17/01/2017 Outside Source


17/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 17/01/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

This is Outside Source. Here are some of the main stories.

:00:13.:00:19.

The British Prime Minister, Theresa May, has

:00:20.:00:21.

ruled out membership of the

:00:22.:00:22.

EU single market, when Britain leaves the European Union.

:00:23.:00:24.

She said staying in would mean accepting the

:00:25.:00:26.

EU's rules without having any say in making them.

:00:27.:00:28.

China's president, Xi Jinpig, has defended globalisation

:00:29.:00:30.

and free trade at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

:00:31.:00:33.

It's the first time a Chinese head of state has visited

:00:34.:00:35.

Turkey says this is the man who entered a nightclub in

:00:36.:00:41.

Istanbul on New Year's Eve and shot dead 39 people.

:00:42.:00:44.

We speak to BBC Uzbek about the claims he's from Uzbekistan.

:00:45.:00:54.

There have been some criticisms that we've not given enough detail what

:00:55.:01:19.

have Brexit actually is by Theresa May and her Government. That

:01:20.:01:23.

criticism is going to be lessened by a speech today in which we got

:01:24.:01:25.

plenty of detail. It was billed as the most important

:01:26.:01:36.

speech of her term in office. It was certainly the clearest exposition

:01:37.:01:39.

yet of what Britain wants from Brexit. Not partial membership of

:01:40.:01:42.

the European Union, associate membership of the European Union, or

:01:43.:01:47.

anything that leaves us half in, half out. I want to be clear - what

:01:48.:01:53.

I am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market.

:01:54.:01:58.

But, she said, Britain would push for the freest possible trade with

:01:59.:02:03.

European countries and other nations around the world. For the first

:02:04.:02:07.

time, Mrs May confirmed that the British Parliament would get to vote

:02:08.:02:11.

on the final deal at the end of the negotiations. Sitting in the

:02:12.:02:15.

audience were some of the ambassadors to the UK. Mrs May

:02:16.:02:19.

emphasised she didn't what to undermine the EU, but she also

:02:20.:02:22.

warned against those who wanted to see the UK punished for voting to

:02:23.:02:27.

leave. While I am sure a positive agreement can be reached, I am

:02:28.:02:32.

equally clear that no deal for Britain is better than a bad deal

:02:33.:02:36.

for Britain. The Opposition Labour Party said Mrs May wanted to leave

:02:37.:02:40.

the single market, yet still have access to it. That, they said, was

:02:41.:02:45.

like having your cake and eating it. They warned against her negotiating

:02:46.:02:49.

position. Throughout the speech, there seemed to be implied threat

:02:50.:02:53.

that somewhere along the line, if all her optimism of a deal with the

:02:54.:02:58.

European Union didn't work, we would move into a low-tax, corporate

:02:59.:03:02.

taxation bargain basement economy on the off shores of Europe. That

:03:03.:03:07.

implication of a warning was picked up by the European Parliament's

:03:08.:03:12.

chief negotiator on Brexit. I don't think we're going to make a lot of

:03:13.:03:18.

progress if this has to happen under threat, because I, so saying, OK, if

:03:19.:03:26.

our European counterparts don't accept it, we gonna make from

:03:27.:03:29.

Britain a sort of free zone or tax haven. I don't think that is very

:03:30.:03:35.

helpful. It creates also an illusion, the illusion that you can

:03:36.:03:38.

go out of the single market, that you can go out of the customs union

:03:39.:03:43.

and that you can cherry-pick, that you can have still a number of

:03:44.:03:49.

advantages and yeah, I think that is, will not happen. The German

:03:50.:03:55.

Foreign Minister said at least the British position was now much

:03:56.:03:58.

clearer, a sentiment echoed in the Irish Parliament. I welcome the

:03:59.:04:02.

statement today in that it brings clarity in a number of areas. This

:04:03.:04:08.

is the start of the process now. Europe is now going to have to

:04:09.:04:13.

respond to the statement made by the Prime Minister today. That response

:04:14.:04:18.

is only just beginning. The tough negotiations will take many years.

:04:19.:04:25.

