28/07/2017 Newsnight


28/07/2017

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines. With Kirsty Wark.


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To be deemed safe, cladding systems are meant to survive

:00:07.:00:09.

Today, we learned Grenfell's lasted just nine.

:00:10.:00:18.

82 other buildings use a design that's similar

:00:19.:00:20.

Also tonight, we're used to being on the wing

:00:21.:00:25.

to Europe in our millions, but when we leave the EU, will we be

:00:26.:00:28.

forced to go into reverse, or even be grounded?

:00:29.:00:36.

If we do not have a transitional arrangement and if we are not a

:00:37.:00:43.

member of the EU as part of that transitional arrangement, then we

:00:44.:00:44.

have chaos. And ahead of tomorrow's first-ever

:00:45.:00:46.

Relaxed Prom for people with learning difficulties

:00:47.:00:48.

and sensory impairments, MUSIC: Flight of the Bumblebee

:00:49.:00:50.

by Rimsky-Korsakov In the six weeks since

:00:51.:01:11.

the fire that turned Grenfell Tower into a tinderbox

:01:12.:01:17.

and killed at least 80 people and injured almost as many again,

:01:18.:01:21.

there have been a variety of tests on the insulation and cladding

:01:22.:01:24.

of other buildings. There have been evacuations

:01:25.:01:27.

from high-rises, and remedial work carried out in buildings

:01:28.:01:30.

all over the country. But today the government revealed

:01:31.:01:33.

that the fire test on exactly the combination used

:01:34.:01:37.

in Grenfell Tower Cladding meant to resist

:01:38.:01:38.

fire for 40 minutes, in the test, burned

:01:39.:01:48.

in just nine minutes. There are also 82

:01:49.:01:51.

buildings with cladding Here's our policy

:01:52.:02:03.

editor Chris Cook. Over the past weeks what the

:02:04.:02:13.

government has been doing is not testing cladding, but auditing

:02:14.:02:17.

cladding and when we hear about hundreds of buildings failing tests

:02:18.:02:20.

it means the government has ascertained they are buildings where

:02:21.:02:23.

they need to work out whether they are dangerous because the thing to

:02:24.:02:28.

know, you might have non-combustible material on the side of the building

:02:29.:02:32.

that it can be safely used in combination with the right materials

:02:33.:02:36.

and so the government is running six huge tests where it will mock-up

:02:37.:02:41.

designs with different combinations of cladding and it works out which

:02:42.:02:49.

are safe and we started today with a combination used at Grenfell.

:02:50.:02:53.

We thought we knew what happened at Grenfell. The importance of doing

:02:54.:02:58.

the test on Grenfell, which was not safe, we ascertained in laboratory

:02:59.:03:03.

conditions it did not work. It tells us 82 other buildings with similar

:03:04.:03:09.

designs are flawed. 37 of them privately owned. It tells us it is

:03:10.:03:17.

implausible that a developer could, following the letter of the law,

:03:18.:03:22.

could have got the stuff through under the building regulations. We

:03:23.:03:24.

made a film to help you understand more about the test.

:03:25.:03:26.

Tbe only way to test the fire safety of a cladding design properly

:03:27.:03:30.

is to rig up your design and then try to set fire to it.

:03:31.:03:34.

Last week, Newsnight was permitted to film preparations for such a test

:03:35.:03:40.

on cladding like that used at Grenfell Tower.

:03:41.:03:42.

So plastic foam insulation on the inside, aluminium panels

:03:43.:03:47.

We visited before the aluminium panels had been put up.

:03:48.:03:51.

So what's underneath those aluminium panels?

:03:52.:03:55.

Well, first of all, the stuff under the foil here,

:03:56.:03:57.

In this case, so-called PIR insulation.

:03:58.:04:01.

It's a plastic foam, it's the kind of stuff

:04:02.:04:03.

Now, importantly, this stuff here, this yellow stuff, that's

:04:04.:04:08.

It's supposed to stop the fire from going horizontally

:04:09.:04:13.

These black strips here, those are intumescent

:04:14.:04:18.

What happens with these is that if there is a fire

:04:19.:04:23.

in this bit of insulation, they will heat up, expand

:04:24.:04:26.

and they will stop the fire from going up the building.

:04:27.:04:28.

But the thing is, both the horizontal firebreak

:04:29.:04:32.

and the vertical firebreak rely on the aluminium cladding

:04:33.:04:35.

on the outside, because otherwise the fire can just go around them.

:04:36.:04:40.

This really is a system that's being tested, not just a group

:04:41.:04:43.

Well, we weren't allowed anywhere near and the government hasn't

:04:44.:04:52.

So here's a graph showing the temperature measured by one

:04:53.:04:58.

instrument in the cladding as the test wore on.

:04:59.:05:00.

At three minutes, the scientists noted...

:05:01.:05:02.

The colour of the panels has changed from white to dark grey.

:05:03.:05:05.

Sporadic flaming from the top of the rig.

:05:06.:05:16.

Flaming several metres beyond the top of the rig.

:05:17.:05:20.

To pass this test, the rig is supposed to last

:05:21.:05:24.

This result implies the design, not poor insulation or bad luck,

:05:25.:05:38.

This result implies the design, not poor installation or bad luck,

:05:39.:05:40.

These materials didn't meet the required standards

:05:41.:05:44.

How this design got signed off is a critical question

:05:45.:05:47.

and not just at Grenfell - also in the 82 buildings that have

:05:48.:05:50.

been told that this test means their cladding

:05:51.:05:52.

Within the past few minutes, President Trump has announced

:05:53.:05:59.

on Twitter that he has appointed a new White House chief of staff.

:06:00.:06:02.

He's the former secretary of homeland security, John F Kelly.

:06:03.:06:07.

It's not clear whether Mr Kelly's predecessor, Reince Preibus,

:06:08.:06:11.

It's not clear whether Mr Kelly's predecessor, Reince Priebus,

:06:12.:06:13.

This follows the apparent failure last night of Republican attempts

:06:14.:06:24.

Joining me to unpack all this is Politico's Daniel Lippman.

:06:25.:06:32.

Good evening, within the last few minutes, CNN reports that Reince

:06:33.:06:39.

Priebus resigned privately yesterday. What do you know about

:06:40.:06:44.

what has been happening? There are conflicting reports on that. Sources

:06:45.:06:51.

close to Reince Priebus said he resigned in the White House sources

:06:52.:06:55.

said he was fired today. He was seen on Air Force One travelling with the

:06:56.:06:58.

president today and we do not know what happened. The broader issue is

:06:59.:07:06.

that this underscores that the White House chaos in the west wing has

:07:07.:07:12.

continued. Reince Priebus, his leaving the White House is not going

:07:13.:07:18.

to stop that. He was not the biggest problem in the White House. Let's

:07:19.:07:25.

talk about Priebus. He was the Republicans' point man. An insider,

:07:26.:07:32.

Republican insider in this slightly strange west wing we have now and

:07:33.:07:36.

Donald Trump has edged him out. Was there any question it was to do with

:07:37.:07:41.

the failure to get the affordable care vote repeals last night, which

:07:42.:07:48.

Priebus was tasked with doing? Even before the health care failure last

:07:49.:07:53.

night, Reince Priebus was on thin ice, because the President's

:07:54.:08:01.

advisers, in his family, they were not happy with his performance.

:08:02.:08:06.

Reince Priebus has promised to be an establishment figure who could get

:08:07.:08:11.

Capitol Hill to follow what Trump wanted and even if the health care

:08:12.:08:15.

bill had passed, Reince Priebus would still probably be out of his

:08:16.:08:21.

job. I think Reince Priebus did not perform to heroin's expectations

:08:22.:08:25.

because it is hard to manage a White House like the one President Trump

:08:26.:08:30.

has. We have a situation where it might look like Steve Bannon has won

:08:31.:08:35.

but Anthony Scaramucci is coruscating about Steve Bannon, who

:08:36.:08:42.

according to the New Yorker had an extraordinary conversation with

:08:43.:08:45.

expletives and denigrating things to say about Priebus. Reince Priebus

:08:46.:08:54.

never fully meshed with Trump and Scaramucci is kind of a mini Trump.

:08:55.:09:01.

And is... He has been told by people close to him to quiet down his

:09:02.:09:06.

media, because generally as communications director for the

:09:07.:09:10.

White House, you are not supposed to publicly trash fellow advisers and

:09:11.:09:17.

colleagues at work. Scaramucci was the whole story this week and Trump

:09:18.:09:22.

does not like being supplanted as the number one media celebrity in

:09:23.:09:28.

politics in DC. I think Steve Bannon is safer the White House, he will

:09:29.:09:33.

not get fired or resign because he has a closer relationship with the

:09:34.:09:36.

president the Reince Priebus ever had. Thanks.

:09:37.:09:38.

Since we joined the EU, we have enjoyed pretty much unfettered air

:09:39.:09:41.

travel to European Union destinations - give or take

:09:42.:09:43.

In fact, the Office of National Statistics reported that,

:09:44.:09:47.

last year, there was a record total of 14.7 million visits to Spain

:09:48.:09:51.

alone by UK residents - the vast majority of

:09:52.:09:54.

But when we exit the EU, if we leave the European

:09:55.:09:57.

industry and safety bodies - as seems to be the plan -

:09:58.:10:01.

Here's our business editor Helen Thomas.

:10:02.:10:13.

For decades, we've been taking flight to an ever-increasing

:10:14.:10:15.

But as we migrate towards Brexit, there are warnings

:10:16.:10:19.

If we're not careful, could we find ourselves, well, flightless?

:10:20.:10:32.

Ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon, it's a great

:10:33.:10:34.

The boss of Ryanair has been vocal about the risks to our getaways.

:10:35.:10:41.

There is a real prospect and we need to deal with this,

:10:42.:10:43.

that there is going to be no flights between the UK and Europe

:10:44.:10:49.

for a period of weeks, months, beyond March 2019.

:10:50.:10:52.

He wants the UK to stay in Europe's existing open skies agreement that

:10:53.:10:55.

He says we're running out of time to negotiate an alternative.

:10:56.:11:03.

The industry that makes the planes has its worries, too.

:11:04.:11:06.

Aeromet manufactures 45,000 fuel connectors for Airbus each year.

:11:07.:11:14.

From here in Rochester they go to Wales to become part of wings,

:11:15.:11:17.

then on to Toulouse, where the planes are assembled.

:11:18.:11:21.

The aerospace industry has some familiar concerns.

:11:22.:11:25.

It wants hassle-free trade with no tariffs or delays for complex

:11:26.:11:28.

But, there is a more fundamental problem.

:11:29.:11:38.

The safety regime that underpins everything

:11:39.:11:42.

from parts to planes, to pilots to maintenance,

:11:43.:11:44.

And that has the potential to ground the industry.

:11:45.:11:52.

That safety regime is the work of the European Aviation Safety Agency.

:11:53.:11:58.

The boss of the UK's aerospace industry body says it's

:11:59.:12:00.

We are very clear that we wish to remain a member of

:12:01.:12:07.

the European Aviation Safety Agency and we don't believe

:12:08.:12:13.

that there is a viable alternative that can be up and running

:12:14.:12:17.

ADS reckons it could take five to ten years and 300 extra

:12:18.:12:28.

staff to equip the UK's Civil Aviation Authority

:12:29.:12:30.

And we may still need a transition period where we stay very

:12:31.:12:35.

When we cease to be an EU member, we need to have in place a whole

:12:36.:12:42.

So, for us, the transition period is important and it's important that

:12:43.:12:47.

during that period we remain an EU member.

:12:48.:12:54.

Really, it's about providing our international colleagues,

:12:55.:12:57.

particularly the US, with confidence that

:12:58.:13:01.

the new regulatory regime that we are going to operate

:13:02.:13:03.

is capable of meeting the high safety and security

:13:04.:13:05.

The challenge is we don't know what that is going to look like.

:13:06.:13:12.

So how complicated is it to secure our freedom to fly?

:13:13.:13:17.

Countries like Norway or Switzerland are part

:13:18.:13:19.

of the European safety agency, but outside the EU.

:13:20.:13:24.

But they also have bilateral agreements with places like the US.

:13:25.:13:30.

Without a safety regime that is recognised by the rest

:13:31.:13:33.

of the world, the UK could find itself left on the ground.

:13:34.:13:39.

This isn't just general griping about the cost

:13:40.:13:41.

and disruption of Brexit, it's a very specific problem.

:13:42.:13:46.

And it's not one that can be sold just by the UK and Europe.

:13:47.:13:50.

It requires input from regulators around the world.

:13:51.:13:54.

By some estimates, that work could take 18 months to make sure

:13:55.:13:58.

that we can keep flying after departure from the EU.

:13:59.:14:03.

And that's even if we stay part of the European safety body.

:14:04.:14:07.

The clock is most definitely ticking.

:14:08.:14:19.

The head of America's Federal aviation administration said in June

:14:20.:14:22.

that discussions with the UK Government had started,

:14:23.:14:24.

but he added they were complicated and time-consuming

:14:25.:14:26.

It is important to keep these time constraints in mind and to not get

:14:27.:14:38.

sidetracked into an uncomfortable situation in which a missed

:14:39.:14:40.

deadline results in an interruption of service.

:14:41.:14:41.

Sticking with the European regulator should make these

:14:42.:14:45.

but staying a member of the European safety agency

:14:46.:14:56.

The main issue is the financial contribution that would

:14:57.:15:01.

still need to be made within and into a European establishment.

:15:02.:15:04.

It is also the issue of oversight of the outer

:15:05.:15:06.

framework and the rules, which currently sits with other

:15:07.:15:09.

European institutions and predominantly the ECJ.

:15:10.:15:10.

This is where aerospace's problems start to sound familiar again.

:15:11.:15:25.

with European Court of Justice oversight,

:15:26.:15:31.

a respected European rule book that actually UK

:15:32.:15:33.

expertise has played a substantial part in devising,

:15:34.:15:35.

and a deadline to figure out what might or could take its place.

:15:36.:15:38.

If we don't have a transitional arrangement, and if we aren't

:15:39.:15:41.

a member of the EU as part of that transitional arrangement,

:15:42.:15:44.

then we have chaos, because we don't have a system to ensure

:15:45.:15:46.

that our products are safe and secure to fly and a regime

:15:47.:15:49.

that is acknowledged around the world.

:15:50.:15:51.

I'm joined now by MEP Jacqueline Foster and by

:15:52.:16:12.

Good evening to the both of you. Jacqueline, how can we be part of

:16:13.:16:32.

the open skies regime after we exit the EU, when it is overseen by the

:16:33.:16:35.

European Court of Justice and Theresa May has made it clear she

:16:36.:16:38.

did not want to be incumbent by any ruling from the ECJ. Two separate

:16:39.:16:46.

issues here, open skies are service agreements, what the piece was about

:16:47.:16:51.

was twofold, it was about the role of the European aviation safety

:16:52.:16:55.

agency, and how we comply with the rules that are laid down there, and

:16:56.:16:59.

when we certify the goods from the aerospace manufacturers. And open

:17:00.:17:04.

skies, where we look at the airlines, is about the arrangements

:17:05.:17:09.

we will have with countries, dearly for traffic flight, to fly from the

:17:10.:17:13.

UK, both into Europe and obviously to other countries around the world.

:17:14.:17:18.

Yes, two separate things, but open skies, open skies are governed by

:17:19.:17:25.

the European Court of Justice, and so therefore, we are in a situation

:17:26.:17:29.

where Theresa May says we will not be involved in it, you have two of

:17:30.:17:33.

I'd buy that to be part of the open skies policy. No, I think you are

:17:34.:17:40.

wrong here, we are talking about service agreements, and the European

:17:41.:17:45.

Court of Justice, the reference to the European Court of Justice, is

:17:46.:17:48.

when we are talking about compliance to the European aviation safety

:17:49.:17:52.

agency, which does not deal with air service agreements and open skies.

:17:53.:17:55.

These are two different things. They are separate bodies. The European

:17:56.:18:02.

aviation safety agency is one thing, but the open skies policy, your

:18:03.:18:05.

understanding is that it comes under the ECJ. I take everything back to

:18:06.:18:11.

the customer, the customer need safe aviation and the customer needs

:18:12.:18:16.

competitive aviation, and dynamic growth of networks in Europe, which

:18:17.:18:20.

is what 40 years of being involved in Europe has done, brought together

:18:21.:18:23.

those two elements so that they are not separate. Will be part of open

:18:24.:18:31.

skies, when we exit the EU? If there was a plan, I would be delighted to

:18:32.:18:35.

be involved in it, post-election it seems the Department for Transport

:18:36.:18:38.

has largely closed down communication with organisations

:18:39.:18:43.

like ERAA in order to have discussions about where you are

:18:44.:18:48.

going, the only doors for discussion open appear to be doors in Brussels.

:18:49.:18:54.

We will not automatically be a member of the safety agency, after

:18:55.:18:58.

EU exit, is that correct? That is my understanding and that is the

:18:59.:19:02.

understanding of the airlines as well. But it is inevitably's

:19:03.:19:06.

interests. I have got to challenge him on the is making. It is in

:19:07.:19:12.

everybody's interests to carry on as tariff free as possible, lots of

:19:13.:19:15.

other European countries want it to happen, it is not a case of what

:19:16.:19:20.

them wanting to lock us out. We have had 260 million journeys last year,

:19:21.:19:24.

which depend upon this freedom and liberalisation. At the same time,

:19:25.:19:29.

you have got to recognise that the number of seats that the UK has in

:19:30.:19:34.

Europe are around 12% of the total. There is an 88% that can get on with

:19:35.:19:38.

its business. Can I put it to you, Jacqueline Foster, we are not

:19:39.:19:46.

automatically going to be part of the European safety agency. I

:19:47.:19:51.

disagree, we will remain part of it, because we are not looking to form

:19:52.:19:56.

some other agency, there are other countries who are part of that

:19:57.:20:00.

agency, compliant with it, not members of the European Union...

:20:01.:20:07.

Norway... The fact that we manufactured goods here, the wings

:20:08.:20:10.

for a bus, Rolls-Royce engines, there will not be a tariff issue

:20:11.:20:13.

either, and those goods will continue to be certified in the

:20:14.:20:17.

European aviation safety agency. When we come to the open skies, I am

:20:18.:20:24.

afraid your other guest is extremely negative, what we need to do, what

:20:25.:20:28.

we clearly need to do, because we will not be part of the EU in terms

:20:29.:20:34.

of open skies, we need to have an arrangement, UK EU, then we will

:20:35.:20:38.

revert back to bilaterals when we are looking at the United States, or

:20:39.:20:43.

being part of an open skies agreement. We have had bilateral and

:20:44.:20:48.

multilateral agreements since 1944, under the Chicago Convention, and

:20:49.:20:52.

therefore, with political will, and there is a lot of discussion, I have

:20:53.:20:58.

to take on board and challenge the comments your guest has made,

:20:59.:21:01.

discussions have been taking place, with people like me, I am a

:21:02.:21:06.

transport spokesman, I specialise in this area, the commission want a

:21:07.:21:13.

transition, the ministers want a smooth transition, politicians want

:21:14.:21:18.

a smooth transition. My guest in the studio here in London... Speed is of

:21:19.:21:24.

the essence. The airline vote with their feet, last week, easyJet has

:21:25.:21:31.

registered, taken of the UK AOC 100 plus aeroplanes, and put them in and

:21:32.:21:35.

AOC in Austria, they are not waiting for government decisions, they are

:21:36.:21:45.

deciding to move business to Europe. -- an AOC.

:21:46.:21:51.

All week there have been celebrations and commemorations

:21:52.:21:52.

of the moment 50 years ago when the Sexual Offences Act

:21:53.:21:55.

decriminalised homosexual acts in private between consenting

:21:56.:21:57.

What it wasn't was full emancipation, or a magic bullet

:21:58.:22:01.

that changed attitudes, prejudices and created

:22:02.:22:02.

That has been a slower and, for many, a painful journey.

:22:03.:22:06.

Now, LGBT people are more comfortable in their skin.

:22:07.:22:08.

But to say that homophobia doesn't exist, or that there is

:22:09.:22:11.

discrimination below the surface would be wrong.

:22:12.:22:13.

Matthew Todd, the former editor of Attitude magazine, brought

:22:14.:22:18.

out his book Straight Jacket: How to be Gay and Happy

:22:19.:22:20.

This is his film for Newsnight about the mental health issues

:22:21.:22:24.

he says are still crippling too many LGBT people.

:22:25.:22:38.

VOICEOVER: Decriminalisation, adoption rights, equal marriage,

:22:39.:22:45.

Britain's LGBT community has come a long way over the past 50 years.

:22:46.:22:54.

But, despite this, LGBT people still suffer with higher levels of

:22:55.:22:59.

depression, anxiety, addictions and suicide, I know, because I am one of

:23:00.:23:03.

them. Soho used to be a place I would come to to get out of my head.

:23:04.:23:08.

Today, in recovery, I am more likely to be here, sipping a cup of herbal

:23:09.:23:14.

tea. Why is it that so many LGBT people suffer with mental health

:23:15.:23:20.

problems? In my experience, these problems are never far away. Rob God

:23:21.:23:26.

was a man I worked with briefly at Attitude magazine, in 2013, aged 34,

:23:27.:23:32.

he took his own life. -- Rob Goddard. He was massively

:23:33.:23:42.

gregarious, he was a central part of every social situation. He had

:23:43.:23:48.

thousands of friends. With those real highs, came the very big lows,

:23:49.:23:57.

as well. He partied quite heavily, he did recreational drugs, he found

:23:58.:24:01.

a cert in utopia within that environment, he could just be

:24:02.:24:06.

himself and nobody would care. -- certain utopia. You said he was not

:24:07.:24:09.

happy being gay. He was fiercely proud of being gay, he never hid it,

:24:10.:24:16.

at all. Not from anyone, did he. But I think that had a negative effect

:24:17.:24:21.

on him. I remember a time when he was sat at the back of a bus, early

:24:22.:24:25.

hours of the morning, with his boyfriend at the time, his head on

:24:26.:24:29.

his shoulder, back from a club, something like that, on the bus, on

:24:30.:24:34.

the way home, laid his head against his shoulder, and he was beaten up

:24:35.:24:39.

for it. He asked the driver of the bus to step in, the driver of the

:24:40.:24:45.

bus was very negative towards him. And kind of... Essentially said, if

:24:46.:24:50.

you put yourself into this position, by being outwardly gay, then you

:24:51.:24:54.

deserve what you get. Just months before he died, Rob had a psychotic

:24:55.:25:00.

episode after ingesting window cleaner and other substances, he

:25:01.:25:08.

ended up breaking his own leg. He was smashing his leg against the

:25:09.:25:11.

wall, there was blood everywhere, he was in hospital for a while, I did

:25:12.:25:19.

go to see him. And he was so sorry at what had happened. He said it was

:25:20.:25:25.

the drugs, he said that it was like fighting an army. In the bedroom.

:25:26.:25:32.

Powerful drugs like crystal meth and JBL are increasingly popular in the

:25:33.:25:38.

gay male community. The only LGBT specific drugs and alcohol service,

:25:39.:25:42.

capital at antidote, has seen a big rise in people seeking help. -- GBL.

:25:43.:25:46.

Some people would say, they are using drugs, no big deal, not the

:25:47.:25:52.

end of the world, but it can destroy lives. Lost relationships, lost

:25:53.:25:58.

homes, lost jobs, not those people, it has a devastating effect on

:25:59.:26:02.

people's mental health, I think it is important we start looking at

:26:03.:26:05.

some of those underlying issues that, you know, that people are

:26:06.:26:14.

using drugs. Low self-esteem, the feeling of not being good enough.

:26:15.:26:21.

The loneliness and isolation, as well, that some people can feel.

:26:22.:26:26.

Young people still struggle, staggeringly, Stonewall recently

:26:27.:26:30.

found that nearly half of young trans people have attempted suicide.

:26:31.:26:35.

Amy, a 19-year-old from Coventry, was bullied to the point where she

:26:36.:26:40.

considered taking her own life. Started off with low-level verbal

:26:41.:26:44.

comments, and then the physical bullying. I was being pushed around,

:26:45.:26:50.

I was having things thrown at me, because of my gender identity.

:26:51.:26:56.

Things thrown at me, books, pens, rulers... This behaviour and

:26:57.:27:03.

bullying was affecting me, and it was not being tackled by the

:27:04.:27:10.

teacher, and that legitimised it, it gave them the power to do the

:27:11.:27:14.

actions, we will not get in trouble for it. Legitimised it in my head.

:27:15.:27:19.

If this is happening and it is not being tackled, then maybe I am not

:27:20.:27:25.

worth this, maybe I am a lover person. If I could just end it, I

:27:26.:27:33.

thought, then I would not be able -- would not have to put up with the

:27:34.:27:36.

abuse and the bullying, it would stop full and if that was the only

:27:37.:27:41.

thing that I could do to get it to stop, that was the only thing left,

:27:42.:27:47.

I felt like I could control it. Good evening, and welcome. Talking is

:27:48.:27:51.

something we have not done enough of, a change of scene is a monthly

:27:52.:27:54.

discussion group for gay and bisexual men to share life

:27:55.:27:58.

experiences, often for the first time. You need to be out and proud

:27:59.:28:03.

and happy, look how fabulous we are, we go out and we have fun. -- A

:28:04.:28:08.

Change of Scene. There is an image, a general image, within the gay

:28:09.:28:16.

community, that we feel we have two project. You may ridicule gay men,

:28:17.:28:23.

but you cannot would it kill my lifestyle... I feel I need to show

:28:24.:28:27.

something that I am OK to be me, but of course, for me to actually make

:28:28.:28:36.

so much effort to do that, deep down, of course, there is

:28:37.:28:39.

insecurity. I don't feel like we have moved beyond the position of

:28:40.:28:44.

defending our right to exist yet, my experience as a gay man is very much

:28:45.:28:48.

about proving my right to be who I am, now, still, before having the

:28:49.:28:55.

luxury to reflect on how I can be a healthy, joyous version of that.

:28:56.:28:59.

APPLAUSE This is not just a gay issue, when

:29:00.:29:04.

society fails to support LGBT children, whole families are

:29:05.:29:08.

devastated, it is time that we all woke up to this mental health

:29:09.:29:09.

crisis. We're in the midst of Prom season

:29:10.:29:15.

and tomorrow there's a new treat, It's a concert created for children

:29:16.:29:20.

and adults with autism and learning disabilities,

:29:21.:29:24.

and others with sensory impairments. Eva Stewart, piccolo player

:29:25.:29:27.

for the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, is here to perform

:29:28.:29:29.

the Flight of the Bumblebee. But she's saving her costume

:29:30.:29:52.

for tomorrow(!) MUSIC: Flight of the Bumblebee

:29:53.:29:54.

by Rimsky-Korsakov Hello, again, really is going to be

:29:55.:31:00.

a mixed bag this weekend, overnight rain in England and Wales moving

:31:01.:31:03.

through the English Channel by the morning, starting to push north

:31:04.:31:06.

again, into southern parts of England and Wales, especially

:31:07.:31:09.

through the afternoon, sleight of dry weather with sunshine and one or

:31:10.:31:11.

two

:31:12.:31:12.

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