24/01/2017 Outside Source


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24/01/2017

Ros Atkins with an innovative take on the latest global stories.


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Hello, I'm Ros Atkins, this is Outside Source.

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President Trump has signed executive orders to reverse blocks on two

:00:10.:00:12.

We will build our own pipeline. We will build our own pipes. That's

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what it has to do with, like we used to in the old days.

:00:27.:00:38.

The UK Supreme Court has ruled that Parliament, not the Government,

:00:39.:00:40.

should be responsible for triggering the Brexit process.

:00:41.:00:42.

We'll report from Westminster and from Brussels.

:00:43.:00:44.

Israel has approved plans to build 2500 new homes

:00:45.:00:46.

in the occupied West Bank, the second announcement

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of new construction since President Trump took office.

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And not a good day for the bookmakers, just as we thought,

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La La Land is leading the way in the Oscar nominations.

:00:56.:01:15.

Donald Trump has revived plans for two hugely

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They're called Keystone XL and Dakota Access.

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We can see them here on this map supplied by the authorities.

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Keystone is in green. It runs from Canada to Kansas. Dakota Access

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would run from north Dakota to ill now. -- Illinois.

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Here is a statement released by senator Bernie Sanders.

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"Today President Trump ignored the voices of millions and put

:01:48.:01:50.

the short-term profits of the fossil fuel industry ahead

:01:51.:01:53.

This, though, is how the President sees things.

:01:54.:02:00.

This is construction of pipelines in this country. We are and I am very

:02:01.:02:09.

insistent that if we're going to build pipelines in the United

:02:10.:02:13.

States, the pipes should be made in the United States. Unless there's

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difficulty with that because companies are going to have to gear

:02:19.:02:23.

up, much pipeline is bought from other countries. From now on we will

:02:24.:02:26.

make pipeline in the United States. We build it in the United States, we

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build the pipelines. We want to build the pipe. Got to put a lot of

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steel workers back to work. A short while ago,

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the White House press secretary, "This decision will create jobs and

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that the environment is a priority." President Trump is known to have had

:02:47.:02:51.

partial investments in two of the parent companies overseeing the

:02:52.:02:54.

development of the Dakota Pipeline. A spokesperson for him announced

:02:55.:02:57.

late last year that he'd sold off his stocks, but it remains unclear

:02:58.:02:59.

when that occurred. Let's go now to

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Washington to Katty Kay. The President would have been under

:03:05.:03:10.

no illusions how controversial this would have been. No President Obama

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delayed this to carry out environmental studies because of his

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concerns from environmentalists. In some ways this is not really an

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economic issue. This has become a symbol of the environmental fight of

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the concerns for the environment versus creation of jobs. It's clear

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that, under the Trump administration, jobs are going to

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win. I spoke it a senior Republican senator just after that signing took

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place. He sits on the energy committee, on the environmental

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committee and he told me that he's thrilled by this. It shows that

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Donald Trump really is committed to two things: Deregulation and

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building jobs in the United States. Now environmentalists really hate

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the Keystone pipeline and Dakota pipeline, one, because it goes

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through hallowed ground of native Americans and on the Keystone

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pipeline, it's bringing oil from the tar sands of Canada, one of the most

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environmentally unfriendly ways to extract oil from the ground. On a

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lot of fronts environmentalists don't like this. When you speak to

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the Republicans you're referring to, who are delighted about this, do

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they care that this potentially makes them look as if they disregard

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the environment or do they reject that argument outright? You hear

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Donald Trump today also saying that he is an environmentalist. They will

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tell thaw they are concerned about the environment and the Republican

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senator I spoke to said we can have clean air and we can have clean

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water and we can do it in conjunction with jobs, the two don't

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have to be set up against each other. Critics of the pipe lines say

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that's not possible. You heard Bernie Sanders saying that America

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is sacrificing the long-term future of the planet for the fossil fuel

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industry. Make no mistake about it, though, this is a change that is

:04:59.:05:01.

