18/01/2017 Outside Source


18/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

:00:08.:00:09.

Let's look through some of the main stories here in the BBC Newsroom.

:00:10.:00:16.

Barack Obama has just finished his final press conference as president,

:00:17.:00:21.

inevitably was asked about his successor. I don't expect that there

:00:22.:00:30.

is going to be, you know, enormous overlap. That may be an

:00:31.:00:32.

understatement. I'll play you a report looking

:00:33.:00:32.

at how the day will play out In sport, I'll look

:00:33.:00:38.

at the Vendee Globe yacht race It only happens every four years,

:00:39.:00:43.

and this one is a thiller. Pete main contenders are expected to

:00:44.:00:58.

finish tomorrow morning. -- the two main contenders. If you want to get

:00:59.:01:00.

in touch, that is the hashtag. will be passed from Barack Obama

:01:01.:01:15.

to Donald Trump. This report by

:01:16.:01:18.

Rajini Vaidyanathan explains the practicalities

:01:19.:01:19.

of the day. I do solemnly swear... That I will

:01:20.:01:35.

faithfully execute the office of... How does it work on inauguration

:01:36.:01:42.

day? This is where Donald Trump will wake up on inauguration morning, the

:01:43.:01:47.

White House guesthouse, it doesn't look like much, really, does it? It

:01:48.:01:50.

has been nicknamed the most exclusive hotel in the world, and

:01:51.:01:55.

that is because it has played host to some distinguished guests over

:01:56.:02:04.

the years. This is St John's Episcopal church, where Mr Trump

:02:05.:02:10.

will head to for a church service. Barack Obama came the morning of his

:02:11.:02:15.

inauguration too. Look at this, it is absolutely beautiful. So here I

:02:16.:02:26.

am, in the President's pew, actually sitting where presidents of history

:02:27.:02:32.

have sat. After he is done, Donald Trump bakes the very short journey

:02:33.:02:37.

across the road to the White House. I don't think they're going to lead

:02:38.:02:42.

us in. As is part of tradition, he will go to the White House to meet

:02:43.:02:46.

President Obama. Another tradition that always happens is that the

:02:47.:02:50.

outgoing president always writes the incoming president a note, a word of

:02:51.:02:52.

advice. This, the US Capitol, is where

:02:53.:03:04.

Donald Trump will officially become president, when he is sworn in.

:03:05.:03:07.

Politicians and dignitaries will get to watch from up close, the rest of

:03:08.:03:11.

us will all have to watch from the bottom. It is cold! Now we are

:03:12.:03:20.

heading to the cheap seats. This is the national moll, not much to say,

:03:21.:03:24.

just a lot of grass, but if you don't have a ticket, this is where

:03:25.:03:32.

you come to watch. Next, the parade, which heads towards the White House

:03:33.:03:36.

and is led by the President and the First Lady. The parade even goes

:03:37.:03:42.

past here, Donald Trump's new hotel in DC, so who would have thought

:03:43.:03:50.

that when he was planning this hotel, Donald Trump would one day be

:03:51.:03:54.

moving into the White House just down the street from here?

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We will have full coverage of the inauguration, whether you're

:04:01.:04:04.

watching in the UK or outside of the UK, on the BBC News Channel and BBC

:04:05.:04:06.

World News. The final stages of the Vendee Globe

:04:07.:04:08.

are drawing to a close. This is a solo

:04:09.:04:12.

round-the-world yacht race. It happens every four years,

:04:13.:04:14.

and this one is a thriller. Welsh sailor Alex Thomson

:04:15.:04:16.

is in second, At Christmas,

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Thomson was about 1000 miles behind. Both men are expected

:04:19.:04:22.

to finish at a fixed point on the Atlantic coast of France

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on Thursday morning. Let's talk to Chris Eakin, author of

:04:29.:04:44.

