12/01/2018 Newsnight


12/01/2018

Analysis of the day's headlines with Kirsty Wark. Is Facebook cleaning up its act? Is Donald Trump mentally unfit for office? The Chelsea pensioners review the new Churchill movie.


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Transcript


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The President of the United States

uses the crudest of language

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to dismiss immigrants from Haiti,

El Salvador and parts of Africa

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before calling for more immigration

from Norway instead.

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Today he went off for his annual

medical exam as his alleged words

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quickly wound up in the Wall Street

Journal.

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We'll ask the African Union's

ambassador to Washington

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if the President is just

a straightforward racist.

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Also tonight, guess

who's had an epiphany?

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People will see more posts from

people they are connected to and

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less content from publishers.

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Facebook was built to connect you to

the stories and people that matter

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most so we're going to keep

listening to you and working hard to

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make sure that's what

you see everyday.

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Is Mark Zuckerberg signalling

that his all-powerful creation

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was actually doing more

harm than good?

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We ask the content creators,

the advertisers and a leading

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psychologist whether this will make

Facebook a happier, even more

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prosperous place.

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And this...

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Now is the time to negotiate

in order to obtain the best

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conditions possible.

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You cannot reason with a tiger

when your head is in its mouth!

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We engaged some very special

Newsnight reviewers of the latest

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portrayal of Churchill

and his crucial decision in 1940.

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My parents were quite distressed

because they had gone

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through the First World War.

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But I was quite excited,

I thought it was

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going to be interesting.

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Donald Trump, no stranger

to outbursts and inappropriate

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and insulting language,

has taken it to another level,

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and has been labelled a racist today

by African politicians and diplomats

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after he was reported to have

described some immigrants coming

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from Africa and Haiti as coming

from "shithole countries"

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during a meeting at the Oval Office

at which US senators were present.

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Trump denies using such derogatory

language but the African Union said

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it was alarmed by Trump's

"very racist comments".

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So just how damaging is this

to a President who has shown himself

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unconcerned about making enemies?

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A few minutes ago I spoke to our

North America editor, Jon Sopel.

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To what extent is this the furore

of a different order

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to previous problems with Trump's

language and his insults?

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Well, I think, Kirsty, in a way

it is part of a piece, isn't it?

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Donald Trump has got himself

in trouble with, kind of,

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comments that have a bearing

on race before.

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Whether it be the fact that

Barack Obama was not an American,

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allegedly, something he withdrew

in the later stages of the campaign.

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His comments on Charlottesville.

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The way he seemed to equate

antiracism protesters with the,

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kind of, far, far right,

Ku Klux Klan, people carrying

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swastikas at a demonstration

in Charlottesville.

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And now this.

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But I suspect what's different

about this is that this has

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an international resonance.

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It is as though, if you accept

the accounts of the meeting,

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and they haven't been strenuously

denied by the White House,

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that Donald Trump believes

they are the Nato countries,

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the ASEAN countries,

and the shithole countries.

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But that has huge applications,

of course, for, as you say,

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international relations.

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The African Union have come out

tonight, various ambassadors

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from other countries mentioned,

and also, of course,

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the Haitian ambassador.

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To what extent does this do

damage to relations,

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or is Trump aside from the ordinary

American politics

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as far as this case?

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Well, I think it does damage

in the sense of, you know,

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American leadership in the world.

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But Donald Trump hasn't particularly

sought to have American

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leadership in the world,

except when it suits him.

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Except when he needs the support

of others to rally around him.

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And I think that you saw it on the,

kind of, vote where the condemnation

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of the announcement of moving the US

embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

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America found itself

very, very isolated,

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and angry at that isolation.

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And that is the price you pay with,

kind of, making these

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unguarded remarks.

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And it does seem that it

has damaged America.

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America's standing in the world.

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What about America's

standing at home?

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I mean, among his supporters

I suspect if you ask people

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about what the president had said,

you'd say was it presidential?

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A pollster would find

that they would say no.

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Were people surprised?

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I'm sure people would say no.