going to stay here in the United States. Donald Trump made it

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absolutely clear during his campaign that he favoured more energy

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exploration, production and use and he is in favour of deregulating the

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fossil fuel industries. Environmentalists won't like it, but

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it's here to stay. Here is the second thing to ask you about. Let

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me show this to you. A short while ago, the whous press secretary Sean

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Spicer held a briefing. His first two appearances in the job

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both featured him defending Mr Trump's erroneous claims

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that the inauguration crowd The one today featured Mr Spicer

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defending Mr Trump's renewed claim that there were millions

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of fraudulent votes in the election. It's a claim backed up by no

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evidence whatsoever. REPORTER: Does the President believe

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that millions voted illegally in that election and what evidence do

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you have of widespread voter fraud, if that's the case? The President

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does believe that. He stated that before. He stated his concerns of

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voter fraud and people voting illegally during the campaign. He

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continues to maintain that belief. REPORTER: Exactly what evidence.

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Senator Ryan says that's there evidence, the national association

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of secretaries of states say they don't agree with the President's

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assessment, what evidence do you have? As I said, I think the

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President has believed that for a while based on studies and

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information he has. Back to catty. He's got a tough job, Mr Spicer,

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defending the claims when there's nothing to back them up. Key words,

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studies and information. Of course, we want to though what the studies

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and information are because nobody else has seen any evidence

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suggesting there was widespread voter fraud. You've had Republican

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secretaries of state and officials say widespread voter fraud and

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illegal immigrants voting or people voting illegally simply did not

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happen in their state. He's setting himself up against the Republican

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establishment here. Why? Why say something like this that dominates

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the news cycle when you're doing an awful lot in terms of actual policy

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changes that may very well be quite popular with American voters, but

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then gets overshadowed by something like this. Sean Spicer couldn't

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point to those documents and evidence and studies because as far

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as we know, they simply don't exist. Those are the two issues I was

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planning to ask you about, I have one other thing. I was listening to

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a clip of Donald Trump at the beginning of the programme, I

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thought, there's an interesting phrase in what he said earlier. Just

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listen to this again and his reference to the past. We will build

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our own pipeline. We will build our own pipes. That's what it has to do

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with. Like we used to, in the old days. The old days, he's talking

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about. There say nostalgia about the way Mr Trump ran his campaign and

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now how he's running his presidency. It's interesting that you picked

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that up. I was thinking exactly the same thing when I heard it. That's

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what the phrase "make America great again" you could argue the most

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important word in that phrase is "again". There is a nostalgia in

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this administration for an era where there was less crime and less drugs

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and things were simpler and people had jobs and arguably at a time when

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America was whiter and more homogeneous. Is Mr Trump running up

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against the course of history? Has the globalisation train left the

:08:29.:08:31.

station? And is he going to find that he cannot take America back to

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a world where protectionism ruled and things were made only in America

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and that world has changed, that technology is changing that world,

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frankly, as fast as anything else. And this idea that it's going to be

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like the old days, it really isn't, because I'm moves forward. It is

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doing so at a very fast pace right around the world. Thank you very

:08:52.:08:54.

much indeed. We'll speak through the week.

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That issue of protectionism, we will speak to Samira Hussain in New York

:09:01.:09:05.

about that. Mr Trump has been talking to the US autoindustry. The

:09:06.:09:10.

message is, if you want to sell cars in the US, make them in the US. Back

:09:11.:09:13.

to Washington and New York in a little white. We must turn to what

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has been by far the biggest story here in the UK today.

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The UK Supreme Court has ruled the British Parliament must

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approve the formal start of Brexit negotiations.

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In other words, Prime Minister Theresa May can't take

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Let's go through the reaction of the parties.

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Here's Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Opposition Labour Party.

:09:33.:09:40.

