29/08/2017 Newsnight


29/08/2017

Emily Maitlis presents in-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines.


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Transcript


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This programme contains some strong language.

:00:00.:00:00.

Tonight, the strongest hurricane to hit the US for thirteen years.

:00:07.:00:09.

And it's also a test for their president.

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As thousands evacuate their homes amid rising floodwaters,

:00:12.:00:14.

Donald Trump makes landfall in Texas.

:00:15.:00:19.

Nobody's ever seen anything like this.

:00:20.:00:25.

Gabriel Gatehouse has followed one family -

:00:26.:00:31.

As they try to evacuate the most vulnerable from the middle of the

:00:32.:00:38.

floods. We were in evacuating patients for around three hours.

:00:39.:00:41.

And we ask the Texan National Guard what measures are being put in place

:00:42.:00:44.

The PM has defended her foreign secretary.

:00:45.:00:48.

I've spoken to one figure who said that working with Boris Johnson

:00:49.:00:54.

is like walking a few feet behind a horse shovelling its shit.

:00:55.:01:02.

As Japan awakes to nuclear sirens, we look at the country's complicated

:01:03.:01:05.

Will America rush to defend it now in its hour of need?

:01:06.:01:11.

The Japanese embassy's gates open in Washington after almost ten years

:01:12.:01:14.

and the key is handed to Mr Takeuchi and once again the flag

:01:15.:01:17.

of the rising sun flies as Japan re-enters the community

:01:18.:01:20.

And they call it whitewashing - white actors have been playing

:01:21.:01:27.

ethnically diverse roles to please Hollywood for a long time.

:01:28.:01:30.

But is it what the audiences really want?

:01:31.:01:45.

Response to natural disaster can make

:01:46.:01:47.

The shadow of Katrina in 2005 loomed large over the remaining years

:01:48.:01:56.

His slowness then spoke not just of incompetency - but of priority -

:01:57.:02:00.

a failure to help the poor and the black communities whose

:02:01.:02:02.

President Trump may or may not have studied the lessons of Katrina.

:02:03.:02:08.

But when he landed at Corpus Christie this evening,

:02:09.:02:12.

There was no talk of ratings, no attempt to re-live the electoral

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He sounded like a man who didn't want to speak too soon -

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We'll congratulate each other when it's all finished.

:02:24.:02:35.

The rising floodwater of Houston has left thirty thousand seeking

:02:36.:02:40.

emergency accommodation - another 40 centimetres of rainwater

:02:41.:02:42.

And the fear is that the risk of flood may now

:02:43.:02:48.

stretch to Louisiana - even Mississippi.

:02:49.:02:50.

Gabriel Gatehouse is in Texas for us - what's the latest?

:02:51.:03:02.

Emily, this is the sixth day in a row that Houston has been consumed

:03:03.:03:09.

by Harvey. The rain has abated a little bit but it is still spitting

:03:10.:03:13.

and raining hard elsewhere and as you can see behind me the rivers are

:03:14.:03:18.

still rising. We are expecting the rain to stay over Houston until

:03:19.:03:23.

tomorrow and then move on to Louisiana. This is a record for

:03:24.:03:28.

rainfall from a single cyclone in the continental United States ever.

:03:29.:03:33.

Some places already recorded 50 inches and they are expecting more.

:03:34.:03:35.

A Lebanese South West of Houston has been breached and

:03:36.:04:01.

residents were told to get out immediately and there have been

:04:02.:04:02.

other mandatory evacuations which have been made difficult by the

:04:03.:04:05.

conditions on the roads which we saw ourselves, they are often flooded.

:04:06.:04:07.

Texan authorities have said at least 13 people have been killed including

:04:08.:04:10.

a policeman who was killed while driving to work. The biggest

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challenge is the sheer number of people who need evacuating. We

:04:13.:04:14.

reached here last night and ever since then we have been watching

:04:15.:04:15.

those rescue operations in action. The rescue efforts continue day and

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night. The highways are a good place to be, out of the water. Out of the

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darkness, they bring another boatload of people. They are

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evacuating an old peoples home, just the last few elderly residents to go

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now and the rest of the staff. We are going to take you back off this

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thing and put you back on the ship. They have seen floods before, but

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not like this. These are some of the those fragile people, uprooted in

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the dead of night, in the cold and the wet. Still, this is Texas.

