics opens.

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This time four years ago, the excitement and the trepidation and

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the Yanks at that things would go well. It did. Was the economics

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worth it and why are fewer cities coming forward to offer to host. We

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will hear from Dame Kelly Holmes, Dame Tessa Jarrell when we ask if

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London 2012 succeeded in inspiring a new generation into sport.

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Inspire a generation became an mantra of the London 2012 Olympics.

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Go back to 2005 and the promise lake at the heart of London's pitch to

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host The Games. And it worked. With London overhauling its main rival,

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Paris in the final vote. The 2012 organisers and the Coalition

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Government made two specific promises. The first centred on

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harnessing Britain's passion for sport to increase grassroots

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participation and to encourage the whole population to be more

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physically active. The other focused on promoting community engagement

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and achieving participation across all groups in society through The

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Games. Has the legacy been achieved? Keep your hand up higher. In 2011 in

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Tower Hamlets, surrounded by Olympic venues, there was a sense of

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optimism. In terms of Olympic legacy, it is here, we are

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delivering it. In terms of the promises about youth and

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participation, we are here doing it. That was christened Willits speaking

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a year before London hosted The Games. Five years on, I went back to

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ask him if the legacy had lived on. We had everything in place to be

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able to deliver probably the best legacy there had been to any Olympic

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Games ever. But since pretty much when the Olympics came into town,

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we've just been fighting for survival. That sense of lost

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opportunity is rooted in the scrapping of the school sports

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partnership. ?162 million of annual government funding, which was

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withdrawn shortly before The Games began. It has been partially

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replaced, but critics point to the inconsistencies in house School

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sport is now provided. In Tower Hamlets, there is pride access to

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sport that the children is continuing and achieving tangible

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success, despite the cuts. What is it about sport you like? I adore it,

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it is my favourite thing in my life. I do sport a lot and this is the

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best sports I have ever done. When you watched some of the Olympics on

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TV, did it make you think you could definitely do that? Yes. When Tom

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Daley did the dive and he landed on his back. That's not a recollection

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Tom Daley would share, having won a bronze medal. These kids are

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enjoying their school summer sports, but it is this kind of activity that

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convinced the IOC in 2005 to give London the 2012 games. They were

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convinced by the organisers' claims of creating a fitter, healthier

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nation. But when you look back to when the bid was one, and then to

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2012 when The Games took place. 15.8 million adults play sport or

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exercise once a week. An extra 1.7 million to 2005. Since 2012, the

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numbers have fallen by just under half of 1%. The biggest decline

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among ethnic minorities and economically deprived groups. The

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overall Olympic budget was ?9.3 billion. The huge proportion going

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towards regenerating a large area of east London. Money was diverted

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towards building a sporting legacy however, with 100 35mm pounds of

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lottery funding spent on facilities, protecting playing fields and

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volunteering programmes and extending access to Olympic sports.

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Our ambition was sky-high, and so it should have been. The recession did

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have an effect, but if you look at the picture across the piece, you

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can't do anything but agree that the London Olympics was a huge success

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for sport in this country. It transformed our reputation

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internationally. The point of this was the future generations and it

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was going to cost a lot of money, no doubt about that. It was going to be

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quite disruptive in many ways. But the point was it would improve us as

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a country. It provided a very nice summer party, and that is it. A ?9

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billion party? At least. Persuading adults to take up sport is a

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continuing process. Sport England's campaign has one post-Olympic

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effort, said to have convinced around 1.6 million women to start

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exercising. The lead sport is yielding significant results, Team

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GB helps to win 48 medals at the Rio games. With 64% of over 16 is doing

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no sport or exercise, it seems changing mindsets and delivering

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London's promise for all, is still a long way off. But, there is always

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hope. What do you watch and think, I can definitely do that? Going round

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the track. I saw the great British runners running round and I thought,

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I can definitely do that. Let's talk to Dame Tessa Jowell,