We want to make sure that process goes ahead, but we also want to make

:09:41.:09:47.

sure that our Government is held to account throughout this process, so

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they don't turn Britain into a tax haven on the shores of Europe. We

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actually maintain living standards being, we improve -- standards, we

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improve living standards and improve workers' rights and have market

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access to Europe. That's the Labour Party. Next let's talk about another

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significant elements of this ruling. is that the Scottish Parliament

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and the Welsh and Northern Irish Assemblies, will not be formally

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asked to approve the triggering Here's Scotland's First

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Minister, Nicola Sturgeon. I think it's a matter of democratic

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principle that the Scottish Parliament, on such a big,

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fundamental issue, with so many implications for the devolved

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settlement should have a say on whether or not it consents to the

:10:38.:10:41.

triggering of Article 50. We will forward a motion that allows the

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Scottish Parliament to do that. I would hope the UK Government would

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pay attention to it. Tim Farron, leader of

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the Liberal Democrats tweeted, "The Lib Dems are clear,

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we demand a vote of the people on the final deal and without that,

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we will not vote for A 50." The biggest single question

:10:59.:11:01.

here is whether this ruling will delay the start

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of the Brexit negotiations. Brexit secretary, David Davies,

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doesn't think so. P We will, within days, introduce

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legislation to give the Government the legal power to trigger Article

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50 and begin the formal process of withdrawal. It will be separate to

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the great repeal bill that will be introduced later this year, to

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repeal the European Communities Act 1972. This will be the most

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straightforward bill possible to give effect the decision of the

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people and respect the Supreme Court's judgment. The purpose of the

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bill is simply to give the Government the power to invoke

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Article 50. On one level, it looks to be hugely

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significant and it's certainly a high profile defeat

:11:52.:11:56.

for the Government. On another level, the time table

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of Brexit doesn't appear Here's Rob Watson at Westminster

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with his reading of the story. On one level, it is deeply

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significant if you're interested in the constitutional, legal

:12:11.:12:12.

arrangements for the United Kingdom. But actually, will it have much

:12:13.:12:16.

difference, make much difference politically? I don't think so. I

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mean, it's true that the Supreme Court has now said it's Parliament

:12:20.:12:23.

that has to give approval, not just the Prime Minister. But of course,

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that would only be a massive story if Parliament were somehow going to

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come to the rescue of those would want Britain to stay in the European

:12:30.:12:34.

Union. Though it's perfectly true that most MPs personally voted to

:12:35.:12:39.

remain, I don't think there's any mood or majority for somehow

:12:40.:12:43.

blocking or delaying Brexit. Big day legally. Is it going to somehow

:12:44.:12:48.

stop, complicate, super delay Brexit? I don't think so.

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Run us through exactly what has to happen in the House of Commons and

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the House of Lords before Article 50's triggered. In the next couple

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of days, possibly as early as Thursday, the Government will

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introduce a bill, presumably a very short one basically saying something

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like, we recognise that the Government should now begin the

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Article 50 process. That will then have to be voted on in the House of

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Commons and in the House of Lords. Ideally from the Government's point

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of view, all in the next couple of weeks. A quick word about the

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Opposition Labour Party. The majority of its MPs supported

:13:22.:13:24.

staying in the European Union. How's it going to play this issue? The

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Opposition Labour Party is just in a horrible position. What it's saying

:13:30.:13:33.

it will do is it won't block Brexit, but it will try to hold the

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Government to account. I say the Opposition Labour Party's in a

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horrible position because half of its MPs represent constituencies

:13:41.:13:44.

where people voted to leave the European Union. About the other half

:13:45.:13:48.

of their MPs voted in constituencies where people very much wanted to

:13:49.:13:52.

remain in the EU. It's in a very, very difficult position. Actually,

:13:53.:13:57.

to get the big politics picture on this, I don't think that the real

:13:58.:14:01.

problems for Theresa May are going to be managing Parliament, at least

:14:02.:14:04.

in the short-term. Her real political problems are going to be

:14:05.:14:08.

when her Brexit plan meets the reality of negotiating with the

:14:09.:14:12.

other EU 27 and perhaps even longer term than that, in keeping the union

:14:13.:14:18.

here in Britain together, because this court ruling very much upset

:14:19.:14:22.

the Scottish National Party, which is saying possibly it brings a

:14:23.:14:28.

second referendum that bit closer. Having heard Rob say perhaps Theresa

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May's greatest challenge is in Brussels, I spoke to Jonny Dymond

:14:35.:14:40.

who's there. If you want to sum up the feeling here it's four words:

:14:41.:14:44.