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People are strong and mostly cheerful. We waiting long? I am one

:05:00.:05:08.

of the nurses, we were evacuating patients for three hours. It sounds

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scary. It is fine, we were coordinated and got the patience out

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and now we are safe and everyone is fine. Daybreak reveals more deluged

:05:17.:05:23.

neighbourhoods. Thousands of people had already fled their homes before

:05:24.:05:27.

the waters rose, but many stayed put. What was it like watching the

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waters rise? It was the scariest thing we have ever seen. Just, there

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are no words for it. This is just devastating for everyone, it is so

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sad for everybody. You know. You going to be all right now? Yeah. And

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all the family is OK. Yes, sir. So, an amateur flotilla has come to get

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them. Boat owners from across Texas and beyond. Some have been called

:06:00.:06:04.

out on a specific mission. Where are you going? We are trying to get some

:06:05.:06:10.

elderly men who cannot walk. We're trying to get to him. Is he a

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personal family member? My daughter is a schoolteacher. It is the family

:06:15.:06:21.

of one of her students. It seems that the water is still rising. So

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many people have to get out and I hope everyone is listening. It is

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not one -- weather, your property is not worth it, your family is the

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only thing that is worth it. Others are working as very men. Get ready

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to hop on. Spending hours in the water taking complete strangers

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across particularly deep and treacherous stretches. It is further

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up. It is difficult work with hidden debris submerged beneath street

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turned into torrents. The rain is carrying on, the water levels are

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rising and these streets have now got crazy Cross currents that we

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have to speed across in order not to get swept sideways. As the waters

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continue to rise, the authorities have been swamped by calls for help,

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hence the community effort, with all manner of craft, jet skis,

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inflatables, even a paddle boards. Hurricane Hardy reveals Texans are

:07:21.:07:37.

the most resilient. This man in his kayak not fleeing home, just off to

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do some shopping. You're going to get gas and then going back? Yes. We

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need gas. Brave business. You don't want to evacuate? No, we need gas

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and some more but -- food. Even as the waters advance, it is not easy

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to leave your home. We heard some people screaming, from our

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neighbourhood. We were woken up by the screams of people who were

:08:06.:08:09.

trying to get out because they got stuck. His street may have turned

:08:10.:08:13.

into a river, but this man will take his chances for now. We did not know

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if they were going to open the dam, but I am not sure and then we

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thought the water was going to come into the house and I don't know, we

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woke up and we saw the water was down a little and we were happy. In

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these politically turbulent times, America can seem desperately

:08:38.:08:41.

divided. The disunited States. But it does not they like that here in

:08:42.:08:45.

Houston, as people help each other through this crisis. Let us go back

:08:46.:08:53.

to Gabriel. It is hard to tell on the individual level, but does it

:08:54.:08:56.

feel like crisis on the same sort of scale as Katrina? Not at the moment.

:08:57.:09:07.

Even though an anniversary just past of Katrina in 2005, I think this

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feels different. For one thing, we have only had 13 people killed,

:09:13.:09:18.

reportedly so far, Katrina had over 1800. Whether that was something to

:09:19.:09:21.

do with infrastructure or to do with the fact that the authorities have

:09:22.:09:26.

learned from it. There was some criticism that the mayor of Houston

:09:27.:09:29.

did not order a more general evacuation and I think people have

:09:30.:09:33.

pushed back from that and what we are seeing is that this has been

:09:34.:09:37.

quite well dealt with by the authorities, as we can see from the

:09:38.:09:41.

relatively low numbers of casualties. Obviously, still very

:09:42.:09:45.

big, but relatively low compared to Katrina. Then there is the political

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element. You mentioned Donald Trump being very restrained and guarded in

:09:50.:09:54.

what he said. He said when he came to Corpus

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Christi where Hurricane Harvey first made landfall, he said we want to do

:10:07.:10:10.

this better than before and this suggest that he has Katrina in his

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mind and he wants to do a better job. We should say that hurricanes

:10:14.:10:15.

are unpredictable, this is early days, this President is also

:10:16.:10:17.

unpredictable, so let's watch him. Thank you. We are joined now by

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Colonel Steven Metze from the Texan National Guard. It sounds like

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things are getting harder now, not easier, is that your assessment and

:10:31.:10:36.

how are you coping? We are definitely seeing the situation

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changed so much that that is one of our biggest issues right now. I

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talked to some people, some of our troops on the streets right now and

:10:45.:10:48.

they said you can literally drive down a street that is fine and come

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back one hour later and it is under six feet of water. The fact that it