A Race Too Far, nice to see you, Chris, a former colleague, talk us

:04:45.:04:48.

through these tactics. They have had to go north from Sables-d'Ollone

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because of the wind, and they have now made their final move, their

:04:53.:04:57.

final tack for home, they are looking at coming in a little bit

:04:58.:05:01.

later, tomorrow afternoon, tomorrow evening, and Alex has slipped back a

:05:02.:05:07.

bit, now 57 miles behind, the last positional report. That is a she,

:05:08.:05:10.

and there is no doubt now that he can win through raw speed alone, he

:05:11.:05:15.

needs something to happen. But there is a history of things happening at

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this stage of a race that has been going on for two and a half months,

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they are all clapped out, the boats and the skippers are tired, so you

:05:24.:05:27.

never know. A lot of people have become aware of this race just in

:05:28.:05:31.

the last few days, and is speed these machines are going out is

:05:32.:05:36.

quite something. A lot of the time they are like powerboats, Alex broke

:05:37.:05:41.

the 24-hour record only a few days ago in this race, doing 23 knots on

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average for that 24 hours. If you look at the first attempt to go

:05:49.:05:52.

around the world by Robin Lod Johnston in 1968-9, his average

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speed was just over 4 knots. These are spectacularly different worlds,

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you can see is both there filmed in the Southern Ocean by a French naval

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helicopter. Really powerful beast of a boat. You can see the blade, these

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are very new, very radical, and a little bit before the shots he lost

:06:15.:06:18.

the starboard one, the one on the right-hand two weeks into the race,

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so he has been at a advantage. Does it continue at this speed even when

:06:27.:06:31.

the pilot is sleeping? It does, and Alex has a problem with his

:06:32.:06:36.

autopilot, which controls the steering, but in a 24 hours, he will

:06:37.:06:41.

have gone to sleep, the last two days he has had very little sleep,

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but that is because of technical problems that have made the

:06:46.:06:50.

autopilot difficult to use. But they absolutely keep going relentlessly.

:06:51.:06:57.

Robin Knox Johnston took ten months to get around, and Alex has said

:06:58.:07:00.

that is tougher than what he does, but you can see the contrast. It is

:07:01.:07:06.

a big sport in a number of different ways, but this race has a hold on

:07:07.:07:11.

the imagination. The French in particular are just huge on it, our

:07:12.:07:16.

stars, people like mike Golding, I don't know how many Britons have

:07:17.:07:20.

heard of him, but he cannot sit in a pavement cafe in Paris without

:07:21.:07:26.

people coming up to him. All of our guys speak French, because the

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French are so much into it, and of course we invented all of this,

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Robin Knox-Johnston's tack won very much against a Frenchman,

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incidentally, there were nine in the race, but the Frenchman was the main

:07:41.:07:45.

contender with him. It is an extraordinary thing, the British

:07:46.:07:48.

have led the way, and now we are struggling no non-Frenchman has ever

:07:49.:07:52.

won this race, as you say, every four years, they call list tonight

:07:53.:08:01.

it's the Everest of the seas. It looks incredibly expensive, it is

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quite a niche sport, how does it add? It is like Formula One in many

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respects, the boats cost at least ?3 million, and the whole team

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organisation considerably more, and that is why you see big sponsor

:08:15.:08:19.

names on these lead boats. Only six of the 29 boats have got those foils

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I was talking about, they are the big-money teams, just like Formula

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One, there will only ever be two teams who can win this season, very

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similar. Before I let you go, there are those who will not finish, some

:08:33.:08:36.

contestants who have got a long way to go. It is a good question, and it

:08:37.:08:42.

illustrates how this is a photo finish. Third place is more than 700

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miles behind the lead two, and the back of the fleet is 9000 miles

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away, that is how fast election Armel Le Cleac'h have been, deeply

:08:52.:08:57.

impressive. -- that is how fast election. I hope the French will

:08:58.:09:01.

turn out for the late arrivals as well it might they will turn out for

:09:02.:09:05.

a Frenchman, you can bet your bottom dollar on that!

:09:06.:09:08.

CSKA Moscow have headed to Spain's Costa Blanca

:09:09.:09:11.

to try and get some sunshine during their mid-season break.

:09:12.:09:13.

It's pretty cold in Moscow right now.

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This is what they got - a complete white-out.

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You can just about make out the goals on the training pitch, but

:09:26.:09:31.

probably not that the Mark Watt they were after, but I'm sure it reminds

:09:32.:09:33.

them of home! Each day, this week I've

:09:34.:09:37.

picked out one rally It takes place in Grand Central

:09:38.:09:40.

Station in New York. As you'll see,

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this rally goes on and on. This is the UK's James Wilstrop

:09:45.:10:04.

against New Zealand's Paul Coll. Wilstrop won,

:10:05.:10:07.

he'll play Karim Abdel Gawad. He's one of two Egyptians

:10:08.:10:11.

in the men's semis. Egypt is the most successful squash

:10:12.:10:14.

country, in part due to former leader Hosni Mubarak,

:10:15.:10:17.

who was a keen player. Anyway, back to this rally,

:10:18.:10:24.

it's about to hot up. Goodness me, this is great! Goodness

:10:25.:10:26.

me, only matter of time! Or! There goes, the acknowledgement,

:10:27.:11:00.

that is the biggest of the day! Thanks to the PSA for sending us

:11:01.:11:02.

those pictures. By the way, we're making a big

:11:03.:11:04.

effort to cover sports that normally don't get

:11:05.:11:07.

too much of the limelight. This week, it's been

:11:08.:11:09.

squash and sailing. Let's turn to some important

:11:10.:11:22.

scientific findings that have come out today.

:11:23.:11:23.

2016 was the hottest year since records began over a century ago.

:11:24.:11:26.

Average global temperatures edged ahead of 2015,

:11:27.:11:29.

and are now 1.1 degrees higher than pre-industrial levels.

:11:30.:11:32.

In fact, it is the third consecutive year

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that the record has been broken, according to Nasa.

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Scientists believe that the El Nino weather phenomenon

:11:42.:11:43.

played a role, but that increasing levels

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of greenhouse gases were the main factor.

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and the latest data suggests that 2016 was a record-breaking year.

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This winter, parts of the Arctic have had a heatwave,

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when they should have been far below.

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While Australia's Great Barrier Reef was transformed to this.

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Vast swathes of coral were killed off as the waters warmed.

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2015 was the warmest year on record up until now,

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It's beaten it by about 0.1, 0.12 degrees Celsius,

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but in terms of the yearly variations, it is actually huge.

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Part of this rise was caused by an El Nino event,

:12:31.:12:36.

a warm ocean current that disrupts the world's weather.

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But scientists say greenhouse gases were the main driver.

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This shows how global temperatures have increased

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The bigger the circle, the hotter the year.

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And the latest data, collected by Nasa and meteorological

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agencies around the world, suggest 2016 is the third year

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The global temperature is edging ever closer

:12:57.:13:04.

Scientists say a rise of two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels

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could lead to dangerous impacts around the world.

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So a lower limit of 1.5 Celsius was set by the Paris climate

:13:15.:13:17.

agreement, a global deal that came into force last year.

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But with carbon dioxide at record levels, scientists say

:13:22.:13:26.

this is a temperature threshold we are on course to surpass.

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To tackle global warming, the world is being urged

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to move away from fossil fuels like coal.

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But in the US, Donald Trump has said he wants to revive the industry,

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and has threatened to pull America out of the Paris climate agreement.

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The woman who brokered the deal is concerned.

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If the US chooses to exit the road and the path that has been pursued

:13:51.:13:55.

by every other country in the world, it is only going to damage itself,

:13:56.:14:00.

because it will become less competitive.

:14:01.:14:03.

We are moving toward a de-carbonised society.

:14:04.:14:05.

All eyes will now be on this year's data.

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Already, scientists forecast that 2017 won't be as warm,

:14:10.:14:11.

But they say longer term, unless action is taken,

:14:12.:14:16.

A lot more background on that story from BBC News if you wanted. In a

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few minutes, this report in full from Jon Kay, who has been

:14:37.:14:39.

travelling from state to state in the US head of Donald Trump's

:14:40.:14:43.

inauguration. His latest reporters from Tennessee, we will have that in

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a few minutes' time. That report is from.

:14:49.:14:51.

Unemployment in the UK has fallen to its lowest level

:14:52.:14:54.

The jobless total dropped by just over 50,000

:14:55.:14:59.

between September and November and now stands at 1.6 million.

:15:00.:15:01.

But as our economics correspondent Andy Verity reports,

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the number of people in employment is no longer growing.

:15:04.:15:12.

This farmer and a food processor near King's Lynn in Norfolk supplies

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root vegetables like carrots to all the major food retailers from M to

:15:20.:15:23.

Morrisons, but it is being squeezed. It has been forced to offer higher

:15:24.:15:26.

wages to attract the people it needs to do the work, regardless of the

:15:27.:15:31.

living wage. It says that is because the supply of workers from the rest

:15:32.:15:35.

of the European Union has now gone into reverse. We are struggling to

:15:36.:15:39.

fill positions at the minute, it is a very fluid marketplace, inflation

:15:40.:15:44.

in wages in our sector at the minute, which is being driven by

:15:45.:15:50.

some EU citizens going home and moving from the UK marketplace, and

:15:51.:15:56.

it is creating a vacuum. In the three months to the end of November,

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the number of unemployed people dropped by 52,000 down to 1.6

:16:01.:16:05.

million. It remains at its lowest rate in 12 is, 4.8%. The average

:16:06.:16:12.

weekly pay packet was ?477, up by ?12 compared to a year ago or 2.7%.

:16:13.:16:18.

Businesses can't always pass on the higher cost of labour by simply

:16:19.:16:22.

charging higher prices. Simon will have to wait until you renegotiate

:16:23.:16:27.

his contract with his customers, the food companies and retailers, and

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they won't want big price increases. All of us are looking to try and

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recoup some of this back. I think the load has got to be shared by

:16:37.:16:41.

all, and that includes the consumer. If tighter labour markets are

:16:42.:16:45.

offering modestly paid workers the chance to big up their wages, many

:16:46.:16:49.

economists will see that as positive. We are seeing quite a

:16:50.:16:54.

robust edge to the UK economy, consistent with the other economic

:16:55.:16:58.

data that we have had. Hiring has not slowed down materially, and

:16:59.:17:03.

people are finding jobs and finding jobs at improved wage levels. But

:17:04.:17:08.

there has been a marked change since the Brexit vote. For 20 years now,

:17:09.:17:12.

the number of people in work in the UK has been hitting new records. In

:17:13.:17:17.

the three months to the end of November, it dipped slightly, and it

:17:18.:17:21.

is no higher than it was in July. Andy Verity, BBC News.

:17:22.:17:29.

I am Roz Atkins with the latest news from the BBC newsroom, Barack Obama

:17:30.:17:40.

has given the final news conference of his presidency, touching on

:17:41.:17:43.

issues such as Donald Trump, Russia and his decision to free Chelsea

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Manning. This is what you have got coming up later.

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If you're outside of the UK, it's World News America next,

:17:50.:17:51.

with a special report from inside Aleppo

:17:52.:17:53.

In the UK it is the News At Ten, where the lead story is Brexit with

:17:54.:18:10.

Huw Edwards. We will also hear from Davos and Strasbourg.

:18:11.:18:16.

Now, a story we covered a couple of weeks ago, the first freight train

:18:17.:18:23.

to travel directly to the UK from China has arrived here in London.

:18:24.:18:27.

The Chinese government is calling it the new silk route. Andy Moore has

:18:28.:18:34.

more on this story. The train began its journey

:18:35.:18:40.

at a giant container depot in China. 34 carriages were loaded with goods,

:18:41.:18:43.

such as clothes, bags China has been operating trains

:18:44.:18:45.

to 14 European capitals from this Now, London has been

:18:46.:18:49.

added to the list. Now, London has been

:18:50.:18:52.

added to the list. Because of different rail

:18:53.:18:55.

gauges along the way, the containers have to be offloaded

:18:56.:18:57.

and reloaded several times, but China sees this

:18:58.:18:59.

as a new version of the Silk Route. In all, the train, carrying

:19:00.:19:12.

?4 million worth of goods, on its journey of more

:19:13.:19:14.

than 7,500 miles. The UK is China's seventh-biggest

:19:15.:19:17.

trading market, so the boost to Chinese enterprise is clear,

:19:18.:19:20.

but it is also hoped the train will make the journey back to China

:19:21.:19:23.

laden with British goods. Back to US politics one more time.

:19:24.:19:43.

It is Donald Trump's inauguration on Friday, and you will see extensive

:19:44.:19:45.

coverage from BBC News. All week we've been playing

:19:46.:19:46.

you reports from Jon Kay. He wasn't Barack Obama's favourite

:19:47.:19:57.

diner in Chicago yesterday. This report comes from Tennessee.

:19:58.:20:01.

If you want to understand Donald Trump's election win,

:20:02.:20:03.