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Dame Kelly Holmes and Debbie Jevans, Dame Kelly, this tag line was about

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inspiring a new generation, did it do that? Is it too early to look

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back and see if it has been achieved? I have always come to the

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assumption that legacy is a long-term effect. Having been

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interactive with lots of people in my years and especially in previous

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years, I have seen a big impact over that time. I am somebody now who

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isn't in elite sport, but wants to keep fit and active and I am trying

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to engage with communities to do that. So the mass participation

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events I have seen improve and get more people into sport, have been

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something I have seen as an ongoing effect of what legacy is. So the

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visibility is there of these high impact events, but what is your

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sense, Tessa Jowell, we had from Hugh Robertson who said it is

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impossible to disagree it was a huge success for sport in this country,

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do you share that? I do in part. 19 major World Championships between

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now and 2020 will be hosted in London. What we failed to do, what

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the Coalition Government did, was to destroy the school sports programme

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that was on course to seeing the majority of children playing at

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least five hours of sport every week. Choosing from 14 different

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sports, renewed facilities and proper coaching. So, we started in

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2002, 20 5% of children playing two hours of sport a week. By the time

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we got to 2010 and the change of government, 60% of children were

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playing five hours or more and 98% of children were playing at least

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two hours of sport. And that was the infrastructure to drive this

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transformation of a generation through sport and the Coalition

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Government dismantled it. When you look at the numbers, as sports

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director of London 2012, we have plateaued and even fallen as a

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nation and participation in sport, it is

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incredible, isn't it? It is incredible, but it is good. If you

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look at Athens, and what has happened in Sydney, the fact we have

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maintained the levels we had in 2012 is a positive thing. Is that right,

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no city in specs to increase their participation and our benchmark is

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Athens? Our benchmark is 14 million. That is when the change of

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investment started and Tessa was a part of that as well. We are up to

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maintaining the levels we had in 2012. Tessa makes the point of what

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happened in schools. That is vital we do continue to invest in those

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and that is what is happening in line to the school games, which is

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another thing that is important. If you dedicate the money, it is not

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spent on sport, so you have to ring fenced it in schools and beyond. I

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was a national school sport champion for three years 2005 to 2008 and I

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saw how schools were empowering young people into sport. But with

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2012, what happened for me, was the enormity of what school brought. The

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set of it just being athletics, football and those high profile

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sports, what happened from 2012 is it encourage people to see that

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sport is for anybody. What you have seen the likes of handball, an

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unknown sport has been rising out of the water because of 2012. Cycling,

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as a sports. If you look back at 2008, it wasn't really well-known,

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now you get a three days festival, which I have just done, ride London.

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Shouldn't it worry you we are seeing a decline in economically deprived

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groups, ethnic minority groups? It is also part of the legacy? I agree

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with that, and there are barriers to entry in some communities. My trust

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works with a lot of areas of depravation and they want to do it,

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but they haven't got the resources or the funding. In some areas they

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don't have the infrastructure. London is very lucky and privileged

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as a city. We see other cities hosting big games, very privileged.

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You go to other areas and they are not feeling it. Was the ambition too

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high? It was sky-high, maybe RIBA unrealistic? The ambition was not

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too high. Until 2010 everybody showed working together across

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party, the ambition was achievable. Would it have been different under a

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Labour government? I think it would have been different had the

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Coalition Government been misguided. I don't want to make this too

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partisan, had they not been so misguided and said, we will remove

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the ring fence, the dedicated funding that goes into schools. I

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accept the work being done at sport England, which I clearly believe is

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excellent and we will not get into a debate. I was delivering The Games

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when it was happening. But ?9,000 was going into every primary school,

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there is still funding. What is important, if we look to an active

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nation, which is what the ambition is now, it is also the way that

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sport is being coached in schools. Kelly, you are a talented athlete,

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you enjoyed it. A lot of children are put off. It is not just about

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the money, it is about the way it is coached. It is an emphasis of the

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child thinks that I can do it. It is a big part of what is being rolled

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out now. We are going to talk about the money next.

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A newly-reinvigorated sporting nation was not the only

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There was also the promise of an East London renaissance.

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The facilities, the housing, the regeneration.

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The Olympic Park itself is well used and well liked -

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Nor is it Montreal, the byword for post-Olympic financial disaster.

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But a lot of the long-term plans for the area - West Ham moving

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into the Olympic Stadium or UCL opening a new site in East London,

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Chris Cook has been piecing together what we can say right now

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about London 2012's long-term economic legacy.

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7,000 pigeons circle the stadium before carrying the news

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The Olympics can be a very expensive enterprise.

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The Russian Sochi Winter Games in 2014, according

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to official estimates, cost 51 billion US dollars.

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The Beijing Summer Games in 2008, cost around 40 billion US dollars.

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Compared to them, the cost of the London 2012 Games

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The building of new offices and a higher education

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campus in Stratford, for example, are still not complete.

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One argument for the economic benefits of the Olympics

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is they give political cover to do things that people

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The Barcelona Games in 1992 were considered successful,

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but they were used as a pretext to implant parts of an urban

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redevelopment plan first drawn up in 1976.

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In London's case though, we built some useful

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things, like housing, but the Olympics where

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things, like housing, but the Olympics were

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the aim of much of our investment, not a pretext.

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That might help explain why earnings are not improving fast

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enough in the Olympic area to catch up with the rest of London.

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Nor the employment rate, nor adult skill levels,

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Barcelona had another economic advantage -

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after years of being forgotten under Franco, Barcelona was a relatively

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There were only 3.8 million tourist nights spent there in 1990.

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20 years later, that stood at 15 million,

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But by then, London was already a world city with 49 million tourist

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Olympic marketing offered smaller opportunities to London than it

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Indeed, the difficulty of emulating Barcelona may explain why a lot

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of cities are now sceptical about hosting the Games.

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Athens 2004 beat off 11 other applicant cities.

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Tokyo is holding the 2020 Games and it beat just four other cities.

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The London Olympics led to a lot of development and real

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regeneration takes time, but maybe it's best to remember it

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as a ?9 billion party, and anything else we get is a bonus.

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Lets pick up again with Tessa Jowell,

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What is emerging from that graphic is that there is less global

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appetite now to actually host these events. Does that shock you? In a

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way, no it doesn't. Because I think the economics have changed in the

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world generally and it is very expensive. The IOC recognised that,

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why they have their 2020 vision. The IOC didn't focus on the future until

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post-2012 and now it makes the city think about the legacy and the

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benefits. But it's enormously expensive and I think it's going to

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need a rethink. I'm not sure in 20 or 30 years' time we will see the

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Games in just one city, it could be in a whole country. We have set a

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bar at ?9 billion which seems hugely unrealistic for anywhere smaller?

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That is absolutely right. At domestic Lee what the investment of

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?9.3 billion did it was to regenerate east London in six years

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at a rate that would have otherwise taken 60 years. That regeneration is

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still happening. But Debbie is absolutely right, you've got to be

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very clear and ruthless about your legacy ambitions before ever

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embarking on it. And we were absolutely clear that we had two

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legacy ambitions, to regenerate east London, which was a wasteland, and

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to transform a generation of young people through sport. Kelly is

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absolutely right in what she said at the beginning coming you've got to

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look at this over the long-term. I hope we can come back in ten years'

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time and look at what's happening in these London. Demi just bring in

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Cali. You are famed throughout the world feel sport but do you ever get

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people here at home saying to you, we spent ?269 million on an Aquatics

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Centre, its one swimming pool, how many kids can use that? Like I say,

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I came on here and I was nervous about coming on the show, I have an

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opinion about this because I do my thing and I am sporty but other

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people on my Twitter for example have a completely different opinion.

