02/02/2018 Newsnight


02/02/2018

In-depth investigation and analysis of the stories behind the day's headlines with Emily Maitlis.


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The legitimacy and legality of the

FBI's investigation into Donald

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Trump is called into question by

Republicans who accuse the

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intelligence agency of bias.

Think

it is a disgrace, what is happening

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in our country, when you look at

that and you see that, so many other

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things that is going on, a lot of

people should be ashamed of

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themselves, and much worse than

that.

He claims members of the FBI

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are against him. We live in

Washington, DC with a man who lives

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and breathes the White House.

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And how do you remember the 2017

election? Newsnight has been granted

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a sneak peek of the work of official

election artist Cordelia Parker.

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Shall we do something here that

doesn't happen very often? Shake

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hands. Great seeing you again.

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Good evening.

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Is the FBI's investigation

into Donald Trump

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compromised by it's reliance

on the work of British Spy

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desperate to bring him down?

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Trump believes it is.

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Tonight, the US President called

for the release of a top secret

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memorandum which accused the FBI

of abusing its powers.

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The document, written by senior

republicans supportive of trump,

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criticises the way the FBI and US

Justice Department used

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Christopher Steele's claims

to approve a wiretap

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on a Trump campaign adviser.

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Steele was, you remember,

partly funded by the Democrats.

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Trump, as you can

imagine, was not amused.

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The memo was sent to Congress.

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It was declassified.

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Congress will do whatever

they're going to do.

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But I think it is a disgrace

what is happening in our country.

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Why does this matter?

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These questions about memos

on dossiers on intelligence

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from spies can get pretty

messy pretty quickly.

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So what is the bigger picture here?

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Nyall Stanage, associate editor

at The Hill joins me

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now from Washington DC.

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Niall put this in context

for us - how big is this?

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This is a huge story here. This is

probably the biggest we've seen

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since James Comey was fired by

Donald Trump. He was the FBI

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director last year. This is

something that puts the White House

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and the FBI in a state of virtual

war with one another and raises lots

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of questions about the independence

of the law enforcement system.

When

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you talk about a state of virtual

war, where does that put the Mueller

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investigation?

Fascinating that this

has happened at a time when he has

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been talking about interviewing

Trump. We will see if they use that

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to avoid the interview. But I think

this raises questions, at least in

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the minds of the sceptics, which is

already what Mueller is looking

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into. So that doesn't really help

the president in the broader

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picture.

Did the Democrats get

something fundamentally wrong? Are

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they recognising that fairly serious

errors were made that have played

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right into Trump's understanding of

that narrative?

It's debatable.

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Errors have been seized upon by

Republicans and people in the media

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who are friendly to Trump. Democrats

are pushing back very hard at this

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memo. They want to release their

room counter memo rebutting these

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points. They say the Republican

version doesn't tell the full story.

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-- release their own counter memo.

There is this idea that there are

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many Trump friendly hands all

pumping at a Bellows to try to

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create or cast doubt on Mueller.

That is a point of the Democrats are

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making.

What Republicans around

Trump thinking or saying to you

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tonight?

Some of them, of course,

are very impressed by what they have

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put out. Others are less so. Even a

Republican source I was talking to

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was speaking fearfully about the

idea the president would use this as

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a blunt force instrument to go right

at Mueller. If that happened we

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would be in the territory of

constitutional crisis.

Thanks very

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much.

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Tonight, Newsnight can

reveal the true extent

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of what appears to amount

to war crimes in Syria.

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This programme has seen the most

compelling evidence yet that Assad's

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forces are repeatedly

targeting hospitals, medical

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centres, and ambulances.

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As many as 500 strikes have now been

verified in rebel strong

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holds like eastern Aleppo,

eastern Ghuta and Idlib.

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The footage and witness accounts

that we are about to bring you paint

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a picture of a country that has

surrendered to Assad

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in all but name.

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And show an administration

led by a man consistently prepared

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to direct violence at some

of the most vulnerable

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citizens in his country.

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Viewers may find scenes in

Mike Thompson's report distressing.

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People come to

hospitals for healing.

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But in rebel-held areas of Syria,

they have now become places to die.

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On Monday, the Oday Hospital

in Saraqeb, southern Idlib,

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was bombed for the fourth time.

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On Tuesday, a bomb hit

its medical warehouse, too.

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Five people are reported to have

died and all medical services

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have now been abandoned.

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Bereft of anywhere to treat them,

Saraqeb's injured now have to be

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taken many miles north to the city

of Idlib for treatment.

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But when they get to the central

hospital, doctors there struggle

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to deal with the growing number

of new arrivals, many of whom have

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injuries they are unable to treat,

and patients moved on yet again.

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TRANSLATION:

Since we cannot cope

with most of the injuries

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that we have admitted

to the hospital, we do

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indeed transfer them

to the northern medical point.

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And what makes things a lot worse

is that the fighters actually target

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ambulances and any cars suspected

as belonging to the civil defence.

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TRANSLATION:

It is barbaric.

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The medical crews

should not be attacked.

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We get bombed and shot at,

even after we collect

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the injured of the roads.

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We get hit with rockets

and machine gun fire.

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The destruction of hospitals hasn't

just been happening in Idlib,

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but right across Syria.

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The New York-based campaign

organisation Physicians For Human

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Rights claims there are 492 verified

attacks on hospitals,

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mostly by Syrian government forces,

since the war began.

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But the group claims that

what amounts to a war

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on health is not confined

to the bombing of hospitals.

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Physicians For Human Rights has also

documented the blocking

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of humanitarian aid,

including deliberate

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stripping of medical supplies

from humanitarian convoys.

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Just today, the UN came out asking

the Russians, the Iranis,

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the Turkish authorities,

to push the Syrian government

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to allow for humanitarian aid.

Apparently, the Syrian government

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has not authorised aid

for the past two months.

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The Syrian government has denied

that it deliberately attacks

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hospitals or other civilian targets.

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But Physicians For Human Rights say

they have documented 11 attacks

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on this one hospital alone

in eastern Aleppo last year.

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Could a mistake be

made that many times?

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At this point I think it is on them

to prove it is not deliberate.

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As we have documented attacks

on health care facilities that

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are in remote areas,

where they really could not have

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wanted to hit anything else.

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As we have documented double attacks

where the same facilities

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are being hit as first responders

are there, as ambulances

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are leaving with patients.

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As we are documenting attacks

on hospitals that have been built

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into caves in order to protect them,

I think there is a lot of

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circumstantial evidence to suggest

these are indeed targeted attacks.

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International lawyer Geoffrey Nice

lead the entire prosecution case

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against Slobodan Milosevic.

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He insists nearly all governments

know the coordinates

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of their hospitals,

which would in any case

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have their roofs clearly marked.

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This, combined with increasingly

sophisticated arms, makes repeated

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mistakes very improbable.

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With modern weaponry,

accurate strike is possible.

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And inaccurate, accidental

non-strike may happen,

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I suppose, from time to time,

but not 11 times.

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In 11 times looks, does it not,

like part of an intentional plan.

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But Geoffrey Nice doubts

that we are likely to see war crimes

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trials any time soon,

or other actions against Syria,

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thanks partly to Russia's much-used

UN Security Council veto.

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TRANSLATION:

The world

simply watches.

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Nobody responds, not one

has helped us till now,

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or stopped the bombardment.

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The situation is quite desperate.

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We need someone to hear our voice

and to see what is happening here.

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We have come a long way,

it seems, since the heady,

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euphoric days of the Arab Spring

seven years ago, though

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not in the direction

hoped for back then.

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Civil war in Syria has evolved

into a regional sectarian conflict

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and has now been spreading even

wider, so making a solution

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ever more complicated

and difficult to find.

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I'm now joined from Princeton

by Ryan Crocker, the former US

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ambassador to Syria.

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And with me in the studio is Ruth

Citrin, Director of the Middle East

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and North Africa Programme

at the European Council

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of Foreign Relations.

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for Syria and Lebanon

at the National Security Council.

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It is great to have you guys here.

Do you accept that President Assad

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has been all but named won this war?

Let me start with some truth and

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advertising. I was 15 years, more

than 15 years with the US

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Department. 15 years in the White

House would have me crossing

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multiple administrations. I am a

long-time civil servant. The point

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about Russia and the strikes that we

currently see is, in essence, that

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you have multiple complex still

ongoing inside Syria. Those strikes

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against hospitals are really the

regime going after what it terms

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terrorists in areas that were

essentially in de-escalation zones

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agreed upon by the Russians, Turks,

and Iranians, with Russian help. It

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increases the territory under

President Assad's control. This has

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been going on since the early days

of the de-escalation agreements. The

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regime is expanding. The amount of

territory that it holds with

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Russia's help. Eventually it will

hit the borders where you have

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coalition supported Kurdish forces.

This would not have been possible

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without the backing of Putin?

It

wouldn't. It would not have been

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possible without a rainy and help.

All the help of his

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-- it would not have been possible

without

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without Iranian help.

We are nowhere

near the end of a war. I spent sexy

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vixen that the none. Different tours

during the Civil War. That went for

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15 years. And it is far more

complex. -- I

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complex. -- I spent six years in

Lebanon on.

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After strike after strike on

civilians in Aleppo, John Kerry was

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to call his Russian counterpart or

go and visit Moscow. Frankly I think

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we went from

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we went from appeasement to

complicity in those crimes.

Is it

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now too late for Trump to push back

against Putin? Do you think his

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military action last April was the

right course?

The action in April...

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It was a token. A one-off. It

changed absolutely nothing. The

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president had an opportunity to take

a much tougher position on Russia.

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But as he has done since the

beginning of his presidency, he

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elected not to do that. So we have

interesting consistency and policy

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from Barack Obama to Trump.

Unfortunately it is in all of the

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wrong directions. With the current

administration it is president to

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president.

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We always risk overstating what the

US is capable of doing in Syria and

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right now the United States has a

couple of thousand troops in the

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areas that are held by Syrian

Kurdish forces that they have been

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working with against Isis.

How can

it be right we overstate America's

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potential in Syria but not President

Putin's?

Given all the

0:15:160:15:24

considerations, made the decision it

was not in US interest to assert

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that kind of military power to try

to change the balance of power on

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the ground. President Putin

determined it was in Russian

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interests to do so. And would wave

in front of the international

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community that the legitimate

government of Syria invited him in.

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I know you dispute the idea we are

near the end but would you agree

0:15:450:15:50

nobody stands a chance of winning

it, if that is a word, except for

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Assad now?

You have to define

winning. How will he rule over how

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much will he will rule with what

assets? Wars like this, and I have

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seen too much of it, are not

predictable. Does he win if various

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militia from the Islamists to the

Kurdish are holding most of the

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territory of a country? Does anybody

win?

My expectation is it will just

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go on. You think devolution is

possible and there could be

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different regions autonomously

controlled?

Ryan's point about the

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limits to what the Syrian regime and

forces can do is important. Assad is

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not capable of really taking the

entire country, especially not with

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the Syrian Kurdish forces backed by

the coalition holding the ground

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east of the Euphrates. Certainly

also not in the south. Where Israel

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has a stake in preventing the regime

from extending control to the

0:17:080:17:13

border. Probably in agreement with

Russia.

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Russia. Prime Minister Benjamin

Netanyahu and he will talk about

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Israeli red lines with respect to

infiltration along the border and I

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suspect President Assad's aim is to

attenuate the conflict and work with

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allies to gain as much ground as

possible, but even to rest and refit

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and move forces elsewhere under

de-escalation but there are

0:17:380:17:42

boundaries. He will reach the

limits, and there is where we come

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to the question of what next? The

what's next should in theory be

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devolution of authority in ways that

allow these small pockets...

To

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administer themselves. Ambassador, I

would like to ask about the Trump

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memo release this evening. The last

guest called it the biggest crisis

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since Comey was five. Is there a

constitutional crisis between the

0:18:140:18:20

FBI and the president in terms of

faith?

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faith?

I have no idea what the

specific points are. I am not a

0:18:280:18:31

lawyer. The crisis I see and it is a

dangerous one, is the crisis of

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extreme partisan ship. To release a

memo drafted by Republican staff and

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sent only to Republican members on

such key issues, I think is a loud

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warning bell. If we do not climb off

this ledge of partisanship I think

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bad things will happen.

Thank you.

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Now the moment on Newsnight

when we turn up the dial and hear

0:18:580:19:02

an impassioned argument.

0:19:020:19:03

Tonight, it's the turn

of mental health campaigner,

0:19:030:19:04

author and actor, Ruby Wax.

0:19:040:19:12

Ruby wax.

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There's new evidence

that the testing regime that

0:21:230:21:26

keeps our buildings safe from fire

is fundamentally flawed.

0:21:260:21:29

The company that makes Celotex,

the insulation used in Grenfell

0:21:290:21:33

tower, has retracted the result

of the test it relied

0:21:330:21:36

upon to sell the product

for use on tall buildings.