Let me bring you breaking news in the US. This is a significant story,

:04:26.:04:32.

a decision made by President Obama, who according to AP, but this is

:04:33.:04:36.

being extensively covered, President Obama has commuted the sentence of

:04:37.:04:41.

Chelsea Manning, who leaked army dock upts and is serving 35 years.

:04:42.:04:45.

I'm certain you'll know who Chelsea Manning is. She was responsible. She

:04:46.:04:50.

served as a soldier in Iraq, formerly known as Bradley manning.

:04:51.:04:56.

In 2010, a huge cache of documents was published by Wikileaks and she

:04:57.:04:59.

was primarily responsible for that leak. She was given a sentence of 35

:05:00.:05:05.

years. By far the longest sentence given to someone in the US for a

:05:06.:05:10.

crime related to leaking. But we're now understanding that she'll be

:05:11.:05:15.

released in May. So just in a few months' time. There had been

:05:16.:05:18.

speculation about whether President Obama might do this. Some

:05:19.:05:23.

commentators thought that this was Chelsea Manning's last Charles

:05:24.:05:27.

Kennedy to get out of praise -- chance to get out of prison for a

:05:28.:05:31.

long time. It's impossible to know the thinking of current

:05:32.:05:35.

president-elect, but we know President Obama has decided to

:05:36.:05:40.

commute a very long sentence. We understand Chelsea Manning will be

:05:41.:05:45.

free come May. We speak to our colleagues in Washington being in a

:05:46.:05:47.

few -- colleagues in Washington being in a

:05:48.:05:50.

few DC in a few minutes. The Chicago cubs have

:05:51.:05:54.

visited the White House, just as President Obama

:05:55.:05:57.

said they would. A few months ago, the Cubs

:05:58.:05:59.

won their first World They're also the last

:06:00.:06:01.

sporting team to visit President Obama

:06:02.:06:08.

while he is in office. They said this day would never come.

:06:09.:06:19.

LAUGHTER . Here is something none of my

:06:20.:06:31.

predecessors ever got a chance to say, welcome to the White House the

:06:32.:06:39.

World Series champion Chicago Cubs. APPLAUSE

:06:40.:06:45.

now interesting insight into the system of the UK's amazing run of

:06:46.:06:50.

success at the Olympics. Seven sports have been told they're not

:06:51.:06:53.

going to be getting any funding ahead of the Rio Games in 2020. All

:06:54.:07:00.

seven are now appealing. They are: In no particular order, badminton,

:07:01.:07:07.

fencing, weightlifting, also table tennis, plus archery and goalball

:07:08.:07:11.

and wheelchair rugby. Let's speak to Olly foster live in the BBC sports

:07:12.:07:17.

centre. What did they do wrong? Well, UK Sport, who dish out

:07:18.:07:23.

something like a third of a billion pounds every four years to all these

:07:24.:07:27.

Olympic sports, it's a brutal business there. What they've done

:07:28.:07:31.

wrong is that they cannot guarantee more than one medal at the Tokyo

:07:32.:07:35.

Olympics in 2020 or Paralympics. This from UK Sport, they say, "We

:07:36.:07:41.

have to prioritise to protect and enhance the medal potential in the

:07:42.:07:45.

system. If we underinvest, we will underperform at the Games. The rest

:07:46.:07:49.

of the world will catch us up and medal success will be put at risk."

:07:50.:08:00.

The argument for those seven sports, para power lifting only has a small

:08:01.:08:03.

amount and are appealing as well for more. If they don't get the funding

:08:04.:08:08.

that they require, for seven sports no funding at all, it's their sports

:08:09.:08:12.

that will be put at risk. Table tennis say this will be a tipping

:08:13.:08:17.

point. You have to feel for badminton because they exceeded

:08:18.:08:19.

their expectations in Rio. They got a bronze medal for the men's

:08:20.:08:24.

doubles. They got no funding whatsoever. Table tennis, they

:08:25.:08:28.

wanted some funding. They did very well. They've doubled their ranking

:08:29.:08:32.

in the world over the last four years. But again, UK Sport are

:08:33.:08:38.

really prioritising where the medals will come. There's no coincidence

:08:39.:08:42.

that since all these billions of lottery funding was poured into UK

:08:43.:08:48.

