23/01/2017 Outside Source


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23/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

:00:31.:00:38.

It has been a busy first day for Donald Trump.

:00:39.:00:42.

He's signed an executive order to withdraw the US from a major

:00:43.:00:45.

international trade deal between 12 Pacific Rim countries -

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And he's also had a message for business leaders.

:00:48.:00:50.

The regulations are going to be cut massively and the taxes

:00:51.:00:53.

are going to be cut way down so you're gonna have now incentive,

:00:54.:00:56.

Mr Trump's Sean Spicer has made his second appearance -

:00:57.:01:02.

his first at the weekend contained a a number of false statements -

:01:03.:01:05.

I'm going to tell you the facts as I know them and if we make a mistake

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we will do our best to correct that. Lyse Doucet is in Kazakhstan

:01:16.:01:17.

where Syrian peace talks convened by Russia, Iran

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and Turkey are underway. Plus Jonathan Beale will be live

:01:21.:01:22.

with me to explain the latest in a political row around

:01:23.:01:25.

the UK's nuclear deterrent. President Donald Trump has

:01:26.:01:46.

begun his first full week in office. One of his first moves

:01:47.:01:52.

is to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership -

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that's a trade deal Samir Hussein is here. Do we have

:01:56.:02:17.

other hurdles to jump before America is out? Did is pretty much it when

:02:18.:02:24.

it comes to the trade deal. The new President Trump was not going to go

:02:25.:02:27.

forward with this trade deal and it was a signature part of the

:02:28.:02:33.

administration, there was a lot of support for that. And when you talk

:02:34.:02:37.

about the transpacific partnership, people who did not agree with that,

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it was more Democrats not in agreement. So we're seeing President

:02:42.:02:45.

Trump, one of the first things he has done is to sign this order to

:02:46.:02:50.

get out of it. He is in fact going ahead with some of the things we

:02:51.:02:54.

talked about during his campaign. But interestingly this is something

:02:55.:03:00.

that usually people on both sides are in agreement with going forward

:03:01.:03:04.

with trade agreements. So it is a departure from what we have seen

:03:05.:03:08.

from other Republicans. But in line with what Donald Trump said of the

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campaign trail, bet he feels free trade is not serving American

:03:14.:03:18.

industry? Absolutely and we heard that the president has gone further

:03:19.:03:22.

still talking about the North American Free Trade Agreement and we

:03:23.:03:27.

heard from the White House spokesperson Sean Spicer who said in

:03:28.:03:33.

his first full briefing that they are going to be speaking with the

:03:34.:03:40.

heads of Canada and Mexico to look at renegotiating the North American

:03:41.:03:42.

Free Trade Agreement. So trade has been a topic for the president on

:03:43.:03:49.

his first full day in office. Stay with us, at the start of the day the

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President said he had a busy week planned.

:03:58.:04:03.

With a heavy focus on jobs and national security.

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We're going to be cutting taxes massively for both the middle-class

:04:06.:04:21.

and companies and that is massive. We're trying to get it down to 15,

:04:22.:04:27.

20%. We are going to be cutting regulation massively. We will have

:04:28.:04:32.

regulation, just a strong and protective of the people as the

:04:33.:04:37.

regulation we have right now. But what we have right now, you cannot

:04:38.:04:43.

do anything. We can cut regulations by 75%, maybe more. A company

:04:44.:04:48.

wanting to fire all its people in the United States, and build some

:04:49.:04:53.

factory someplace else and then thinks that product is just going to

:04:54.:04:57.

flow across the border into the US, that is not going to happen. They

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will have to pay a substantial border tax. When Donald Trump speaks

:05:03.:05:10.

of regulation, was specifically is he driving at? There are a few

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things he is driving at. When he talks a lot regulation he is talking

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about things like banking regulations, that he believes are

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hurting the ability of the banks to be able to engage in investing

:05:24.:05:27.

activities. When he talks about other regulations, he means the tax

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code, that is very complicated and he wants to reduce any difficulties

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around that and make it easier for businesses to create more jobs in

:05:36.:05:44.

the US. It is interesting about the people he assembled, business

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leaders from 12 different companies including Mr musk, and we thought

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that we had the head of Lockheed Martin, the number one arms supplier

:05:55.:06:01.

for the Pentagon, in charge of a fighter jet programme. The one that

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back in December Donald Trump criticised for cost overruns. There

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were also part of this roundtable discussion. And Donald Trump has now

:06:10.:06:13.

said he wants to bring this group back together again for almost a

:06:14.:06:20.

month to talk about different ways that they can keep more

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manufacturing jobs here in US. Thank you very much.

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White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer has just

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This follows his debut on Saturday when he accused the press of false

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reporting and then made a number of incorrect statements.

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Well he tried to lighten the mood at the start of this one.

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Good afternoon and thank you for coming to our first official

:06:54.:07:00.

briefing. I was going to start with a recap of the inauguration but we

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have covered that pretty well. By the way I know that Josh Ernest was

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voted the most popular press secretary by the press corps and

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after checking my Twitter feed I shot him an e-mail letting him know

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he can rest easy that his title is secure for the next few days at

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least! That did not go down so well. We then got a sign of how the rules

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of the game have changed - first question to Rupert Murdoch's

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New York post. Second to the Christian

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Broadcasting Network, then two Inevitably though

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the issue of the size Remember Sean Spicer said

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it was the biggest ever inauguration crowd -

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when a raft of evidence There are times when we believe

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something to be true or get something from an agency or we act

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in haste because the information available was not complete but our

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desire to communicate with the American people, and so we do it.

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But I think when you look, we're going to do our best ever done we

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can. I will come out and tell you the facts as we know them and if I

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make a mistake I will do my best to correct it.

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For the record Sean Spicer defended his statement

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that the inauguration was the most watched of all time.

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He brought in internet viewing figures, not quite the point because

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originally he said it was the biggest crowd for inauguration.

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Let's go to Washington. You could argue that the first questions as

:08:48.:08:53.

these press briefings are turned around, Anthony Zurcher, but it

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looked like a quite conscious message being sent to a section of

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the US media? I think that is the case, the people he picked early on,

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he was going to get slightly different questions from them and I

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think that he knew that and managed to avoid some of the pressing

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questions especially about that contentious non-press briefing

:09:14.:09:18.

episode on Saturday until later on in the press conference. As you

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mention the questions came eventually. It is one thing for Sean

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Spicer to stand and talk about how even the administration makes

:09:29.:09:31.

mistakes sometimes. I think the press issue with that briefing was

:09:32.:09:34.

the confrontational nature of it, that he was accusing all the media

:09:35.:09:39.

pair of misrepresenting the facts and doing a poor job and being

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dishonest. So that set the stage for the press briefing today, where a

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lot of the people there, felt that they had some serious issues they

:09:50.:09:55.

need to air with Sean Spicer. Donald Trump was entitled to attack the

:09:56.:09:59.

media as a candidate, entitled to do so as president, but I guess this

:10:00.:10:04.

leaves some big decisions for the main US networks, for some of the

:10:05.:10:08.

pillars of US journalism like the New York Times, how they respond to

:10:09.:10:12.

a presidency which is carrying on completely differently to anything

:10:13.:10:18.

we've seen before? And say what you will about the nature of that press

:10:19.:10:22.

briefing statement on Saturday, but several of the major networks here

:10:23.:10:28.

in the US cut into the regular programming this afternoon to cover

:10:29.:10:32.

large chunks of the press briefing, all the major news networks covered

:10:33.:10:37.

it and there was a lot more attention to this press briefing

:10:38.:10:41.

than the past press briefings in the Obama White House. Part of that is

:10:42.:10:44.

it is the first one but still people were paying attention and want to

:10:45.:10:48.

see what Sean Spicer would say and do. So if you wanted to try to put

:10:49.:10:52.

the spotlight on the Trump administration, that was mission

:10:53.:10:58.

accomplished. I want to ask you, in a couple of hours we have a couple

:10:59.:11:02.

of Senate committee is due to vote on some of the key nominees in the

:11:03.:11:07.

Trump Cabinet. First of all Rex Tillerson, the man nominated for

:11:08.:11:12.

secretary of state and then Mike Pompeo, nominated as director of the

:11:13.:11:16.

CIA. If this goes through the committee then the full Senate will

:11:17.:11:19.

still vote on this but we are talking, while the process goes on,

:11:20.:11:31.

sometimes yours asked me if the screen and there is proof of it! The

:11:32.:11:35.

process goes on, but really we are not in for any shocks. I do not

:11:36.:11:41.

think so. From what I hear, when the confirmation comes through in

:11:42.:11:43.

committee, when approval comes through, they will be quickly voted

:11:44.:11:49.

on on the Senate floor because in reality there is a majority of

:11:50.:11:52.

Republicans in the Senate and all that has to happen for these people

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to be confirmed, as for the Republican senators to stick

:11:58.:12:01.

together. We found out earlier today Marco Rubio, who was a big question

:12:02.:12:07.

mark over the confirmation of Rex Tillerson, would be on board. Mike

:12:08.:12:16.

Pompeo, no real opposition for him amongst the Republican party. I

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think smooth sailing for them. Thank you very much. The idea of the

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screen, we can access everything coming through the BBC newsroom

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including all video and audio feeds. And if I select the wrong one as you

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see the feed coming in for someone else, but not for me, comes up on

:12:38.:12:40.

the screen. So I need to be very careful pressing the button.

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Let's go to what is happening in Kazakhstan.

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It's the first time representatives of Syria's armed rebel groups have

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led the opposition side at the negotiating table.

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Jihadist groups such as the Islamic State group

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and the Al Nusra Front are not in attendance.

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They're brokered by Turkey, which supports the rebels,

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and Iran and Russia, which back the Syrian government.

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The Russian Foreign Minister said last week he hoped

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the new administration of President Donald Trump would send

:13:29.:13:30.

The US State Department declined to do that -

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but the US Ambassador to Kazakhstan is in attendance.

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Lyse Doucet is at the talks and sent us this.

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In the opening ceremony rebel commanders, Syrian generals, sat

:13:49.:13:54.

together in public for the first time. Nobody walked out. But here on

:13:55.:14:01.

in it gets harder so what can be achieved, at the opening ceremony

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the first to speak was the hosts of these proceedings, the Kazakhstan

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Minister. We must admit that the bloodshed that continues to persist

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in Syria for approximately six years, has brought nothing but

:14:17.:14:21.

misery and hardship to the whole region, regarded as an intersection

:14:22.:14:28.

of different civilisations and cultures. So an effort at a peaceful

:14:29.:14:32.

settlement of the situation in Syria but how will they go about it, while

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the government delegation here are saying the same thing as the

:14:38.:14:39.

opposition when it comes to the main item on the agenda. That is

:14:40.:14:45.

consolidating a fragile ceasefire. The opposition says the government

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forces are violating the truce. That will be their main item and from

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then on they had different issues they want to begin to put on the

:14:56.:15:03.

table. And if you want updates on those talks, you can get more from

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our international correspondent on Twitter.

:15:10.:15:19.

We learnt today that Theresa May was told about a recent problem

:15:20.:15:22.

with the UK's nuclear deterrent, Trident when she became

:15:23.:15:24.

It's been announced that Michelle O'Neill will take over

:15:25.:15:36.

from Martin McGuiness as the new leader of Sinn Fein

:15:37.:15:38.

She's the party's current health minister.

:15:39.:15:41.

Mrs O'Neill will have just five weeks to prepare for an election

:15:42.:15:44.

after Stormont's power-sharing coalition fell apart over a botched

:15:45.:15:46.

Martin McGuiness is standing down because of ill health.

:15:47.:15:49.

Mrs O'Neill's appointment comes just weeks before a snap

:15:50.:15:51.

In a statement today she spoke of the scale

:15:52.:15:56.

For me to be selected to lead our party in the north is truly the

:15:57.:16:10.

biggest honour and privilege of my life. I feel enormous responsibility

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on my shoulders and while I do not underestimate my task, given the

:16:20.:16:23.

changing political world locally, nationally and internationally, I

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will not let you down. This is Outside Source live

:16:25.:16:36.

from the BBC newsroom. On his first weekday

:16:37.:16:39.

in the White House, President Trump has signed an executive order

:16:40.:16:45.

to withdraw the US from a major international trade deal

:16:46.:16:48.

with Pacific countries including In the US, tornadoes

:16:49.:16:50.

and thunderstorms have left at least 19 people dead

:16:51.:17:00.

in Georgia and Mississippi. More severe weather warnings have

:17:01.:17:04.

been issued as the weather system BBC Hindi has been reporting

:17:05.:17:06.

on protests in Chennai over Police have now moved

:17:07.:17:13.

in on demonstrators who've been camped on the beach

:17:14.:17:17.

for several days. The protesters have threatened

:17:18.:17:20.

to disrupt India's Republic Day celebrations on Thursday

:17:21.:17:22.

if their demands are not met. We learnt today that Theresa May

:17:23.:17:35.

was told about a recent problem with the UK's nuclear deterrent,

:17:36.:17:38.

Trident when she became It's reported that an unarmed

:17:39.:17:40.

missile went off course This incident occurred only a month

:17:41.:17:44.

before the UK parliament The opposition Labour Party said

:17:45.:17:49.

today - "people on both sides of the argument on Trident

:17:50.:17:58.

would have expected that to be reported to parliament,

:17:59.:18:01.

and the fact that Theresa May didn't Let's speak to Jonathan Beale, our

:18:02.:18:18.

defence correspondent. The story has been running over the weekend. What

:18:19.:18:27.

has shifted today? To be honest not a lot. Theresa May had been told

:18:28.:18:33.

there was a problem, we have not even have that confirmed from

:18:34.:18:36.

Downing Street. We know that she was told about this test, they have not

:18:37.:18:41.

said that there is has been a problem with this tripe missile test

:18:42.:18:47.

that occurred last June. Essentially both Theresa May and the Defence

:18:48.:18:51.

Secretary Michael Fallon are sticking to their script, refusing

:18:52.:18:55.

to confirm that there was a problem or refusing, or not it even

:18:56.:19:02.

admitting that there was a problem. And Michael Fallon in the Commons in

:19:03.:19:07.

front of MPs refused to be drawn on a number of questions, citing

:19:08.:19:11.

operational national security reasons. The problem with that is

:19:12.:19:15.

that in the past the Ministry of Defence when have been successful

:19:16.:19:19.

launches, has publicised them, has released video. Why it did not this

:19:20.:19:23.

time, was it because of that vote a few weeks later in the about

:19:24.:19:29.

renewing the Trident weapons system and I think the other problem

:19:30.:19:34.

tonight for Michael Fallon, won the Ministry of Defence is refusing to

:19:35.:19:37.

confirm that there was a problem, over on the other side of the

:19:38.:19:41.

Atlantic, an unnamed US defence official has told the Pentagon

:19:42.:19:45.

reporter that there was a problem and that the missile had to be

:19:46.:19:48.

aborted and destroyed during mid-flight. Not saying that it was

:19:49.:19:55.

going of course, I should say. So you have this bizarre situation

:19:56.:19:57.

where on the one hand the British Government is saying it will not

:19:58.:20:03.

comment further on what is the independent British nuclear

:20:04.:20:05.

deterrent but at the same time an unnamed official, someone we are

:20:06.:20:09.

told that direct knowledge of these tests, who said that something went

:20:10.:20:15.

wrong. We do not know if anything went wrong but if it had, would be

:20:16.:20:20.

proud for the Prime Minister to brief parliament? -- would it be

:20:21.:20:28.

protocol. Not necessarily, I think this is just an issue because in the

:20:29.:20:33.

past when they have been successful launches, the Ministry of Defence

:20:34.:20:36.

has released details of those successful launches. Over the past

:20:37.:20:41.

four occasions. So we do not know if they have been any other problems

:20:42.:20:46.

and it is true to say that the Trident missile system has been

:20:47.:20:51.

tried and tested 161 successful tests, we understand only six have

:20:52.:20:58.

had problems. So not necessarily, but I think there are questions as

:20:59.:21:01.

to why this was covered up so close to the Parliamentary vote. Thank

:21:02.:21:05.

you. The UK government has unveiled plans

:21:06.:21:14.

for a new industrial It says science, technology

:21:15.:21:16.

and infrastructure will be Here's the BBC's business

:21:17.:21:21.

editor Simon Jack. Growing an economy

:21:22.:21:29.

for the 21st-century. This biotech firm is trying

:21:30.:21:32.

to increase crop yields, reduce fertiliser use

:21:33.:21:34.

and provide high-paying jobs. Most Conservative governments have

:21:35.:21:38.

preferred a hands-off What this is about is creating

:21:39.:21:40.

the right conditions As we leave the European Union I'm

:21:41.:21:47.

ambitious for the opportunities available to us, building

:21:48.:21:52.

a truly global Britain. But we need to ensure that our

:21:53.:21:56.

economy is working for everyone, working in every part

:21:57.:21:59.

of the country. The government's ten point

:22:00.:22:01.

plan includes investment in research and development

:22:02.:22:04.

in high-growth sectors. ?170 million for technical

:22:05.:22:06.

colleges to improve skills. And infrastructure investment

:22:07.:22:11.

targeted to fit regional needs. I think it's absolutely essential

:22:12.:22:15.

and it's been too long in coming. And it's all about coordination,

:22:16.:22:19.

and directed and focused input to meet the needs of the economy

:22:20.:22:22.

of this country. And why wouldn't we be doing it

:22:23.:22:27.

if it's going to bring us the skills we need in a coordinated way,

:22:28.:22:31.

with the key industry sectors that have the most potential for growth

:22:32.:22:34.

based on our scientific ability? The government wants

:22:35.:22:41.

businesses of the future, like biotechnology or life

:22:42.:22:42.

science, to grow. But with limited amounts

:22:43.:22:46.

of new money available, the fear is that while some sectors

:22:47.:22:49.

will be cultivated, others may wither, leaving behind the workers

:22:50.:22:52.

in those industries. I don't think we can afford

:22:53.:22:58.

to leave any sector behind in an industrial strategy,

:22:59.:23:00.

particularly given so many millions of workers are employed

:23:01.:23:02.

in areas like retail, food, care, where wages are often

:23:03.:23:05.

too low and investment too scarce. So it has to be a holistic

:23:06.:23:12.

industrial policy ARCHIVE VOICEOVER: After

:23:13.:23:14.

the government stepped Previous attempts to get involved

:23:15.:23:22.

in industrial strategy have met Millions were afforded

:23:23.:23:26.

to British Leyland for The strategy that somewhat

:23:27.:23:31.

ironically became known Modern industry leaders

:23:32.:23:35.

say this is different. Picking winners is much more

:23:36.:23:39.

about picking the company What I think you are seeing

:23:40.:23:41.

here is much earlier This is all about building skills,

:23:42.:23:45.

building capabilities, These are just proposals at this

:23:46.:23:49.

stage but ones the government hopes will inject new life to a post

:23:50.:23:58.

Brexit economy. There were multiple cases

:23:59.:24:01.

of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 mobile phone overheating

:24:02.:24:10.

and bursting into flames. It led to the phone being banned

:24:11.:24:14.

on planes and pulled from the shops. Now the investigation

:24:15.:24:21.

into what caused the overheating has concluded - and found

:24:22.:24:23.

that it was a fault in the design Rory Cellan-Jones has

:24:24.:24:26.

been writing about this He explained what was found

:24:27.:24:35.

in this investigation. They poured enormous resources into

:24:36.:24:46.

the investigation and knew how important it was. They had three

:24:47.:24:50.

outside bodies and many top scientists to investigate. And they

:24:51.:24:54.

concluded that it was the batteries. Tell me something new! But there was

:24:55.:24:59.

something fascinating in there, a line from the man in charge of the

:25:00.:25:03.

smartphone division saying what we've done is ask more and more and

:25:04.:25:09.

more of the battery in this high-performance smartphone, we ask

:25:10.:25:13.

too much of it. There's a general truth, everyone is trying to put

:25:14.:25:17.

more and more capability into these extraordinary devices which of

:25:18.:25:20.

course are very powerful computers. People are using them more and more

:25:21.:25:26.

intensively there's one more pressure to fit batteries into the

:25:27.:25:30.

same space or into a constricted space and in some cases they are

:25:31.:25:33.

failing. Was this mobile phone trying to do more than other

:25:34.:25:38.

high-end mobile phones? The competition is so intense that yes,

:25:39.:25:43.

every new phone, and this was a very high end phones, meant to be

:25:44.:25:49.

competing against the iPhone seven, Samsung very confident in its great

:25:50.:25:53.

technology, it is much admired but it always wants to go a step

:25:54.:25:59.

further. And in the design of this particular handset, there was too

:26:00.:26:04.

much, not enough space ready for this battery. And not enough

:26:05.:26:06.

insulation material around it. And you can find that report on the

:26:07.:26:17.

BBC News app. I will be back in a couple of minutes. Goodbye.

:26:18.:26:30.

It is that time of day one we take a look at some interesting weather

:26:31.:26:34.

events

:26:35.:26:35.