Next to Route 45, the Ohio River meets the Mississippi.

:20:04.:20:14.

It's an essential artery for the US economy,

:20:15.:20:19.

carrying 18 million tonnes of cargo every year.

:20:20.:20:27.

But things aren't what they used to be.

:20:28.:20:34.

The locks which boats pass through here have seen better days.

:20:35.:20:42.

Nearly 100 years old, they regularly break down,

:20:43.:20:44.

A boat could be waiting out for 52 hours before coming through?

:20:45.:20:53.

Mark, the lock keeper, says it's a struggle

:20:54.:20:55.

The concrete is starting to break up and crumble.

:20:56.:20:58.

Every time it gets hit by a boat as it lands on it it puts pressure

:20:59.:21:02.

on it and causes more cracks and stress on it, we patch it

:21:03.:21:05.

together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last forever.

:21:06.:21:21.

to rebuild America's rivers, roads and railways,

:21:22.:21:27.

a promise that's won him plenty of support round here,

:21:28.:21:29.

but he hasn't said where the money will come from.

:21:30.:21:32.

We head back on Route 45 to see the kind of project

:21:33.:21:34.

the new President wants to encourage.

:21:35.:21:36.

A huge dam and lock system to replace the failing one downriver.

:21:37.:21:39.

It's nearly 20 years behind schedule and $2 billion over budget.

:21:40.:21:45.

Many here believe Donald Trump's life in business

:21:46.:21:48.

I think he if he really wants to put his mind with it

:21:49.:21:55.

and really wants to work with the people, for sure, why not?

:21:56.:21:58.

One person can't do it, but if you take a group of people

:21:59.:22:01.

and you've got good conversation communication skills,

:22:02.:22:03.

good listening skills, you can pretty much accomplish anything.

:22:04.:22:06.

Has he got those skills? I hope so.

:22:07.:22:10.

Trump's critics say his pledges are unrealistic and unaffordable.

:22:11.:22:15.

But in an area where jobs can be scarce,

:22:16.:22:17.

We drive on into America's rural south.

:22:18.:22:28.

There are two million farms in this country.

:22:29.:22:31.

Will a property developer president understand this business?

:22:32.:22:42.

students are learning how to weigh and vaccinate cattle.

:22:43.:22:48.

Stick it in, press it forward, pull it out.

:22:49.:22:52.

Some are gonna be more willing to go forward,

:22:53.:22:54.

Sounds like politicians! I guess so!

:22:55.:23:01.

Donald Trump won nearly 80% of the vote in the Martin area.

:23:02.:23:07.

and in turn they have confidence in him.

:23:08.:23:12.

He might have a few mess-ups on the way,

:23:13.:23:15.

but eventually he'll figure it all out.

:23:16.:23:20.

We're always going to need agriculture, that's what feeds us.

:23:21.:23:22.

So we're going to need it to keep going.

:23:23.:23:25.

But is farming compatible with Trump's plans for building?

:23:26.:23:27.

What about the land, the environment?

:23:28.:23:32.

Donald Trump is a man you associate with skyscrapers

:23:33.:23:34.

and New York City, not with farming and places like this.

:23:35.:23:37.

Do you think he understands you and what you want to do?

:23:38.:23:41.

I think he's going to help small-town people also out.

:23:42.:23:44.

I don't think he's going to be the big-city man

:23:45.:23:47.

What about farming, does he understand farming?

:23:48.:23:52.

Not as well as some agriculture people.

:23:53.:23:58.

Whether it's agriculture or infrastructure,

:23:59.:24:00.

in these communities away from Washington,

:24:01.:24:05.

many feel Trump will be a President who finally speaks for them -

:24:06.:24:08.

someone not just following the political herd.

:24:09.:24:20.

I was mentioning that we were trying to focus on sports that do not get

:24:21.:24:27.

all the limelight, you have given me some good ideas. Justin in Cambridge

:24:28.:24:33.

says, what about tour de ski, where people ski up mountains. And Jay in

:24:34.:24:41.

Dublin says, how about a Spanish sport which is a crash between

:24:42.:24:48.

tennis, squash and real tennis, where you take the ball off the back

:24:49.:24:52.

wall as well? Obligated but it looks good, we will try to cover those

:24:53.:24:56.

next week. -- quite complicated.

:24:57.:25:05.

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