Sport, it's the envy of every other world governing body that the UK

:08:49.:08:52.

teams, the British teams have gone right to near the top of the medals

:08:53.:08:56.

table. They'll all have an hour each, these governing bodies in the

:08:57.:09:00.

next fortnight to put their case to UK Sport and perhaps save their

:09:01.:09:03.

sport. Let's talk about that again after their appeals have been heard.

:09:04.:09:07.

Thank you very much. Next, to a sport that would love to

:09:08.:09:10.

have the problem of whether it gets funding ahead of the Rio Olympics or

:09:11.:09:15.

not. Squash, it's not an Olympic sport. One of its big

:09:16.:09:18.

pro-championships, the tournament of champions is taking place in New

:09:19.:09:22.

York. It's got a great venue in Grand Central station with the court

:09:23.:09:25.

in the middle of it. Each day this week we're playing the best rally of

:09:26.:09:28.

the day. Here is the latest rally that I picked out for you.

:09:29.:09:46.

COMMENTATOR: That's well done. She's absolutely gone for that.

:09:47.:09:57.

That's America's Amanda Sobie. She lost against the UK's Sarah-Jane

:09:58.:10:02.

Perry. They are now at the quarter finals in New York. Another rally

:10:03.:10:05.

for you tomorrow from that tournament. In a few minutes I play

:10:06.:10:09.

Jon Kay's latest report. He's weaving his way across the US ahead

:10:10.:10:13.

of Donald Trump's inauguration on Friday. He's been to President

:10:14.:10:16.

Obama's favourite diner. Now the UK voted to leave the

:10:17.:10:30.

European Union by 52% to 48. The Leave camp won the majority of votes

:10:31.:10:35.

in England and Wales. While every council in Scotland saw Remain

:10:36.:10:39.

majority. So is Theresa May's vision of Britain's future what voters had

:10:40.:10:44.

in mind when they went to the polls for the referendum? Our Midlands

:10:45.:10:53.

correspondent has more. It's the 50-50 city, where half the

:10:54.:10:57.

population voted to leave the EU and the other half voted to remain.

:10:58.:11:02.

Today in her speech, the Prime Minister said people who had voted

:11:03.:11:06.

for Brexit had done so with their eyes open. Out. Out of course,

:11:07.:11:12.

absolutely. Country seems like it's slipping, slipping. We lost

:11:13.:11:15.

everything, didn't we. Everything to the European. Everything is going

:11:16.:11:19.

up. We seem to be slipping away. She spells out her vision for Britain

:11:20.:11:24.

after it leaves the EU. But not everybody's clear about what she

:11:25.:11:29.

means. Unless it's laid out in Lehman's terms, we don't -- layman's

:11:30.:11:34.

terms, we don't understand the jargon. Might as well speak Chinese

:11:35.:11:39.

to us. At the market, locals were digesting the headline announcement.

:11:40.:11:43.

She's just said that the UK will be leaving the single market. What do

:11:44.:11:48.

you think about that? I don't think the UK should leave. I think things

:11:49.:11:53.

are all right the way it is. Because personally, they're rocking the boat

:11:54.:11:57.

quite a lot. Diversity is a good thing. You bring all kinds of

:11:58.:12:00.

different ways of life. And the jobs that some of the people in England

:12:01.:12:05.

don't want to do, other people are happy to come and do, it to keep the

:12:06.:12:10.

country going. The Leave campaign won by a whisker here. 4,000 votes

:12:11.:12:17.

made the difference. No matter which way people voted, the question many

:12:18.:12:20.

want the answer to is what Brexit really means. -- means for them. We

:12:21.:12:27.

need still even more information. I don't think we will fully understand

:12:28.:12:31.

until we have made that complete break away. Then we will understand

:12:32.:12:38.

what it means. You know, at the moment, it's just pie in the sky.

:12:39.:12:43.