Get on with. It the desire very strongly of officials and

:14:45.:14:48.

politicians in Brussels and in other European capitals is that the Brexit

:14:49.:14:52.

negotiations start soon, finish on time and are done with. I think

:14:53.:14:57.

there is an absolute resignation to the fact that Britain is going to

:14:58.:15:00.

leave the European Union. And what leaders of the EU and the officials

:15:01.:15:05.

here in the EU do not want under any circumstances is for Brexit to be

:15:06.:15:08.

the only thing that is discussed in the European Union for the next two,

:15:09.:15:14.

three, five years. There are very major challenges, some of them

:15:15.:15:18.

nothing to do with Brexit, the migration crisis, there is still a

:15:19.:15:21.

banking system to be reformed. There are still the crisis of the euro.

:15:22.:15:27.

Then there are issues thrown up by Brexit, which are not directly

:15:28.:15:31.

related to Britain leaving. That's issues such as how to restore some

:15:32.:15:35.

kind of popular legitimacy to the European Union. What they don't want

:15:36.:15:38.

to be doing is talking the fine details of Brexit, when they want to

:15:39.:15:42.

be trying to work out how to strengthen and maintain the union.

:15:43.:15:44.

For them, getting some kind of certainty over what's going to

:15:45.:15:49.

happen in the next few weeks and getting certainty that Article 50,

:15:50.:15:52.

that resignation note, will be triggered on time, by the end of

:15:53.:15:55.

March, by Theresa May, is the most important thing.

:15:56.:16:03.

In the a few minutes it's Outside Source business.

:16:04.:16:12.

Coming up in a few minutes, on the same day he revives

:16:13.:16:14.

controversial oil pipeline project, Donald Trump tells autoexecutives

:16:15.:16:16.

that to a large extent, he's an environmentalist.

:16:17.:16:18.

We'll pick up on that with Samira Hussain in NYC.

:16:19.:16:21.

A man who was on holiday with his wife in Tunisia has said

:16:22.:16:24.

the Thomson staff he booked the holiday with didn't warn them

:16:25.:16:26.

about any potential security risks, just a month before terrorists

:16:27.:16:29.

Jim Windass, whose wife Claire was killed in the Sousse attack

:16:30.:16:35.

in May 2015, also told the inquest that Thomson staff didn't mention

:16:36.:16:38.

the Foreign Office travel advice available online.

:16:39.:16:42.

Our correspondent, Richard Galpin, was at the

:16:43.:16:44.

This is a really important piece of evidence in this inquest. Of course,

:16:45.:16:54.

the role of the holiday companies is key. It's been discussed already a

:16:55.:17:00.

lot during this inquest, did they provide enough information to the

:17:01.:17:05.

holidaymakers, many of them who booked through Thomson, did they

:17:06.:17:08.

provide sufficient information to the people planning to go to Tunisia

:17:09.:17:10.

at that time? This is Outside Source, live from

:17:11.:17:26.

the BBC Newsroom. Our lead story is: President Trump

:17:27.:17:32.

has signed executive orders to relaunch two controversial oil

:17:33.:17:35.

pipelines in the US. The projects were rejected

:17:36.:17:38.

by Barack Obama following years The Gambian Parliament has skaed

:17:39.:17:42.

the state of emergency imposed last -- scrapped the state of emergency

:17:43.:17:57.

imposed last week by the former President,

:17:58.:18:07.

The new President, Adama Barrow, is expected to return home

:18:08.:18:14.

