23/02/2018 Newsnight


23/02/2018

With Evan Davis.


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Transcript


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They've been working hard at the UN

Security Council today,

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but getting nothing done.

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Meanwhile, with no ceasefire agreed,

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the Syrian government has been busy

in its familiar way -

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bombing Eastern Ghouta.

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You might have hoped that somehow

diplomacy or human decency

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would lead to a pause

in the brutality.

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But hope is all too scarce.

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I'm witnessing these

things before my eyes.

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When the bomb landed near us,

the children panicked

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and were crying out loud.

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It's part of the United Kingdom,

except it opts out

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of the socially liberal bits.

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What explains Northern Ireland's

social conservatism?

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We know the society

that we want to be part of.

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We know there is overwhelming

public support for some of

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these issues, so it's really

disappointing that some of our

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leaders cannot enact that change.

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And fewer people are using public

transport in the capital.

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A blip, or an early sign we've

finally reached peak London?

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Hello.

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It's been one of those

days that demonstrates

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the limits of diplomacy.

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The Security Council

was meant to vote on a motion

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for a ceasefire at 4 o'clock this

afternoon, our time.

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Then it was postponed to 7.30.

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And in the last few minutes the vote

has been rescheduled again -

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this time delayed until tomorrow.

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You probably don't need me to tell

you that it is the Russian veto -

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or the threat of it -

that has blocked the motion.

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However, the Russians have said

they'll sign up to a ceasefire

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as long as it is guaranteed to be

observed by rebels as well as

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the Syrian government.

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Talks will no doubt continue

overnight before the vote -

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which we're now told will happen

at 5pm our time tomorrow.

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Well, we'll hear from an air-raid

shelter in Douma in Eastern Ghouta

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shortly, but what hope

is there for a ceasefire?

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And an effective one at that.

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Mike Thompson reports.

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While politicians talk, the

incessant bombardment of rebel held

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Eastern Ghouta by Syrian and Russian

forces goes on and on.

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Is now, if you can hear,

the jets are bombing.

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With hundreds dead over the last few

days, and many more injured, medics

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there are struggling to cope,

and it's a battle that this doctor

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says they are losing.

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When you get injury to the hospital,

you expect to deal

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with 70, 80 injuries

at the same time.

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This, you cannot imagine any

hospital can deal with these

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numerous cases.

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Ultimately, events are likely

to go only one way for

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the people who are bombarded

and besieged in Eastern Ghouta -

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evacuation.

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This was the fate of this rebel held

area. And then east Aleppo several

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months later and finally Homs in

2017. People were pounded and

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starved into submission before being

taken to rebel held Idlib province.

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Death and destruction has not been

all one way. Mortars have been fired

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into downtown Damascus by rebel

groups in Eastern Ghouta, one of

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which had formal ties with Al-Qaeda.

One former British ambassador to

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Syria who is a director of a group

with links to President Assad's

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family believes the pictures we are

seeing do not reflect.

It. Do you

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think it remarkable in the harrowing

video we are being regaled with, the

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war pornography we are wallowing in,

is it remarkable you never see the

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thousands, probably 7000, 8000

jihadi warriors who won there and

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why not? Because all the images we

see come from the jihadis and

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auxiliaries in Eastern Ghouta, who

are adept at stirring western

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sympathy, hoping we are going to

come in over the horizon to save

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them.

A spokesman for the White

Helmets rescue teams in Eastern

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Ghouta said there is a good reason

for that.

You do not see them

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because they are targeting directly

civilian neighbourhoods. At the

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front lines. They are at the front

lines. There is no one armed between

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civilians.

The horrors happening in

Eastern Ghouta mirror the fate of

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East Aleppo. It brings back terrible

memories to this woman, who I have

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interviewed many times, before she

narrowly escaped from the city with

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her life.

We can present the same

feeling we have felt in the past. I

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can hear the sound and crying of the

kids.

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kids. I can even smell the dust of

bombing.

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bombing.

So what chance a ceasefire?

Some are optimistic.

