18/01/2017 Outside Source


18/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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We'll begin in Washington where Barack Obama has just finished his

:00:07.:00:19.

final press conference as president. Inevitably, he was asked about his

:00:20.:00:23.

successor. I don't expect there is going to be you know, enormous

:00:24.:00:30.

overlap. The British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson warns EU

:00:31.:00:35.

leaders not to give the UK punishment beatings over Brexit like

:00:36.:00:38.

a World War II movie. We've had a response from the top of the EU,

:00:39.:00:44.

Theresa May's announcement that the UK will leave the single market.

:00:45.:00:50.

Thousands of tourists are leaving the Gambia because of an ever

:00:51.:00:54.

worsening political crisis. In theory the new president will be

:00:55.:00:57.

inaugurated tomorrow. It's not going to happen as the man who lost the

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election is refusing to go. We'll talk to the US journalist who

:01:02.:01:05.

campaigned to get the CIA to put millions of documents online, which

:01:06.:01:09.

they've now done. And Frank Gardner on Donald Trump and the nuclear

:01:10.:01:10.

codes. Barack Obama has just finished his

:01:11.:01:31.

last press conference as president. There was plenty to discuss within

:01:32.:01:34.

it. We'll work through the main points with the help of Katty Kay.

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Here is the president talking about Russia. In my first term we

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negotiated the start two treaty which has substantially reduced our

:01:48.:01:50.

nuclear stockpiles, both Russia and the United States. I was prepared to

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go further, I told President Putin I was prepared to go further. They

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have been unwilling to negotiate. If President-elect Trump is able to

:02:01.:02:04.

restart those talks in a serious way, there remains a lot of room for

:02:05.:02:08.

our countries to reduce our stockpiles. Part of the reason we've

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been successful on our nonproliferation agenda and nuclear

:02:15.:02:19.

security agenda is because we were leading by example. I hope that

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continues. Let's bring in Katty Kay from Washington. A few years ago

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there was lots of talk about resetting the relationship with

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Russia. Hasn't really worked out as planned, has it? No. Relations are

:02:31.:02:37.

not good at the moment. Obama Administration officials would tell

:02:38.:02:40.

you they are not good at the moment. People here are slightly bewildered

:02:41.:02:43.

by what will happen next with Donald Trump and his new tone towards

:02:44.:02:48.

Vladimir Putin. I've heard two messages from the Obama

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Administration people, one is what the president was saying. We can and

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have worked with Russia on certain issues, the Iran nuclear deal for

:02:57.:03:00.

example. We cooperated with the Russians on that and got a

:03:01.:03:06.

successful outcome. The other message to Donald Trump in

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particular from the Obama people is Vladimir Putin's interest to know

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not to line up with American interest that the moment and if you

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think you can get them on the same page you are kidding yourself, treat

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this relationship very carefully. That's effectively what you're

:03:20.:03:23.

hearing from the president and his staff. So many elements of this

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press conference to discuss. Let's hear what President Obama said as he

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defended his decision which we got this time yesterday that he has

:03:32.:03:35.

commuted Chelsea Manning's sentence for leaking documents to WikiLeaks.

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Given she went to trial, that due process was carried out, that she

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took responsibility for her crime, that the sentence she received was

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very disproportional, disproportionate, relative to what

:04:03.:04:10.

other leakers had received... And that she had served a significant

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amount of time, that it made sense to commute, not pardon, her

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sentence. Does the fact this has happened right at the end of the

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Obama Presidency take the sting out of the controversy? No, there has

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been a firestorm of reaction from conservatives to the commutation of

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Chelsea Manning's sentence, indeed, president Obama's secretary of

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defence, Ashgabat, we understand was not in favour of this, nor were

:04:37.:04:41.

people at the Pentagon. If you commute sentences of people who

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leaked classified information, you are encouraging others to do the

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same thing, they think, and the president was wrong to take this

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action. In the press conference Obama said I don't think anybody who

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is thinking of leaking is going to look at Chelsea Manning who has

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spent seven years in an American prison and think this is a piece of

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cake and decide to do the same thing. He's trying to say, she

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served her time, being apologetic, this is not Edward Snowden, the

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sentence was disproportionate and other people will look at her and

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say, actually, there was a strong punishment here. That won't satisfy

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conservatives. It was inevitable Chelsea Manning would come up and