The Prime Minister says she wants a smooth and orderly Brexit. But the

:12:44.:12:47.

process could take years. And for some of those who voted out,

:12:48.:12:51.

patience could be wearing thin. This is Outside Source. Hello, I'm

:12:52.:13:09.

Ros Atkins. Our lead story, as we've been seeing, the British Prime

:13:10.:13:12.

Minister, Theresa May has ruled out membership of the EU's sing the

:13:13.:13:15.

market, when Britain leaves the European Union. She's saying staying

:13:16.:13:19.

in would mean accepting the EU's rules without having any say in

:13:20.:13:24.

making them. A quick look at what's coming up: If you're outside of the

:13:25.:13:28.

UK, it's World News America next. It has a great interview with the

:13:29.:13:33.

outgoing US ambassador to the UN Samantha Power. She's not known for

:13:34.:13:39.

mincing her words. She says Russia is threatening the rules based

:13:40.:13:43.

international order. Here in the UK, it's the news at Ten. It will have

:13:44.:13:47.

extensive coverage of Theresa May's speech on Brexit.

:13:48.:13:56.

Now Russia has invited Donald Trump's transition team to Syria

:13:57.:13:59.

Peace Talks that are going to happen next week. They'll take place in

:14:00.:14:05.

Kazakhstan. Sergey Lavrov is the Russian Foreign Minister. He's been

:14:06.:14:11.

saying today the new administration, ie Mr Trump's administration,

:14:12.:14:14.

judging by its statements is prepared to seriously fight terror,

:14:15.:14:18.

not the way it's been until now. So a compliment for Mr Trump. A dig for

:14:19.:14:23.

President Obama. These Peace Talks are aimed at consolidating a truce,

:14:24.:14:26.

a national truce in Syria, that's been in place since the end of the

:14:27.:14:31.

year. Really you have to see everything that may happen at those

:14:32.:14:34.

Peace Talks in the context of what happened recently in Aleppo. The

:14:35.:14:40.

Syrian government recaptured the parts of the City it didn't control.

:14:41.:14:44.

It drove the rebels out. That was a huge moment for it. Our Middle East

:14:45.:14:50.

editor is in Aleppo. Here's a report from what remains of the great

:14:51.:14:54.

mosque of Aleppo, which you can see marked there on the map.

:14:55.:14:59.

The battle for Aleppo was the most decisive of the war so far. It is

:15:00.:15:03.

Syria's biggest city. It's the key to the north of the country and both

:15:04.:15:10.

sides were prepared to destroy it to possess it. The cost has been very

:15:11.:15:17.

high, in blood and in the ruin of a city that can trace its history back

:15:18.:15:27.

50 centuries. Now this is the great mosque in Aleppo. It dates back to

:15:28.:15:33.

the 700s and as you can see, it's been used as a military position.

:15:34.:15:37.

There's heavy damage here. It's a UN World Heritage Site. But now it's

:15:38.:15:43.

covered in sandbag, bullet holes. Can you see from the number of

:15:44.:15:47.

bullet holes how much fighting went on here. Over in that corner stood

:15:48.:15:54.

the famous minarette that looked out over this mosque. It was built in

:15:55.:16:01.

1090. It was destroyed in April of 2013. At the time, there were a lot

:16:02.:16:05.

of reports saying it was done by regime shelling. The people here,

:16:06.:16:08.

who are representatives of the Syrian government, who are with us,

:16:09.:16:12.

say it was done by the rebels, who blew it up deliberately. Now this is

:16:13.:16:17.

one of the sides of the mosque. It was used as an entrance and an exit.

:16:18.:16:22.

There's a lot of damage around here, a lot of bullet holes. Evidence of

:16:23.:16:28.

shell fire and the fact that was used as a military position is very

:16:29.:16:33.

clear. You can see this from this line of oil drums. They were used to

:16:34.:16:37.

shield the people who were inside here. If you look at the ceiling, it

:16:38.:16:44.

is absolutely pitted with shrapnel marks. That means there were big

:16:45.:16:48.

explosions here, right inside the mosque. You can see the damage right

:16:49.:16:55.

up there now. The damage done to these really important religious,

:16:56.:17:01.

cultural, historic sites is tragic, way more tragic, though, is the fact

:17:02.:17:04.

that so many of the people who used to pray in this morphing, who

:17:05.:17:08.

shopped in these -- in this mosque, who shopped in these streets are now

:17:09.:17:13.

dead. In terms of the progress of the war, capturing Aleppo was a

:17:14.:17:19.

vital moment for the regime and its allies, the Russians, Iranians,

:17:20.:17:22.