A ceasefire,

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every

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every time when the start, he begins

bombing and shelling.

If any

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ceasefire deal here is to last, it

will require trust on all sides.

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Right now, there is precious little

of that. Mike Thompson.

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Nowhere are the effects of those

delays at the United Nations

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being felt tonight as firmly

as in eastern Ghouta itself.

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Before we came on air,

I spoke to Mahmoud Bwedany.

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He's a 20-year-old student activist

who has spent much of the last

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week in an underground

shelter with his family.

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The regime claims the images we are

seeing look worse in eastern Goutha

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than it actually is.

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I asked Mahmoud

about his experience.

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Well, how can we make it worse?

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It's the worst situation there is.

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And I am witnessing these

things before my eyes.

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When the bomb landed,

near us, the children

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panicked and were crying out loud.

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They were not holding any guns.

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The front line aren't

being bombed as heavy

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as the centres of the city.

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You perhaps have

heard that the United

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Nations is struggling to get

a ceasefire motion agreed.

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The Russians are

obviously saying they

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will veto the motion, the Swedish-

Kuwaiti motion for 30 days of

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ceasefire.

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It must be frustrating for you.

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What is devastating,

the international community is not

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doing any actions to prevent

the tragedies

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from happening in this area.

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400 people were killed

in the last five days.

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32 casualties just today.

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And a lot of wounded.

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The medical staff is

overwhelmed with patients and

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injured people from the bombardment.

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They are working most of the day,

I think more than ten hours.

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It is horrible.

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The international community...

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Go on.

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They are still delaying

the meeting and we probably

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know the Russians

will veto this motion.

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What is your hope?

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A UN resolution for

a 30-day ceasefire

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would be enormously helpful.

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Well, that is not

something I know for

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sure what to say about.

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But I think that is

the international community,

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the world leaders' job, to fight war

crimes to prevent more tragedies

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from happening.

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So I hope the ceasefire

goes through.

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This is a difficult question.

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Is there any way, if you

could surrender and just

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get out, would you contemplate,

at some point, the

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white flag might have to go up?

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Well, that is just devastating.

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First, displacement

is not the solution

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to what we are living in.

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The problem is that

the regime and Russia

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and the forces that

are in

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the alliance, they are attacking

Ghouta and other places in Syria.

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That is the problem.

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The solution is not to get

everyone out of their

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homes and move them

out of their lands,

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and into God knows where.

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The solution is to

push Assad and the

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regime, I'm sorry, the regime

and Russia to stop this assault

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and to let this country get back

on its feet

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with a legitimate country,

legitimate government that respects

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human rights and

believes in equality.

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Does everybody in Eastern

Ghouta believe that?

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Do you think there are

people who want to escape

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and just want to stop

the war at any price,

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or do you think everybody

there holds firm to the description

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you have just given

me of your views?

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Well, not everyone.

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Of course there are

people who are tired and

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have suffered so much in this war.

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So, yes, some people might think

of that as a solution.

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But, let's face it, nobody

can guarantee what will

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happen if they decided to move

us out of this area.

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They might take everyone

to the slaughterhouses and

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just execute.

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Everyone against this regime.

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And who fought in this revolution.

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If that is going to be our choice,

then the entire world

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has not done anything.

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Mahmoud, it is very good

of you to talk to us

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and describe the plight there,

which obviously everybody here

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thinks is quite horrific.

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We wish you all the best, very much.

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Thank you.

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Northern Ireland was condemned

today by a UN committee.

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The Committee on the Elimination

of Discrimination Against Women

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attacked the fact that

Northern Ireland criminalises

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abortion, restricting it

even in cases of rape,

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incest or fatal foetal abnormality.

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The committee said the restrictions

caused great harm and suffering.

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This is pretty routine criticism,

but the strange thing

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about it is that it's aimed

at a piece of the UK,

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and yet most people in the UK

would probably agree with it.

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Northern Ireland has

allowed itself to become

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an exceptional piece of the UK,

in clinging to some socially

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conservative norms.

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It is the one nation not to have

same-sex marriage for example.