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inevitable Russia would come up, and of course, inevitable, Barack Obama

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was asked about Donald Trump. My working assumption is that, having

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won an election opposed to a number of my initiatives on certain aspects

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of my vision for where the country needs to go, it is appropriate for

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him to go forward with his vision and his values. And I don't expect

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there is going to be, you know, enormous overlap. Maybe a little

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understatement. Katty, I know Donald Trump and Mr Obama have such

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different styles but some of his supporters frustrated he's not

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speaking more frankly, more pointedly about Donald Trump? I'm

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not hearing that, I'm not hearing President Obama's supporters think

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this is the moment, the appropriate moment for him to be massively

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critical. What Obama did say in the press conferences, look, if there

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are individual issues on which I really feel Donald Trump is taking

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the wrong action, for example, deporting the children of illegal

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immigrant is from the US, Buttler children brought here by their

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parents, then I will speak out. He's not saying he's not going to say

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anything, but I think is going to choose his moment carefully. This

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press conference was fascinating because it really was an example of

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no drama Obama and one of the most memorable moment in the press

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conference was when he said, listen, I've always taught my daughter is

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the only thing that is the end of the world is the end of the world.

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This is not the end of the world, this is a transition of power in the

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US, part of the democratic process. It's right and expected Donald Trump

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will implement his own policies even if I don't agree with them. That was

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the tone, quite philosophical but quite calm look at the situation in

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America today. One more click to play you. This is Mr Obama talking

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about the prospect of leaving office and what the future may hold. I want

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to do some writing, I want to be quiet little bit, not tear myself

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talk so much. I want to spend precious time with my girls. So

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those are my priorities this year. This is the last press conference Mr

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Obama will be holding. He's had eight years in office. He's talked

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about how he has reshaped America, how he has hope he is reshaped

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America. What do you think will be his lasting legacy? That's a big

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question. In 90 seconds, that would be great. Listen, he's always going

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to be remembered even though he perhaps didn't want to be, as

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America's first black president, it's part of his biography. He will

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go down as the person who stopped America falling off the financial

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cliff in 2008. Proving a negative. But things could have been a lot

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worse than they were. He spoke out consistently in favour, as he did

:08:45.:08:48.

today, of gay rights and minority rights. You can quibble with how

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much he has done on those issues, and there have been feeling

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failings. Obamacare is not particularly popular, he didn't get

:08:58.:09:02.

far on gun control. He leaves office with a 58% approval rating, not bad

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for two term president in a very divided country. I think Americans

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will look back with respect for President Obama and his time in

:09:13.:09:15.

office, if nothing else, for the fact he was their eight years in the

:09:16.:09:21.

fishbowl, not a single scandal out of the Obama White House. That's not

:09:22.:09:26.

bad. You did it, I didn't doubt you would. You will be back for viewers

:09:27.:09:32.

outside the UK after outside source. We're going to come back to America

:09:33.:09:37.

across the hour because Donald Trump will be president in two days. We

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must turn to an ever more serious situation in the Gambia because

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tensions are increasing. This is a small country in West Africa and the

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whole crisis stems from the presidential election last year. Two

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men are at the heart of this. This is Adama Barrow. It seems unlikely

:09:57.:10:05.

he will become Prime Minister on Thursday because because recurrent

:10:06.:10:10.

President Jammeh doesn't accept the result. He has Parliament to extend

:10:11.:10:18.

his term by three months. If you want a measure of how serious the

:10:19.:10:22.

situation is, we have a number of other west African nations saying

:10:23.:10:26.

they are ready to use military force to remove him. Senegalese forces

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# # We're are already on the border.

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We are ours from that deadline and there seems no prospect of a

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political solution. What this has meant is that thousands of Gambians

:10:49.:10:52.

have been fleeing, they are concerned about violence, tourists

:10:53.:10:56.

are being evacuated. Our correspondent can bring us up to

:10:57.:10:57.

date. Since the state of emergency was

:10:58.:11:06.

announced on Tuesday, Gambians are fleeing anywhere they can. Crowding

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onto boats and roads to neighbouring countries and rural areas. The

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national assembly announced it will allow the president to stay in

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office three more months. Foreign tourists some advice to leave

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immediately with extra flights coming into the capital to take them

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home. Things have moved quickly since the announcement and the

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atmosphere in the Gambia is uncertain. Tourists are leaving, not

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as they came, not as they had anticipated. In the hotel everything

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was OK, yes. But now when we go from the hotel, to the airport, we see

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all the people leaving. All the buses, they take all... Even the

:11:48.:11:50.

people in Gambia they are very, very scared. It's for our family that we

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go home. Behind me is the national stadium of the Gambia, the planned

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venue for the inauguration on Thursday of Adama Barrow as the

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country's next president. President Jammeh has declared a state of

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emergency, some of the measures include the banning of large

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gatherings of such proportions. It remains to be seen what will happen

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here on Thursday. Yesterday the lead story was UK Prime Minister Theresa

:12:20.:12:23.