Lebanese, Hezbollah. For the first time, I think, President Assad can

:17:23.:17:28.

now sense victory. The war is in a new phase. It's not over, but from

:17:29.:17:31.

the point of view of the regime in Damascus, this is the strongest

:17:32.:17:37.

they've been since it started. Jermey Bowen, BBC News, Aleppo.

:17:38.:17:43.

Let's return to an important story from Washington. This is a picture

:17:44.:17:48.

of Chelsea Manning. This is copy telling us that President Obama has

:17:49.:17:53.

commuted the sentence of Chelsea Manning who leaked the Army

:17:54.:17:58.

documents and is serving 35 years. Chelsea Manning was the person

:17:59.:18:03.

behind a huge leak to WikiLeaks that gave Wikileaks a global profile,

:18:04.:18:08.

this caused a huge amount of diplomatic tension between the US

:18:09.:18:12.

and some of its closest partners. Well, she had been serving or is

:18:13.:18:16.

serving a 35-year sentence. We understand she'll now be released in

:18:17.:18:21.

May. Twice last year she tried to commit suicide and there were lots

:18:22.:18:27.

and lots of question marks about her future incarceration as a

:18:28.:18:30.

transgender woman currently serving time in a men's prison. We'll bring

:18:31.:18:34.

you more information as we get that. As we understand it, she'll be

:18:35.:18:37.

released in May and will not serve the rest of her sentence, which was

:18:38.:18:43.

going to go on for a very long time. This time yesterday, if you were

:18:44.:18:47.

watching, you'll know that we started to get information through

:18:48.:18:50.

from curbingy that police had -- Turkey that police had found the man

:18:51.:18:56.

they said carried out the attack on New Year's Eve. They did have the

:18:57.:18:59.

man they were looking for, it's this man. According to the authorities

:19:00.:19:06.

he's admitted the attack. Here's for details from the Istanbul governor.

:19:07.:19:12.

TRANSLATION: His name is Abdulkadir Masharipov. He was born in

:19:13.:19:21.

Uzbekistan in 1983 and trained in Afghanistan. The terrorist spoke

:19:22.:19:25.

four languages and was well educated. It is clear that this

:19:26.:19:31.

attack was carried out for Daesh. The Turkish government said this man

:19:32.:19:35.

is from Uzbekistan. We contacted BBC Uzbek to see if they can confirm

:19:36.:19:43.

that. He certainly looks Uzbek. His name sounds Uzbek. But we haven't

:19:44.:19:47.

seen any evidence in terms of for example a passport photo or any

:19:48.:19:51.

other evidence to show that he is actually national of Uzbekistan. He

:19:52.:19:57.

may be Uzbeki, from Tajikhistan or any other part of central Asia.

:19:58.:20:03.

There was another suspect earlier in the year whose name was similar.

:20:04.:20:08.

Later he was found and it turned out he was innocent. He wasn't linked at

:20:09.:20:13.

all to the whole thing. Later, we had more reports about people,

:20:14.:20:19.

suspects, maybe from Tajikhistan or even from China. This time, Istanbul

:20:20.:20:26.

mayor is saying this man is national of Uzbekistan. Uzbek government is

:20:27.:20:30.

saying we haven't had any information about this man. Earlier

:20:31.:20:34.

in the year, this etold us the Turkish -- they told us the Turkish

:20:35.:20:38.

government hasn't made any requests about this person. If he is Uzbek,

:20:39.:20:43.

would that be a huge surprise, is there an issue of radicalisation

:20:44.:20:48.

there? I don't think there is a massive radicalisation going on in

:20:49.:20:52.

central Asia, because the governments that are staunchly

:20:53.:20:57.

secular, they are ex-Communist leaders, who actually are accused of

:20:58.:21:01.