Organisations that provide sexual Health Services in Africa have

:18:15.:18:18.

criticised President Trump's decision to reinstate a policy

:18:19.:18:20.

that denies them access to American funding.

:18:21.:18:22.

And US authorities have seized $20 million in cash hidden under

:18:23.:18:25.

The money's believed to be linked to a $1 billion pyramid scheme.

:18:26.:18:35.

Stories from the UK, the US and west Africa. Next let's go to Israel.

:18:36.:18:56.

? New homes are going to be built in Israel. The Defence Ministry has

:18:57.:19:07.

said the move is meant to fulfil demand for new housing to maintain

:19:08.:19:13.

regular daily life. The announcement may not be unrelated to the arrival

:19:14.:19:16.

of President Trump in the White House. Mark Lowen can explain. This

:19:17.:19:23.

is the second time in the space of a week that the Israeli government has

:19:24.:19:31.

announced more building in settlements, 2,500 homes to be build

:19:32.:19:34.

in the occupied West Bank announced today. And over the weekend, there

:19:35.:19:39.

was an announcement that over 560 new homes will be built in

:19:40.:19:43.

settlements in occupied east Jerusalem. Both of these

:19:44.:19:46.

announcements coming after the inauguration of Donald Trump. A

:19:47.:19:49.

feeling here that the Israeli government is feeling emboldened,

:19:50.:19:53.

even encouraged by the new administration in the US to build

:19:54.:19:56.

more in the settlements after the relationship between Israel and the

:19:57.:20:00.

US under Barack Obama plummeted, partly over the issue of settlement

:20:01.:20:06.

building. Mr Obama was fiercely opposed to the settlements. He

:20:07.:20:11.

allowed a UN Resolution to pass condemning Israeli building in the

:20:12.:20:14.

settlements. Donald Trump, his son-in-law and pick for US

:20:15.:20:19.

ambassador for Israel have donated to the settlements and will take a

:20:20.:20:24.

more pro-Israeli policy. There is also a feeling that this is done

:20:25.:20:27.

partly for domestic political consumption. The Prime Minister

:20:28.:20:31.

here, Benjamin Netanyahu, is facing a bill challenge at the moment from

:20:32.:20:35.

the -- is facing a big challenge from the far right. He's trying to

:20:36.:20:39.

burnish his credentials by choosing an issue that will go down well with

:20:40.:20:43.

Nationalists. The issue of settlements is so contentious

:20:44.:20:47.

because it violates international law, according to the UN and it is

:20:48.:20:50.

being built in areas that the Palestinians want for a future

:20:51.:20:54.

state, that are going beyond Israel's borders, according to the

:20:55.:20:59.

1967 border demarcation. So the Palestinians have reacted furiously.

:21:00.:21:03.

A spokesman for the Palestinians saying this would foster extremism

:21:04.:21:07.

and terrorism and calling on the international community to take a

:21:08.:21:11.

stand against Israel and against the issue of settlement building.

:21:12.:21:15.

Donald Trump met with executives from the US autoindustry today.

:21:16.:21:18.

We're going to make the process much more simple for the companies and

:21:19.:21:28.

everybody auto else that wants to do business in the United States. I

:21:29.:21:37.

think this you will find this to go from very inhospitable to very

:21:38.:21:41.

hospitable. We will go down as one of the most friend lip companies.

:21:42.:21:45.

Right now it's not. I have friends that want to build in the United

:21:46.:21:50.

States and have to wait years and year and then don't get the

:21:51.:21:56.

approval. Do these car companies like the idea of making cars in the

:21:57.:22:01.

US? It comes at a tricky time. We're seeing a little bit less demand for

:22:02.:22:05.

some cars, but if you talk about cars in the United States, which is

:22:06.:22:07.

really what we're talking about, there is a little bit more demand

:22:08.:22:12.

for SUVs and bigger kinds of cars. It doesn't mean that these car

:22:13.:22:16.

operators need to build new factories. They could revamp the

:22:17.:22:22.

ones they have. It's really interesting to see just how much

:22:23.:22:26.