0:21:360:21:39

The retraction is because a major

error was made in the safety tests -

0:21:390:21:43

they added an additional layer

of fire-resistant material

0:21:430:21:47

onto the test design

without telling test scientists.

0:21:470:21:49

The admission is the

latest in a series of

0:21:490:21:51

clarifications by the firm,

0:21:510:21:53

and it raises serious questions

about how fire testing

0:21:530:21:57

in this country works,

and how confident the public can be

0:21:570:22:00

that the necessary

standards are being met.

0:22:000:22:01

Chris Cook has our report.

0:22:010:22:03

This week, there was a curious

new development in what we know

0:22:030:22:06

about how dangerous cladding came

to be on towers across the country,

0:22:060:22:10

including Grenfell Tower,

where the cladding had such

0:22:100:22:12

a terrible cost.

0:22:120:22:17

A lot of attention has been paid

to the cladding's outer layer.

0:22:170:22:20

Aluminium panels which had

a combustible plastic core.

0:22:200:22:24

Those flammable panels

were critical to the disaster.

0:22:240:22:27

But beneath them was a much

thicker layer of flammable

0:22:270:22:35

plastic foam insulation,

a product sold under

0:22:360:22:38

the name Celotex RS5000.

0:22:380:22:39

Celotex is an excellent insulator.

0:22:390:22:41

For any given weight or thickness

of the material that helps

0:22:410:22:42

keep homes very warm.

0:22:420:22:44

But it's combustible,

so can only be used on tall

0:22:440:22:47

buildings in certain designs,

designs that have been carefully

0:22:470:22:49

assembled on a rig like this

and then tested against fire.

0:22:490:22:55

We already know the design

at Grenfell was never tested, but,

0:22:550:22:58

this week, the makers of Celotex

announced they were withdrawing

0:22:580:23:00

the only such test they had

prior to the fire.

0:23:000:23:08

Back in 2014, the company that makes

Celotex insulation sought to test

0:23:090:23:12

a design that was very different

to the design used

0:23:120:23:14

at the Grenfell Tower.

0:23:140:23:18

It was a design that

would hem in the combustible

0:23:180:23:21

insulation in on all sides with very

flameproof material.

0:23:210:23:24

But what they installed at the test

centre for testing was a slightly

0:23:240:23:27

different design than the test

centre scientists were expecting.

0:23:270:23:30

It was a design that would be more

likely to pass the test,

0:23:300:23:38

Based on subsequent test results,

there is very strong reason

0:23:390:23:41

to suppose that the original design

would have passed anyway.

0:23:410:23:44

But this raises a serious question.

0:23:440:23:46

Why is it that it took four years

and the fire at Grenfell Tower

0:23:460:23:49

for anyone to notice this very

serious breach in

0:23:490:23:51

the testing regime?

0:23:510:23:52

And there is more.

0:23:520:24:00

In 2011, Celotex passed a test

relating to a flame's ability

0:24:040:24:12

to travel over the surface

of the insulation.

0:24:120:24:14

But it failed a retest last year.

0:24:140:24:17

A separate test found it was not

as good as previously thought

0:24:170:24:19

at insulating homes.

0:24:190:24:20

We don't know quite

what is going on here.

0:24:200:24:22

A scientist who developed Celotex

products long before they went

0:24:220:24:24

on tall buildings thinks part

of the issue is these tests

0:24:240:24:27

are all done in secret.

0:24:270:24:28

What I think is it should happen.

0:24:280:24:31

That reports which I used as a base

for product certifications

0:24:310:24:33

should be published.

0:24:330:24:36

Should be publicly available,

so everybody can access reports

0:24:360:24:44

and scrutinise these test reports.

0:24:440:24:45

Celotex has already suspended

a number of products

0:24:450:24:49

and is retesting them and seeking

to establish what the safety

0:24:490:24:52

consequences of this are.

0:24:520:24:55

But as the ongoing review

of building regulations has found,

0:24:550:24:57

the problems we have go well

beyond one insulation company.

0:24:570:25:03

Chris Cook is here.

0:25:030:25:07

Do you sense it helps us to

understand Grenfell better?