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And yet it's a complicated

picture there because polls

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in Northern Ireland show support

for liberalisation of the abortion

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law and support for

same-sex marriage.

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Matthew Thompson has been

looking at the strength

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of social conservatism there.

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The history of Ireland

is traced upon the cross.

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In this land of saints

and scholars, religion held

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immense power over minds,

lives, and indeed, deaths.

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Divided as they were,

the island's squabbling

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churches were united

by their stance on public morals.

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You will legislate

perversion and immorality.

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But in recent years,

most notably in the

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Republic, such

attitudes have shifted.

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Scandals have shaken public faith

in the Catholic church -

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secularism is on the march.

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The Republic's gay

marriage referendum

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in 2015 left Northern Ireland nearly

alone in Western Europe as one of

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the few places where same-sex

marriage was still forbidden by law.

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Take the issue of abortion, however,

and Ireland's isolation is even

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starker.

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Strict laws north and south

of the border mean the island ranks

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alongside Andorra, Malta

and San Marino as the most

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restrictive places in Europe.

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A forthcoming referendum

in the Republic could

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compound Northern

Ireland's isolation.

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With its religiouus quarrels

and fractious political

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landscape, Northern Ireland can

seem, to large swathes of British

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opinion, a place frozen in time.

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And nowhere is the country's social

conservativism more in evidence than

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here in Ballymena, the buckle

of Northern Ireland's Bible Belt.

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If you were voting,

would you think it

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was important that the politicians

were representing religious values?

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Yes, certainly, certainly.

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That's why I do support

DUP, because they

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do have a lot of religious values

on same-sex marriage

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and stuff, where, you know...

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Where is that all coming from?

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I have nothing against gay people

in any way, but I don't think it's

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right for them to be married,

definitely

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not, not the way I was brought up.

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The DUP is not the only party

to hold these views.

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The Ulster Unionist Party,

for one, is split on

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such issues.

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But the DUP's unique brand

of fundamentalism find fertile

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ground here.

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The religion of the DUP informs

the party's attitude to such

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questions as same-sex

marriage and abortion.

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The fact is that on a scale of zero

to ten, when we asked

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how much should faith and church

condition the outlook of the DUP,

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members scale that at

almost seven out of ten.

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It's difficult to imagine

any other party across

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the United Kingdom

having such an outlook,

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wanting faith and church

to

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condition the outlook

of their party.

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The power to legislate on social

issues rests with Northern

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Ireland's devolved government,

when it actually sits.

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The Assembly here at Stormont

has declined to endorse

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more liberal legislation on both gay

marriage and abortion.

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In 2015, a vote to

legalise gay marriage was

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actually passed

by a majority of one,

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but the DUP were able to use

a

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controversial veto power, known

as the Petition Of Concern, to block

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the legislation.

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This move, in defiance

of both majority public

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opinion and the majority of Assembly

members, provoked outrage.

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The 2017 Northern Ireland

general election

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survey indicated that 54% of people

supported same-sex marriage.

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Only 23% opposed it.

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Other polls have put

support higher still.

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But only 50% of unionists

were in favour, against

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66% of nationalists.

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And of DUP supporters,

almost exactly as many

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oppose as support same-sex marriage.

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People's views in Northern Ireland

on same-sex marriage are conditioned

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more by age than necessarily

religion these days.

0:16:100:16:12

And with a new generation

coming through, the

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chances are that at some point,

same-sex marriage will be allowed in

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Northern Ireland.

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As symbols of that new generation

go, it's hard to look

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past the Sunflower bar

in central Belfast.

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At the height of the Troubles,

it was the scene of a

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loyalist terror attack that

left three people dead.

0:16:310:16:33

Now it's a trendy bar that

attract a younger, more

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progressive crowd.

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These issues are incredibly

important to students...

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These young people voice frustration

with a political system that they

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feel isn't working for them.

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People, for a variety

of reasons, continue

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to vote on a sort of community

affiliation basis rather than

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particular social issues, so it

isn't effective to necessarily say

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to people that they should vote for

this particular party because they

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will bring abortion reform

or marriage equality.

0:16:590:17:04

It simply doesn't work that way

in Northern Ireland yet.

0:17:040:17:07

We know the kind of society

that we want to be a part of, and we

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know that there is overwhelming

public support for some of these

0:17:110:17:13

issues, so it's really disappointing

that some of our leaders can't

0:17:130:17:16

actually enact that change.

0:17:160:17:17

Olivia, you're the president

of the National

0:17:170:17:19

Union of Students in

Ireland, and you've met

0:17:190:17:21

actually with a lot

of

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the parties, I think as recently

as last week with the DUP, to talk

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about some of these issues.

0:17:270:17:28

What...

0:17:280:17:29

How did you come away from that?

0:17:290:17:32

I don't think anything

has come out of

0:17:320:17:34

these talks that wasn't really to be

expected, personally.

0:17:340:17:36

I think, if anything,

one of the things that's

0:17:360:17:38

become crystal-clear

is, for any progress

0:17:380:17:39

to be made in any sort

of

0:17:390:17:43

area in legislation

in Northern Ireland,

0:17:430:17:45

the Petition Of Concern is most

definitely in need of some

0:17:450:17:47

desperate reform, and it is unclear

0:17:470:17:49

as to whether or not any

of the parties have a clear path

0:17:490:17:52

forward for how that should be done.

0:17:520:17:54

Sinn Fein have made

much in recent years

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of what they call the equality

agenda, but their position on

0:17:560:17:59

abortion has only recently softened,

and they still don't officially

0:17:590:18:01

support any unrestricted access.

0:18:010:18:02

The nationalist SDLP,

sister party of

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Labour, remains staunchly pro-life.

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In October, the Supreme Court heard

an appeal from the Northern Ireland

0:18:100:18:13

Human Rights Commission

against the country's abortion laws.

0:18:130:18:15

That judgment is expected

within the next month.

0:18:150:18:17

The most recent Northern Ireland

Life And Times Survey

0:18:170:18:19

suggests that abortion is is another

area in which politicians are out of

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step with public opinion.

0:18:220:18:24

Ask people whether abortion

should be given in

0:18:240:18:31

the case of serious fatal

abnormality, or in the case of rape

0:18:320:18:35

or incest, and significant

majorities are in favour.

0:18:350:18:38

But ask if a woman should

be able to have an

0:18:380:18:41

abortion on demand and the balance

tips significantly.

0:18:410:18:46

Fully 60% of people

are opposed in this instance.

0:18:460:18:48

Overall, Catholics are more likely

than Protestants to oppose abortion.

0:18:480:18:51

For Sinn Fein, I think

that what we see is

0:18:510:18:54

a changing relationship

of

0:18:540:18:57

the citizens of Ireland

with the Catholic church,

0:18:570:19:01

so over the past 20 years,

you see that, but Sinn Fein

0:19:010:19:05

also having their position

on the constitutional question,

0:19:050:19:07

which is overwhelmingly supported.

0:19:070:19:08

So, they can have this liberal

agenda that's there.

0:19:080:19:11

For the SDLP, they are more

conservative traditionally, but I do

0:19:110:19:15

think that they are going

to change as attitudes

0:19:150:19:18

change on the island

of

0:19:180:19:20

Ireland, where they will not want

to be caught on the wrong side of

0:19:200:19:24

social change.

0:19:240:19:27

So, what hope for change

for those who seek it?

0:19:270:19:29

Absent reform, delivering same-sex

marriage, will be an uphill struggle

0:19:290:19:35

for a restored Assembly at Stormont,

abortion even more so.

0:19:350:19:40

Though, of course,

the Supreme Court could

0:19:400:19:43

force the issue.

0:19:430:19:46

Should Stormont remain empty,

direct rule ministers

0:19:460:19:47

could legislate from

London, but that will

0:19:470:19:49

hardly be a priority

for a

0:19:490:19:50

Government dealing with Brexit

and in bed with the DUP.

0:19:500:19:55

Short-term, then, in

spite of the will of a

0:19:550:19:57

majority of its people, it seems

likely that Ulster's peculiar

0:19:570:20:01

political system will

continue to say no.

0:20:010:20:09

For three decades, London has been

enjoying a long boom.

0:20:090:20:13

Its economy, its population

and its global status have all been

0:20:130:20:15

growing to the point that it has

sometimes felt increasingly

0:20:150:20:18

disconnected from the

rest of the country.

0:20:180:20:20

It's almost taken for granted that

there's that kind of imbalance.

0:20:200:20:23

So listen carefully.

0:20:230:20:25

Something strange is currently

happening in the capital.

0:20:250:20:29

It happened quite suddenly

and unexpectedly.

0:20:290:20:31

It could be nothing significant.

0:20:310:20:33

But it could possibly be historic.

0:20:330:20:41

It's public transport

that offers the

0:20:440:20:46

most important sign something's up.

0:20:460:20:50

Actually, I've expressed that badly.

0:20:500:20:53

It's that passenger

numbers are down.

0:20:530:20:56

The decline sounds small -

bus journeys down 5% over the last

0:20:560:21:00

two years, Tube journeys down 0.3%.

0:21:000:21:02

But small falls cause a big headache

0:21:020:21:03

for transport bosses.

0:21:030:21:04

Infrastructure spending

in London has been based on

0:21:040:21:11

ever-growing passenger numbers.

0:21:110:21:13

It was meant to be 1.44

billion Tube journeys

0:21:130:21:15

next year.

0:21:150:21:18

Now, it's expected

to be 1.34 billion.

0:21:180:21:20

The gap leaves hundreds

of millions in lower

0:21:200:21:21

revenues.

0:21:210:21:22

It's not just London.

0:21:220:21:27

A couple of years

ago, I heard it from

0:21:270:21:29

New York, that the subway ridership

had levelled off and was beginning

0:21:290:21:32

to decline, bus ridership in fact

had started to fall before that.

0:21:320:21:40

And since then, we've seen this

phenomenon on extended to London,

0:21:410:21:46

probably to Toronto,

levelling off on the Paris Metro.

0:21:460:21:50

And it appears as if

something more broadly is

0:21:500:21:55

occurring to big city transport

and the ridership on it.

0:21:550:21:58

Heads are being scratched

in search of a definitive

0:21:580:22:00

explanation.

0:22:000:22:01

Is it the Uber effect, for example?

0:22:010:22:02

People taking taxis rather

than trains or buses.

0:22:020:22:04

Is it cycling?

0:22:040:22:06

Certainly, it can no longer be

dismissed as an irrelevance in

0:22:060:22:08

the big transport picture.

0:22:080:22:09

Is it terror keeping

people away from the

0:22:090:22:11

crowds?

0:22:110:22:12

Or is it that people shop from home

these days and entertain

0:22:120:22:15

themselves there too?

0:22:150:22:24

I don't think this there's likely

to be a single answer.

0:22:250:22:28

It's more likely to be a complex one

involving the way we

0:22:280:22:31

live in and use big cities.

0:22:310:22:32

It could just be something

more than transport.

0:22:320:22:34

The end of a three decade surge

in the role of megacities.

0:22:340:22:37

You see, it's not just

transport feeding

0:22:370:22:39

it.

0:22:390:22:40

In London, museum visits are down

as well, for example.

0:22:400:22:48

The British Museum, down 8% in 2017.

0:22:480:22:49

Not untypical of the sector.

0:22:490:22:50

For years, mega city

growth has felt like a law

0:22:500:22:52

of nature.

0:22:520:22:56

But you don't have to go back far

to know that cities shrink

0:22:560:22:59

as well as grow.

0:22:590:23:00

London's population declined

after the Second World War,

0:23:000:23:02

right through to the 1980s.

0:23:020:23:03

It was a story of managed decline.

0:23:030:23:05

Is it possible that we

are seeing an early

0:23:050:23:08

sign that we've reached peak city,

that the inevitable crowds,

0:23:080:23:10

congestion and expense

out way the advantages,

0:23:100:23:13

that the long-awaited rebalancing

to the rest of the

0:23:130:23:15

country is poised to occur?

0:23:150:23:23

Let's reflect on that, remembering

that the population of London is

0:23:260:23:29

still growing and the number of jobs

is still growing.

0:23:290:23:32

I'm joined now by Richard Florida,

an American Urban Studies theorist

0:23:320:23:34

and Professor at the University

of Toronto, and by Sian

0:23:340:23:37

Berry, a Green Party

London Assembly member.

0:23:370:23:44

Richard, do you think this is a

turning point? Is something

0:23:440:23:47

happening in some of the big cities?

No, I think we live in a winner

0:23:470:23:53

takes all urban system. London, New

York and Toronto, that you mention,

0:23:530:23:56

are big winners. Transit users are

down because they walk, ride a bike

0:23:560:24:02

or

0:24:020:24:07

or take Uber. I put a long bet on

London and I think it will be just

0:24:080:24:11

fine.

You accept that these cities

have long cycles, and London and New

0:24:110:24:17

York had a long cycle. They have had

their period of decline.

There was

0:24:170:24:23

the period of mass suburbanisation

after the war that took middle-class

0:24:230:24:29

jobs out of the city, but what we

have seen over the past 20 or 30

0:24:290:24:34

years, and certainly since the turn

of the 21st century, is this massive

0:24:340:24:37

movement of jobs, of people, of the

affluent and educated, but also of

0:24:370:24:45

technology firms, which always used

to be located in these suburban

0:24:450:24:48

office complexes. They have come

barrelling back, and the places that

0:24:480:24:54

have grown more than anywhere are

London, New York and downtown San

0:24:540:24:58

Francisco, so I think you are right:

If the long cycle after the war was

0:24:580:25:03

the shrinkage of the city, the long

cycle of the past generation, and

0:25:030:25:10

certainly the past decade and a

half, it is big world cities like

0:25:100:25:18

London, New York and a few you have

mentioned.

Sian, is this just a

0:25:180:25:23

transport thing or is there

something bigger?

One of the

0:25:230:25:27

interesting part of why people are

not taking so much public transport

0:25:270:25:30

is that visitors from elsewhere in

the UK are down, so that is part of

0:25:300:25:34

your Museum figures. One of the

reasons why you might not be taking

0:25:340:25:43

so many journeys is partly that you

have replaced things with technology

0:25:430:25:46

and people delivering to you, but

also that you can't afford that. You

0:25:460:25:50

can't afford to go out... Not just

the journey but the reason for it.

0:25:500:25:54

And that is worrying. We are also

seeing a drop in the number of

0:25:540:25:59

20-something people coming to

London.

Run that passed me again.

0:25:590:26:06

Population is still growing, is the

big counterargument to any of this.

0:26:060:26:11

Siam of course, London is a world

city will

0:26:110:26:18

city will stop --

of course, London

is a world city. Nobody wants to

0:26:180:26:26

raise children in London because of

air pollution, and they can't afford

0:26:260:26:29

to offer even if they wanted. We

have also seen a drop off in the

0:26:290:26:33

number of 20-somethings coming in. I

am not from London, I came in my

0:26:330:26:38

20s, seeking my fortune, and those

are the people we have to keep

0:26:380:26:41

attracting. And from the rest of the

UK, people don't see London as being

0:26:410:26:46

as attractive as it was.

You cannot

move to London unless you have a job

0:26:460:26:51

before you get here.

I turned up

with nothing but an overdraft and

0:26:510:26:55

managed to survive because it was

possible back then to get a bit of

0:26:550:26:59

money together. Astronomical costs

now. I think people are choosing

0:26:590:27:03

other cities, and London cannot take

its place for granted.

I wonder if

0:27:030:27:09

you are being too optimistic about

the limits that you perceive. You

0:27:090:27:15

just do reach a point where you say,

that's it, we had 30 years of

0:27:150:27:19

growth, and then it is not.