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keeps changing, we are far from out of danger. We still have people who

:10:59.:11:03.

need to be rescued and I think we still have a long way to go. What

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would help but now in concrete terms aside from the elements? The biggest

:11:11.:11:16.

thing, we are here to support state, local and federal agencies where

:11:17.:11:22.

they need us. If people are in imminent danger, that they call 9-11

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and that is life limo or eyesight, if they otherwise go to one of the

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other sites that put you in the other cute, and you don't call the

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National Guard directly, we are taking our cues from them. As long

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as people continue to communicate their needs through the right

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channels then we will get the message the right way and be able to

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prioritise where we move people. There was a lot of discussion about

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whether mandatory evacuation would make things easier or more

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difficult, do you think the choices made fee like the right one or do

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you think more should have been done earlier? That is a complicated

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decision, made by the local authorities. Our focus is the Texas

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military Department is what we can do now. Our number one security is

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safety, security and protection of life. Texas I know has a large

:12:15.:12:22.

number of people who are clinically obese, has that had an impact on how

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fast you and the rescue workers can work? I have not heard anything on

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that issue in particular, I know that we are rescuing people with

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health issues and that is where a lot of our focus is, people who

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cannot get to shelters on their own for whatever reason. I do not know

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how much of it is that issue or others, I have heard about diabetics

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with that the medicine and people with broken legs, elderly people,

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people on rooftops, from my point of view, we are hearing that a lot of

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people need to be rescued because they cannot move on their own, but I

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do not know how many people have that issue. In Louisiana, they are

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telling people Tuesday in their homes, does that feel like the right

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call to you now? If the local authorities have not said to

:13:13.:13:15.

evacuate, then staying in the home is the thing to do until you proceed

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a threat to your life, limbs or eyesight. Going out into waters

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where you do not know where the danger spots are, whether Mike the

:13:25.:13:30.

electrical lines or other dangers, put you and your family at risk.

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Take your cues from the local responders, they know the area and

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they know where it is safe to go. We were talking about President Trump

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landing in your state earlier, what is the most helpful thing that he

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can say or do right now for you? I think, what we have seen across the

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board is an incredible amount of support for our chain of command.

:13:56.:14:01.

Everyone has been supportive, everything... We are seeing a

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constant influx of people and equipment, we are seeing it from

:14:07.:14:13.

local agencies, Red Cross, other agencies, all of them are all

:14:14.:14:17.

working together right now and the level of cooperation that we have

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seen and the level of support from our chain of command has been

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amazing across the board. I appreciate your time, thank you.

:14:24.:14:28.

The Prime Minister has had to defend her Foreign Secretary

:14:29.:14:30.

today after scathing criticism - albeit some anonymous -

:14:31.:14:33.

declaring him a national and international joke.

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Asked if Theresa May had full confidence in Boris Johnson,

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But the briefings around his competency, his commitment

:14:38.:14:40.

and his trustworthiness have been rumbling all summer.

:14:41.:14:44.

Could today's devastating column in the Times -

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or any of the other voices joining the chorus - embolden the PM

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to sack a man she is known to have little time for?

:14:52.:14:54.

Here - with some bad language - is our political editor, Nick Watt.

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Boris Johnson, a showman for the cameras, although usually with mixed

:15:10.:15:18.

results. Our Foreign Secretary's habit of ending up in scrapes his

:15:19.:15:21.

prompting questions about how long he can last. But is Boris Johnson a

:15:22.:15:27.

hopeless buffoon or is he actually a statesman of the New World order who

:15:28.:15:34.

axed and communicates in a way befitting these times? We are now

:15:35.:15:39.

able to fly the Union Flag once again. And perhaps that new style is

:15:40.:15:45.

all too much for diplomatic grandees from the past, most of whom can

:15:46.:15:49.

never forgive his role in taking the UK out of the EU. One withering

:15:50.:15:56.

assessment was penned last week. The intervention by the former head of

:15:57.:15:59.

the Foreign Office unleashed a flurry of criticism.

:16:00.:16:14.

Over in Brussels, they have long memories of the man they remember is

:16:15.:16:20.

the Daily Telegraph's troublemaking correspondent. It is always

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wonderful to talk to him and he is a very intelligent man, we like in

:16:28.:16:33.