It helps

0:25:070:25:13

us understand the picture in an

important way. We have talked a lot

0:25:130:25:19

about how for examples there are

companies that will test one design

0:25:190:25:24

for fire safety and take a totally

different design say they are

0:25:240:25:28

basically the same, even though we

know they are not. We have talked

0:25:280:25:35

about the transparency problem about

how you can live in a tower with

0:25:350:25:39

this potentially dangerous cladding

and you are not allowed to see the

0:25:390:25:42

evidence that says the building you

are living in is safe. It adds a new

0:25:420:25:47

angle to both of those things, which

is what if the tests that happen are

0:25:470:25:52

terrible, just wrong? What if the

tests allow bad cladding designs

0:25:520:25:58

through? In that situation, those

two problems that you cannot see the

0:25:580:26:04

evidence and the fact people might

be manipulating evidence to get

0:26:040:26:08

unsafe designs onto building become

worse.

Thank you.

0:26:080:26:15

Cast your mind back to that

turbulent few months

0:26:150:26:17

of the 2017 election campaign.

0:26:170:26:20

The terrorist attacks

in London and Manchester,

0:26:200:26:23

the leaked Labour manifesto,

the Tory U-turn on social care,

0:26:230:26:26

alongside the insistence

nothing had changed.

0:26:260:26:27

And then the night itself.

0:26:270:26:29

Exit polls.

0:26:290:26:30

Victories.

0:26:300:26:31

Defeats.

0:26:310:26:32

And Lord Buckethead.

0:26:320:26:35

That is, perhaps,

a journalist's take on it.

0:26:350:26:37

But what would an artist find?

0:26:370:26:38

Cornelia Parker was named official

artist of the 2017 election.

0:26:380:26:41

And in an exclusive interview

with Steve Smith, she reveals

0:26:410:26:43

for the first time how she saw it,

and what she created from it.

0:26:430:26:50

It took a lot of negotiating

and time and permissions,

0:26:500:26:56

and nothing moves fast,

so it was quite a challenge,

0:26:560:26:58

but it was fantastic

to have that opportunity.

0:26:580:27:03

I needed a drone, I think,

because I wanted to have two

0:27:030:27:11

cameras in the House,

the benign one, a dispassionate

0:27:110:27:15

camera that just watches

the drone do its stuff.

0:27:150:27:18

A kind of malevolent one,

which is the drone, which is a free

0:27:180:27:23

radical swooping around,

hunting, or surveilling.

0:27:230:27:26

The film is called Left,

Right and Centre, and it's basically

0:27:260:27:31

filmed at night at the beginning.

0:27:310:27:32

It is stacks of

newspapers on this desk.

0:27:320:27:34

All of the newspapers

from the election period and beyond.

0:27:340:27:36

About five months of newspapers.

0:27:360:27:38

All of these newspapers

have been read here in

0:27:380:27:41

the Houses of Parliament.

0:27:410:27:42

They are the ones they subscribe to.

0:27:420:27:45

I put all the right-wing

newspapers on the right side,

0:27:450:27:50

and all the left-wing on the left,

and the drone disrupts

0:27:500:27:54

all of the papers and blows

them all over the House,

0:27:540:27:57

creating this terrible mess.

0:27:570:27:58

Left and right newspapers all get

mingled together and they form this,

0:27:580:28:01

kind of, bombardment,

visual bombardment,

0:28:010:28:03

of news headlines, some

trivial, some meaningful.

0:28:030:28:11

A lot of your finished

pieces concern the printed

0:28:140:28:16

media, the press.

0:28:160:28:17

But there's a view that they are

rather on the way out now.

0:28:170:28:20

Yeah, but the fourth

estate is not going away,

0:28:200:28:22

people read newspapers

online, that's all.

0:28:220:28:25

The physical object,

I like the cliche of the newspaper.

0:28:250:28:27

Is that what it's become now?

0:28:270:28:28

I think it has.

0:28:280:28:32

I love all of those things

in films where you see

0:28:320:28:35

the newspapers spinning round,

and, you know, on the news

0:28:350:28:37

you always having a factory

where they are printing them.

0:28:370:28:39

So I quite like the

cliche value of that.

0:28:390:28:42

Perhaps if newspapers have gone

in ten years it'll be

0:28:420:28:46

a snapshot of a time,

but they haven't

0:28:460:28:48

gone away, you know?

0:28:480:28:50

You get off the Tube at the end

of the day and it's covered

0:28:500:28:53

in Evening Standards.

0:28:530:28:54

I like that.

0:28:540:28:55

When you see the Tube covered

in Evening Standards.

0:28:550:28:57

It's somehow people have digested

something and they've moved on.

0:28:570:29:00

Let's talk about the Instagram feed.

0:29:000:29:02

You know, it was left completely up

to me what I wanted to deliver

0:29:020:29:05

as election artist work.

0:29:050:29:07

And I found it very hard to boil it

down to just one piece.

0:29:070:29:10

I'd never done social media before.

0:29:100:29:11

I really enjoyed that because it was

just like my sketchbook.

0:29:110:29:14

I take photographs all the time,

so for me it was very

0:29:140:29:18

natural to be recording

all of these little snippets.

0:29:180:29:21

Then I started to use more video

because I just thought, well,

0:29:210:29:24

this action is happening,

the photograph isn't going to do it.

0:29:240:29:27

Strong and stable leadership...

0:29:270:29:30

And then I thought, well,

how can I crystallise

0:29:300:29:32

all of these Instagram,

all of this period of time?

0:29:320:29:35

So, that's when this

animation I've made,

0:29:350:29:36

which is about three minutes long,

called Election Abstract,

0:29:360:29:40

which is basically all of my videos

and images from the Instagram

0:29:400:29:43

condensed into this flyby

of the election and the aftermath.

0:29:430:29:51

Do you think that rapid, sort of,

superfluity of images

0:29:510:29:53

is what the voter experienced?

0:29:530:29:56

I think there was so much happening,

especially with the terror attacks

0:29:560:30:00

in Manchester and London Bridge,

Finsbury Park mosque,

0:30:000:30:05

the Westminster attack that just

happened more or less same time

0:30:050:30:11

as I was being appointed,

and then Grenfell Tower.

0:30:110:30:13

Those things played into politics

whether you liked it or not.

0:30:130:30:16

All of the politicians I saw out

on the stump and, you know,

0:30:160:30:21

at various demos and things,

they seemed very engaged

0:30:210:30:23

with the public.

0:30:230:30:24

They were amongst the public.

0:30:240:30:32

The ones that I've met

seemed to be great,

0:30:340:30:37

I mean from all parties,

they all had their own passions

0:30:370:30:39

and beliefs, they were talking

to the crowd about that.

0:30:390:30:42

That was great.

0:30:420:30:48

Individual MPs are lowly paid

and doing a pretty great job.

0:30:480:30:50

Most of that was quite positive.

0:30:500:30:52

But meanwhile, I'd be

walking to the Tube,

0:30:520:30:54

or get off a train in Scotland,

for example, and I just couldn't

0:30:540:30:57

stop photographing homeless

people, for example.

0:30:570:30:59

It just seems like...

0:30:590:31:01

There's a statistic that's 15% more

0:31:010:31:02

homeless people on the street over

the last year.

0:31:020:31:04

I got bound up with those

issues by the end.

0:31:040:31:07

The general public

sort of took over.

0:31:070:31:10

I'm curious to know

whether at the end of this

0:31:100:31:14

you felt more optimistic,

positive about politicians,

0:31:140:31:20

the press, the democratic process,

or you thought, yes,

0:31:200:31:23

we really are going to the dogs.

0:31:230:31:26

I think I felt we were

going to the dogs.

0:31:260:31:28

You did think that?

0:31:280:31:31

I really did think at the end,

after all of the arguments,

0:31:310:31:34

discussions, and the surprise

of the election, that

0:31:340:31:37

then afterwards that

would change something.

0:31:370:31:40

That that would be reflected

in things going forward.

0:31:400:31:43

I think the election

got hijacked by Brexit.

0:31:430:31:46

People were really confused about

which party to vote for on that.

0:31:460:31:53

And I think that the hung

parliament reflected

0:31:530:31:54

the ambivalence of the public.

0:31:540:32:00

And yet everything juddered on as if

the election hadn't happened.

0:32:000:32:03

So that was a curious thing.

0:32:030:32:04

I was quite surprised by that.

0:32:040:32:05

Shall we do something that doesn't

happen here very often?

0:32:050:32:08

Shake hands.

0:32:080:32:09

Thank you very much.

0:32:090:32:10

Great seeing you again.

0:32:100:32:18

It could have been any thing with

Steve!

0:32:200:32:23

And if you'd like to see the rest

of Cornelia Parker's election work,

0:32:230:32:26

it's on Parliament's website -

and in an exhibition

0:32:260:32:28

in Westminster Hall.

0:32:280:32:29

That's all we have time for.

0:32:290:32:31

Good night.

0:32:310:32:39