Two

points. She's absolutely right.

0:27:190:27:25

First, London will continue to grow.

It has overcome bigger problems than

0:27:250:27:30

a decline in transit users. It has

gone through world wars, bone to the

0:27:300:27:35

ground. It is the most resilient

city on the planet, maybe New York

0:27:350:27:39

in second place. It is a tale of two

cities, which we didn't talk about.

0:27:390:27:47

London has replaced working people

with rich people. Young people with

0:27:470:27:49

old wealthy people. The people who

use public transport tend to be

0:27:490:27:54

working people and less wealthy

people. The affluent people working

0:27:540:27:57

in London do not live in London

full-time. They owed a big flat and

0:27:570:28:01

they do not take transit, but a

private car, or Uber or something

0:28:010:28:08

like that. I think public transit

transport use a ship is not the key

0:28:080:28:18

figure.

I would like to give a

Northern perspective on this. London

0:28:180:28:24

has had all the money spent on

transport over the last decades, and

0:28:240:28:29

the North has craved some of it, and

London is basically saying, we need

0:28:290:28:33

a subsidy to pay for this that

because we have built it now and it

0:28:330:28:37

is not being used as we anticipated.

We have had a lot of transport

0:28:370:28:43

investment, but we need a shift from

cars onto public transport. If I was

0:28:430:28:50

to swap something, I would swap HS2

for something else.

Won't this be

0:28:500:28:58

taken as a sign that Crossrail 2,

that money can be spent on the

0:28:580:29:02

Northern Powerhouse, and there are a

million things and suddenly all of

0:29:020:29:06

that is open again, isn't it?

We are

desperately short of new housing for

0:29:060:29:11

our families. Affordable housing

needs to be built, and in areas that

0:29:110:29:17

can be opened up by Crossrail 2,

that need investment. They also need

0:29:170:29:22

investment in mundane things like

better bus routes. We need the

0:29:220:29:28

Government to be giving us more

powers and money from the car income

0:29:280:29:33

they get.

Very briefly, Richard, you

wrote about the creative class that

0:29:330:29:38

made these big world cities such

dynamic places. At that class grown

0:29:380:29:43

less creative?

It has certainly be

the case that the creative class

0:29:430:29:48

revival has been a crisis of

success. My new book is called The

0:29:480:29:54

New Urban Crisis, and London is at

the epicentre of this. The way that

0:29:540:29:58

London grows in the future is to

expand its boundaries to include

0:29:580:30:03

those northern industrial cities,

connected by high-speed rail. It not

0:30:030:30:07

only becomes more dense, it connects

to these areas through high-speed

0:30:070:30:11

rail and that kind of transit is

London's future.

Thank you, both,

0:30:110:30:16

very much indeed.

0:30:160:30:17

Well that's all we have

time for tonight.

0:30:170:30:20

Before we go, news broke this

evening of the death aged 73

0:30:200:30:22

of soul star Eddy Amoo.

0:30:220:30:23

He was a member of the band

The Real Thing in the 1970s,

0:30:230:30:27

who were pioneers of black British

music and the first all-black band

0:30:270:30:29

to reach number one here.

0:30:290:30:31

That was with You To Me

Are Everything in 1976.

0:30:310:30:33

We'll leave you now with another

of their performances -

0:30:330:30:36

from Top of the Pops in 1977.

0:30:360:30:44

Good night.

0:30:440:30:45

# Love, love's such

a wonderful thing.

0:30:450:30:47

# Just think of the

joys it can bring.

0:30:470:30:51

# I've got so much

love to give to you.

0:30:510:30:59

# My love is a shelter.

0:31:010:31:04

# Let me be your shade.

0:31:040:31:08

# Somewhere you can run to.

0:31:080:31:12

# Your troubles will fade.

0:31:120:31:16

# Life's so full of shadows.

0:31:160:31:19

# It's so full of pain.

0:31:190:31:23

# Let my love surround you.

0:31:230:31:27

# And keep out the pain.#

0:31:270:31:35

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