Donald Trump is speaking directly with corporate America. This is not

:22:27.:22:29.

something we would typically see with an American President. In terms

:22:30.:22:34.

of action, policy that Mr Trump can take in order to encourage these

:22:35.:22:39.

companies to base their manufacturing in the US, what's

:22:40.:22:43.

available to him? What he has said is that he wants to cut back on

:22:44.:22:47.

regulation. So when it comes to regulations in the car industry, it

:22:48.:22:51.

could be anything from taxes, corporate taxes, to anything

:22:52.:22:56.

regarding the environment and emissions or anything limiting in

:22:57.:23:00.

terms of how freely part can travel. And these are some of the issues

:23:01.:23:07.

that the makers have raised auto with Trump in their hour-long

:23:08.:23:11.

meeting in. Terms of what will actually happen, they was short on

:23:12.:23:16.

specifics. When some of the car makers spoke with reporters

:23:17.:23:18.

afterwards they said they believe today was a healthy conversation but

:23:19.:23:22.

no real specifics in terms of what regulations the President is looking

:23:23.:23:26.

to cut. I guess we'll have to give him a little longer to come up with

:23:27.:23:30.

those. Only in the job a few days. Certainly people would like to see

:23:31.:23:34.

them. This is what happened to BT's share price today.

:23:35.:23:41.

down 21%, the biggest slump in the company's history.

:23:42.:23:43.

It's bought BT is writing down the value of its Italian

:23:44.:23:46.

Here's BBC business editor, Simon Jack.

:23:47.:23:56.

It was a real shock, BT's not the kind of company we expect to have

:23:57.:24:02.

profits warnings. It's a very strong company with quite a reliable,

:24:03.:24:06.

dependable and forecastable business. We just don't expect these

:24:07.:24:11.

kind of issues. Why this sudden and very dramatic

:24:12.:24:15.

slump? BT has problems on a number of fronts. Today we learned the

:24:16.:24:19.

accounting scandal in BT's Italian business is much worse than

:24:20.:24:24.

expected. The black hole there has widened from ?145 million to ?530

:24:25.:24:29.

million. Even more worrying for investors, it warned today that

:24:30.:24:33.

profits in its core business will be 175 million lower this year and

:24:34.:24:38.

next. Now that's down to stagnating revenue from some of its biggest

:24:39.:24:42.

customers, who are not renewing major contracts. Today's news is set

:24:43.:24:46.

against an already uncertain back drop for the company. The company is

:24:47.:24:51.

fighting calls from competitors and the regulator to split off its Open

:24:52.:24:56.

Reach network division. It has one of the biggest pension fund deficits

:24:57.:24:59.

and it's been spending big on entertainment. There's a lot of

:25:00.:25:05.

nervousness around BT at the moment, particularly given the ongoing

:25:06.:25:08.

review of Open Reach and the review of pensions due to happen this year.

:25:09.:25:12.

If there's one thing that investors hate, it's uncertainty. Given the

:25:13.:25:15.

amount of uncertainty there is at the moment any knock to BT sees an

:25:16.:25:19.

amplified effect which we've seen with the share price today. Heads

:25:20.:25:24.

have already started to roll. The BBC has learned tonight the head of

:25:25.:25:27.

BT Europe is expected to resign imminently. All this will put

:25:28.:25:32.

pressure on the ultimate boss, who's been in charge during a period of

:25:33.:25:36.

bold expansion for BT. We're in the process of really building our

:25:37.:25:42.

Broadband business... BT expressed disappointment at I vent in --

:25:43.:25:47.

events in Italy. Shareholders will be disappointed today too. When a

:25:48.:25:52.

company as big as BT says its biggest company aren't spending

:25:53.:25:55.

money, it's a worry for the wide ere economy. I'm back in a couple of

:25:56.:25:57.

minutes. Bye-bye.

:25:58.:26:02.