15/08/2016 Newsnight


15/08/2016

With Evan Davis. How are Great Britain doing so well in Rio? A look at tensions in Ukraine. And is Joseph Chamberlain Theresa May's hero?


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Transcript


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The national anthem is ringing out across Rio this month.

:00:08.:00:29.

After a summer of the strangest political

:00:30.:00:31.

shenanigans, is sport making Britain look serious?

:00:32.:00:33.

We're on the medal trail tonight, symbols of success

:00:34.:00:35.

that have the power to lift a nation.

:00:36.:00:38.

So how exactly have we

:00:39.:00:39.

The woman in charge of UK Sport will tell us what

:00:40.:00:46.

we're doing right and whether it can last.

:00:47.:01:06.

The most unfriendly rivalry - in Donetsk and on the

:01:07.:01:08.

Crimean peninsula, new tension between Russia and Ukraine.

:01:09.:01:10.

We'll ask if Brexit Britain should be

:01:11.:01:12.

trying to reset its relationship to Russia.

:01:13.:01:14.

And it is this man, Joseph Chamberlain, the new Guru

:01:15.:01:16.

He promised better housing, minimum wage, to crack down

:01:17.:01:20.

He promised many things that Theresa May promised the

:01:21.:01:23.

Are you one of those people who can't help poring over the medal

:01:24.:01:31.

Taking delight in the fact that Britain, number two,

:01:32.:01:34.

are ahead of China, for the moment at least?

:01:35.:01:36.

It is certainly more fun when your country is doing well,

:01:37.:01:39.

and for the third Games in a row, Britain is looking

:01:40.:01:42.

It wasn't always like that - some of us can remember our typical

:01:43.:01:46.

haul of three or four gold medals, the numbers we achieved at Munich

:01:47.:01:49.

Five golds was a good Games haul - Barcelona in 1992, for example.

:01:50.:01:54.

After the embarrassment of Atlanta, we went up one gear,

:01:55.:01:58.

and then after Athens, we went up another.

:01:59.:02:00.

Other countries have seen their fortunes shift,

:02:01.:02:02.

too: Australia had no golds in Montreal but rose

:02:03.:02:05.

Fortunes wax and wane, and fortunes are spent.

:02:06.:02:14.

Given the capacity of the Olympics to instil feelings of national well

:02:15.:02:16.

being, it's worth asking, what is it that makes

:02:17.:02:19.

What have we done right, and is it going to last?

:02:20.:02:22.

Let's start with some facts and analysis from Secunder Kermani.

:02:23.:02:32.

We must be doing something right. Yesterday, we won five gold medals,

:02:33.:02:43.

and there were more today. In Atlanta in 1996, Great Britain won

:02:44.:02:47.

just one medal. Is this all simply the result of more and better

:02:48.:02:53.

focused funding? In Sydney in 2000, Britain's Olympians received ?59

:02:54.:02:58.

million in funding. They won 28 medals. That's around ?2.1 million

:02:59.:03:05.

per medal. London 2012, Olympians received ?264 million and won 65

:03:06.:03:10.

medals, just over ?4 million per medal. This time round,

:03:11.:03:25.

they got ?274 million, and if, as looks likely, they reach their

:03:26.:03:29.

target of 48 medals, that would work out at ?5.7 million per medal, and

:03:30.:03:31.

it would be Britain's most successful overseas Olympics. I am

:03:32.:03:33.

most surprised by how people are surprised by how well we're doing.

:03:34.:03:35.

We have increased funding, good systems and structures in place, and

:03:36.:03:39.

in the past, we went to the Olympic Games would hope rather than

:03:40.:03:42.

expectation. Given the investment we have made in the last 20 years so,

:03:43.:03:46.

we can expect rather than hope. You might have thought that the bigger

:03:47.:03:52.

and richer a is, automatically the more medals it gets. This graph

:03:53.:03:58.

compares total medals won in 2012 with GDP full stop America, for

:03:59.:04:01.

example, lots of money, lots of medals. But it's not quite that

:04:02.:04:07.

straightforward. India, with a big economy, underperforms massively,

:04:08.:04:10.

while Cuba does better than you would expect. Britain is above the

:04:11.:04:15.

line, which means it did well. With population, the correlation is even

:04:16.:04:19.

bleaker. Outliers like India, massive population but few medals.