a lot of religious persecution against Muslims. It's tightly

:21:02.:21:07.

controlled. There are men who go to, for example, Turkey seeking

:21:08.:21:10.

religious freedoms, but the numbers are quite low. There has been some

:21:11.:21:17.

cases of Daesh or Isis recruitment in Russia, for example, where there

:21:18.:21:21.

is they say about seven million Uzbeks working there. They say young

:21:22.:21:26.

men who've gone to Russia to work there in menial jobs as migrant

:21:27.:21:30.

workers. So there's been some recruitment amongst those men. But

:21:31.:21:35.

compared to other parts of the world, the recruitment levels are

:21:36.:21:38.

not great in central Asia. So there may be a few hundred. Now for the

:21:39.:21:44.

first time Vladimir Putin has responded to those unverified claims

:21:45.:21:48.

that Russia has compromising material on Donald Trump. I wanted

:21:49.:21:52.

to make sure I had time to play you the clip.

:21:53.:21:57.

TRANSLATION: First of all, he's a grown up man. And secondly, he's a

:21:58.:22:01.

person who has been organising beauty contests for many years. He

:22:02.:22:05.

communicated with the most beautiful women in the world. You know, I can

:22:06.:22:10.

hardly imagine that he went to the hotel to meet with our girls of

:22:11.:22:15.

reduced social responsibility. Undoubtedly my girls are the best in

:22:16.:22:19.

the world, of course. But I doubt Mr Trump took this bait. People who

:22:20.:22:24.

order such fakes, which are now being spread against a new president

:22:25.:22:28.

of the United States, they fabricate them and use them in the political

:22:29.:22:31.

race, they are worse than prostitutes. They do not have any

:22:32.:22:37.

moral limits. I want to finish with the latest report from Jon Kay, in

:22:38.:22:40.

the US ahead of Donald Trump's inauguration. Today he's in Chicago.

:22:41.:22:44.

He's been to Barack Obama's favourite diner.

:22:45.:22:53.

Right through the middle of Donald Trump's America, to get a sense of

:22:54.:22:58.

the country he's taking over. But our next stop is not Trump

:22:59.:23:05.

territory. Chicago. This is Barack Obama's favourite diner. He lived

:23:06.:23:08.

round the corner before he was president and he still comes back.

:23:09.:23:19.

He is humble. He is strong. Tahisha is a fan. As a nurse, she likes the

:23:20.:23:25.

changes he made to health care, giving poorer people better access.

:23:26.:23:28.

She worries Donald Trump will overturn the reforms, hitting the

:23:29.:23:33.

most vulnerable. Many of them will be very sick, can't get medicine,

:23:34.:23:40.

some of them will die. Some here do question the Obama legacy and think

:23:41.:23:46.

change is overdue. Aspiring businesswoman Erica, hopes Donald

:23:47.:23:51.

Trump will help people like her. I believe that he's going to open up

:23:52.:23:57.

doors for small business owners, hopefully, that's trying to create

:23:58.:24:00.

big businesses. That's you? Yeah. Maybe you'll be as rich as Donald

:24:01.:24:13.

Trump in a few years. We head to the suburbs Elgin, where nearly half the

:24:14.:24:16.

population is Hispanic. Donald Trump's plans to build a giant wall

:24:17.:24:21.

along the Mexican border mean many here cannot support him. Never.

:24:22.:24:27.

Never. Some views here may surprise you. Rosa hopes a wall would stop

:24:28.:24:34.

illegal immigrants. We have our own problems here in America. You know,

:24:35.:24:40.

to add more of them coming over here, I think, that I don't think

:24:41.:24:45.

it's a good thing. It seems this Hispanic community is split just as

:24:46.:24:50.

America is split. And look where we are - time to get back en route 45.

:24:51.:24:58.

I'll see you tomorrow at the same time. Bye-bye.

:24:59.:25:08.

Hello. If you're a fan of cold winter weather, the past few winters

:25:09.:25:15.

in the UK have left the waiting, waiting and wanting. You may have

:25:16.:25:18.

felt like

:25:19.:25:19.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS