19/01/2017 Outside Source


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19/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, there's only one place to begin this half-hour, Washington,

:00:14.:00:21.

DC. A concert is underway, as you can see. These are live pictures

:00:22.:00:25.

from the Lincoln Memorial. This is the Make America Great Again concert

:00:26.:00:28.

on the eve of Donald Trump's inauguration. This time tomorrow, he

:00:29.:00:33.

will be president. Senegalese troops have entered the

:00:34.:00:38.

Gambia after the new president was sworn in in a ceremony in Senegal.

:00:39.:00:43.

The man who lost the election, the current president, is refusing to

:00:44.:00:51.

stand down. The vendee Globe has finished after

:00:52.:00:55.

a thrilling race. We will have a full report from the coast of

:00:56.:00:59.

France. And as you are watching, if you have

:01:00.:01:03.

questions, some of you have been getting in touch. I will do my best

:01:04.:01:05.

to answer you as we go along. I think the actor Jon Voight is

:01:06.:01:28.

currently on stage during the Make America Great Again concert in

:01:29.:01:31.

Washington. 'S have a look at the pictures and see what's happening.

:01:32.:01:37.

To a barrage of propaganda that left us all breathless with anticipation,

:01:38.:01:42.

not knowing if God could reverse all the negative lies against Mr Trump,

:01:43.:01:47.

whose only desire... CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

:01:48.:01:54.

Whose only desire was to make America great again.

:01:55.:02:04.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE He certainly didn't need this job.

:02:05.:02:11.

And, yes, yes, God answered all our prayers. Because here it is. We will

:02:12.:02:25.

be part of history. All of us. And President Lincoln, who sits here

:02:26.:02:30.

with us, I'm sure is smiling, knowing America will be saved by an

:02:31.:02:34.

honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their

:02:35.:02:39.

creed or colour. CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

:02:40.:02:50.

So, my friends, let us rejoice in knowing that from this time on, we

:02:51.:02:56.

will see a renewed America. The spirit of America is perhaps best

:02:57.:03:03.

captured by one of our country's most beloved patriotic songs,

:03:04.:03:11.

written over a century ago. America The Beautiful. And here to perform

:03:12.:03:16.

his own version of this truly American classic is a Grammy

:03:17.:03:24.

award-winning rock and roll hall of fame member and a soul music legend,

:03:25.:03:31.

and it gives me great honour to introduce the legendary Sam Moore.

:03:32.:03:42.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE That's Jon Voight, the actor, who

:03:43.:03:46.

said Donald Trump is an honest man and didn't need the job of president

:03:47.:03:51.

and only sort it for one reason, not for himself, but to make America

:03:52.:03:54.

great again. We will come away from those pictures just for a moment. We

:03:55.:03:59.

might go back again before the end of the programme. And it is

:04:00.:04:05.

striking, isn't it? The formalities before the inauguration begins. Many

:04:06.:04:09.

separate events happen on the day is self building up to the oath of

:04:10.:04:13.

office. You can't help but, once again, reflect on the enormity and

:04:14.:04:18.

improbability of what Donald Trump has achieved. We've been speaking

:04:19.:04:22.

about this with the BBC North America editor, John Sobel. If we

:04:23.:04:28.

had been talking a year ago, two years ago, we would have said, you

:04:29.:04:34.

know what? On January 20, 2017, we would be witnessing the election of

:04:35.:04:41.

President-elect Trump, our viewers would have thought we had taken

:04:42.:04:45.

leave of all of our senses. It is an extraordinary moment, and if you

:04:46.:04:50.

look back at the process, from George Washington onwards, there's

:04:51.:04:54.

been a sense of continuity, Democrat to do much -- Democrat Republican,

:04:55.:05:00.

Republican and Democrat, I think the 45th president of the United States

:05:01.:05:03.

represents a break from some of that, because what he has done, he

:05:04.:05:08.

has upended political normality in the way he has campaigned and in the

:05:09.:05:15.

way he has been since he won that election last November, and I think

:05:16.:05:18.

we are in for a very unpredictable time. He talks about draining the

:05:19.:05:23.

swamp of Washington, changing the way everything works, and it's like

:05:24.:05:25.

a disruptor is going to take over the keys of the White House and no

:05:26.:05:31.

one is quite sure what that means in terms of policy, whether

:05:32.:05:35.

domestically or internationally. And I guess all incoming presidents have

:05:36.:05:39.

to go from talking the talk to walking the walk, and listening to

:05:40.:05:43.

Mike Pence this afternoon, he was emphasising how much they want to

:05:44.:05:47.

get done quickly. Do you think the transition team is in good nick to

:05:48.:05:53.

do that? Well, I mean, if you listen to Mike Pence, an awful lot of

:05:54.:05:57.

people have taken up key positions and they say the transition is on

:05:58.:06:01.

schedule and under budget, and they were obviously making the rhetorical

:06:02.:06:05.

point, as you would expect, that's what we're going to do for the

:06:06.:06:08.

country. Deliver things on time that we promised that might be costing an

:06:09.:06:12.

awful lot less than had been the case before that. And also questions

:06:13.:06:17.

about what the tone will be of the inaugural address. We are being

:06:18.:06:22.

expected not to expect a big policy document but much more of a

:06:23.:06:25.

philosophical argument from Donald Trump about what it means to be an

:06:26.:06:29.

American, the role of citizen, the role of the state, we're told it

:06:30.:06:33.

will be personal, we are told it will be sincere, and that I think

:06:34.:06:37.

will be the tone he tries to set. He needs to unify America after what

:06:38.:06:41.

was the most fractious and bitter election campaign and he's going to

:06:42.:06:50.

have his work cut to do that. And we will have extensive coverage of the

:06:51.:06:54.

Inauguration Day on the BBC News Channel or elsewhere on BBC world

:06:55.:06:58.

News. Time for some sport, and let's go

:06:59.:07:01.

back to a story we've been covering all week. A Frenchman has won this

:07:02.:07:07.

year's vendee Globe yacht race, around the world, and it took him 74

:07:08.:07:24.

days. He was run in very close. After ten unpredictable weeks in the

:07:25.:07:31.

world's most inhospitable seas, a Frenchman celebrating victory was a

:07:32.:07:35.

well told story. What wasn't was the plucky yachtsmen who gave him a run

:07:36.:07:39.

for his money. The three-month Alex Thompson has battled everything the

:07:40.:07:44.

ocean has thrown at him, eaten only freeze dried noodles and jelly and

:07:45.:07:48.

survived on as little as 20 minutes sleep every few hours. At stake, his

:07:49.:07:54.

life's obsession. To win the around the world race. He set off from here

:07:55.:08:00.

on the 6th of November, heading out of the Bay of Biscay and into the

:08:01.:08:05.

south Atlantic. He headed around Antarctica under the Cape of good

:08:06.:08:09.

hope and passed around Australasia, across the South Pacific, where he

:08:10.:08:14.

passed point Nemo, the furthest point from civilisation on Earth,

:08:15.:08:17.

and then back up the Atlantic around Cape Horn, and when he arrives back

:08:18.:08:25.

home, you will have notched up something between 20000 and 30,000

:08:26.:08:30.

nautical miles. For Alex, there have been good moments... Bad moments...

:08:31.:08:38.

I do wonder why I do it sometimes! And moments over Christmas where his

:08:39.:08:42.

family worried he was going slightly mad.

:08:43.:08:48.

# Jingle Bells, Alex Sayles, round the world he goes!

:08:49.:08:53.

His wife is desperate to get him home. I have spoken to him and been

:08:54.:09:00.

in contact but seeing him is totally different. I can't wait. Just two

:09:01.:09:05.

weeks into the race, his boat got so badly damaged it hugely affected his

:09:06.:09:09.

speed, but he still smashed the world record for the greatest

:09:10.:09:14.

distance sailed solo in 24 hours. But what perhaps is better than a

:09:15.:09:18.

record after three months at sea, his team promised to have on hand a

:09:19.:09:24.

hot burger and a cold beer! You might have seen this already.

:09:25.:09:29.

Novak Djokovic is out of the Australian Open. He lost in the

:09:30.:09:33.

second round. That doesn't happen often. He lost to the world number

:09:34.:09:40.

117, Dennis is stunning. This is the assessment of the two-time Wimbledon

:09:41.:09:43.

Schenkel -- two-time Wimbledon champion from Pat Cash. It is

:09:44.:09:49.

incredible to think he couldn't get through. Normally this time last

:09:50.:09:53.

year, we would have said, straight sets, wouldn't take much more than

:09:54.:09:57.

an hour and a half. It just shows Novak has lost his edge. No doubt

:09:58.:10:02.

about that. If we were doubting that before, we are certainly confirmed

:10:03.:10:05.

that he is not the same player he was six months ago.

:10:06.:10:10.

Deloitte has released its annual report into the world's richest

:10:11.:10:16.

football clubs. Ollie Foster at BBC Sport has read it so you don't have

:10:17.:10:22.

to! Let me find you. There you are. Got you at last! Manchester United

:10:23.:10:25.

top, aren't they? I saw the headline. They are indeed. After 11

:10:26.:10:31.

years, Real Madrid have been knocked off the top spot. Manchester United

:10:32.:10:35.

are really going to worry the rest of the Premier League this season

:10:36.:10:38.

but at least their accountants and their money men can take some pride

:10:39.:10:41.

in the fact that they are top of this mini league table. Delight,

:10:42.:10:46.

they reveal this, they've done over the last 20 years or so. --

:10:47.:10:59.

Deloitte. Man United were top on ?88 million a few years ago. ?515

:11:00.:11:06.

million! The first time the club went over the ?500 million mark.

:11:07.:11:11.

Real Madrid have moved down to third, with Barcelona just above

:11:12.:11:16.

them with .1 of ?1 million between them. Manchester City on the up.

:11:17.:11:24.

This was last season, when they were in the Champions League. Deloitte to

:11:25.:11:28.

say they have phenomenal commercial revenue growth, and they say that

:11:29.:11:33.

they secured commercial partnerships in excess of that achievable by

:11:34.:11:38.

their peers. But don't expect Manchester United to stay there,

:11:39.:11:41.

because when they look at this season, Man United haven't been in

:11:42.:11:45.

the Champions League, there's Brexit, sterling has fallen against

:11:46.:11:49.

the euro and all those other big clubs as well, they will be saying,

:11:50.:11:53.

look at those kit deals and the commercial deals Manchester United

:11:54.:11:57.

have achieved. In that last season. We want a deal as big a fact as

:11:58.:12:02.

well. So United back to the top but you can imagine Real Madrid

:12:03.:12:06.

returning there next year. Thank you. Thanks for putting that in

:12:07.:12:09.

context Ross. All week we've been following the

:12:10.:12:14.

squash tournament of champions that takes place in New York's Grand

:12:15.:12:18.

Central Station. I've been picking up a rally each day of the week.

:12:19.:12:25.

Here's another one for you featuring two giants of the game. Some of

:12:26.:12:31.

these rallies went on for so long, you can really put the kettle on,

:12:32.:12:36.

talk to your friends, and the rally will go on till it gets to the sharp

:12:37.:12:40.

end of things. This was actually a five set thriller. Gauthier won.

:12:41.:12:44.

Very injured at one stage in the match. Another match featuring Laura

:12:45.:12:51.

Massaro. She is in the final later today. Unfortunately, technical

:12:52.:12:55.

details in New York, not the BBC, but in New York, the organisers,

:12:56.:12:59.

mean I cannot show you how game, which is a shame because it was a

:13:00.:13:03.

great performance. You can get clips on our Facebook page. I've talked

:13:04.:13:07.

all this way and still I can show you the end of the rally! Can't

:13:08.:13:13.

believe how tight they are hitting it! Brilliant! He's made the error!

:13:14.:13:26.

There it is. Fist pumps! Very impressive from both of them.

:13:27.:13:31.

Gauthier is in the final later on. Let me pick up the feed of the

:13:32.:13:35.

concert going on by the Washington Memorial. This is the Make America

:13:36.:13:39.

Great Again concert. Let's have a listen. BAND MUSIC PLAYS.

:13:40.:13:51.

CHEERING AND APPLAUSE That's what is happening in

:13:52.:14:03.

Washington at the moment. I've just had a message from Christina saying

:14:04.:14:06.

can you update us on what is happening in Italy? A terrible

:14:07.:14:12.

avalanche by the hotel. We will cover this in just a few minutes.

:14:13.:14:21.

A British local authority is to hold a referendum on whether to increase

:14:22.:14:26.

council tax by 15% to pay for essential services which it says are

:14:27.:14:32.

at risk due to a funding shortfall. Surrey County Council, which is

:14:33.:14:35.

controlled by the Conservative Party, says it has a huge gap in its

:14:36.:14:39.

budget and needs the extra money to fund improved social care for the

:14:40.:14:43.

elderly, services for those with disabilities and for children.

:14:44.:14:50.

You don't get a choice about getting old, but how to pay the huge bills

:14:51.:14:54.

for care? Councils pay most of it and now one authority has had enough

:14:55.:14:58.

of government cuts and paying for more and more with less and less.

:14:59.:15:03.

Surrey is asking council tax payers, yes or no, to a 15% increase for

:15:04.:15:10.

social care. I think it's important that politicians stand up and tell

:15:11.:15:13.

the truth and be honest with the residents and tell them what it

:15:14.:15:17.

costs to run these services. We have to pay for these services! Is not

:15:18.:15:22.

easy finding people here who are pay what will be nearly ?2000 more than

:15:23.:15:27.

on an average home, though nobody could call Surrey hard up. I heard

:15:28.:15:35.

it on the one o'clock news today. They want more of the money for

:15:36.:15:40.

social care. Certainly not. That's totally obscene. There's lots of

:15:41.:15:44.

money in Surrey but it doesn't mean we are going to accept a 15%

:15:45.:15:49.

increase. It's not on. I think it's a very bad idea. I can't afford to

:15:50.:15:55.

pay because my pension is frozen. More council tax to pay for social

:15:56.:16:01.

care. Do you fancy that? I'm up for it. I think we live in a very

:16:02.:16:05.

affluent area and I think we can all afford it. I know lots of people

:16:06.:16:10.

around who need it more than we do. I agree. I think that's right. Is

:16:11.:16:15.

the side of a civilised society, one that looks after and cares for its

:16:16.:16:19.

older people responsibly, and I think it's a problem that will

:16:20.:16:26.

escalate over the years. It's not going to go away and we have to

:16:27.:16:28.

address it. The Labour Leader also agrees we should bear the rising

:16:29.:16:32.

costs of social care. It is not right which cross the social care

:16:33.:16:36.

crisis on local authorities, all of whom have different levels of income

:16:37.:16:40.

over the country. Its central government responsibility and the

:16:41.:16:42.

central government should face up to its responsibility. -- it is a

:16:43.:16:52.

central government responsibility. In several votes over the last few

:16:53.:16:55.

years on whether to raise council tax, the answer was no.

:16:56.:17:03.

We live in the BBC newsroom in Outside Source. Events have begun in

:17:04.:17:06.

Washington leading up to the inauguration of Donald Trump on

:17:07.:17:11.

Friday. Earlier he appeared at Arlington Cemetery to honour those

:17:12.:17:14.

who lost their lives serving in the American military.

:17:15.:17:18.

This is what is coming up after Outside Source. If you are watching

:17:19.:17:24.

outside of the UK, it is World News America. As you can imagine, they

:17:25.:17:29.

have plenty on Donald Trump, looking at his relations, including with

:17:30.:17:33.

Vladimir Putin. Next in the UK, we have the News at

:17:34.:17:41.

Ten with Hugh Edwards. Local officials in Italy are saying

:17:42.:17:46.

between 30 and 35 people are still missing after an avalanche hit a

:17:47.:17:51.

hotel. We know there were four earthquakes in quick succession in

:17:52.:17:55.

and around the region and they are thought to be the cause of what

:17:56.:17:59.

happened. Rescuers worked through the night to reach the hotel to see

:18:00.:18:04.

if they could find survivors. It was incredibly hard to get there because

:18:05.:18:08.

all the roads were blocked. As you will see in this report.

:18:09.:18:15.

At night, the quickest way through the wall of snow was on skis. These

:18:16.:18:21.

rescuers are amongst the most experienced in Europe. Even they

:18:22.:18:25.

struggled to move forward. Step-by-step, they shovelled their

:18:26.:18:30.

way up towards the Rigopiano hotel. They went further in,

:18:31.:18:33.

and came to where the avalanche hit. A six-foot-high wall

:18:34.:18:52.

of snow and rock broke Several miles away,

:18:53.:18:54.

a father waited for news Straight after yesterday's

:18:55.:19:02.

earthquakes, they texted each other. "I think the worst has already

:19:03.:19:10.

happened," he reassured her. His daughter, and many other

:19:11.:19:23.

people, may be trapped These pictures, filmed

:19:24.:19:28.

after daybreak, show the Rigopiano Do you think it's possible

:19:29.:19:35.

to find more people alive? In the past, we found

:19:36.:19:43.

people after three days And especially in this case,

:19:44.:19:50.

there could be some Rescuers are helped by the fact that

:19:51.:19:59.

conditions here have improved. We haven't felt any more

:20:00.:20:10.

earthquakes or tremors. Relief workers a few miles up

:20:11.:20:12.

the hill, will hope the snow holds Relief workers a few miles up

:20:13.:20:16.

the hill will hope the snow holds And those rescuers continue

:20:17.:20:19.

on their path to and from the destroyed hotel,

:20:20.:20:23.

searching for survivors or bodies. James Reynolds, BBC News,

:20:24.:20:29.

Penne, central Italy. Of course people all over the world

:20:30.:20:40.

will be watching Donald Trump's inauguration as president of the US,

:20:41.:20:44.

but perhaps people in Mexico will be paying more attention than most.

:20:45.:20:48.

He's been very critical of the trading relationship between Mexico

:20:49.:20:52.

and the US and of the immigration setup. He wants to build that wall,

:20:53.:20:58.

which he's talked about a lot. You may have recently seen Ford withdrew

:20:59.:21:03.

a significant investment in Mexico. We've been looking at that issue.

:21:04.:21:11.

This places a world away from the spectacle on Capitol Hill. The dry

:21:12.:21:15.

valleys and desert landscape could and contrast more sharply with the

:21:16.:21:19.

glitz of the presidential inauguration ceremony in Washington,

:21:20.:21:23.

DC. And yet since Donald Trump was elected, the two places are now

:21:24.:21:27.

inexorably linked. This dusty corner of central Mexico felt perhaps the

:21:28.:21:32.

first blow of Mr Tron's aggressive brand of economic protectionism.

:21:33.:21:36.

Faced with threats of higher border taxes, the car giant Ford decided to

:21:37.:21:41.

pull out of $1.6 billion car assembly plant it was building here

:21:42.:21:44.

and invest at least part of the money in Michigan instead. -- Mr

:21:45.:21:50.

Tron 's aggressive brand. The suggestion was that the next four

:21:51.:21:54.

years would be tougher than he had hoped. He had worked on the site for

:21:55.:21:57.

the six months when the entire workforce was told out of the blue

:21:58.:22:02.

they were fired. He now harvests cactuses to make a living.

:22:03.:22:08.

TRANSLATION: I would ask him to play fair with us and lend us a hand. We

:22:09.:22:13.

need jobs here, too. We need work. I think that's where delinquency and

:22:14.:22:19.

crime come from. No work. The authorities here admit Ford's

:22:20.:22:21.

decision has hurt their economic forecast. It is a worry and I can

:22:22.:22:28.

tell you that the worst thing that is happening is that we don't have

:22:29.:22:32.

the rules yet. We don't know how he's going to play the rules in the

:22:33.:22:36.

economy or the platform he's going to plan for the next months.

:22:37.:22:41.

Automobiles and agriculture are the mainstay of the local economy here,

:22:42.:22:45.

but as more US car firms choose Michigan over this town, desert

:22:46.:22:51.

towns and villages are finding themselves on the of Donald Trump's

:22:52.:22:56.

economic conflict with Mexico. These people are some of its first

:22:57.:23:00.

casualties. And it comes at a particularly volatile time for the

:23:01.:23:04.

Mexican economy, too. Many furious at a government imposed

:23:05.:23:09.

fuel price hike, with some protest bubbling over into looting and

:23:10.:23:13.

clashes with riot police. Most people, though, are simply worried

:23:14.:23:17.

about the rising cost of living in Mexico and the overall direction of

:23:18.:23:21.

the economy. Especially the community of around 500 families

:23:22.:23:26.

that lies behind Ford's abandoned construction. The community leader,

:23:27.:23:31.

known locally as Don Corleone, fears that in the absence of stable work,

:23:32.:23:36.

young people will head north, exacerbating the very problem Donald

:23:37.:23:39.

Trump has vowed to tackle - illegal immigration.

:23:40.:23:45.

As the factory sits gathering dust in the desert, the Ford name has

:23:46.:23:49.

already been taken off the billboard. What began as a shining

:23:50.:23:53.

example of cross-border free trade is now an eerie monument to US

:23:54.:23:54.

protectionism. I was going to bring in the feed of

:23:55.:24:03.

this concert taking place in Washington, DC anyway, but I think

:24:04.:24:06.

my timing might be good here, because... Lets see you has come on

:24:07.:24:12.

the stage. I think President-elect Donald Trump has done. -- let's see

:24:13.:24:18.

who has come. CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

:24:19.:24:44.

You'll never break this heart of stone, sings Mick Jagger in that

:24:45.:24:51.

trap, as the President-elect of America greets his supporters in

:24:52.:24:54.

Washington. Tomorrow he will become the president. Goodbye.

:24:55.:25:09.

Hello. If you were watching yesterday evening, I was telling you

:25:10.:25:15.

about how quiet the weather picture is at the moment. This will stay

:25:16.:25:19.

with us certainly for

:25:20.:25:20.