:04:20.:04:23.

Cuba, small population but many medals. These are more pronounced.

:04:24.:04:29.

So how do you explain these results? It might come down to the things

:04:30.:04:34.

such as the health of the population, Government policy,

:04:35.:04:39.

cultural importance of sport and other factors. You have to have the

:04:40.:04:46.

will and commitment to do that. In India, they have a vast population,

:04:47.:04:51.

which would presumably generate hundreds of thousands of Olympic

:04:52.:04:54.

athlete if the nation were really committed to developing them, but

:04:55.:05:00.

they are just not. Addicting the Olympics and understanding results

:05:01.:05:05.

has become a bit of an obsession. This formula was formulated by

:05:06.:05:09.

German academics. It includes GDP, whether there is a centralised

:05:10.:05:14.

economy, and whether the population is mainly Muslim, which can affect

:05:15.:05:19.

how many female athletes there are. A colleague of mine at the

:05:20.:05:22.

University of Colorado carried out an exercise when he compared the

:05:23.:05:34.

prediction of the models. The model predicted pretty much everything. It

:05:35.:05:40.

is hard to make like-for-like comparisons between competing

:05:41.:05:43.

nations and their level of funding, but Britain has been spending more

:05:44.:05:47.

than its other less successful rivals. For now, though, few will

:05:48.:05:50.

complain. It is worth saying, by the way,

:05:51.:05:52.

that there has been medal inflation: there are a lot more events

:05:53.:05:55.

in the Olympics these days. So there are 306 gold

:05:56.:05:57.

medals this year. Liz Nicholl is the Chief Executive

:05:58.:05:59.

of UK Sport and she joins Lovely to speak to you, and

:06:00.:06:13.

congratulations on what is going on over there. On the target, the 48,

:06:14.:06:18.

we will bust through that, won't we? Are you thinking it is possible

:06:19.:06:27.

Britain will outperform its London 2012 performance? The target, as you

:06:28.:06:32.

said, is at least 48. And yes, we are on track to achieve that over

:06:33.:06:39.

the coming days. Will we reach 66? Who knows? We know there is a good

:06:40.:06:43.

number of possible medal opportunities over the next week,

:06:44.:06:48.

and we will have to see where we get to. There is very little... The

:06:49.:06:56.

space between a fourth and a third and a second and a first is minute,

:06:57.:07:01.

so we will have to see how it plays out here in 30. It is costing us,

:07:02.:07:07.

depending on how many medals we end up with, around ?5 million of

:07:08.:07:11.

investment per medal, isn't it? Do you think about those figures, what

:07:12.:07:16.

it costs to get one in swimming and one in hockey? Do you work that way

:07:17.:07:21.

in working out the funding allocation? We work it out by

:07:22.:07:25.

identifying the athletes that have the potential to deliver medals in

:07:26.:07:30.

the Olympic Games environment, and then the sport developed a strategy,

:07:31.:07:35.

and we call that a what it takes to win strategy. It is omitted to us at

:07:36.:07:40.

UK Sport for review, and that will include what it takes to surround an

:07:41.:07:45.

athlete with world-class coaching, sports science, sports medicine,

:07:46.:07:50.

competition opportunities, innovation work where appropriate,

:07:51.:07:54.

and alongside that strategy, like in any business, we have a what it

:07:55.:08:00.

costs to win assessment. Each sport has unique check the wood features,

:08:01.:08:08.

and we have done a lot of work to prepare for our big Tokyo investment

:08:09.:08:13.

in December. My understanding was, which you haven't talked about, that

:08:14.:08:18.

we have the most brutal system of the big countries in terms of

:08:19.:08:22.

punishing sport that don't do very well, taking money away, and giving

:08:23.:08:26.

it to spot that don't do so well, which a lot of people say is

:08:27.:08:29.

perverse because you are taking money from the ones that need it. Is

:08:30.:08:34.

that a big part of it - the carrot and the stick? No, there is no

:08:35.:08:43.

punishment and no reward. We invite hast -- reinvest National Lottery

:08:44.:08:48.

funding. Our aim is to support every athlete with medal potential in any

:08:49.:08:51.