Germany his Churchill biography. But we are not very clear that we can

:16:34.:16:38.

really rely on what he will do next day. He sometimes has in Europe the

:16:39.:16:48.

image of a gambler. And that he is taking this question sometimes not

:16:49.:16:55.

so seriously. When we note that in a discussion about the referendum and

:16:56.:17:00.

after David Cameron's negotiations in Brussels that nobody was sure,

:17:01.:17:07.

probably he himself, if he would be for Brexit or against Brexit. Boris

:17:08.:17:12.

Johnson inspires mixed emotions here at the Foreign Office, he does have

:17:13.:17:16.

a fan base among some officials who love having a star as Foreign

:17:17.:17:20.

Secretary who is instantly recognised in chancelleries across

:17:21.:17:24.

the world. Detractors say those counterparts lightning got for his

:17:25.:17:27.

autograph do not taken seriously and in fact snigger behind his back --

:17:28.:17:32.

lining up for his autograph. That is not all. There are some in the

:17:33.:17:38.

Foreign Office who say Boris Johnson is a liability as Foreign Secretary.

:17:39.:17:43.

I have spoken to one figure you said that working with Boris Johnson is

:17:44.:17:46.

like walking a few feet behind a horse shovelling its shit. No doubt

:17:47.:17:52.

that arresting metaphor will register with a thoroughbred

:17:53.:17:58.

wordsmith like Boris Johnson. All eyes are Boris Johnson blame Remain

:17:59.:18:04.

supporters in government for seeking to undermine the Foreign Secretary I

:18:05.:18:07.

leaking highly damaging and what they regard as erroneous stories

:18:08.:18:13.

that he cannot be trusted with intelligence. One old friend insists

:18:14.:18:17.

that criticisms are wholly without foundation. The reality is if you

:18:18.:18:22.

talk to the Iraqi Prime Minister, the Kurdish Prime Minister, the

:18:23.:18:31.

Libyan politicians, South America, Asian politicians, they are all

:18:32.:18:33.

ambassadors around the world to say he is one of the finest Foreign

:18:34.:18:37.

Secretary is we have had. I have worked with him closely in the

:18:38.:18:40.

Middle East, he can master a brief literally in half an hour and get

:18:41.:18:47.

off a flight and engage with our friends and partners and allies in a

:18:48.:18:51.

very constructive way and, when making them feel really good. One

:18:52.:18:54.

great thing Boris can do is make people feel good and he has done

:18:55.:18:56.

that on the world stage, I think. As a politician who sees himself as

:18:57.:19:09.

a fine figure of a statesman, Boris Johnson will continue to bestride

:19:10.:19:13.

the world in his own unique manner. Others are braced for incessant

:19:14.:19:17.

clearing up operations. Their Scottish Labour leader Kezia

:19:18.:19:33.

Dugdale has just announced her resignation, a bit of a surprise.

:19:34.:19:38.

Yes, one of the youngest party leaders to resign, Kezia Dugdale in

:19:39.:19:41.

her mid-30s and she has announced she is going to be resigning with

:19:42.:19:46.

immediate effect to pass on the bat on to another generation. This is an

:19:47.:19:53.

interview she has done with BBC Scotland, Brian Taylor. This is a

:19:54.:19:57.

shock, Kezia Dugdale is symbolic of that new generation, that new way of

:19:58.:20:02.

communicating in Scotland, Ruth Davidson the leader of the Scottish

:20:03.:20:06.

Tories and Nicholas Torry June the SNP leader, they tease on Twitter.

:20:07.:20:10.

They communicate in a new way. The Labour Party in Scotland had a much

:20:11.:20:14.

better expected result in the general election and came back from

:20:15.:20:18.

nowhere to get 11, 12 seats and they could be on their way to another

:20:19.:20:22.

bounce back. You could say Kezia Dugdale surely has had a success at

:20:23.:20:26.

some supporters of Jeremy Corbyn have said, you are incredibly

:20:27.:20:30.

critical of Jeremy Corbyn and that election result we had in June, that

:20:31.:20:33.

was downed Jeremy Corbyn and not you. Do you think that is what this

:20:34.:20:39.

is about, a falling out, or is it more subtle? I think there is

:20:40.:20:43.

interesting politics going on, there is an assumption her successor will

:20:44.:20:48.

be Neil Finn Lay, who is more on the left, although Allan Smith won the

:20:49.:20:54.

Labour leadership contest in Scotland against Jeremy Corbyn.

:20:55.:20:57.

Kezia Dugdale recently announced she is in a relationship with an SNP

:20:58.:21:03.

member and they have been on a trip to the United States and they fell

:21:04.:21:05.

in love and it was really touching. But there has been under the scenes

:21:06.:21:15.

criticism at Holyrood from Labour SNP is saying, you want to be

:21:16.:21:20.

candidate for First Minister, Labour First Minister? And some people in

:21:21.:21:25.

the Scottish Labour Party are saying that Kezia Dugdale has faced quite a

:21:26.:21:29.

lot of pressure even though people were delighted about the romantic

:21:30.:21:36.

story. Nick, thank you very much indeed.

:21:37.:21:37.

Well, Japan may have other things on its mind this week

:21:38.:21:40.

beyond the minutiae of a possible trade deal with the UK.

:21:41.:21:44.

Residents in the northern island of Hokkaido were awoken this morning

:21:45.:21:47.

by sirens warning of a ballistic missile launch from North Korea.

:21:48.:21:56.

The first to fly over Japan since 2009.

:21:57.:22:00.

Within three minutes of the weapon being fired,

:22:01.:22:02.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had gathered his officials.

:22:03.:22:04.

Six minutes later, the missile - travelling at around

:22:05.:22:06.

7,500 miles an hour - had hurtled beyond

:22:07.:22:08.

Japan is, of course, no stranger to nuclear assault.

:22:09.:22:12.

So what effect will today's test flight have on Japan's

:22:13.:22:15.

own militarisation, and its ability to depend on others to protect her?

:22:16.:22:25.

It was in August 1945 that the US changed the history

:22:26.:22:28.

The two atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities

:22:29.:22:33.

of Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed an estimated 150,000 people.

:22:34.:22:39.

Japan had no choice but to surrender.

:22:40.:22:41.

A pacifist constitution was drafted, as punishment

:22:42.:22:47.

It prevented Japan from having a military, even after it

:22:48.:22:51.

Over the years, Japan's self-defence forces have grown, as the perception

:22:52.:23:01.

The end of the Cold War and rising tensions with China in particular

:23:02.:23:08.

mean that Tokyo now finds itself amongst the world's

:23:09.:23:11.

In May, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe set a target to modify

:23:12.:23:26.

the constitution's so-called 'peace clause' by 2020.

:23:27.:23:28.

Moves away from pacifism, though, are not accepted lightly.

:23:29.:23:31.

Two years ago, when Mr Abe pushed through a law that would allow

:23:32.:23:34.

Japanese troops to fight overseas for the first time since

:23:35.:23:36.

the Second World War, it drew mass protests on the streets

:23:37.:23:39.

Nevertheless, Japan is the only country to have

:23:40.:23:44.

suffered a nuclear attack - one that went deep into

:23:45.:23:47.

In 2016, Barack Obama became the first serving US

:23:48.:23:52.

Controversially, he offered no apology, but said the memory

:23:53.:23:58.

But at 6am local time, a missile was fired over Japan

:23:59.:24:07.

from near the North Korean capital, Pyongyang.

:24:08.:24:15.

It flew over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, before

:24:16.:24:17.

For the Japanese, this may be a game-changer.

:24:18.:24:23.

The last time North Korea did anything like this

:24:24.:24:25.

Then, it stymied any rapprochement with Pyongyang.

:24:26.:24:32.

This time round, the sound of sirens in Hokkaido will embolden

:24:33.:24:36.

military hawks in Japan, and Donald Trump's refusal to play

:24:37.:24:41.

the role of world policeman may leave Tokyo no choice but to listen.

:24:42.:24:51.

The UK's former Ambassador to Japan, Sir David Warren.

:24:52.:24:57.

And in Washington, from Shihoko Goto, who is a senior associate

:24:58.:25:00.

Shihoko, does Japan still enjoy being a pacifist country?

:25:01.:25:06.

Well, there is certainly a disconnect between what the Prime

:25:07.:25:18.

Minister of Japan once and what the public wants. The Japanese Prime

:25:19.:25:22.

Ministers Shinzo Abe has been pressing for changes in the

:25:23.:25:27.

constitution so Japan can play offence, especially in light of the

:25:28.:25:32.

new development in North Korea which will only strengthen it. But there

:25:33.:25:37.

is a lot of public hostility, even today, about Japan increasing its

:25:38.:25:42.

military capabilities. You said Japan has suffered a nuclear strike,

:25:43.:25:45.

the only country to come and a nuclear attack not just once, but

:25:46.:25:51.

twice. And Japan is also unique in the world insofar as its forces have

:25:52.:25:56.

never faced any casualties since the end of World War II, so no body bags

:25:57.:26:03.

in Japan since 1945 and a lot of Japanese want to keep that.