May's speech on Brexit and her vision for it. Today the UK Foreign

:12:24.:12:27.

Secretary Boris Johnson said this while on a visit to India... If Mr

:12:28.:12:33.

Hollande wants to administer punishment beatings, to anybody who

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chooses to escape in the manner of some sort of World War II movie, I

:12:40.:12:45.

don't think that it is the way forward. I think actually it's not

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in the interest of our friends and our partners. Diplomatic

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correspondent James Landale has posted an excellent piece online,

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you can get it on the Apple now. He quotes a European diplomat who says

:13:00.:13:01.

for that clown to compare rest of the Nazis, that hurts. It'll not be

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forgotten. Most of the reaction we've had today has been to do with

:13:07.:13:10.

a speech by Theresa May. We've heard from two big beasts of the EU.

:13:11.:13:14.

Donald Tusk, the European Council president... Yesterday's speech by

:13:15.:13:22.

Prime Minister Theresa May proves the unified position of 27 member

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states on the indivisibility of the single market was finally understood

:13:29.:13:34.

and accepted by London. It would be good if our partners also understood

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that there will be no place for pick and choose tactics in our future

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negotiations. At the same time, I want to underline that we took note

:13:50.:13:56.

of the warm and balanced words of Prime Minister May on European

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integration, which we are much closer to the narrative of Winston

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Churchill than President-elect Donald Trump. Next is Jean-Claude

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Juncker, president of the European Commission. A fair deal is still

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valid, we need the fair deal we've written, fair means equal

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obligations for everyone taking part. In a kind of internal market.

:14:23.:14:29.

We'll see this in the course of the next coming months. Must remember

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the extensive background on Brexit on the BBC News website. We'll talk

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about the CIA deciding to declassify 13 million documents and post them

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online. We'll hear from a journalist to fall for that to happen and spent

:14:46.:14:50.

plenty of time examining what's on these records.

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A disabled man has partially won a Supreme Court case over a dispute

:14:59.:15:07.

over a wheelchair space on a bus, drivers will have to do more to

:15:08.:15:10.

accommodate wheelchair users. Doug Pauley from Yorkshire brought his

:15:11.:15:13.

case after he was refused entry to a first group bus in 2012 when a

:15:14.:15:19.

mother with a pushchair refused to move. He and his supporters say the

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ruling will make a major difference. I mean, I'm aware some people won't

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be pleased. It's not gone as far as some people would like. It's gone

:15:33.:15:37.

too far for people, but in the end this is about disabled people's

:15:38.:15:41.

right to access, to travel on the bus. And hopefully today has been at

:15:42.:15:46.

least a step in the right direction. I feel it'll create a cultural

:15:47.:15:50.

shift, that's what they said in court, so people will be aware of

:15:51.:15:53.

the fact the wheelchair area for wheelchair users and they should

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take priority. Our lead story comes from

:15:57.:16:13.

Washington. In the final news conference of his presidency Barack

:16:14.:16:17.

Obama has defended his decision to free WikiLeaks source Chelsea

:16:18.:16:21.

Manning. We can turn to some of the main stories from BBC World Service.

:16:22.:16:26.

From BBC Arabic the Iraqi army says it is preparing military operations

:16:27.:16:29.

to retake western Mosul. The last part of the city which is held by

:16:30.:16:34.

the Islamic State group. BBC Ukrainian reports a baby has been

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born to a previously infertile couple in Ukraine using a new type

:16:40.:16:45.

of 3-person IVF. Doctors used a method called pro-nuclear transfer

:16:46.:16:52.

in what is a world first. There is a moth and Donald Trump. A new species

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has been named after the President-elect. The scientist who

:16:57.:17:00.

took this decision, a Canadian, says he was inspired by the striking

:17:01.:17:03.

golden flakes covering the moth's head.

:17:04.:17:08.

As I was mentioning a couple of minutes ago, about 30 million pages

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of declassified documents from the US Central intelligence agency have

:17:14.:17:18.

been released and put online. You can access them if you are minded to

:17:19.:17:24.

and search them. They are on the CIA library website. Records include

:17:25.:17:29.

intelligence briefings UFO sightings, psychic experiments, they

:17:30.:17:33.

even detail how the CIA tested the celebrity psychic Uri Geller in

:17:34.:17:38.

1973. Lots of you watching on BBC News Channel will know of him very

:17:39.:17:42.

well. One test is a person would draw a picture in one room, such as

:17:43.:17:47.

this, then Uri Geller would draw a picture themselves in another room.

:17:48.:17:51.

Obviously you can see they are reasonably close. The conclusion

:17:52.:17:56.

those behind the experiment came to was he demonstrated his paranormal

:17:57.:18:00.

perceptual ability in a convincing and unambiguous manner. Lots of

:18:01.:18:03.

other people have since concluded he was merely a very good magician.

:18:04.:18:08.

That a separate discussion but the CIA spent time on the issue. It has

:18:09.:18:12.

explained the release of these documents in terms of a commitment

:18:13.:18:16.

to increasing the accessibility of declassified records to the public.

:18:17.:18:21.

It also follows a long campaign for this to happen and Mike Best is a

:18:22.:18:26.

journalist who has been involved in that and joins us from the US. Do

:18:27.:18:32.

you applaud what the CIA has done? I'm glad they finally followed

:18:33.:18:35.

through and made the documents available to everyone. Unfortunately

:18:36.:18:41.

they also decided to make the document is no longer text

:18:42.:18:44.

searchable so it is a bit of a mixed bag. Why do you think they have

:18:45.:18:50.

published these documents? Do you buy the argument it is a commitment

:18:51.:18:55.

to greater transparency? I'm quite sceptical of that. They had to be

:18:56.:19:00.

sued into agreeing to release it in the first place, they said it would

:19:01.:19:05.

take 28 years. Eventually they were forced out to say it would take six

:19:06.:19:10.

years. It was only after I began using their own ink and paper to

:19:11.:19:15.

print out the documents and scan them that they went ahead and

:19:16.:19:18.

decided, we're going to go ahead and released them. It'll save us time

:19:19.:19:24.

and money. We're quite pleased the digital copies are finally available

:19:25.:19:29.

to people everywhere. What did these documents have in common? What

:19:30.:19:34.

connects them? Its millions of pages, about 775,000 documents. What

:19:35.:19:39.

connects them is the Central intelligence agency. They are all

:19:40.:19:45.

into five years or older. That is the declassification review cycle.

:19:46.:19:49.

You spent all this time campaigning to see them, now you can see them in

:19:50.:19:54.

more detail than before. Have you discovered things you didn't imagine

:19:55.:19:55.

you would see? Fortunately I'm more familiar with

:19:56.:20:08.

them than most people are but there are quite a few surprises in there

:20:09.:20:13.

and things relevant to almost anyone's interest. If it's anything

:20:14.:20:19.

at all historical belated, genealogist and scientists will be

:20:20.:20:22.

interested, as will cartographers. Not just military and national

:20:23.:20:27.

intelligence history. Can you give one example of something you found

:20:28.:20:33.

of particular interest to you? There was one CIA memo which accused the

:20:34.:20:39.

NSA director and secretary of defence of creating the CSS,

:20:40.:20:47.

military branch of the NSA, to "Be an abortion". It put into the

:20:48.:20:54.

context of declassified NSA documents gives the strong

:20:55.:20:58.

impression the whole section was sabotaged so the NSA director would

:20:59.:21:04.

get a promotion. It's based off the CIA memo making that accusation is a

:21:05.:21:14.

high level. This huge cache of declassified documents posted online

:21:15.:21:18.

by the CIA, if you can see it, you can find it on the CIA library

:21:19.:21:25.

website. We are two days away from the presidency of Donald Trump and

:21:26.:21:29.

on trade we've heard some very clear pointers of what is to come. Wilbur

:21:30.:21:34.

Ross has been taking questions at his confirmation hearing and

:21:35.:21:38.

inevitably he was asked about the free trade deal between Mexico,

:21:39.:21:42.