Olympic sports that are competing at the games, so it is a fair system

:08:52.:08:55.

that gives the opportunity to every athlete of equal talent. If they

:08:56.:09:02.

have the talent to deliver a medal, we support them. We are always

:09:03.:09:07.

investing in future potential, so we are not punishing past performances

:09:08.:09:09.

if they were not as successful as they should have been. We are

:09:10.:09:13.

investing in future potential of athletes. We have invested

:09:14.:09:17.

significantly in Rio, and our plan is to invest in Tokyo. Is it

:09:18.:09:27.

possible, particularly looking at our performance, because you put in

:09:28.:09:29.

a lot more money and got more medals, but everyone is not going to

:09:30.:09:33.

start doing what we are doing. We are getting into an arms race. We

:09:34.:09:38.

will have to spend ?10 million per medal next time. Is that something

:09:39.:09:44.

that could happen? No, I think that we need to be very smart about the

:09:45.:09:51.

way that we invest the National Lottery and Government exchequer

:09:52.:09:53.

funding in the right athletes and the right sports for the right

:09:54.:09:58.

reasons. A lot of other countries are copying our system here, which

:09:59.:10:02.

has been incredibly successful, as you can see from the performances

:10:03.:10:07.

and results to date here in Rio. So, yes, there will be other countries

:10:08.:10:11.

investing, competition will get stronger, the spread of medals will

:10:12.:10:16.

go wider across more nations as other countries actually look to try

:10:17.:10:21.

to copy the successful system we have created here. You know there is

:10:22.:10:26.

a bit of a pattern to host nations, is in their? They do well in the

:10:27.:10:30.

games before the one-day house, they do fantastically well in the one-day

:10:31.:10:34.

host and then there is a depreciation effect where it tails

:10:35.:10:38.

off. Argue confident that we can buck that trend? Do you think we

:10:39.:10:45.

will have a similar target in Tokyo? Might we expect 50 or more medals in

:10:46.:10:51.

Tokyo? I am confident that with the support of the National Lottery

:10:52.:10:54.

players, with the continued support of Government, that we can live

:10:55.:11:00.

sustained success with British athletes in the Olympic and

:11:01.:11:04.

Paralympic games environment. I'm confident that, in fact, we can

:11:05.:11:12.

build on... You are right - before the home games, there is an uplift

:11:13.:11:17.

because there is a stronger strategic focus on trying to deliver

:11:18.:11:20.

something that will make the nation proud. We saw the impact of that in

:11:21.:11:24.

Beijing. We saw then the full benefit in London. And since then,

:11:25.:11:32.

the athletes that we have funded have been delivering volunteer days

:11:33.:11:34.

to inspire the next generation, so that special impact of success that

:11:35.:11:40.

we felt in London, that we are feeling now from the performances

:11:41.:11:43.

here, is also giving added value to the country, to the nation, by

:11:44.:11:47.

inspiring the next generation of talent to come through with an

:11:48.:11:51.

ambition to achieve great things in the Olympic environment. Let's hope

:11:52.:11:55.

so. Liz Nicholl, thank you very much indeed. Enjoy the evening air.

:11:56.:11:58.

The festering tensions between Ukraine and Russia have

:11:59.:12:00.

In the last few days, the Russians have claimed that

:12:01.:12:04.

Ukraine orchestrated some kind of terrorist attack on Crimea that

:12:05.:12:07.

killed a Russian soldier and security officer.

:12:08.:12:08.

But both sides appear to be putting their military on alert.

:12:09.:12:13.

Let's talk to Tom Burridge, who is in Kiev.

:12:14.:12:20.

Tom, you have been to the unrecognised border between Crimea

:12:21.:12:27.

and Ukraine. What is happening there? Essentially, Ukrainians

:12:28.:12:34.

crossed the border, hit the beaches, see family friends, pretty much

:12:35.:12:38.

business as usual this weekend, a relaxed atmosphere at odds with the

:12:39.:12:42.

tension we have seen between Moscow and Kiev in recent days. We saw no

:12:43.:12:46.

evidence of a Ukrainian military build-up in the region, even driving

:12:47.:12:50.

around, which tallies with the idea and a belief of most people that

:12:51.:12:54.

some sort of military incursion from the south by Russia is unlikely, and

:12:55.:12:58.

this tension is more likely to do with the wider Ukrainian - Russian

:12:59.:13:04.

relations. The Russians said there was some kind of incident and a

:13:05.:13:08.

Russian soldier was killed, so what is the truth of it? What we know

:13:09.:13:13.

about what actually happened? It is hard to answer. With Russian

:13:14.:13:19.

involvement and strategy vis-a-vis Ukraine, we saw it with the

:13:20.:13:25.

annexation in 2014, the line between fact and fiction is often blurred

:13:26.:13:28.

and it makes it harder for western countries to respond with their own

:13:29.:13:32.

strategy. We know that around the time of this alleged plot, there was

:13:33.:13:38.

some incident, some reports of firing on the administrative border

:13:39.:13:42.

between Crimea and southern Ukraine, but one element of the Russian

:13:43.:13:45.

account of events, if you like, doesn't seem to stack up and stop

:13:46.:13:51.

the Russians said there was an artillery bombardment by the

:13:52.:13:54.

Ukrainians into Crimea just around the time, just after, basically. In

:13:55.:14:00.

this day and age, you would expect there to be some video evidence, and

:14:01.:14:04.

we have not seen that so far. We interviewed the brother of one of

:14:05.:14:09.

the Eurocrat is who is being detailed -- Ukrainians who is being

:14:10.:14:14.

detained and accused of being a plotter, creeping into Crimea to

:14:15.:14:17.

carry out this alleged attack. On the face of it, he doesn't seem to

:14:18.:14:22.

have the profile of a special Ops soldier. In the words of these

:14:23.:14:26.

brother, he was overweight, could hardly run 100 metres without being

:14:27.:14:30.

out of breath. Until recently, he was a minibus driver at a nuclear

:14:31.:14:35.

power plant 150 miles from Crimea, and on the face of it, his brother

:14:36.:14:39.

's account, his animosity and his claim that his brother is a victim

:14:40.:14:43.

of a bigger political picture seems genuine. Tom, thank you very much.

:14:44.:14:48.

Well, there is basically one big strategic choice in foreign policy:

:14:49.:14:50.

It is a question that's at the heart of our relationship with Russia.

:14:51.:14:55.

Remember that Britain is looking for new post-Brexit relationships.

:14:56.:14:57.

And remember, too, we no longer have the energy independence

:14:58.:14:59.

We're joined by Sir Tony Brenton, former British Ambassador to Russia,

:15:00.:15:03.

and Nancy Soderberg, who was Deputy National Security

:15:04.:15:05.

Good evening to you both. Nancy Soderberg, do you think this is a

:15:06.:15:15.

time for conciliation or toughness in relation to Russia? Vladimir

:15:16.:15:21.

Putin all now understands toughness. The United States has gone through

:15:22.:15:25.

this, we tried a reset and it didn't work. He is looking for a fight and

:15:26.:15:30.

we need to make sure he does not get another one in Georgia or Ukraine. I

:15:31.:15:35.

think he is trying to fabricate incidents and make up the mess, the

:15:36.:15:39.

UK is moving troops and making it clear we will defend our friends and

:15:40.:15:43.

that's the only message she will understand. I don't entirely agree.

:15:44.:15:49.

Nancy is right we need to be on our guard and not offer the Russians any

:15:50.:15:56.

opportunities to exploit any disagreements. But over the last

:15:57.:15:58.

three years we have been sliding rapidly towards people are

:15:59.:16:03.

describing as a new Cold War. Those of us who remember the old Cold War

:16:04.:16:07.

will remember it was fantastically expensive and occasionally very

:16:08.:16:10.

dangerous and it seems to me we need to look for ways to stop that slide,

:16:11.:16:14.

looking for ways of cooperating with Russia where we can. Syria is an

:16:15.:16:19.

obvious example, the United States is already finding ways to work with

:16:20.:16:22.

the Russians to help get the situation under control. I don't

:16:23.:16:32.

think you will disagree with that Nancy Soderberg? We obviously need

:16:33.:16:34.

to Russia on our strategic challenges not just in Syria but

:16:35.:16:41.

also Iran, they continue to support our arms control agreements in those

:16:42.:16:45.

pictures but on territorial disputes and brute force against not only

:16:46.:16:48.

their own population but some of their neighbours I think we need to

:16:49.:16:53.

stand up to that. Of course I am a diplomat as well and believe in

:16:54.:16:57.

diplomacy but I think with Russia he does not understand consolatory

:16:58.:17:00.

messages and will take every and she can. We are having this debate in

:17:01.:17:06.

the United States with our own presidential candidate on the

:17:07.:17:10.

Republican side questioning Nato and are use of nuclear weapons. I think

:17:11.:17:16.

any source of weakness which would come from the United States would be

:17:17.:17:20.

dangerous for Britain and all our allies in that region. You will

:17:21.:17:25.

agree where cooperation is useful we should cooperate but it's on the

:17:26.:17:28.

other things, it is how you can overlook the fact how the Russian

:17:29.:17:33.

state appeared to be involved in the assassination of a British citizen,

:17:34.:17:39.

they invaded Crimea, took it from a sovereign nation. That is all true,

:17:40.:17:44.

Russia is a pretty difficult international customer. But it's

:17:45.:17:46.

also true that Russia is not the great threat which it has been

:17:47.:17:52.

presented as in Washington and London. It's important to remember

:17:53.:17:55.

at that Russia spends on its defence about one tenth of what we in need

:17:56.:18:01.

to do. It has at no economy about one 20th the size of us. It sees

:18:02.:18:07.

itself as threatened by us. You are any classic situation where each

:18:08.:18:10.

side sea itself threatened by the other and you need to look for ways

:18:11.:18:16.

to get those false impressions on both sides down. A quick answer on

:18:17.:18:24.

that Nancy Soderberg? It is Russia creating false impressions by saying

:18:25.:18:27.

it had to go to the Ukrainian defence. We have to look at areas of

:18:28.:18:34.

cooperation but Russia is a very dangerous regional power, it's no

:18:35.:18:38.

longer a superpower so we are not headed towards a new Cold War but we

:18:39.:18:42.

are headed towards a possibility of not having a partner in Russia and

:18:43.:18:46.

having a regional, very weak governmental lashing out in a

:18:47.:18:51.

dangerous way. We need to try and contain them as we did in the Soviet

:18:52.:18:56.

Union but on a much smaller scale. This president is not one who will

:18:57.:18:59.

understand anything but strength from Nato and it's important to

:19:00.:19:03.

convey that. You will not agree on that point but let asked if Brexit

:19:04.:19:08.

makes a difference, does it mean we need to Russia as a friend, is it

:19:09.:19:13.

time for a re-set? I don't think Brexit makes a huge difference, at

:19:14.:19:19.

the harder end of that, our position on this I understand will not change

:19:20.:19:24.

very quickly and from the EU point of view, one thing we have brought

:19:25.:19:31.

to their party has been our foreign policy and defence expertise and I

:19:32.:19:34.

am sure they will want to maintain those links as strongly as they can.

:19:35.:19:39.

Nancy Soderberg I am guessing you will worry about the effects of

:19:40.:19:46.

Brexit, Britain was pulling the UK towards your position? -- pulling

:19:47.:19:52.

the EU to urge position? I think it's a mistake for the UK to pull

:19:53.:19:58.

out of the EU, I think a stronger EU is in everyone's interest. I can

:19:59.:20:03.

guarantee Vladimir Putin is loving this debate about watching Europe

:20:04.:20:08.

fall apart amongst itself over no big issue. I think it's unfortunate,

:20:09.:20:13.

I think it is survivable but it doesn't help put a unified front

:20:14.:20:18.

against Russia when the biggest foreign policy power, the most

:20:19.:20:21.

respected part of the EU, frankly, Leeds. That's not good for anyone.

:20:22.:20:27.

Nancy Soderberg, Sir Tony Brenton, thank you very much.

:20:28.:20:32.

Theresa May has been Prime Minister for over a month now,

:20:33.:20:35.

but it still doesn't feel like we really know

:20:36.:20:37.

Early days, but maybe we have a clue as to her thinking in the fact that

:20:38.:20:42.

on the steps of Downing Street she name-checked Joseph Chamberlain,

:20:43.:20:44.

a politician who helped define modern Conservatism.

:20:45.:20:46.

He wasn't really a Conservative at all.

:20:47.:20:48.

He was a radical and a liberal who built his career by building

:20:49.:20:51.

Lewis Goodall reports on Joseph Chamberlain

:20:52.:20:53.

In 30 years, Birmingham grew into a dirty,

:20:54.:21:00.

The transformation that was to come was more astonishing.

:21:01.:21:11.

Elegant thoroughfares, sewers, clean water,

:21:12.:21:15.

beautiful civic buildings like the law courts

:21:16.:21:17.

One man is responsible for this - Theresa May's new lodestar.

:21:18.:21:27.

You could say that Joseph Chamberlain

:21:28.:21:31.

was Britain's first truly modern political

:21:32.:21:32.

political organiser, someone who was truly transformative.

:21:33.:21:38.

He turned Birmingham from being just a quiet,

:21:39.:21:40.

provincial backwater into one of the most advanced and progressive

:21:41.:21:42.

Joseph Chamberlain became mayor of the city

:21:43.:21:51.

This Victorian chameleon was a radical liberal, a guardian of

:21:52.:21:56.

the working class, and a godfather of municipal conservatism, and he's

:21:57.:22:00.

The political hero of one Nick Timothy, Theresa May's

:22:01.:22:09.

chief of staff and most trusted adviser, is none other than

:22:10.:22:12.

And who should be mentioned in her first policy speech

:22:13.:22:17.

From Robert Peel to Lady Thatcher, from Joseph Chamberlain to Winston

:22:18.:22:22.

Churchill, throughout history, it has been the Conservative Party's

:22:23.:22:26.

role to rise to the occasion and to take on the vested interests before

:22:27.:22:30.

Listen to the kind of language she uses -

:22:31.:22:36.

We don't just believe in individualism

:22:37.:22:39.

We value the role that only the state can play.

:22:40.:22:47.

Chamberlain took the waterworks and gas supply

:22:48.:22:49.

into city ownership and disease fell.

:22:50.:22:53.

This was local nationalisation, and the profits were

:22:54.:22:55.

This was the Civic Gospel, that famous Victorian morality.

:22:56.:23:02.

The Civic Gospel was born of a religious idea.

:23:03.:23:05.

Chamberlain was a Unitarian and a nonconformist.

:23:06.:23:08.

His approach terrified the middle classes of the

:23:09.:23:11.

day, who saw him as a gas and water socialist.

:23:12.:23:14.

We have not the slightest intention of making profit, he said.

:23:15.:23:17.

We shall get our profit in the comfort and health of our

:23:18.:23:20.

I think it was Chamberlain's business sense to take

:23:21.:23:26.

that risk, to see that there was potential that they could gain

:23:27.:23:29.

profit, and that that profit could fund

:23:30.:23:31.

other ventures, such as the

:23:32.:23:35.

building of the museum and art gallery which we are standing in

:23:36.:23:38.

The university is one of Chamberlain's most abiding legacies.

:23:39.:23:49.

It represents the power of civic pride that made

:23:50.:23:52.

Birmingham the first of

:23:53.:23:54.

In the shadow of the old Joe clock tower, Malcolm Dick explains

:23:55.:24:03.

Chamberlain's primary contribution to Conservative history - the appeal

:24:04.:24:05.

We can see him emphasising a social reform

:24:06.:24:10.

strand, at least in as far as linking working-class aspirations,

:24:11.:24:15.

social and economic aspirations, with the state.

:24:16.:24:21.

And a tradition of strong local authorities versus a

:24:22.:24:23.

Chamberlain began life as a liberal, but split over home-rule, founding

:24:24.:24:33.

Then he took them into the Conservative Party.

:24:34.:24:39.

He believed in the union and in

:24:40.:24:40.

policies that appealed to the working class.

:24:41.:24:43.

But Chamberlain was also an avowed imperialist.

:24:44.:24:51.

He was colonial secretary and progenitor of the

:24:52.:24:53.

He wanted the Empire to be a single trade block.

:24:54.:24:58.

He designed Corporation Street, a Parisian-style

:24:59.:25:01.

boulevard running through Birmingham to sell its wares.

:25:02.:25:04.

And the taxes on those goods would be

:25:05.:25:06.

Imperialism was probably his fatal mistake, but a politically

:25:07.:25:13.

He promised better housing, old-age pensions, the

:25:14.:25:21.

minimum wage, to crack down on immigration.

:25:22.:25:24.

things that Theresa May promised the day.

:25:25.:25:29.

It is the only industrial city where the

:25:30.:25:38.

Conservative Party has survived in significant numbers.

:25:39.:25:42.

A strong presence in the council chamber

:25:43.:25:43.

Their local leader relishes a Tory shift

:25:44.:25:49.

I think we will see a focus on an industrial

:25:50.:25:54.

Theresa May talked about the importance of

:25:55.:25:57.

making sure that key industries aren't taken out of the country.

:25:58.:26:01.

And I think we will see some changes on

:26:02.:26:03.

devolution, a speeding up of the devolving

:26:04.:26:05.

strings to allow cities to really make the best deal they can.

:26:06.:26:11.

Theresa May has been in politics for 30

:26:12.:26:14.

years, and Home Secretary for the last six, yet

:26:15.:26:16.

we know surprisingly little about her political beliefs.

:26:17.:26:18.

Chamberlain may well be her lodestar, and if he is, the

:26:19.:26:22.

Conservatives are in for a bit of a shock,

:26:23.:26:24.

strand of conservatism and Conservative thought that would mark

:26:25.:26:29.

the biggest departure for the party since 1979.

:26:30.:26:36.

Churchill said of Chamberlain that he was a politician

:26:37.:26:39.

If Theresa May is serious in reawakening this

:26:40.:26:45.

strand of thinking, she may well yet manage the same.

:26:46.:26:52.

Back to the Olympics now, and time to join one of the country's

:26:53.:26:56.

Not Stephen Smith, needless to say, but the evergreen former Olympics

:26:57.:27:00.

and Match of the Day commentator, Barry Davies.

:27:01.:27:10.

Will Stephen Smith complete his Olympic marathon?

:27:11.:27:17.

Oh, you can really feel it in the pelotons.

:27:18.:27:26.

Just getting into the spirit after Jason Kenny and Laura Trott,

:27:27.:27:32.

It was for me, I didn't get off the couch until four.

:27:33.:27:39.

I must say it's an absolute treat to have a proper

:27:40.:27:47.

I think it's exhilarating stuff, we're doing far better

:27:48.:27:51.

I wonder if I'm really setting the right tone sitting on a sofa

:27:52.:27:57.

Is this what Lord Reith had in mind when he began sports coverage?

:27:58.:28:06.

COMMENTATOR: Into the finishing straight, Jason Kenny has got this

:28:07.:28:08.

and Jason Kenny wins the gold medal for the second time!

:28:09.:28:11.

You half expect the lead guy to throw some tacks over

:28:12.:28:13.

COMMENTATOR: It is gold medal number five.

:28:14.:28:16.

And Max Whitlock has gone ahead of Louis Smith.

:28:17.:28:24.

Do these guys basically dislike each other?

:28:25.:28:27.

They can't help but be sore and jealous if things don't

:28:28.:28:30.

I mean, I know the Americans like to say we are only

:28:31.:28:48.

going for gold but if you get a medal you have done darn well.

:28:49.:28:53.

The contrast this summer between the Olympians

:28:54.:28:57.

with the performance of the England team at Euro 2016.

:28:58.:29:02.

The major difference is that these guys, certainly

:29:03.:29:05.

in their first Olympics, have to do something

:29:06.:29:07.

They are not making money at an early stage of their lives.

:29:08.:29:14.

Some young footballers are making a lot of money for their potential,

:29:15.:29:17.

Can you remember some Olympic moment, maybe you had an iffy tummy,

:29:18.:29:29.

I did an Olympic Games, doing the opening

:29:30.:29:35.

By making sure you are prepared for the disaster.

:29:36.:29:45.

Do you wish you were out there this time?

:29:46.:29:54.

Talking to you is worth probably a copper.

:29:55.:30:02.

It's always good to see a sportsman working hard.

:30:03.:30:12.

At the height of his game, yeah.

:30:13.:30:14.

But if you're an older viewer and you have a funny feeling

:30:15.:30:26.

that the Olympic women's gymnastics are a little bit more...

:30:27.:30:29.

Well, more everything than you remember from your youth,

:30:30.:30:31.

we leave you with this rather clever comparison made by the music channel

:30:32.:30:34.

MTV which suggests that you're absolutely right.

:30:35.:30:37.

Hello. After a day in which we saw sunny skies from Shetland to the

:30:38.:31:29.

Channel Islands, a fine start to Tuesday morning. Things will be on

:31:30.:31:34.

the cool side in the countryside but quickly warming up as blue skies for

:31:35.:31:39.

most of the day, some cloud towards eastern coasts. For most, sunny

:31:40.:31:43.

skies throughout. Northern is

:31:44.:31:44.

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