:26:04.:26:06.

Extraordinary legacy for a country to have that. So do you think Shinzo

:26:07.:26:13.

Abe will now succeed in changing the constitution bluntly, do you believe

:26:14.:26:19.

that Japan is on track to go nuclear, what is your sense? There

:26:20.:26:24.

is two issues. The nuclear issue is a highly unlikely issue because

:26:25.:26:31.

under several international treaties, Japan is unable to nuclear

:26:32.:26:36.

race. But in terms of increasing its military spending even further,

:26:37.:26:40.

increasing its ability to operate overseas and perhaps even strike

:26:41.:26:45.

down North Korea's missiles going overhead, that is certainly

:26:46.:26:48.

something that will be entertained. The problem is that Abe's and

:26:49.:26:54.

support domestically has weakened rapidly over the last few months and

:26:55.:26:59.

so even though as he has said he wants to make changes in the

:27:00.:27:02.

constitution over the next few years, that is going to face a lot

:27:03.:27:07.

of difficulty. I say that because changing the constitution requires

:27:08.:27:11.

the approval not only of the upper house and the lower house, two

:27:12.:27:15.

thirds majority, but it also requires a public referendum and the

:27:16.:27:21.

majority of Japanese need to support that. As we know from the British

:27:22.:27:25.

experience, public referendums are often difficult to gauge. David,

:27:26.:27:31.

Japan, if it chooses to remain pacifist, relies on other countries

:27:32.:27:38.

to come to its defence. As America, in your opinion is the one of those?

:27:39.:27:46.

I believe that it is, I believe with Shihoko Goto this may embolden hawks

:27:47.:27:50.

in Japan who like Shinzo Abe want to see Japan's self defence forces

:27:51.:27:57.

become more militarily -- defensive. There is not a groundswell of

:27:58.:28:00.

popular support in Japan for that move. When you hear Donald Trump

:28:01.:28:05.

memorably talk about America first, how he did not want to be the

:28:06.:28:10.

world's policeman was quite critical of Japan on the election trail, is

:28:11.:28:14.

he really now going to come to defend Japan in its hour of need? I

:28:15.:28:20.

think Prime Minister Abe has positioned Japan skilfully with

:28:21.:28:24.

President Trump, both as crucial to the President's economic agenda

:28:25.:28:28.

because Japan is a major investor in America and crucial to its security

:28:29.:28:32.

agenda in terms of maintaining stability in North East Asia. The

:28:33.:28:36.

worry about President Trump is he is volatile and unpredictable and his

:28:37.:28:40.

tweets and public statements inspire as much concern and fear as they do

:28:41.:28:45.

reassurance. But I do not think Japan has many options but to double

:28:46.:28:50.

down on the Alliance. Is that right, do you sense America is still the

:28:51.:28:55.

glue that keeps this region in its place, away from war? Whether or not

:28:56.:29:06.

the United States and its commitment to that role remains strong and

:29:07.:29:12.

Trump remains to be seen. But certainly, expectations from Asia

:29:13.:29:17.

and in Japan as well as in Korea, that remains very strong. British

:29:18.:29:22.

eyes very much on Japan now, with the arrival of Theresa May who is

:29:23.:29:29.

looking for presumably affirmation that there is a world outside of the

:29:30.:29:34.

EU for trade, will she finds that, will she be received well with that

:29:35.:29:39.

in Japan? She will be received well by the Japanese because our

:29:40.:29:42.

relations with Japan warm and close. Japan is a major trading partner for

:29:43.:29:47.

Britain, we export ?10 billion worth of goods and services a year and an

:29:48.:29:51.

even more important provider of investment in the UK with hundreds

:29:52.:29:55.

of thousands of jobs depended on Japanese companies. What the

:29:56.:29:58.

Japanese will be looking for from Theresa May is reassurance we will

:29:59.:30:02.

not fall off a cliff edge over Brexit and that these Japanese

:30:03.:30:07.

companies in the UK will continue to enjoy the same frictionless access

:30:08.:30:10.

to the single market and the customs union that they do at the moment.

:30:11.:30:16.

Talk us through how the language will work. Make to something? The

:30:17.:30:24.