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I was very surprised that there were a lot of really positive responses.

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I asked the question I was on Newsnight, talking about legacy,

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what do you think? I was release apprised, I -- really surprised, I

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saw a lot -- hike spec today lot of negative talk, people saying, you

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spent tenderly hands, what did it for me? But I had a lot of positive

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responses, some saying their children are so motivated and want

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to be into sport. Others saying World Championship events are now

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hosted in the UK and they get to go, others love the Olympic. For east

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London we are creating a low busy and that is long-term. Are we doing

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nationally? Not sure. Why are places like Toronto and Hamburg having to

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ask through referendums whether there cities want to host the Games?

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The world has changed, we just had our own referendum, and the economic

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situation is very difficult. People are looking at that and maybe if we

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asked about hosting the Games now we would not have had the same

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response. I think there is a growing rebellion against what people

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experience as the kind of imposition of big events like this. I think

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there is a challenge for the International Olympic Committee in

:21:04.:21:08.

really calibrating the ownership with the cities and the countries

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that decide to host them. Probably to become less prescriptive, to be

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less proprietorial about the Olympic brand. And I think very particularly

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to decide whether the Olympic Games is going to continue to be a global

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Games. When will we see an Olympic Games in Africa? Post-Rio, I think

:21:34.:21:38.

we're going to have a lot of questions asked about how it has

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affected the people who live there. Thank you very much indeed, all of

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you. The London 2012 Opening Ceremony

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portrayed a Britain of the NHS, of the Industrial Revolution,

:21:47.:21:49.

of Isambard Kingdom Brunel, of Prospero, of Suffragettes,

:21:50.:21:51.

immigrants and Chelsea Pensioners, of James Bond, of Corgis,

:21:52.:21:52.

of the Queen and Mr Bean. It was broadly hailed as a triumph,

:21:53.:21:55.

chaotic, bonkers, but brilliant, a stark contrast to an equally

:21:56.:21:59.

commended but highly-regimented one So, does the Opening Ceremony tell

:22:00.:22:01.

us anything about our country? Peter Hitchens and Sunder

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Katwala have joined me. Let me throw that one open to both

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of you. What did it tell us about the country and what did it say to

:22:55.:22:59.

you? I love it. The world was watching, we had the Queen with

:23:00.:23:03.

James Bond and Mr Bean and that were recognisable but it was a story

:23:04.:23:08.

about us, us, full of in jokes about our national psyche and

:23:09.:23:12.

conversation, the shipping forecast, the EastEnders theme tune. It's

:23:13.:23:17.

about things we experience together, things we share, the shared

:23:18.:23:21.

soundtrack of our lives. The fact that 27 million of us were watching

:23:22.:23:26.

that night is quite rare in society today, doing something together on

:23:27.:23:31.

that scale. Peter Hitchens. I just don't think that everyone at the

:23:32.:23:35.

country thought at the time or things now that the 1960s were the

:23:36.:23:45.

beginning of civilisation, that rap music was the best representation of

:23:46.:23:51.

British culture... Certainly myself, I didn't find it particularly

:23:52.:23:56.

appealing. I felt very much under pressure to say that I liked it and

:23:57.:24:00.

when I said that I didn't, people could say we disagree -- people

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didn't say we disagree with you, let's talk about this, they said it

:24:05.:24:08.

was shocking that I didn't like it. I agree there was a monoculture at

:24:09.:24:13.

the time, wasn't there? Why do you go back to the 1960s? The opening

:24:14.:24:19.

ceremony went back to the industrial revolution and Shakespeare. It was

:24:20.:24:23.

dominated hugely by the 60s theme, by rock music and punk and all this

:24:24.:24:27.

garbage as far as I'm concerned which has no bearing on culture at

:24:28.:24:31.

all and this is what they were clearly happiest with and what

:24:32.:24:36.

dominated. The suffragettes? Well, the suffragettes were in their too.

:24:37.:24:42.

Paul Flynn, who I like immensely who is a very good left-wing member of

:24:43.:24:45.

Parliament enjoy it immensely because it was left wing. I'm not

:24:46.:24:50.

left wing and I disliked the bits of it that were left wing. I'm not so

:24:51.:24:53.

sure about that because in a way because it had a leftward reach and

:24:54.:24:58.

a liberal reach for something that was patriotically at the history and

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the roots were their too. I think you try to blend that. Cultural

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voices were on stand-by to defend it and there was no biddy to defend it

:25:10.:25:17.

against. Apart from anybody else, nobody can criticise the Olympics

:25:18.:25:26.

for being multicultural while using language like that... It's a much

:25:27.:25:29.

broader ownership than that. The clue is the 27 million people. If

:25:30.:25:34.

you're one of the people in London who voted Remain and are very upset

:25:35.:25:38.

about the referendum, it you would be thinking what have we lost, I

:25:39.:25:45.

want my country back. If you are a Leave voter in the potteries, you

:25:46.:25:50.

will beat thinking that explains the reason I voted leave, the Jarrow

:25:51.:25:56.

marchers, the Industrial Revolution... People who disagree

:25:57.:25:58.

politically shared these cultural moments. Unjustified confidence. The

:25:59.:26:07.

Olympics are like a family on your street known for being heavily in

:26:08.:26:10.

debt who can't make their mortgage payments who suddenly borrow

:26:11.:26:15.

hundreds of thousands of pounds to stage an enormous party. That is

:26:16.:26:18.

what we did. This is a country hugely in debt as a step and as a

:26:19.:26:22.

people and we splashed 9 billion quid on this immense party, which we

:26:23.:26:27.

didn't need to stage and we actually fought to stage. Austerity should

:26:28.:26:34.

have been a gigantic plughole with George Osborne shovelling ?50 notes

:26:35.:26:40.

in. This reminded people of everything we've achieved, the

:26:41.:26:43.

Industrial Revolution, Shakespeare, Dickens, Harry pot, the Queen. It

:26:44.:26:47.

gave us that, if you like, nation state confidence. We've soared

:26:48.:26:55.

onwards and upwards ever since, of course (!) What does that mean? What

:26:56.:27:02.

about Brexit's effect of the economy? It had no effect except

:27:03.:27:07.

increasing our overdraft. It doesn't feature in the ground sweep after

:27:08.:27:13.

Sergeant Pepper, you don't have Heath and Wilson taking us into

:27:14.:27:18.

Europe. That process of change wasn't on the ballot paper in this

:27:19.:27:24.

election, it wasn't do you want to live in 1962 or 2016? It was asking

:27:25.:27:33.

do you like living in 2016 and 52% of the population said not really,

:27:34.:27:37.

not very much. They still own that historic sweep which belongs to both

:27:38.:27:41.

sides of the referendum. They said we don't like being ignored by the

:27:42.:27:45.

kind of people who devise our opening ceremony. This is a bit too

:27:46.:27:49.

short and I apologise, thank you very much indeed for coming in.

:27:50.:27:54.

The father of a 21-year-old woman imprisoned in Saudi Arabia

:27:55.:27:56.

has been ordered by a high court judge to return her to the UK.

:27:57.:27:59.

Amina Al Jeffery, who grew up in Swansea and has dual British

:28:00.:28:02.

and Saudi nationality, complained that her father had kept her locked

:28:03.:28:05.

up in a cage because he disapproved of her Western lifestyle.

:28:06.:28:09.

Her father claims he was trying to protect her.

:28:10.:28:11.

Secunder Kermani has interviewed Amina's friend, who first raised

:28:12.:28:13.

the alarm of her imprisonment, and has spoken to a charity who say

:28:14.:28:18.

