11/01/2018 Newsnight


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11/01/2018

Analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Emily Maitlis. Including the NHS winter crisis in numbers, Farage and the second Brexit vote and Trump author Michael Woolf.


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How badly our NHS targets being

this? We asked the Health Secretary

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last week, and he couldn't answer.

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Why won't you tell me

what the number is, the percentage?

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It is not my target,

it is your own number.

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Because we don't have a number

to publish, there is no number that

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I'm sitting on that I am

not telling you.

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It will be published next

week and I don't know

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what that number will be.

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Today we got the true figures.

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Waiting time performances

in A&E are at their worst

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level for 14 years.

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We hear from one doctor

who is feeling it first-hand.

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A&E is at breaking point.

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We are exceptionally,

exceptionally busy.

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Doctors and nurses are being

pushed to the limit.

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And patients are having to wait far

too long for the care they deserve,

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Also tonight: Guess who fancies

a second referendum on Brexit?

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I'm reaching the point in thinking

that we should have a second

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referendum on EU membership.

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The whole thing?!

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Of course.

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Why do both sides still think

they would win if we asked

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the country to vote all over again?

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And what does Europe make of us?

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We'll ask the president

of the Eurogroup.

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We'll also be joined

by the author of "that" Trump

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fly-on-the-wall book,

Fire and Fury, Michael Wolff.

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And we report from the ruins

of Mosul in Iraq, where some

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estimate that 10,000 people

lost their lives.

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In some parts of Mosul,

the smell of death is

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pungent even after months

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since the battle for the city ended.

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The bodies of many residents

are still trapped under the rubble.

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Good evening.

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It's getting harder by the day

to pretend the NHS is not

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in crisis this winter.

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Like a rubber band you keep

pulling and pulling,

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said one consultant today,

eventually it snaps.

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Staff have described patients dying

prematurely in corridors.

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But if you want harder figures,

they're here for the taking.

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Waiting times performances

in accident and emergency

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departments have reached their worst

level in 14 years.

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Today a letter from the heads

of more than 60 A&E departments

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in England and Wales warned

the Prime Minister that the current

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level of safety compromise

is at times intolerable.

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Last week, I asked the Health

Secretary Jeremy Hunt how far off

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target the waiting figures were.

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He didn't have the number.

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But today we heard performance

levels were the worst result

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since the introduction

of the target in 2004.

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Here's Chris Cook.

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Accident and emergency figures

are the most visible sign

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of the strain now placed

on the English NHS.

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Rising patient demand has

overwhelmed the service's

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ability to cope.

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Let's take a look at monthly A&E

performance going back to 2010.

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Since then, emergency departments

have been aiming to deal

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with 95% of patients

within four hours.

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That target, that is

the dotted line.

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That has proved harder

in winter months.

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Marked in by these grey bars.

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If we draw in the line

showing their performance,

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the most striking pattern is that

during the last Parliament,

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A&E performance started

to drift away from target.

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It is now well off, down at 85%.

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The number is even lower.

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About 77%.

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If you look just at

traditional, major A&Es.

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So-called type ones.

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And don't think include things

like walk-in centres.

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Our hospitals are overfull.

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We are miles from where we need

to be to hit our targets.

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It means my patients are waiting

in the waiting room,

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maybe sometimes standing

because there aren't

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even enough chairs.

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Patients are waiting in corridors,

patients may have to wait

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in the back of ambulances.

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And then when patients

even get into a cubicle,

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sometimes there are two patients

per cubicle,

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just with a temporary partition

between them for a bit of privacy.

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It is sometimes just

a number, just a statistic.

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But it is having real

effects to patients.

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Some individual hospital trusts

have seen astonishing

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collapses in performance.

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Take the Blackpool and

Royal Cornwall Trust.

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They were respectively

at 61% and 77% last year.

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Both poor performances.

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This year, they dropped

to 40% and 58%.

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The NHS is 70 years old this year,

and we know by now the pressures

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on it will keep growing.

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Medicine is advancing

so it can treat more stuff

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and our society is ageing.

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But the NHS budget has been growing

at a historically slow rate

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since the onset of austerity

under the Coalition.

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It keeps becoming ever more

efficient but it can no longer meet

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the demands being placed on it.

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The underlying problem is best

illustrated by this chart.

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The number of people turning up

to A&Es just keeps rising, and this

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isn't about people who should not be

there skipping the queue at the GP.

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You can see that if you look

at the past 12 months.

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The number of people turning up

at major A&Es has risen by 1%

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but the number of people sick

enough, turning up to A&E who need

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admitting to hospital,

is up by 5.6%.

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The underlying pressure

is that we are an ageing society

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with rising sickness levels.

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And this year, a bad case of flu.

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We are seeing the same as we saw

last year with no change and it

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could just get worse and worse next

year and the year after and that is

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the real worrying thing.

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Because we are at breaking point.

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Who knows where we will be

if nothing changes by next year?

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There are no easy fixes here.

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The elastic won't spring

back as winter thaws.

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Either we pay more in tax or we'll

pay more in the form

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of worse health care.

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We asked the Government and NHS

England to join us tonight

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but nobody was available.

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In a statement, the Department

of Health said it treated

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more than 55,000 people

within the four-hour

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target every day.

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NHS England said it was dealing

with rising flu and record numbers

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of admissions but that the service

had managed to maintain A&E

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performance at the same

level as last January.

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I'm joined by Dr Taj

Hassan, president

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of the Royal College of Emergency

Medicine.

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We saw there figure is rising up.

Very nice of you to come in. How

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accurately do the figures reflect

what happens to you on an average

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shift? Described for us, if you can,

your last shift.

It was a busy one.

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It involved a significant number of

patients in my department who were

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coming in through the front door,

but there was also a significant

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number of patients, unfortunately,

that I and my staff were caring for

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a should have been on wards in the

hospital. We are effectively

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managing a ward for a patient that

should be within the hospital as

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well as the ones coming through the

door, so that unfortunately creates

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what is called a crowded emergency

department, or exit blocked, because

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we can't get them out of our

department, and that causes delays

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in assessment, in antibiotics being

given, and delays in pain relief. It

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compromises the dignity of the

patients that we care for, which I

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think is one of the big things that

nurses and doctors in our department

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is care about.

When you say it

compromises the dignity of patients,

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does it all so ultimately compromise

their safety, or do you still feel

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confident that you are delivering

the same levels of medicine?

We work

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in a health service where I think we

have amongst the best health care

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workers in the world, people who

were really, really hard, and they

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will go the extra mile, but

unfortunately, the Independent

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scientific evidence, both from the

UK and internationally, shows that

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the more crowded your emergency

department, the greater the risk of

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harm to patients, and that has been

proven.

This is not going to get

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better now, because of the

demographics and the way that

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society is ageing, this is a problem

that we're going to live with or

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after solving a totally different

way.

I don't think it should be

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something that we should live with,

because unfortunately, over the last

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five years, we have had a number of

significant cuts in areas that have

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influenced that crowded emergency

department. We have cut £6 billion

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out of social care funding, and that

results in patients who are fit from

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hospital beds that need to be sent

home, they and their families want

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them to be at home, and they can't

get out of hospital. We have cut the

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number of Acute Hospital beds by

approximately 15,000, which results

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in and exacerbates the exit blocked.

Most importantly, we have had to

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compromise in terms of the number of

staff that we're able to employ, for

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a variety of reasons.

And that is

critical. Privately, are you having

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more hearing conversations by staff

who are saying, actually, why would

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I carry on if I am five years away

from retirement, or even ten years,

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and take the risk of ever doing

something that could be damaging if

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I work in these conditions? Is that

happening?

Over the last few years,

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there has been a recognition that in

my specialty, if you rank

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specialties for a potential for

burn-out than people leaving

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prematurely, emergency medicine sits

at the top, and that is in the

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international ranking. We have been

campaigning hard for the last year,

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and actually, last October, with the

help of colleagues from NHS England

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and NHS Improvement, especially

people like Jim Mackie and Si

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Stephens, we were able to go to the

Secretary of State and agree is a

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formula and a framework by which we

can deliver better staffing and grow

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our workforce and reduce attrition.

-- Simon Stephens. The wider context

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is the environment that these people

are working in, and that can only be

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influenced by investing. At the

moment, in this country, we are not

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investing in social care and acute

bets adequately. -- acute beds. And

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we're not investing in our staff.

Thank you for coming in.

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Does anyone really think

there should be a second referendum

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on our decision to leave the EU?

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The latest advocate

of a return to the ballot box

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came from unexpected

quarters this morning.

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Nigel Farage told Channel 5's

The Wright Stuff that he was warming

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to the idea and believed a second

vote would result in

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another - much bigger -

win in favour of Brexit.

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Have a listen.

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My mind is actually

changing on this.

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Go on.

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I...

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What is for certain

is that the Cleggs, the

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Blairs, the Adonises

will never, ever give up.

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They will go on whingeing

and whining and moaning

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all the way through this

process, so maybe, just

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maybe, I'm reaching

the

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point of thinking that we should

have a second referendum, because...

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On what?

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On EU membership.

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The whole thing?!

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Yes, of course, of course.

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Unless you want to

have a multiple-choice

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referendum, which

would confuse people.

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No, no, no, I, I, I...

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I think if we had

a second referendum

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on EU membership, we'd kill it

off for a generation.

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The percentage that would vote

to Leave next time would be

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very much bigger than it

was last time round.

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I, I...

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It may just finish

the whole thing off.

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We'll be discussing this in moment

with our guests here.

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But first, our political editor,

Nick Watt, is here.

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Nick, the story doesn't end there?

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That's right, a slight row wingback

by Nigel Farage this evening in the

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Daily Telegraph. He has gone from

what he said there, saying maybe we

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should have a second referendum, to

saying, I fear that maybe there

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would be a second referendum if

Parliament vote down the deal. Today

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he spoke at because Brexit

supporters were strongly critical of

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him, and remain supporters said

thank you very much. This was

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sparked off last week when Tony

Blair said the British people should

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have the right to have a say, either

in an election or a referendum on

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that final deal. Earlier today, I

spoke to Tony Blair's former

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director of communications, Alistair

Campbell, and is as what he had to

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say.

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And I think, actually, Nigel Farage,

I think we're the reason that Farage

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and Johnson and these guys

are getting a little bit desperate

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and just trying to take the ball

into the corner flag and just get

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the final whistle blown.

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Because I think they understand that

as people do see the detail,

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do realise the cost and the chaos,

then not only should

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they have the right to think again

but I think they will want to think

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again and I think they will give

you a very different answer.

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And everyone thinks that the polls

would now go their way, which is

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fascinating. How do the polls sit?

Interestingly, there is a snap poll

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in the daily Mirror after those

Nigel Farage remarks, showing there

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is minority support per second

referendum, 43-51, but a majority

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support for Remain, 55-45. It is a

snap poll, better to look at the

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monthly tracker on that question,

which asks, is it right or wrong to

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have left the EU? And that shows

even Stevens,

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even Stevens, though since August,

it was wrong has been ahead. There

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was a blip of nine points for the

league side. Today, we spoke to

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Deborah Martinson of Britain Thinks.

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So, we've been tracking this

at Britain Thinks over the last 18

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months and the really fascinating

thing is that people's fundamental

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views haven't changed

at all in that time.

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So really nothing has changed,

other than people are more worried.

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But I think the one thing you have

to factor in when you think

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about this is the youth vote.

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Of course, what we know is that many

more young people voted

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in the last election,

people who didn't vote

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in the referendum.

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If they still vote, then that

could change things.

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Joining me now is Diane James,

the former leader of UKIP,

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Lucy Thomas, who was deputy director

of the Remain campaign,

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and Jeroen Dijsselbloem,

former Dutch Finance minister

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and outgoing president

of the eurogroup of eurozone

0:14:440:14:47

finance ministers.

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Nice to have all of you. Diane, what

was he thinking?

I am not sure! What

0:14:510:14:58

was he smoking? It took you by

surprise? It did, this is the sort

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of thing Nigel has got form with, he

does have outrageous statements and

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in context, I will give my personal

response, I can understand his

0:15:120:15:16

frustration with the fact that the

Remainers have not given up in

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trying to overturn this decision and

when you hear that Tony Blair

0:15:210:15:25

launches a £10 million fund and

there are other organisations

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endorsed by the likes of Sir Nick

Clegg and such, they still want to

0:15:280:15:34

overturn a democratic vote, it is

quite unbelievable. It will be

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interesting to see where this goes.

Would you be up for the fight? Of

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course I would. And I brought this

document with me, this future of

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Europe, this was released to the

MEPs in October last year and this

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actually fleshes out the future of

the European Union. It is a

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frightening document in terms of

control. When that is in the public

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domain it will be interesting to see

how people react.

Lucy, would you

0:16:050:16:09

relish a second chance? For me it

was a democratic decision, people

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have had their say and I want to ask

Nigel Farage, why can't you accept

0:16:140:16:19

that you have one? What do you not

accept? I have no Nigel Farage for

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about ten years and he alone is the

fight, he loves campaigning. You

0:16:250:16:29

think this is about publicity? He

wants to remain relevant. The point

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of Diane was that Nick Clegg and

Tony Blair do not feel this was

0:16:350:16:39

undemocratic terms because of false

promises, is at a reason to go back

0:16:390:16:43

to the polls?

There are some former

Remainers who would like a second

0:16:430:16:47

referendum but going back to what

Nick said about the polls, public

0:16:470:16:53

opinion has not shifted, there isn't

any massive clamour for a second

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referendum and I don't think there

is any big push for that. You can

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think about once the terms are

known, where people to be suddenly

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up in arms and say we don't like

these terms, do you want a second

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go?

But the polls are not there. You

were at the vanguard of that, deputy

0:17:090:17:17

director, would you fight this in a

different way? Did you look back

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with your head in your hands at the

way the Remain campaign went about

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that?

I think it was a very hard

campaign to fight. Given that

0:17:230:17:29

people, when we first started, it

was 50-50, when we spoke to focus

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groups there was no real concept of

what the positives of remaining

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wearer. Within six months, there was

a huge amount of work to do to land

0:17:380:17:45

those positives, what do we get from

being in the EU? It is a very hard

0:17:450:17:50

discussion, not least because in a

referendum when there are choices

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and it is a very conjugated

question, people can put all sorts

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of different things into the pot.

And our building to take back

0:17:580:18:02

control or whatever it is they

choose to put into the pot.

Jeroen

0:18:020:18:06

Djesselbloem, what is Europe

thinking about Brexit right now?

0:18:060:18:14

Today, after this cry from the

second referendum? I have not heard

0:18:140:18:18

anybody in Brussels arguing for a

second referendum. I think people in

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Brussels are waiting for what does

the UK government want to have in

0:18:210:18:25

the end deal? What does it look

like? We want clarity to move

0:18:250:18:30

forward on that.

It is up to the UK

government to decide what that looks

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like?

To have a negotiating

position, indeed. Very helpful. No

0:18:360:18:43

one in Brussels is questioning the

mandate that the UK government has

0:18:430:18:47

coming out of the first referendum,

that is quite clear, there is going

0:18:470:18:51

to be Brexit. We are trying to sort

out these conjugated questions, what

0:18:510:18:57

does it look like, the future

relationship? My argument, we focus

0:18:570:19:01

on trying to solve these issues and

minimise the losses because is going

0:19:010:19:05

to be losses on all sides. Let us

focus on that rather than reopen the

0:19:050:19:10

debate and going back to zero.

There

is a delicious irony that the only

0:19:100:19:14

person questioning the mandate is

the former leader of Ukip, Nigel

0:19:140:19:18

Farage! Does it suggest, as Lucy

said, that he just wants to be back

0:19:180:19:24

at the centre of attention? Or does

he think that it is not convincing

0:19:240:19:30

enough people that this is going in

the right direction?

He has got two

0:19:300:19:35

objectives, he wants to expose the

degree of resistance from the

0:19:350:19:38

Remainers, that still is with them

in terms of their absolutely

0:19:380:19:44

determined to overturn that

decision.

I am not at all and I see

0:19:440:19:50

it as a democratic decision, there

isn't this.

But Tony Blair and Nick

0:19:500:19:55

Clegg are leading this is the main

issue of overturning that democratic

0:19:550:20:01

decision. And the Labour Party is

being very interesting in terms of

0:20:010:20:04

denying its position that everything

at once currently would mean staying

0:20:040:20:10

in the EU.

That is absolutely not

right, to quote Nigel Farage, he

0:20:100:20:16

said before the referendum that if

it were to be narrow and 52 remain,

0:20:160:20:21

48 to leave, that would be

unfinished business, and what he

0:20:210:20:28

said he would carry on fighting

for... For those people who were

0:20:280:20:32

former Remainers and want a second

goal, Nigel Farage himself said

0:20:320:20:37

52-42 was too narrow.

What has

changed? We have Tony Blair, Nick

0:20:370:20:43

Clegg, Nigel Farage, sitting in a

particular corner saying, wait a

0:20:430:20:49

minute, we still believe, given our

previous position, that it is

0:20:490:20:53

unfinished business.

I am agreeing

with you. The point was we think we

0:20:530:20:57

have left Europe in a certain place

but Europe has moved on. But there's

0:20:570:21:01

more interested and in more

integration post written?

That has

0:21:010:21:05

been the talk? You have to realise

and the people in the UK have to

0:21:050:21:11

understand that Brexit is no longer

on the front pages in Europe and has

0:21:110:21:14

not been for some months. It is on

the front pages in the UK every day,

0:21:140:21:19

the first three pages. If you open

up the papers on the continent you

0:21:190:21:24

will find very little.

Nobody in

Europe is trying to convince Britain

0:21:240:21:29

to stay?

You will find individuals.

But there is no drive to reopen this

0:21:290:21:34

debate.

That is not entirely true,

the German automotive industry in

0:21:340:21:39

the last few days highlighted the

dangers that Brexit is going to

0:21:390:21:43

have. Because of the degree of the

volume of cars exported.

You are

0:21:430:21:51

agreeing with the German

manufacturing is?!

I am simply

0:21:510:21:54

highlighting that there is an

industry that is... Added was

0:21:540:22:01

in-built, to stay -- to say it is

not covered by the European press is

0:22:010:22:05

untrue.

Do you think the concept of

no deal is a very clever way of

0:22:050:22:10

bringing Europe right to the table?

Where Theresa May needs to start

0:22:100:22:15

negotiations? My sense is that some

strategic politicians in the UK

0:22:150:22:21

thought that if they said, if they

threatened us with no deal, that

0:22:210:22:26

would be helpful for their position.

It has completely backfired because

0:22:260:22:31

in Europe people are preparing for

the possible outcome of no deal and

0:22:310:22:36

the British Government is in panic.

How can it be that they are

0:22:360:22:41

preparing no deal? It is going to be

a bad situation, it is a bad

0:22:410:22:48

decision, the car industry is right.

It is a political fact for us. And

0:22:480:22:53

we need to concentrate on minimising

the damage and getting a good

0:22:530:22:56

outcome.

Isn't the truth that the

Europe we will leave in two years

0:22:560:23:02

will be a very different shape and

feel to the Europe were part of

0:23:020:23:06

right now?

Yes and that is why Nigel

Farage was talking about the

0:23:060:23:13

referendum, into what? What would

the terms be? It is not right to say

0:23:130:23:18

we would go into what we had before.

I would agree entirely, the decision

0:23:180:23:24

has been made, Europe is moving on

and Brexit will happen.

Thank you

0:23:240:23:28

all very much indeed.

0:23:280:23:31

"Why are we having all these people

from shithole countries come here?"

0:23:310:23:34

That, according to the Washington

Post, is what Donald Trump today

0:23:340:23:37

uttered during a meeting aimed

at finding a cross-party

0:23:370:23:40

deal on immigration.

0:23:400:23:42

This revelation comes hot

on the heels of Michael Wolff's book

0:23:420:23:45

on the Trump White House.

0:23:450:23:48

A bit like any tweet

by the President, Fire and Fury has

0:23:480:23:51

caused a stir the ramifications

of which may not truly be understood

0:23:510:23:54

for some time to come.

0:23:540:23:56

What we do know is that

a bad tempered tiff

0:23:560:23:59

between the President and his former

White House Advisor Steve Bannon

0:23:590:24:03

over the contents of Wolff's book

has changed the dynamics of the US

0:24:030:24:07

political climate with his departure

this week from Breitbart News.

0:24:070:24:15

Michael Wolff is with us for his

very first British TV interview,

0:24:150:24:19

joining us from New York. Did you

feel when you were writing this

0:24:190:24:24

book, but in this book together, did

you feel as if you are trying to

0:24:240:24:28

bring down the President?

Quite the

opposite. I went into this project,

0:24:280:24:37

into the White House, with an

entirely open mind. I really would

0:24:370:24:40

have been willing to write a book

about the unexpected success of

0:24:400:24:47

Donald Trump. That, of course, is

not what I found, quite the

0:24:470:24:50

opposite. Stop I find a White House

filled with the people closest to

0:24:500:24:56

him who turned out to be the people

most worried about him.

When you

0:24:560:25:01

talk about going into the White

House, the details are fascinating

0:25:010:25:05

from any of us. Give us some sense

of your access. Donald Trump he

0:25:050:25:10

denies he spoke to you or that you

had any access, did you walk into

0:25:100:25:14

the same place every time? Did you

say hello to the same people?

Yes,

0:25:140:25:19

exactly.

0:25:190:25:24

exactly. Donald Trump's says that I

had no access and no permission

0:25:240:25:30

because I was there for the better

part of seven months. You have to

0:25:300:25:35

ask the question, how do they get

there? And the answer is, Donald

0:25:350:25:39

Trump. I said to Donald Trump and he

says he doesn't know me but we have

0:25:390:25:45

known each other for 20 years. At

any rate, I said that I would like

0:25:450:25:52

to come and be an observer at the

White House and he thought I was

0:25:520:25:55

asking for a job. I said I wanted to

write a book. And his face fell with

0:25:550:26:06

absolute lack of interest in the

idea of the book. But he said OK,

0:26:060:26:09

knock yourself out. And with that,

using that, but basically became the

0:26:090:26:19

carte blanche for me to enter the

White House, to stay there, to sit

0:26:190:26:26

down with almost every member of the

senior staff again and again.

And

0:26:260:26:31

with Donald Trump himself, how many

times would you say that you

0:26:310:26:34

conversed with him personally since

becoming President?

I have said from

0:26:340:26:40

the beginning on this that I have

spent about three hours with Donald

0:26:400:26:45

Trump through the campaign, the

transition and in the White House.

0:26:450:26:51

Since he became President, how long

would that have been?

From the

0:26:510:26:56

inauguration onwards, we had one on

the record session and then I would

0:26:560:27:03

see him in The West Wing and we

would chat.

We did not presumably

0:27:030:27:11

see Steve Bannon quitting Breitbart

News as a direct consequence of this

0:27:110:27:14

book, did you?

I did not anticipate

that, it seems to have been the

0:27:140:27:23

outcome.

My question is, you think

that balance remains a key figure on

0:27:230:27:34

the ideological right? Will Trump be

weakened or strengthened wi-fi ten?

0:27:340:27:38

Will he lose his base? Where he goes

soft or does it make the next year

0:27:380:27:42

of elections easier for him?

I don't

think we know the answer to this. It

0:27:420:27:50

might well mean that Trump goes to

the traditional Republican side,

0:27:500:27:57

does not run the sort of wing nut

party in Congressional races and it

0:27:570:28:05

gives the Republicans an advantage.

That is one scenario. Another is

0:28:050:28:09

that Steve Bannon decides to take

down Donald Trump.

Could he do that?

0:28:090:28:18

Without Breitbart News?

I don't

know. Steve Bannon, his title was

0:28:180:28:28

chief strategist in the White House

and he is nothing if not the

0:28:280:28:32

ultimate strategist. I would

anticipate that at this point he is

0:28:320:28:37

thinking through his options. But I

felt that when he spoke to me for

0:28:370:28:43

this book, he was making, on his way

to making a calculated break with

0:28:430:28:50

the President, who honestly, he

seemed to regard as an idiot.

I want

0:28:500:28:56

to pick up on some of the criticism

of the book, Gillette conflicting

0:28:560:29:02

narratives get told, unclear whether

he had been told these things

0:29:020:29:05

first-hand, whether you had

conversations, some say it is

0:29:050:29:09

directly out of Donald Trump's own

playbook. Why not make it more

0:29:090:29:13

rigorous?

Yes, let me talk a little

about this book. The book has become

0:29:130:29:21

something more than a book, it has

become a political event. That means

0:29:210:29:27

it is going to be the subject of an

enormous amount of controversy, it

0:29:270:29:31

means that a lot of people said

things to me and now they find

0:29:310:29:37

themselves like Dors in the

headlights. My job on this book and

0:29:370:29:41

I really had just one goal, it was

too, as I sat there every day on a

0:29:410:29:47

couch in The West Wing, to bring the

reader right there. So that the

0:29:470:29:52

reader could experience what I

experience.

You don't regret the

0:29:520:29:57

fact that it is so unfiltered?

No.

My job is to bring an absolutely

0:29:570:30:05

unfiltered account. It has been

enormous controversy about that but

0:30:050:30:09

what I would say is that there is

room for a lot of interpretations of

0:30:090:30:16

this White House, not only room but

there will be so it is not just...

0:30:160:30:21

There are daily reporters doing a

good job of covering the White

0:30:210:30:26

House. But my account, and it is an

account that has obviously resonated

0:30:260:30:32

with people, apparently everywhere,

it is a contextual story of what has

0:30:320:30:38

happened.

Over these number of

months. Let me ask you... At this

0:30:380:30:46

point you have written the book

after he became President. Many

0:30:460:30:50

journalists are questioning how they

covered the campaign, is there any

0:30:500:30:54

guilt that you or your colleagues

were much too caught up in a very

0:30:540:31:00

sensational, sexy story to cover? If

you were going back right now, you

0:31:000:31:05

would be covering Trump in a very

different way?

Well, I don't know. I

0:31:050:31:12

am not sure that I have any

colleagues, which is part of the

0:31:120:31:17

interesting thing that allowed me to

write a totally independent version

0:31:170:31:20

of this White House. But I think,

from the beginning, there has been a

0:31:200:31:27

problem. Nobody has known how to

cover Donald Trump. When this

0:31:270:31:33

administration began, many in the

media said we cannot normalise this

0:31:330:31:38

person. Effectively, the media

coverage has formalised it. So the

0:31:380:31:44

explosions every day have become so

normal that we can no longer member

0:31:440:31:49

what happened the day before. I

would maintain that I actually may

0:31:490:31:53

have found a way to write about this

Presidency and this President.

Great

0:31:530:32:00

to have you. Thank you.

0:32:000:32:04

Time for Viewsnight now.

0:32:040:32:05

The concert pianist James Rhodes

publishes a memoir this

0:32:050:32:07

week, Fire on all Sides,

in which he recounts his experience

0:32:070:32:10

of suffering from mental illness.

0:32:100:32:11

This is his take on the

pursuit of happiness.

0:32:110:32:14

We're not meant to be

happy all of the time.

0:32:160:32:22

The pursuit of happiness seems

like such a noble one.

0:32:220:32:27

And yet it is fundamentally flawed.

0:32:270:32:30

No one knows for sure how many

civilians were killed in the battle

0:34:520:34:55

to liberate the city of Mosul

from the so-called Islamic State.

0:34:550:34:58

The city was the group's last urban

stronghold in Iraq before

0:34:580:35:01

it was retaken last July

by the country's army with the help

0:35:010:35:04

of US-led coalition forces.

0:35:040:35:06

Amnesty International has reported

that the civilian death toll

0:35:060:35:10

could be up to 10,000 -

more than ten times

0:35:100:35:12

the official estimate.

0:35:120:35:14

Nafiseh Kohnavard from the BBC's

Persian Service has returned

0:35:140:35:18

to Mosul, where the city's former

old town lies in ruins and life

0:35:180:35:21

for ordinary Iraqis has anything

but returned to normal.

0:35:210:35:29

This street used to be the beating

heart of the old part of Mosul,

0:35:420:35:49

Iraq's second most populated city.

0:35:490:35:52

Even for a country

which has seen many

0:35:520:35:54

battles over the years,

the

0:35:540:35:56

destruction here is unprecedented.

0:35:560:36:02

Mosul fighting to drive so-called

Islamic State out of its main

0:36:020:36:05

stronghold in Iraq has left large

parts of this city in ruins.

0:36:050:36:13

Only three years ago,

you could hear the

0:36:200:36:23

noise of shops, restaurants and busy

traffic navigating through the

0:36:230:36:27

streets.

0:36:270:36:30

They have now been replaced

by a deafening silence and a strong

0:36:300:36:32

stench of death in the air.

0:36:320:36:34

Bodies of Islamic State

fighters are lying

0:36:340:36:36

around unburied.

0:36:360:36:37

And for survivors like Ahmad,

the struggle hasn't ended.

0:36:370:36:40

TRANSLATION:

This is the city that

I grew up in, and we were proud

0:36:400:36:43

of it.

0:36:430:36:47

It's a shame.

0:36:470:36:50

Look now, nothing is left

of it, especially in

0:36:500:36:53

the west side.

0:36:530:36:56

It's completely devastated,

and there are no

0:36:560:36:58

services here as well.

0:36:580:36:59

He has lost eight members

of his family here but

0:36:590:37:02

still hasn't been able to find

and bury their bodies.

0:37:020:37:10

This is the first time

he returns to what's left of

0:37:110:37:14

the home he just

bought five years ago.

0:37:140:37:18

TRANSLATION:

IS came to my family's

neighbourhood and asked

0:37:180:37:21

them to leave and replaced them

with their own families.

0:37:210:37:29

The first one who died

was my brother-in-law,

0:37:300:37:34

while he was trying to bring

water from the river.

0:37:340:37:42

Then my sister-in-law,

who just got a little sick.

0:37:430:37:45

At that time, IS were

moving people from

0:37:450:37:47

house to house, so they

didn't want to have

0:37:470:37:49

someone ill with them,

so

0:37:490:37:52

they killed her and threw her

body into the river.

0:37:520:37:54

For the security forces now

in charge of the city,

0:37:540:37:59

the biggest challenge is to build up

trust with Mosul's residents.

0:37:590:38:07

People who survived

the air strikes are

0:38:080:38:10

marked as possible IS sympathisers.

0:38:100:38:13

For some, it's impossible to return

to their homes without an

0:38:130:38:16

authorisation signed

by the new rulers.

0:38:160:38:22

TRANSLATION:

This is a dilemma.

0:38:220:38:26

These people should go

through security checks to make sure

0:38:260:38:32

that they were not with IS.

0:38:320:38:34

There are not very

well-known IS members who

0:38:340:38:36

we can only find through the people

here, as local people know their

0:38:360:38:39

faces, so we need first to identify

them before we are able to let these

0:38:390:38:42

people go back to their houses.

0:38:420:38:46

The task to rebuild

Mosul and clear the

0:38:460:38:48

city of its rubble will take years.

0:38:480:38:53

Driving IS fighters out

of the narrow alleys

0:38:530:38:55

of the old city took many months.

0:38:550:39:02

These same streets and buildings

with plenty of remaining

0:39:020:39:05

death traps are proving to be

the most difficult to clear.

0:39:050:39:08

In some parts of Mosul,

the smell of death

0:39:080:39:14

is pungent, even after months

since the battle for the city ended.

0:39:140:39:22

The bodies of many

residents are still

0:39:230:39:25

trapped under the rubble,

and there are people still looking

0:39:250:39:29

to find out what happened

to their lost loved

0:39:290:39:31

ones.

0:39:310:39:39

We witnessed the operation

to recover the bodies of this man's

0:39:410:39:43

three nephews.

0:39:430:39:44

The eldest was only 12 years old.

0:39:440:39:47

TRANSLATION:

These

are my sister's children.

0:39:470:39:48

They were in another

neighbourhood, but IS

0:39:480:39:50

brought them here by force.

0:39:500:39:56

Two days before we were

bombed, I managed to

0:39:560:39:58

talk to them.

0:39:580:40:05

My nephew was telling me, Uncle,

I just pray that our area

0:40:050:40:08

be liberated so that

I can come to you,

0:40:080:40:10

and so we can play PlayStation.

0:40:100:40:13

Despite all these difficulties,

efforts to rebuild Mosul have

0:40:130:40:17

started, and the new authorities

are trying to clear all visible

0:40:170:40:20

destruction.

0:40:200:40:24

But the deeper underlying

scars and wounds will

0:40:240:40:26

take much longer to heal.

0:40:260:40:31

Nafiseh Kohnavard there.

0:40:310:40:36

That's it for tonight.

0:40:360:40:38

Before we go, you may have heard

that singer Lana del Rey

0:40:380:40:41

is being threatened with legal

action by Radiohead for the full

0:40:410:40:44

rights to her song, Get Free,

which they say sounds

0:40:440:40:48

like their 1992 anthem, Creep.

0:40:480:40:50

But Radiohead's people are now

making more friendly noises,

0:40:500:40:54

while del Rey's fans took to social

media to remind us that Creep

0:40:540:40:59

was itself a rip-off

of The Hollies from 1974,

0:40:590:41:02

for which Radiohead

were themselves successfully sued.

0:41:020:41:05

We're looking forward

to fresh copyright claims

0:41:050:41:07

from the 1950s tomorrow.

0:41:070:41:08

Until then, you decide who takes

home the pot of gold.

0:41:080:41:11

Goodnight.

0:41:110:41:12

LANA DEL REY: # Take

the dead out of the sea.

0:41:120:41:18

# And the darkness from the arts.

0:41:180:41:24

# This is my commitment.

0:41:240:41:28

# My modern manifesto.

0:41:280:41:32

RADIOHEAD: # I wanna perfect body.

0:41:320:41:37

# I wanna perfect soul.

0:41:370:41:43

THE HOLLIES: # Peace came upon me.

0:41:430:41:48

# And it leaves me weak.

0:41:480:41:54

RADIOHEAD: # She's running out.

0:41:540:41:59

# She's run, run, run, ruuuuuun.

0:41:590:42:07

THE HOLLIES: # All I need

is the air that I breathe.

0:42:070:42:11

# Yes to love you.

0:42:110:42:19

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Emily Maitlis.

The NHS winter crisis in numbers. Farage and the second Brexit vote. Trump author Michael Woolf. Mental illness and being happy. Mosul.