Japanese government produced a detailed paper where they set out

:30:25.:30:29.

clearly what they wanted to see in the negotiations and they have

:30:30.:30:33.

pressed for transparency and cleared -- clarity since then. They are

:30:34.:30:37.

worried about the principle of Brexit if it means that Britain does

:30:38.:30:43.

not have access to the single marker without friction. They are too

:30:44.:30:48.

polite to say so publicly, they are puzzled to why we have taken what

:30:49.:30:53.

they see as a result -- and action of self harm. Theresa May may want

:30:54.:30:58.

to pursue a free-trade agreement with Japan when Britain is able to

:30:59.:31:01.

do so when we leave the European Union. But Japan I think has higher

:31:02.:31:06.

priorities in that area, in terms of pushing the EU Japan free trade

:31:07.:31:12.

agreement over the line and salvaging as much as they can from

:31:13.:31:16.

the Pacific free-trade agreement that President Trump has pulled out

:31:17.:31:17.

of. Thank you. Critics call it 'whitewashing' -

:31:18.:31:19.

the Hollywood practice of casting white actors in roles of characters

:31:20.:31:21.

of a different ethnicity. Today, the British actor Ed Skrein

:31:22.:31:24.

announced he was leaving a remake of Hellboy,

:31:25.:31:26.

after his appointment sparked fury it should have

:31:27.:31:28.

gone to an Asian actor. He bowed out, saying he didn't

:31:29.:31:30.

want to continue a worrying tendency of obscuring ethnic minority stories

:31:31.:31:33.

and voices in the Arts. And that seems pretty

:31:34.:31:37.

easy to understand. And yet, if we welcome

:31:38.:31:40.

the new female Doctor Who, or a black James Bond,

:31:41.:31:44.

or a woman playing Shakespeare's Kings,

:31:45.:31:46.

then shouldn't - purists argue - we move past the confines

:31:47.:31:48.

of character and cast who we want? I'm now joined from LA by comedian

:31:49.:32:41.

and actress Jenny Yang. And with me in the studio

:32:42.:32:43.

is Metro's Chief Film Critic Very nice to have you both. Jenny,

:32:44.:32:55.

Ed Skrein dropped out of this, was at the right thing to do?

:32:56.:33:00.

Definitely. Ed Skrein finally made the move we have all been waiting

:33:01.:33:05.

for. Someone got a high-profile part that originally was a character for

:33:06.:33:10.

an Asian character or a non-white character and a white person was

:33:11.:33:14.

cast and they finally said, I am not going to take this role because

:33:15.:33:18.

representation matters. He could have checked it on Google before he

:33:19.:33:22.

accepted the role. It would not have been hard to

:33:23.:33:36.

find out. Probably not. At this point when no one else has ever done

:33:37.:33:40.

this, when it came to recent history of Asian characters, we will

:33:41.:33:42.

appreciate Ed Skrein for what he did and I hope you set an example for

:33:43.:33:45.

the rest of Hollywood, both on the front end when you are making the

:33:46.:33:48.

deals and going through the casting process and also in the final

:33:49.:33:50.

moments when you are saying, yes, I will take this role. Jenny, before I

:33:51.:33:53.

finish this, do you think there is a problem specifically with Asian

:33:54.:33:55.

characters in Hollywood, rather than black characters, do you think

:33:56.:33:59.

Hollywood has a particular Asian problem if I can put it like that?

:34:00.:34:01.

You know what, I would say that Hollywood like many

:34:02.:34:15.

other institutions of power has a lot of problems when it comes to

:34:16.:34:18.

representing bodies that are not typically able white male or

:34:19.:34:20.

straight. Asians tend to be more invisible sometimes than you think.

:34:21.:34:22.

Because of the power of Hollywood in our global culture, I think it is so

:34:23.:34:25.

important that we really advocate for the kind of roles that will

:34:26.:34:30.

represent Asian-Americans or bodies as whole people. Hollywood does this

:34:31.:34:33.

presumably because they think that is what audiences want, do they? I

:34:34.:34:37.

think we are realising that they do not want this. You have to look at

:34:38.:34:41.

the people making these films, Hollywood is run by old white guys

:34:42.:34:43.

and they think that what everyone wants

:34:44.:35:08.

to what is them representing themselves and the audience,

:35:09.:35:10.

everyone always said, the only people who watch films are white

:35:11.:35:13.

guys between 18 and 30 and that is because the films they been shown is

:35:14.:35:15.

like that. You have a film like wonder woman becoming a smash hit

:35:16.:35:18.

and it is finally giving women and little girls what they want. They

:35:19.:35:20.

want to see super-heroine. How far would you push this? The question I

:35:21.:35:23.

raised before, if we now accept that Doctor Who can be a female or James

:35:24.:35:26.