Canada and the US, that Donald Trump really doesn't like. Here is the

:21:43.:21:48.

answer we heard. President-elect has made no secret in his public

:21:49.:21:53.

remarks, nor have I in earlier remarks, during the campaign. That

:21:54.:21:59.

Nafta is logically the first thing for us to deal with. We ought to

:22:00.:22:04.

solidify relationships in the best way we can in our own territory

:22:05.:22:10.

before we go off to other jurisdictions. I think that should

:22:11.:22:18.

be and hopefully will be, if I'm confirmed, a very very early topic

:22:19.:22:25.

in this administration. Michelle, in New York, what are the

:22:26.:22:30.

practicalities of America renegotiating all exiting Nafta?

:22:31.:22:35.

I've been talking to various trade experts and on the point of law, can

:22:36.:22:40.

President Trump repeal Nafta, the answer is yes. We're starting to

:22:41.:22:47.

hear the globe and mail in Canada is reporting Mr Ross has told the

:22:48.:22:52.

Canadian government already in a formal letter to start negotiations

:22:53.:22:55.

with Canada and Mexico would be sent within days of the start of the new

:22:56.:22:59.

administration. At its heart what this deal does essentially mean the

:23:00.:23:04.

three countries can trade easily with each other without having to

:23:05.:23:09.

worry about tariffs. What you're talking about is a renegotiation of

:23:10.:23:11.

the trade deal, starting from scratch again, going through list by

:23:12.:23:17.

list, which rules do you want to keep, which do you want to

:23:18.:23:22.

renegotiate? It's usually a lengthy process, but that has been Donald

:23:23.:23:26.

Trump's message all along, he wants to rip up existing trade deals he

:23:27.:23:30.

doesn't think are particularly good for the United States. It's a

:23:31.:23:34.

message that has certainly resonated in some states that helped him carry

:23:35.:23:39.

the election, notably Pennsylvania and Ohio. We'll be watching the

:23:40.:23:43.

story closely. That's Michelle in New York. This is a tweet from a way

:23:44.:23:48.

that during the presidential campaign from Hillary Clinton,...

:23:49.:23:55.

It didn't scare everyone because enough Americans voted for him.

:23:56.:24:02.

He'll be the new president. Inside that briefcase is everything the

:24:03.:24:05.

President of the United States needs to set a nuclear strike in motion.

:24:06.:24:13.

On Friday the briefcase will be passed to Donald Trump. Frank

:24:14.:24:15.

Gardner has been looking at the practical measures that have to

:24:16.:24:19.

happen for a nuclear strike to happen. There is a great article you

:24:20.:24:24.

can find online now. Frank has been an outside source tatami what he

:24:25.:24:32.

found. The way it works in the US is on Friday, inauguration day, there

:24:33.:24:37.

will be an unnamed military aid official week you and I have never

:24:38.:24:41.

seen before and will never see again, it will appear at the side of

:24:42.:24:44.

President Obama with a briefcase, the nuclear football. There are the

:24:45.:24:50.

launch codes and predesignated menus, they are called, for target

:24:51.:24:58.

sets, should the unthinkable happen. He or she will never leave the

:24:59.:25:02.

President's side. At the end of the inauguration, after the oath, that

:25:03.:25:05.

aid will be beside the future President Trump. The briefing will

:25:06.:25:10.

already have taken place so President-elect Trump by then will

:25:11.:25:14.

already know what he has to do. They raise an authentication card called

:25:15.:25:18.

the biscuit, three inches by five injured, the president will have to

:25:19.:25:22.

authenticate himself. He doesn't carry out the order himself and he

:25:23.:25:26.

gives it and gives it to the Secretary of State for Defence,

:25:27.:25:32.

which will be General James Mathis. A lot depends on the circumstances.

:25:33.:25:37.

If carrying out nuclear strike was a long-term measure policy a lot of

:25:38.:25:40.

people would be involved but if there is imminent threat to the US

:25:41.:25:45.

is has told Frank the president has extraordinary latitude to take the

:25:46.:25:49.

sole decision to launch. You can find on the BBC News app. I'll be

:25:50.:25:53.

back with you in a few minutes time. See you then.

:25:54.:26:07.

In the next half an hour Helen Willetts will get her thoughts on

:26:08.:26:13.

developments back home with the weather for the week

:26:14.:26:14.

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