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And does it change your

view of Donald Trump?

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Also, probably know,

because this is what a lot

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of people voted for,

a president who can say

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what they're thinking,

but they're not saying.

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John, thanks very much indeed.

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We hope to speak to the ambassador

from the African Union very shortly.

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It's hard to estimate

the impact Facebook has had

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on politics and our lives.

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What finally did for Facebook's

rampant domination,

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some might say

enslavement of the media?

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Was it all the fake stuff,

the political interference

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in the American election?

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Or an increasing distaste

about the mining and manipulation

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of the tiniest details

of our online lives?

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Now Zuckerburg wants to take it back

to a simple social network

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and slough off all the news feeds,

the political propaganda

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and the viral diarrhoea,

and make it good for our wellbeing.

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But what brought on Mark

Zuckerburg's decision to make

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Facebook a simpler, gentler world?

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Here's our technology

editor, David Grossman.

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In the history of the world, as any

successful company ever said, we

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want you to use our product less? Do

other things with your time?

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Because, well, believe it or not,

that's what Facebook are saying.

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We also expect overall time spent

on Facebook to go down,

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but our goal is that the time people

do spend on Facebook will be better.

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This is all about what Facebook

shows us in our news feed.

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From now on the company says it's

going to downgrade professionally

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creative content from businesses,

brands, and media organisations,

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and upgrade personally created

content from people we know,

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from real human beings

in our network.

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In a post on Facebook last night,

CEO of Mark Zuckerberg said,

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it's all about making sure that time

on Facebook is an emotionally

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uplifting experience.

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We are in a really interesting space

in the tech community right

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now, which is to say,

how do we harness this addictive

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nature, the technologies that we've

built, but to contribute

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to something that's going

to be a net positive

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for an individual or for a society.

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We don't exactly know how

to measure that yet.

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This is all a new

and emerging space.

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But what today's announcement

from Facebook symbolises, to me,

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is that the senior management team

is getting behind this and is trying

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to actually get ahead of a wave,

a current of people,

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thinking more carefully about how

they are spending their time online.

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It didn't take us long to find

former Facebook users

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who've left the platform.

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For me, personally, the biggest

thing was how angry it made me.

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It's all a bit much.

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It's...

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Once you have, I suppose,

the ability to broadcast every

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single detail of your life

to everybody you know, you do.

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If anybody is thinking

of getting rid of Facebook,

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I can assure you it's the best

decision I ever made.

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It improves your mental health.

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It improves your social life.

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It improves your productivity.

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But there's also a strong

business case from Facebook,

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showing us more of the personal

stuff like this...

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And less of the corporate

stuff like this...

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Because Facebook's value depends

on what it knows about us.

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Selling that information

to advertisers.

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It's going to learn a lot less

about us if we are just

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passively scrolling

through professionally

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creative content.

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It's going to know a lot more

about us if we're creating

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and sharing content of our own.

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But this could potentially

have a huge impact

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on publishers of content,

like media organisations.

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Late last year Facebook

trialled a similar change

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to their ranking algorithm in six

countries, including Guatemala.

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When the Facebook experiment began,

we saw a huge drop of traffic

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from 30 to 60% drop.

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We saw, again, a huge drop

since yesterday when they announced

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that they will prioritise content

made by family and friends

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and reemphasise the content

made by publishers.

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These will send a seismic blow

throughout the market.

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It will be...

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It will affect, tremendously,

particularly young, innovative,

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independent news outlets.

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In essense, Facebook

is prioritising the future health

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of its brand and platform,

and the future health

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of the companies and organisations

that have spent the past five years

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building their brands on Facebook.

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It's a big change for the company,

and a big change, potentially,

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for how 2 billion people react

with the online world.

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Joining me now is Peter Heneghan,

head of communications

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at LADbible Group.

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I'm also with Catherine Becker,

chief executive of the advertising

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agency VCCP Media.

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And Daria Kuss, a psychologist

specialising in internet usage

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at Nottingham Trent University.

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Good evening. First of all, who has

got most to lose out of this?

I

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would say the audience. That is the

big winner in this case. But we see

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that as a good thing because

ultimately, the audience is what

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makes Facebook and as a publisher,

we have a huge audience so we have

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62 million followers across social

on different channels. And they see

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us as like being a friend, and as a

result we will do well out of this.

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They will find you but you won't be

quite so prominent?

Publishers will

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not be so prominent but there will

still be a lot of space for

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publishers and publishers that do

social in the right way and we are

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very good example of how to do

social in a good way.

And a variety

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of campaigns we can talk about. As

far as advertising is concerned, you

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heard the contributor in Guatemala

talking about how that traffic was

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gone and that was problematic.

There

will be winners and losers and we

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have seen these algorithm changes in

the past and it is just about

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adapting and being fleet of foot and

making sure we adapt to the new

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social engaging environment.

You

want a bloody good spin on this but

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the fact is advertising has had a

very good time on Facebook because

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you have a much bigger and quicker

audience than you have a television.

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That is going to be separated? It is

not going to be alongside the family

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and friends?

There will still be

advertising and the important thing

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is to have advertising that is

socially engaging and that people

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adapt to and reactive.

Do you think

that by doing this, Zuckerberg has

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recognised that some of the content

has a pernicious effect?

Yes and it

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is a short-term pain for the

long-term gain and it is the

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interests of the advertisers that

this is an engaged platform, it is

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about adapting to that and having

that, companies like us, being fleet

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of foot and making sure we make

changes.

You have looked at the

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impact of sustained online usage and

I wonder, do you think Mark

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Zuckerberg seriously looked at the

impact on mental health that

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Facebook was having?

That was one of

the key drivers. When we considered

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the research at Nottingham Trent

University into social media use and

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the kind of mental health benefits

or potential problems that excessive

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use can cause, we would as soon the

kinds of changes being proposed

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appear to potentially lead to really

beneficial results for the user. On

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one hand, Mark Zuckerberg is trying

to propose using Facebook in a

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different way, to have a news feed

that allows people to have more

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content from family and friends

which potentially might indeed

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impact on mental health positively.

My research has shown that when we

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are using Facebook to connect with

people around us, with our family

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and friends, this may indeed impact

on how your feeling about ourselves

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and improve our mood mental health

and well-being and in addition, what

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I need to add is if we are looking

into excessive use, which has been

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in the media a lot and is something

we have researched for a number of

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years here at Nottingham Trent, we

know that if people are using

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Facebook and other social networking

sites excessively, this might lead

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to a detrimental impact, such as

feelings of depression, anxiety,

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stress and addiction but we want to

do is try to counter this and

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potentially the new movements with

Facebook may lead to providing a way

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into how to improve the situation.

And ensure users are happier in

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engaging with Facebook.

I wonder if

that idea, interacting as opposed to

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passive viewing, is something that

you take on board when thinking

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about the content you make for your

website? Do you recognise the

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problems that we're talking about?

Absolutely, and the example I can

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give is we asked our audience what

was important to them and they told

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us that the biggest issue for them

was mental health. We launched a

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campaign which allowed us to talk in

a really relatable way to the

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millennial audience and that was

helpful because we explained that

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one in four people will at some

point suffer from a mental health

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problem, not necessarily due to

Facebook but generally in life. For

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the first time, people came back to

us and said, you are allowed us to

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sit with our friends in the pub and

talk about mental health and

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Facebook enabled us to do that.

Although there is negativity within

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social media, there is also

positivity and we have experienced

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that.

We still have a situation

where people they know their friends

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and seeing how much better they are

doing, there will still be that

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element of Facebook?

But equally you

have that outside of Facebook,

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people will always look at friends,

they have a better car while they

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seem to be getting married earlier

and so forth. They will always look

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at that in a way and maybe feel

uneasy about themselves. But

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ultimately, I don't believe that is

the responsibility of Facebook.

This

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idea that David Grossman was talking

about is no use to Facebook if

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people are scrolling and not

waiting. Presumably, that is what is

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happening in advertising so you will

hope that people stick longer on a

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page?

And the more engaged they are

cleaned up -- we know the more

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effective advertising can be because

they are participating with that

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brand and advertising works harder

at that. That is what we have been

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advising clients to do.

Mark

Zuckerberg is not just in this as an

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altruist, he wants to make money.

While? You have millennials, and

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many of them are on Instagram and

other sites and how do you get them

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back?

There are two factors, the

audience of 2 billion, but is a

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finite audience and he has saturated

that the other major is engagement

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and the length of time they are on

Facebook and that is what he is

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encouraging. Encouraging a human

being to be on Facebook longer? What

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is positive about this press release

is it is talking about making people

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more engaged and happy. We want a

more positive outcome and that is

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better.

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Mark Zuckerberg was influenced by

the impact on children. What's good

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about Facebook if it is interactive

and has children on them for even

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longer than they are at the moment,

how is that good for mental health?

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When we are looking at children,

their brains are still developing,

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they have a considerable way to go

until their brain has reached full

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maturity, we need to be careful in

terms of technology use. American

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paediatricians are now really

speaking of limiting the use of

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technology, including Facebook,

social media, etc, for children.

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Especially at the years of two,

three, four. We need to be careful.

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Facebook is only allowed to be used

by teenagers from the age of 13.

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This is for particular reasons. We

need to be able to curb technology

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used to such an extent that the

developing brain went been

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negatively affected. It's not really

a problem. As long as we as parents

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and teachers are making children

aware that there may be potential

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dangers associated with overuse and

that we are very much aware of the

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benefits of social networking and

social media use at the same time.

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It's always very important to be

able to see two side of the coin.

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Otherwise we would have a limited

and one-sided discussion.

Briefly,

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Peter, we talk about Mark Zuckerberg

as if he has had a great epiphany,

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but the truth of the matter is had

there not been all of the problems

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with the fake news on the

interference with the American

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elections, do you think this would

have happened?

I think he has looked

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at this. He realises the audience is

the key. He's making the decisions

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that what is best for the audience

is ultimately better for Facebook.

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Thank you all very much indeed.

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Everybody's talking about the Oscar

chances of 'Darkest Hour',

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the story of how Winston Churchill

shrugged off the doubters

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and appeasers to lead

Britain against the Nazis.

0:18:190:18:21

The film, released today,

has already earned a Golden Globe

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for the veteran British actor

Gary Oldman as the wartime PM.

0:18:230:18:26

The critics have been generous

with their praise, but how well

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does the film stand up for those

who were actually around

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when the film was set, in 1940?

0:18:310:18:33

Newsnight took a charabanc

of Chelsea Pensioners -

0:18:330:18:35

men in their eighties and nineties

who served in the second world

0:18:350:18:38

war - to see the film.

0:18:380:18:39

These distinguished old soldiers

shared their memories

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with our still-surprisingly callow

and jejune Stephen Smith.

0:18:410:18:49

We are looking at the collapse of

Western Europe in the next few days.

0:18:500:18:55

How long have they got if we don't

rescue them? Maybe two days, we

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would need a miracle to get our men

passed.

Gary Oldman and his

0:19:000:19:05

extraordinary prosthetics have been

acclaimed for this story of

0:19:050:19:08

Churchill's struggle against the

Nazis and his own party.

We must

0:19:080:19:12

renegotiate peace talks.

When will

the lesson be learned, you cannot

0:19:120:19:16

reason with a tiger!

0:19:160:19:22

reason with a tiger!

But we wondered

how it would go down with Britons

0:19:260:19:29

who actually lived through the

film's Darkest Hour, May 19 40.

0:19:290:19:37

film's Darkest Hour, May 19 40.

I'm

91. I joined the Scots Guards in

0:19:370:19:40

1944.

Hello, I'm Alan, I served in

Burma and India.

My name is James

0:19:400:19:58

Little, I'm 87, and I served in the

Corps of Royal Engineers.

My name's

0:19:580:20:04

Fred Ruck. I served with the Royal

intellectual and mechanical

0:20:040:20:09

engineers during the Second World

War. Having got rid of Hitler, I

0:20:090:20:14

came out of the Army in 1947.

Good

afternoon, gentlemen, you must be

0:20:140:20:21

the Chelsea Pensioners. Very nice to

see you. Fancy a trip to the

0:20:210:20:25

pictures?

That would be very

interesting. Take us with you.

0:20:250:20:33

We put our distinguished old

soldiers on short rations of Rosie

0:20:360:20:41

Lee and plain biscuits and settled

in for the feature.

Where you are

0:20:410:20:47

doing your victory sign. In the

poorer quarters that gesture means

0:20:470:20:55

something else.

What does it mean?

I

wouldn't like to say.

I must catch

0:20:550:21:01

it.

Up your bum, Sir.

Up your bum?

LAUGHTER

0:21:010:21:14

The way you are doing it, yes, sir.

In my memory it was always referred

0:21:140:21:22

to a cantankerous so and so. He was

always referred. That's when we

0:21:220:21:31

wanted somebody like that, at the

time.

What did you think of Gary

0:21:310:21:35

Oldman in the part?

Very good.

Did

he convince you?

Yes, very good.

The

0:21:350:21:42

other thing that was good was the

relationship between King George VI

0:21:420:21:47

and Churchill. The way that was

portrayed.

I believe we are to speak

0:21:470:21:51

regularly.

Once a week, I'm afraid.

How are you for Mondays?

I shall

0:21:510:22:00

endeavour to be here on Mondays.

Four o'clock.

I nap at four.

Is that

0:22:000:22:08

permissible?

No, but necessary.

He

was the right man, at the right

0:22:080:22:14

time, in the right place, and the

public knew that, from what I

0:22:140:22:19

recall. But I think, you know, the

battles in Parliament were once that

0:22:190:22:24

he had to take on and thank God he

won them, otherwise we wouldn't be

0:22:240:22:28

here talking about it now.

Did you

feel fear at the time of joining up?

0:22:280:22:33

No.

You are smiling.

Youngsters

don't feel fear, it's all

0:22:330:22:41

excitement. I remember when it was

announced we were at war with

0:22:410:22:44

Germany. How my parents were quite

distressed because they had gone

0:22:440:22:48

through the First World War, but I

was excited, I thought it would be

0:22:480:22:52

interesting.

Watch that film did for

me, it conjured up memories of me as

0:22:520:22:57

a young lad. A lot of very young

fellows, with no experience, not

0:22:570:23:05

knowing what would happen to them,

went off. And a lot of them didn't

0:23:050:23:10

survive. And you think about how old

these chaps were, 17, 18, 19 years

0:23:100:23:15

old. Incredible.

0:23:150:23:21

Two trumpet stories make it to the

front pages. -- two Donald Trump

0:23:250:23:33

stories. The Daily

0:23:330:23:36

front pages. -- two Donald Trump

stories. The Daily Mail says he

0:23:360:23:37

isn't coming to Britain next month,

partly because he doesn't like the

0:23:370:23:41

architecture of the new US embassy.

He is going to miss out on the royal

0:23:410:23:45

wedding.

0:23:450:23:50

We hoped to be joined from Nashville

by Dr Arikana Chihombori-Quao,

0:23:530:23:55

the African Union's ambassador

to the United States.

0:23:550:23:57

Unfortunately she has been snowed

in.

0:23:570:24:00

Today, Trump flew to the Walter Reed

National Miilitary Medical Centre

0:24:000:24:02

in Maryland for his first medical

since taking office,

0:24:020:24:05

from which he'll receive doctors'

notes indicating whether he is "fit

0:24:050:24:07

to serve", which Trump is under no

obligation to publish.

0:24:070:24:10

But this is a physical,

whereas the speculation

0:24:100:24:12

surrounding his mental health

is swirling constantly,

0:24:120:24:13

especially after the publication

of Michael Wolff's book.

0:24:130:24:15

President Trump, of course,

has self diagnosed -

0:24:150:24:17

calling himself "mentally stable

and, like, really smart."

0:24:170:24:19

But such is one Ivy League

psychiatrist's concern

0:24:190:24:21

about Trump's mental state,

which she describes as "dangerous",

0:24:210:24:23

that Bandy Lee held a private

meeting with members of Congress

0:24:230:24:26

to convince them that he is "unfit

to serve" and has been calling

0:24:260:24:29

for a mental health evaluation

for more than a year.

0:24:290:24:31

I spoke to her earlier.

0:24:310:24:36

I've never met him and I'm not

interested in making any comments

0:24:360:24:39

that relate to things

I cannot assess.

0:24:390:24:41

So basically the Goldwater rule

was implemented after about 10%

0:24:410:24:43

of the psychiatrists

who were surveyed returned

0:24:430:24:45

with an answer saying that

Mr Goldwater was unfit.

0:24:450:24:52

That is not an assessment

we can make from afar.

0:24:520:24:55

And all that I am speaking

to are the worrying signs

0:24:550:24:57

of possible incapacity and therefore

calling for an evaluation.

0:24:570:25:05

If you haven't met him,

if you haven't spoken to him,

0:25:110:25:14

if you haven't been in the same room

as him, how can you assert

0:25:140:25:19

that he is dangerous?

0:25:190:25:22

The information that is important

for dangerousness is mostly not

0:25:220:25:25

obtained in an in-person interview.

0:25:250:25:28

In fact, a personal interview is not

likely to reveal very

0:25:280:25:31

important information.

0:25:310:25:37

What you look at are patterns

of behaviour, responses

0:25:370:25:39

to situations, how the individual

is evolving over time

0:25:390:25:46

and others' reports.

0:25:460:25:47

People who work close to him.

0:25:470:25:51

As well as written statements

and verbal statements over time.

0:25:510:25:57

So it's actually a vast amount

of data that we already have

0:25:570:26:00

on Mr Trump, far more

than we generally do with most

0:26:000:26:03

of our patients, in fact.

0:26:030:26:05

Still, that doesn't allow us to make

a diagnosis but there is certainly

0:26:050:26:08

ample objective data to be able

to say that he is a

0:26:080:26:11

high risk, a danger.

0:26:110:26:19

So tell me, in your evaluations

and in your observations of data

0:26:240:26:27

and indeed your observations

of the President, what do

0:26:270:26:30

you think are the key things,

the key signs which lead

0:26:300:26:32

you to believe that this man

is dangerous and capable

0:26:320:26:35

of acting dangerously?

0:26:350:26:38

First of all, past violence

is the best predictor

0:26:380:26:42

for future violence.

0:26:420:26:47

He has shown verbal aggressiveness,

a history of boasting

0:26:470:26:49

about sexual assaults,

a history of inciting

0:26:490:26:51

violence at his rallies.

0:26:510:26:53

A history of endorsing violence

in his public speeches.

0:26:530:26:57

And a continual taunting of

a hostile nation with nuclear power.

0:26:570:27:00

All of these are signs of danger

and he has also exhibited

0:27:000:27:05

characteristics that are highly

associated with violence,

0:27:050:27:08

which include impulsivity,

recklessness, paranoid reactions,

0:27:080:27:11

showing a loose grip on reality,

having no empathy, rage

0:27:110:27:13

reactions and a constant need

to burnish his sense of power.

0:27:130:27:16

These are all associated

with dangerousness.

0:27:160:27:24

There has been reaction from African

0:27:310:27:33

There has been reaction from African

nations, also highlighted, El

0:27:330:27:36

Salvador, and the UN to remarks made

by Donald Trump in the oval Office

0:27:360:27:40

in front of senators and a

bipartisan meeting where he

0:27:400:27:43

apparently talked about African

countries and Haiti being shithole

0:27:430:27:49

countries.

0:27:490:27:54

We are joined from Nashville

by Dr Arikana Chihombori-Quao,

0:27:570:27:59

the African Union's ambassador

to the United States.

0:27:590:28:02

I wonder what the African Union's

response has been to the office of

0:28:020:28:07

the president. I know you said he

has been racist. But what is the

0:28:070:28:12

next step to deal with this?

As the

African Union we were quite

0:28:120:28:18

appalled. Infuriated, outraged by

the comments. For a country like the

0:28:180:28:27

United States, which is a valued

partner for the Africans, this was

0:28:270:28:32

quite a shock.

President Trump

appeared to say today that fewer

0:28:320:28:41

immigrants from Africa, more

immigrants from Norway. Do you think

0:28:410:28:44

President Trump's statements have

been racist?

His words will speak

0:28:440:28:50

for themselves and for himself. What

I can say unequivocally is that our

0:28:500:28:57

contributions to the United States,

as Africans who came electively, and

0:28:570:29:04

as Africans who came in shackles,

and for the administration to

0:29:040:29:14

disregard the contributions of the

Africans, through the continental

0:29:140:29:17

Africans, as well as the

African-Americans, I think that is

0:29:170:29:21

just really unfortunate. Will the

African Union be seeking an apology?

0:29:210:29:29

-- Donald Trump has denied making

derogatory remarks, but the White

0:29:290:29:33

House has not been unequivocal in

its denial, and I wonder if you will

0:29:330:29:38

be seeking clarification and also if

it is indeed the case that he used

0:29:380:29:42

that language you will be seeking an

apology?

Absolutely. We will be

0:29:420:29:48

looking to having a conversation

with the State Department. And

0:29:480:29:52

requesting for clarification on that

matter. But also it's important that

0:29:520:29:56

there is a better understanding of

the Africans by the administration.

0:29:560:30:01

That's my role, to make sure that

our relationship with the United

0:30:010:30:07

States is a power. And it is my

responsibility to clarify any

0:30:070:30:14

mistakes. I definitely will be

reaching out to the State Department

0:30:140:30:18

for a conversation.

It's interesting

because you have said and are saying

0:30:180:30:23

that there is a vast

misunderstanding of Africa within

0:30:230:30:30

Trump's administration. Is that

because there has been a change of

0:30:300:30:35

administration? Or do you think it

is an ongoing misunderstanding?

I

0:30:350:30:39

think it is an ongoing

misunderstanding of Africa in

0:30:390:30:42

general. As Africans we have a

responsibility to step up, speak

0:30:420:30:46

out, make our position is known,

make sure not only must we expect

0:30:460:30:53

the American agenda. But also make

sure we have an agenda to the United

0:30:530:31:00

States. Make clear what we accept

from the US. What areas are up for

0:31:000:31:05

discussion. As African nations,

absolutely, we must articulate our

0:31:050:31:10

position. We also have to be very

clear as to what areas are

0:31:100:31:15

completely no go. What we will not

accept at all. We have a

0:31:150:31:19

responsibility to articulate our

policy on the US.

At the beginning

0:31:190:31:25

of the programme our North American

editor said many people will be

0:31:250:31:28

shocked by the language and the

sentiment expressed by Donald Trump.

0:31:280:31:33

Though, as I say come he does deny

it. But for much of his base, they

0:31:330:31:39

will think this is OK, they would

expect this kind of language from

0:31:390:31:43

the president. Our correspondent

said that what he is saying is

0:31:430:31:47

answered by them but they are happy

to hear the president say it. What

0:31:470:31:50

do you make of that?

There is always

going to be a segment of the

0:31:500:31:56

population that feel otherwise. Even

during slavery. As you know, there

0:31:560:32:02

was a percentage of the population

who felt that slavery should have

0:32:020:32:06

continued. To those we pray for

them. We are not going to stop

0:32:060:32:11

moving the African agenda forward

because of a small group of eight

0:32:110:32:15

few people who are in the fringes of

society. -- small group of a few

0:32:150:32:21

people.

Thank you very much.

Thank

you, and keep up the good work.

0:32:210:32:30

That's it for tonight.

0:32:300:32:32

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Kirsty Wark.

Is Facebook cleaning up its act? Is Donald Trump mentally unfit for office? The Chelsea pensioners review the new Churchill movie.


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