Bond can be black or Fiona Shaw can play Richard the second, then don't

:35:27.:35:29.

you say, this is about a character? It is not about ethnicity race or

:35:30.:35:33.

gender? I take that on and I think lots of actors would agree but

:35:34.:35:37.

ethnic actors do not have the luxury of choice. There are very few parts

:35:38.:35:42.

available for them so them getting taken away by white actors, when

:35:43.:35:53.

they are supposed to be in place of equality, it is not equal. A

:35:54.:35:59.

reminder of that phrase that Samuel L Jackson used when he criticised a

:36:00.:36:04.

British black actor for playing a black American cop. Where does that

:36:05.:36:09.

end up when you are saying, you have to have the right race and colour

:36:10.:36:14.

and are white men allowed to play straight men, they are actors,

:36:15.:36:19.

right? Let us be real. There is no one high Council of people deciding

:36:20.:36:24.

what is OK when it comes to diversity casting. A lot of this is

:36:25.:36:29.

very negotiable. This is culture and art, some of the soft stuff we argue

:36:30.:36:34.

over and I would say, because of the rise of technology and Twitter and

:36:35.:36:38.

Facebook and YouTube, we have a greater say, beyond the traditional

:36:39.:36:42.

gatekeepers to say we will not accept white folks only been

:36:43.:36:57.

all of the characters. Let's have some more colour or invoices or

:36:58.:37:01.

nuance and I think to argue over whether or not a British black actor

:37:02.:37:03.

can play an American black character, we are talking about

:37:04.:37:05.

crumbs here. What is the bigger picture? It is about more diversity

:37:06.:37:08.

in our stories, more actors getting more roles. It is the bigger picture

:37:09.:37:11.

it that you have to do this around the back of Hollywood, I am thinking

:37:12.:37:15.

of something like big little lies where Nicole Kidman and Reese

:37:16.:37:19.

Witherspoon, from what I understand, got together and made that script

:37:20.:37:22.

themselves, because they wanted the Pirates, is that the answer? There's

:37:23.:37:27.

a difference between people making their own films and you see this in

:37:28.:37:31.

Hollywood with older female actresses like those actresses who

:37:32.:37:35.

have now got that credibility setting up their own companies and

:37:36.:37:39.

that will be the big change when you have black and ethnic minority

:37:40.:37:42.

actors making films, not just starring in them. Does that actually

:37:43.:37:49.

shot Hollywood out of the picture or are we a long way from that? Let us

:37:50.:37:56.

be real. Just because Ed Skrein said I am not going to take this Asian

:37:57.:38:02.

character part, it is not a radical move, he has just been a decent guy

:38:03.:38:05.

who says I think representation matters. Above all of this, we have

:38:06.:38:11.

a whole movement of Asian American creators, disable creators, queer

:38:12.:38:16.

creators and we are making our own work and hopefully someday, the rise

:38:17.:38:22.

in the tide of our creativity will affect Hollywood property --

:38:23.:38:26.

properly. Great to speak to. Thank you for coming in. The Guardian

:38:27.:38:31.

tomorrow has weaker pupils dumped by top grammar. Schools accused of

:38:32.:38:34.

unlawfully throwing out sixth formers who did not get the required

:38:35.:38:38.

grades and AS-level is to improve their results. It has got a picture

:38:39.:38:42.

of Milan near Trump in those shoes that no one on social media can take

:38:43.:38:46.

their eyes from. Apparently she did change their high heels before she

:38:47.:38:51.

landed. The daily Terror that, but in steering at Michel Barnier, the

:38:52.:39:00.

EU negotiator tells EU to behave -- the Daily Telegraph. The Times

:39:01.:39:03.

follows up on the story from yesterday, the judge ruling that the

:39:04.:39:07.

child must leave unless foster home the paper says it has been praised

:39:08.:39:12.

for exposing the tower Hamlets council failure.

:39:13.:39:16.

Until recently, the country of Georgia remained one of the last

:39:17.:39:19.

nations where drone pilots could fly in relatively unregulated skies.

:39:20.:39:21.

In a few days, they will adopt European-style flight restrictions,

:39:22.:39:24.

so photographer Amos Chapple took advantage of the final frontier

:39:25.:39:26.

of photography and took these images of the country.

:39:27.:39:29.

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