Imprisoned in her father's home for four years in Saudi Arabia without

:28:19.:28:24.

being allowed to leave. 21-year-old Amina Al Jeffery

:28:25.:28:37.

believes her family once heard dead. She was taken to Jeddah by her

:28:38.:28:42.

ultraconservative parents who claimed she was taking drugs and

:28:43.:28:46.

drinking. Through lawyers, she has been fighting to be able to return

:28:47.:28:52.

to the UK. In court today, the judge said that the constraints placed on

:28:53.:28:55.

Amina Al Jeffery by her father might be acceptable in Saudi Arabia but

:28:56.:28:59.

they are not in Britain. He said she was being deprived of her right to

:29:00.:29:02.

act as an independent adult and that she needed to be rescued. The judge

:29:03.:29:09.

ruled that Amina's father must allow her to return to Britain by Sunday

:29:10.:29:13.

the 11th of September. The question is whether her father, living in

:29:14.:29:17.

Saudi Arabia, will pay any attention to the rulings of a court the UK.

:29:18.:29:25.

Amina's lawyer has not been able to talk to her because of her father. I

:29:26.:29:32.

would love to speak to Amina today to explain to her what the judge

:29:33.:29:39.

said and how concerned he is for her well-being, that he considers her to

:29:40.:29:43.

be under constraint and he used the word peril. Amina grew up here in

:29:44.:29:50.

this quiet, mainly white Swansea a bird. We've spoken to a number of

:29:51.:29:56.

her friends who extra I'm her -- who described her family as being

:29:57.:29:59.

extremely socially conservative. Amina didn't fit into that, we have

:30:00.:30:04.

been told that unlike her sisters she would take off her hijab at

:30:05.:30:16.

times. She wanted to have a normal life but that brought her into

:30:17.:30:21.

conflict with her father. She would take clothes to change into at

:30:22.:30:26.

school. She didn't want to be dressing in skimpy clothes, she just

:30:27.:30:29.

wanted to be dressed how she wanted to be dressed. Colourful blazers and

:30:30.:30:34.

nice shoes and jewellery. She would stick jewellery on hand statement

:30:35.:30:40.

necklaces. -- and statement necklaces. One charities say they

:30:41.:30:46.

warned the police in 2011 that Amina was at risk of being taken to Saudi

:30:47.:30:50.

Arabia by her family but nothing was done. The police say they received

:30:51.:30:54.

no such warning and only got involved in April 2012 after Amina

:30:55.:30:59.

had disappeared. I had a message saying she was going on holiday to

:31:00.:31:05.

Morocco for two weeks. I didn't hear from her until three months later,

:31:06.:31:10.

telling me she had been taken to Saudi Arabia. What did you say in

:31:11.:31:14.

her messages to you? She just said I've been taken against my will, I

:31:15.:31:20.

don't want to be here, you need to help me. She just didn't want to be

:31:21.:31:24.

there. She said it was like prison, she couldn't get out. She wanted to

:31:25.:31:29.

get on with her life. She wanted to get home, it wasn't where she

:31:30.:31:33.

belonged. Her friend read out one of the many worrying messages she

:31:34.:31:37.

received. "I'm Writing this story in case worse comes to worst people

:31:38.:31:41.

know what happened. You don't know what I've been through the last

:31:42.:31:46.

week. I have to tell you but I don't have time". Amina's mother and some

:31:47.:31:51.

of her siblings Silicon Wales. We've spoken to members of the family who

:31:52.:31:56.

say their brothers controlled their sister's actions. At the moment she

:31:57.:32:03.

doesn't have any support from her siblings and her siblings have filed

:32:04.:32:06.

evidence in support of her father's case. Amina is a jewel Saudi and

:32:07.:32:12.

British national and that could come to eight things. The Foreign Office

:32:13.:32:15.

say they are raising the matter with Saudi authorities but if her father

:32:16.:32:19.

does not comply, it's not clear what the courts here can do.

:32:20.:32:24.

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